National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tungsten halogen spotlights

  1. Spotlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spotlights 2016 NETL Researcher Recognized for Innovation in Energy NETL researcher Dr. Shiwoo Lee has been honored with an Innovation in Energy award NETL researcher Dr. Shiwoo Lee has been honored with an Innovation in Energy award by the Carnegie Science Center for his work on critical efficiency improvements that will make solid oxide fuel cells economically attractive. Dr. Lee accepted the award on May 6, 2016, at the 20th Annual Carnegie Science Award celebration at the Carnegie Music Hall

  2. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  3. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spotlight Mekena McGrew Single-shot, Second Harmonic Generation Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (SHG FROG) system for damage testing. Nick Zobrist Optics inspection algorithms that evaluate the condition of NIF's optics. Maverick Chea Optimization of Ultrathin Films Alexandra Carlson Image Analysis Classification algorithm to automatically classify NIF optics damage sites. Nick Czapla Characterizing Scatter Plate Material

  4. Applications of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral particles on ITO glass in photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants under a halogen tungsten lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Wei; Sun, Fengqiang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lihe; Min, Zhilin; Li, Weishan

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Photocatalytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals on ITO glass was studied. They showed high abilities in degradation of methylene blue in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount could affect the degradation efficiency. Such particles could be easily recycled and still kept high activity. Many dye pollutants and their mixtures could be efficiently degraded. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals were prepared on the ITO glass by galvanostatic electrodeposition in CuSO{sub 4} solution with poly(vinylpryrrolidone) as the surfactant. By controlling the electrodeposition time, the microcrystals could be randomly distributed on the ITO glass and separated from each other, resulting in as many as possible (1 1 1) crystalline planes were exposed. Such microcrystals immobilized on ITO glass were employed in photodegradation of dye pollutants in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under a 150 W halogen tungsten lamp. The photodegradation of methylene blue was taken as an example to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the octahedral Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals. Effects of electrodeposition time and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount on the degradation efficiency was discussed, giving the optimum conditions and the corresponding degradation mechanism. The catalyst showed high ability in degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, eosin B and their mixtures under identical conditions.

  5. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists in the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Dec 12, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Every Second Saturday Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum features actual scientists and researchers talking to visitors about their favorite STEM (Science, Technology,

  6. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Apr 11, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about their favorite STEM topics. Join us at the

  7. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Aug 08, 2015 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about their favorite STEM topics. Join us at the museum every

  8. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists in the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Feb 14, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum, 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientist Spotlight Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum will have special scientists on the floor talking to people about their favorite STEM topics. The scientists

  9. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Jun 13, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about their favorite STEM topics. Join us at the museum every

  10. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: May 09, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA SPEAKER: Steven Hayden, Chemist CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login scientist in the spotlight series Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about their

  11. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists in the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Nov 14, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum features actual scientists and researchers talking to visitors about their favorite STEM topics.

  12. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Oct 10, 2015 11:00 AM - Feb 12, 2015 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight every Second Saturday Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about

  13. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Sep 12, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87544 USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Scientists in the Spotlight every Second Saturday Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about their favorite

  14. Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues submit Spotlight: Bryant Roybal Champion chile and a recipe March 1, 2015 Bryant Roybal and his ingredient Bryant Roybal and his...

  15. Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

    1997-03-01

    A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

  16. Scientist in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist in the Spotlight Scientist in the Spotlight WHEN: Jan 09, 2016 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Museum features actual scientists and researchers talking to visitors about their favorite Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

  17. Scientist in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist in the Spotlight Scientist in the Spotlight WHEN: Mar 12, 2016 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event. Every second Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., the Museum has scientists available to talk to visitors about their exciting topics. Fun for the whole family! Capturing an eggs-plosion on

  18. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists In the Spotlight Scientists in the Spotlight WHEN: Mar 14, 2015 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Celebrating Women in Science Event Description MARK YOUR CALENDARS for this special event! Every second Saturday from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the museum has scientists on the floor talking to people about their favorite STEM topics. Join us at the

  19. Employee Spotlight: Dances of India

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Career Stories Employee Spotlight Alina Deshpande Alina Deshpande-Dances of India Lab scientist Alina Deshpande teaches classical Indian dance and writes, produces,...

  20. Workers' Spotlight Newsletters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workers' Spotlight Newsletters Workers' Spotlight Newsletters Newsletters Available for Download December 4, 2014 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. October/November/December 2014 issue covers Remembrance Quilt, National Day of Remembrance, JOTG Meeting in Paducah, University of Iowa

  1. Employee Spotlight: Ian Tregillis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Jobs» Career Stories» Employee Spotlight» Ian Tregillis Ian Tregillis-Master of Alternate Worlds Laboratory physicist creates intricate, exquisitely crafted settings for his genre-bending science fiction novels tregillis tregillis tregillis tregillis 12 3 4 "I had the misconception that the time would come when I had the time. As I got older and more mature, I realized I'd have to make the time." Master of Alternate Worlds Laboratory physicist Ian Tregillis of the Plasma

  2. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Careers, Jobs » Careers Stories » Employee Spotlight » Janice Lovato Janice Lovato-A gift for imagination The Associate Directorate for Nuclear and High Hazard Operations' Janice Lovato has turned her love for nature-watching and story-telling into writing a children's book called Germaine the Beetle. March 10, 2015 Janice Lovato Janice Lovato and her first children's book. "I am always telling stories, whether at bedtime, in the car going somewhere or sitting under a tree in the

  3. Employee Spotlight: Jason Halladay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Jobs» Career Stories» Employee Spotlight» Jason Halladay Jason Halladay-Ascending one of the world's highest active volcanoes The Network and Infrastructure Engineering Division's Jason Halladay is an accomplished rock climber and mountaineer who recently climbed a well-known volcano in Ecuador. halladay halladay halladay halladay halladay halladay halladay halladay halladay 12 3 4 5 6 789 "I just keep placing one foot in front of the other and in the dark focus on the six-foot

  4. Employee Spotlight: Sim Balkey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Jobs» Career Stories» Employee Spotlight» Sim Balkey Sim Balkey-On the way up The "kid who has the goods" has been quite busy lately. Just ahead of the MusicRow review he celebrated the release of his new CD, Messin' Around, with a CD release party in Albuquerque on March 13, and before then he was in the national limelight performing in Nashville on February 24. Balkey Balkey Balkey Balkey Balkey Balkey Balkey Balkey 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "As I walked to the microphone I knew

  5. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PDF icon Spotlight on Austin, Texas More Documents & Publications Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best ...

  6. Scientist Spotlight on February 13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist Spotlight on February 13 Scientist Spotlight on February 13 WHEN: Feb 13, 2016 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login welding sparks Event Description In this demonstration you will learn to weld with a glue gun! Welding-With a glue gun? Typically when we think of welding (joining two metals together) we think of protective gear and flying sparks or

  7. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. November 2012 issue covers National Day of Remembrance, Secure Electronic Records Transfer (SERT), and Early Lung Cancer Detection.

  8. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 14

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. July/August/September issue covers Director's Note, 2014 Sylvia Kieding Award, National Atomic Testing Museum, and Calendar of Events.

  9. Employee Spotlights | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Apply for a Job External Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Fellowships Students Faculty Programs Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities Newcomers/International Assistance Benefits Education Community Diversity Directory Argonne National Laboratory About Safety News Careers Education Community Diversity Directory Energy Environment Security User Facilities Science Work with Argonne Careers Apply for a Job External Applicants

  10. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions | Department of Energy Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions. PDF icon Spotlight on Maine More Documents & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine:

  11. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy...

  12. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards Newsletter highlights the ...

  13. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of ...

  14. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces ...

  15. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time This Better ...

  16. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success. PDF icon Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

  17. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings

  18. Employee Spotlight: Muge Acik | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or partnering with Argonne to solve your R&D or production challenges, contact partners@anl.gov. Related People Muge Acik Next article: Employee Spotlight: Peter Friedman...

  19. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2014 Sustainability Awards. PDF icon DOE SPOtlight - 2014 DOE ...

  20. Employee Spotlight: Dances of India

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Career Jobs» Career Stories» Employee Spotlight» Alina Deshpande Alina Deshpande-Dances of India Lab scientist Alina Deshpande teaches classical Indian dance and writes, produces, directs and choreographs an annual benefit performance in Los Alamos. deshpande deshpande deshpande deshpande deshpande deshpande deshpande 12 3 45 67 "My goal for the Dances of India benefit event is not only to raise money for worthy organizations but to showcase my students." Dances of India Each

  1. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 December 2012, Issue 2 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. January 2013 issue covers: Director's Note Site Exposure Matrics (SEM) Advisory Board Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 More Documents & Publications Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3

  2. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives | Department of Energy Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives. PDF icon Spotlight on Michigan More Documents & Publications Spotlight on Michigan:

  3. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Work for Contractors | Department of Energy Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors. PDF icon Spotlight on Portland More Documents & Publications Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to

  4. Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives PDF icon Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives More Documents & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Focus

  5. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker Share Description nn Schlenker, Director of the Center for Transportation Research, discusses working and mentoring at Argonne. Duration 1:48 Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles

  6. Employee Spotlight: Peter Friedman | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Click image to view larger.) (Click image to view larger.) Employee Spotlight: Peter Friedman By Jo Napolitano * September 25, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint Peter Friedman, 30, is a...

  7. Employee Spotlight: Jennifer Hogan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    what it's like to work at Argonne in her Employee Spotlight video. Click the image to play the video. Hogan discusses what it's like to work at Argonne in her Employee...

  8. Spotlighting Howard University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlighting Howard University Spotlighting Howard University February 27, 2012 - 2:45pm Addthis Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant. Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist Students at Washington, D.C.'s Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest

  9. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bellows, Richard J. (Hampton, NJ); Kantner, Edward (E. Brunswick, NJ)

    1988-08-23

    It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

  10. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local ...

  11. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards Workforce ...neighborhoods 2 Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big ...

  12. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success | Department of Energy Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success. PDF icon Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania More

  13. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 11 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 11 January/February 2014, Issue 11 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker medical Screening Program. Janaury/February 2014 issue covers: Director''s Note Audiogram Staff Trivia Question Calendar of Events PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 11 More Documents & Publications Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -

  14. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3 January 2013, Issue 12 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. January 2013 issue covers: Director's Note National Supplemental Screening Program (NSSP) Staff What's going on Trivia Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3 More Documents & Publications Workers' Spotlight

  15. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 May 2013, Issue 7 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. May 2013 issue covers: WHPP and BTMed Roster Updates Director's Note Staff Trivia WHPP Video Acknowledgement. Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 More Documents & Publications Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -

  16. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to a Sustainable Level of Incentives | Department of Energy Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives PDF icon Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives More Documents &

  17. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  18. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  19. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, Paul K. (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  20. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  1. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Louisiana | Department of Energy High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana This four-page case study describes Green Coast Enterprises efforts to rebuild hurricane-ravaged New Orleans through Project Home Again. PDF icon green_coast_enterprises.pdf More Documents & Publications High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana

  2. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues April 23, 2014 - 10:38am Addthis In case you missed it, last Thursday's White House Solar Champions of Change and Solar Summit shed a spotlight on all the amazing work that solar innovators around country are doing to speed deployment and make it faster, cheaper and easier to go solar! The progress made over the last three

  3. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings | Department of Energy - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incentives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings. PDF icon

  4. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 10 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 10 November/December 2013, Issue 10 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker medical Screening Program. November/December 2013 issue covers: Director's Note Remembrance Staff Beryllium Trivia Question Secure Electronic Records Transfer (SERT) Former Worker Program Milestone Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -

  5. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 12 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 12 March/April 2014, Issue 12 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker medical Screening Program. March/April issue covers: Director's Note Joint Outreach Task Group town hall meeting video Bradybury Science Museum Spirometry Staff Trivia Question Calendar of Events PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 12 More

  6. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 13 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 13 May/June 2014, Issue 13 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. May/June issue covers: Director's Note Cold War Patriot's Remembrance Quilt National Museum of Nuclear Science and History Chest X-ray B-reading Calendar of Events PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 13 More Documents

  7. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 4 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 4 February 2013, Issue 4 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. February 2013 issue covers: Director's Note What's Going on around the Complex John Hopkins University Former Worker Program Trivia Staff Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 4 More Documents & Publications

  8. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 5 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 5 March 2013, Issue 12 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. May 2013 issue covers: Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2012 Annual Report Staff Trivia University of Iowa - Former Worker Program Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 5 More Documents & Publications

  9. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 April 2013, Issue 6 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. May 2013 issue covers: BTMed takes aim at COPD, Lung Cancer Director's Note Staff Trivia Pantex Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. Trivia Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 More Documents &

  10. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 8 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 8 July/August 2013, Issue 8 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Screening Program. July/August issue covers Site Information Sessions Director's Note Staff Joint Outreach Task Group Meeting - Chicago National Supplemental Screening Program Low-Dose CT Program Calendar PDF icon Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 8

  11. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Reach | Department of Energy Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend Program Reach Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend Program Reach Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend Program Reach, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website. PDF icon Spotlight on Seattle, Washington More Documents & Publications Seattle Summary of Reported Data Better

  12. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives BetterBuildings for Michigan: ...

  13. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...neighborhoods 1 Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives ... half of the 27 sweeps and continues to experiment with program design to understand the ...

  14. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  15. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better...

  16. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage ...

  17. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Portland Summary of Reported Data Voluntary ...

  18. In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Who We Are In The Spotlight Allison Davis Sandia National Laboratories Allison Davis October 2009 NNSA Defense Programs Award of Excellence Two individuals and nine teams received the NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence at ceremonies this year at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico and California. The NNSA Defense Programs Awards of Excellence were created in the early 1980s to give special recognition to those at the laboratories and plants directly associated with the stockpile

  19. Employee Spotlight: John T. Murphy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Employee Spotlight: John T. Murphy Share Topic Operations Human Resources Programs Mathematics, computing, & computer science Modeling, simulation, & visualization Security Decision science Public health preparedness John T. Murphy, an Argonne computational engineer, describes what he does at Argonne and why. Click to read more at his Employee Spotlight

  20. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time | Department of Energy Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website. PDF icon Spotlight on Austin, Texas More Documents & Publications Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin,

  1. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Time | Department of Energy Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time This Better Buildings case study from April 2011 focuses on grantee partner Austin. PDF icon Spotlight on Austin, Texas More Documents & Publications Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big

  2. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  3. Employee Spotlight: John T. Murphy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Click the image to watch his Employee Spotlight video. Connect Find an Argonne expert by subject. Follow Argonne on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn. For inquiries on...

  4. Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRODUCTION BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. ...

  5. Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work January 27, 2015 - 12:57pm Addthis The Hyundai Tucson FCEV is currently available for lease in Southern California for less than $500 per month, including free hydrogen fuel. Hydrogen for FCEVs can be produced from a variety of resources all providing emission reductions. Hydrogen derived from natural gas reduces emissions by half and

  6. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 October/November/December 2014, Issue 15 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. November/December issue covers: Director's Note National Day of Remembrance Remembrance Quilt JOTG Meeting in Paducah University of Iowa Recognition Events Second Anniversary of Secure Electronic Records Transfer

  7. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 9 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    9 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 9 September/October 2013, Issue 9 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker medical Screening Program. September/October 2013 issue covers: Former Worker Medical Screening Program Milestone Director's Note Staff United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Trivia John Hopkins Former Worker Program Calendar PDF icon

  8. ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight March 1, 2011 - 1:49pm Addthis William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last night, we had the chance to visit with a few of the researchers and scientists behind

  9. EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford Site December 17, 2015 - 12:40pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - In this issue of the EM Update newsletter, EM marks the many accomplishments the Richland Operations Office and its contractors have achieved in cleanup along the Columbia River corridor at the Hanford Site. This year marked the 10th anniversary of the River Corridor Closure

  10. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  11. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  12. #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs Our #LabSpotlight series profiles standout individuals at the National Labs. From a theoretical physicist working to better understand one of the most elusive particles in the universe to a master optician hand-polishing precision optics used in high-powered lasers, the National Labs are home to some of the most exceptional people in their fields. These are their

  13. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  14. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton" on May 23, 2011.

  15. Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

  16. Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Report: Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, June 2015.

  17. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fans and Pumps Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps Chilled water pumps at a central plant. Image by Warren Gretz, NREL/06196 Chilled water pumps at a central plant. Image by Warren Gretz, NREL/06196 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. See below for a few highlights from monitoring fan and pump energy use. Fans At the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building, supply, return/exhaust, and

  18. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two

  19. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medical Equipment Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. Additional plug load data from medical office buildings were provided by Mazzetti, Inc. See below for a few highlights from monitoring large medical imaging equipment and medical office building plug loads. Graphic showing the average weekday energy use of a CT machine. Graph showing average weekday energy

  20. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA) | Department of Energy Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA) Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA) January 14, 2015 - 7:03pm Addthis R&D→Innovation→Partnership→Demonstration→Market Transformation-hallmarks of Building America, DOE's premier

  1. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation and PARR |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Home Innovation and PARR Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation and PARR April 9, 2015 - 10:55am Addthis This article continues our series of profiles about the Building America research teams-multidisciplinary industry partnerships that work to make high performance homes a reality for all Americans. This month's article focuses on Partnership for Home Innovation and Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits-leaders in research and practical

  2. Gas tungsten arc welder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  3. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chiller Plants Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. See below for a few highlights from monitoring chiller plant energy. Image of a chiller plant. Chiller Energy Annual site energy use intensities (EUIs) for chiller energy were estimated to be 27.7 kBtu/ft2-yr for the the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building and 26.8 kBtu/ft2-yr for the State

  4. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J.; Dye, Robert C.; Son, Steven F.; Jorgensen, Betty S.; Perry, W. Lee

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  5. EECBG Success Story: The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Los Angeles -- a city known as the "Entertainment Capital of the World" -- now has its spotlight on energy efficiency. The city of Los Angeles held a press event to wrap up the ...

  6. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  7. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S.; Sheinberg, Haskell; Hogan, Billy M.; Lewis, Homer D.; Dickinson, James M.

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  8. The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency July 30, 2012 - 9:19am Addthis Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Founding Partners of Los Angeles Better Buildings Challenge sign commitments to reduce energy use in their buildings. | Photo courtesy of the City of Los Angeles. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Founding Partners of Los Angeles Better Buildings Challenge sign commitments to reduce energy

  9. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR May 14, 2015 - 12:36pm Addthis This article continues our series of profiles about the Building America research teams-multidisciplinary industry partnerships that work to make high performance homes a reality for all Americans. This month's article focuses on Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions and NorthernSTAR Building America

  10. Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Here are past webinars and materials from Home Energy Score. February 3, 2016: Know the Score: Hear the Latest on Home Energy Score from DOE and Utility Partners As part of efforts to recruit new Partners, Home Energy Score hosted a webinar for utilities. Joan Glickman, Home Energy Score Program Manager, outlined the basics of the program and the specific features that make Home Energy Score beneficial to

  11. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility | Department of Energy Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility October 21, 2014 - 5:39pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy, Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (Western) will present the final webinar in the 2014 Tribal

  12. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William Kevin; Janikowski, Stuart Kevin

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  13. METHOD OF MAKING TUNGSTEN FILAMENTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frazer, J.W.

    1962-12-18

    A method of making tungsten filaments is described in which the tungsten is completely free of isotope impurities in the range of masses 234 to 245 for use in mass spectrometers. The filament comprises a tantalum core generally less than 1 mil in diameter having a coating of potassium-free tantalum-diffused tungsten molecularly bonded thereto. In the preferred process of manufacture a short, thin tantalum filament is first mounted between terminal posts mounted in insulated relation through a backing plate. The tungsten is most conveniently vapor plated onto the tantalum by a tungsten carbonyl vapor decomposition method having a critical step because of the tendency of the tantalum to volatilize at the temperature of operntion of the filament. The preferred recipe comprises volatilizing tantalum by resistance henting until the current drops by about 40%, cutting the voltage back to build up the tungsten, and then gradually building the temperature back up to balance the rate of tungsten deposition with the rate of tantalum volatilization. (AEC)

  14. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falkenstein, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  15. Retention of Halogens in Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-05-01

    In spite of their potential roles as melting rate accelerators and foam breakers, halogens are generally viewed as troublesome components for glass processing. Of five halogens, F, Cl, Br, I, and At, all but At may occur in nuclear waste. A nuclear waste feed may contain up to 10 g of F, 4 g of Cl, and ?100 mg of Br and I per kg of glass. The main concern is halogen volatility, producing hazardous fumes and particulates, and the radioactive iodine 129 isotope of 1.7x10^7-year half life. Because F and Cl are soluble in oxide glasses and tend to precipitate on cooling, they can be retained in the waste glass in the form of dissolved constituents or as dispersed crystalline inclusions. This report compiles known halogen-retention data in both high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. Because of its radioactivity, the main focus is on I. Available data on F and Cl were compiled for comparison. Though Br is present in nuclear wastes, it is usually ignored; no data on Br retention were found.

  16. Operation of thoriated tungsten cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, J.E. )

    1993-01-20

    The operating temperature of thoriated tungsten cathodes used in electric thrusters depends on the surface coverage of thorium, which is determined by a balance of rate processes which supply and deplete the surface layer. The fundamental processes and rates are first reviewed in detail, then a phenomenological model based on these rate processes is described. The model indicates that the thermionic emission capabilities of thoriated tungsten cathodes decay rapidly because of thorium depletion at temperatures encountered in electric thrusters.

  17. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.; Davis, John W.

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Monagle, Matthew (Los Alamos, NM); Coogan, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) detector is formed from a silent discharge (also called a dielectric barrier discharge) plasma generator. A silent discharge plasma device receives a gas sample that may contain one or more HHCs and produces free radicals and excited electrons for oxidizing the HHCs in the gas sample to produce water, carbon dioxide, and an acid including halogens in the HHCs. A detector is used to sensitively detect the presence of the acid. A conductivity cell detector combines the oxidation products with a solvent where dissociation of the acid increases the conductivity of the solvent. The conductivity cell output signal is then functionally related to the presence of HHCs in the gas sample. Other detectors include electrochemical cells, infrared spectrometers, and negative ion mobility spectrometers.

  19. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  20. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

    1987-08-21

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  1. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Hann S.; Sather, Norman F.

    1988-01-01

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gases and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  2. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  3. C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers September 16, 2014 - 12:17pm Addthis Watch highlights from last year's Women in Clean Energy Symposium -- an annual event that is working to build a community of professionals dedicated to advancing the careers and goals of women in clean energy. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Caroline McGregor Policy Analyst, Office of International Affairs How can I participate? Watch the

  4. Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals 2015 Performance Appraisal Process 211 - 220: Employee writes self-appraisal. 221 - 310: Evaluating Supervisor writes appraisals for...

  5. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T.; Driemeyer, Daniel E.

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  6. Process development for cladding APT tungsten targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, M H; Barber, R; Dalder, E

    2000-11-27

    This report describes development of processes for cladding APT Target tungsten components with a thin layer (0.127-mm) of Alloy 718, Alloy 600 or 316L stainless steel alloy. The application requires that the cladding be thermally bonded to the tungsten in order to transfer heat generated in the tungsten volume to a surrounding coolant. High temperature diffusion bonding using the hot isostatic processing (HIP) technique was selected as the method for creating a metallurgical bond between pure tungsten tubes and rods and the cladding materials. Bonding studies using a uniaxially loaded vacuum hot press were conducted in preliminary experiments to determine acceptable time-temperature conditions for diffusion bonding. The results were successfully applied in cladding tungsten rods and tubes with these alloys. Temperatures 800-810 C were suitable for cladding tungsten with Alloy 600 and 316L stainless steel alloy, whereas tungsten was clad with Alloy 718 at 1020 C.

  7. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

  8. EECBG Success Story: The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Angeles -- a city known as the “Entertainment Capital of the World” -- now has its spotlight on energy efficiency. The city of Los Angeles held a press event to wrap up the Department of Energy’s Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant (EECBG) program and launch its commitment to the Department’s Better Buildings Challenge. Learn more.

  9. Method for halogenating or radiohalogenating a chemical compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabalka, George W.

    2006-05-09

    A method for obtaining a halogenated organic compound, whereby an organotrifluoroborate compound is reacted with a halide ion in the presence of an oxidizing agent to produce the corresponding halogenated organic compound. The method may be used for producing radiohalogenated organic compounds.

  10. Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map Location County Churchill County, UT Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Geothermal Region...

  11. Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, Walter L.; Catherino, Henry A.; Kotch, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

  12. Spotlight: Two Los Alamos scientists honored with E.O. Lawrence Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Two Los Alamos scientists honored with E.O. Lawrence Awards Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Spotlight: Two Los Alamos scientists honored with E.O. Lawrence Awards Fryer and Dors noted for achievements in space physics, satellite radiation sensors July 1, 2015 Eric E. Dors (l) and Christopher L. Fryer (r) Eric E. Dors (l) and Christopher L. Fryer (r) Contact Linda Anderman Email Outstanding performance

  13. Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainability

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Award | National Nuclear Security Administration Home / Blog Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainability Award Monday, June 15, 2015 - 11:01am Sandia Team - Sustainability Award On June 8, Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Sandia Field Office Manager Jeffrey Harrell presented a Best in Class NNSA Sustainability Award to a team from Sandia National Laboratories. The award was in the Innovation and Holistic Approach

  14. Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino2,3,4- ij quinolin-4-ium triiodide Citation Details ...

  15. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Authors: Zaug, J. M. [1] ; Bastea, S. [1] ; Stavrou, E. [1] ; Armstrong, M. R. [1] ; Crowhurst, J. C.

  16. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations Authors: M.Zaug, J ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-06-25 OSTI Identifier: 1149562 Report Number(s):

  17. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Faraj, Bahjat

    1999-01-01

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  18. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  19. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-06-21

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  20. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  1. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  2. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  3. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Halogen Incandescent MR16 Lamps and LED Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses the halogen MR16 lamp and its commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  4. Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

    2013-05-21

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  5. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  6. Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

  7. Growth of tungsten oxide on carbon nanowalls templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hua; Su, Yan; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Tungsten oxide deposited on carbon nanowalls by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. ? This composite has two-dimensional uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. ? Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. - Abstract: In the present work we present a simple approach for coupling tungsten oxide with carbon nanowalls. The two-dimensional carbon nanowalls with open boundaries were grown using plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, and the subsequent tungsten oxide growth was performed in the same equipment by direct heating of a tungsten filament. The tungsten oxide coating is found to have uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. The method of synthesis described here provides an operable route to the production of two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanocomposites.

  8. Employee Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services Employee Services The Office of Management provides many of the services that keep the Department of Energy Headquarters offices operational. These services keep the Department's facilities operating, as well as many of the managerial support functions that are shared by many of the Program Offices. These functions are primarily provided by the Office of Administration, MA-40. For a listing of office contacts please use the About Us menu, the Contact Us section, available directly

  9. Spotlights Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...

  10. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Student Jobs Gain valuable work experience while pursuing your academic interests! We are looking for bright, dedicated students interested in making a real difference, and we welcome forward-thinking people from all backgrounds and cultures. At NNSA, we have an array of opportunities that will help your transition from the classroom to the real world. NNSA recruits students using a variety of programs, including the Student Temporary Employment Program (STEP), the Student Career Experience

  11. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maverick Chea default image Completing an MS in Chemical Engineering Stanford University Area of NIF: Target fabrication, particularly tents Project: Optimization of Ultrathin Films Tell us about your student internship experience. I was first here two years ago, also working with tents. As a senior figuring out a direction for job prospects, I became interested in polymers. Here I am studying them in "real life." I've found that it's been a great hands-on experience. What does your

  12. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mekena McGrew Mekena McGrew First-year physics PhD student University of California, Merced Area of NIF: Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Project: Created a Single-shot, Second Harmonic Generation Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (SHG FROG) system for damage testing Tell us about your work at NIF.FROG is a technique for characterizing ultra-short pulses. With them, we can measure pulse parameters, such as the pulse intensity, pulse width, spectrum, and spectral phase. It is important to

  13. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Czapla Nick Czapla Project Name: Image Analysis Classification algorithm to automatically classify NIF optics damage sites Project Description: Develop a classification system of potential damage sites on the NIF Final Optics based on the sites' morphology (i.e., shape, color, size, roughness of edges, etc.) and automate the classification process using a wavelet transformation algorithm, called the Image Analysis Classification (IAC), written by Wim deVries. The project includes the manual

  14. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zobrist Nick Zobrist Junior (graduating spring 2015) Physics and Applied Mathematics, U.C. Berkeley, Area of NIF: Optics Inspection Tell us about your work at NIF. I'm here to contribute to the optics inspection algorithms that evaluate the condition of NIF's optics. One of the ways I've done this is by modeling reflection locations which is a new capability that they've needed, but I've helped my mentor, Laura Kegelmeyer, with parts of other projects as well. You received an award for your work

  15. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  16. Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  17. Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum organometallic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voges, Mark; Bullock, R. Morris

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes. The functional group is selected from groups represented by the formulas R(C.dbd.O)R' and R(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The active catalyst for the process has the form: [CpM(CO).sub.2 (PR*.sub.3) L].sup.+ A.sup.-, where Cp=.eta..sup.5 -R.sup..tangle-solidup..sub.m C.sub.5 H.sub.5-m and R.sup..tangle-solidup. represents an alkyl group or a halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =OR' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =CO.sub.2 R' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) and m=0 to 5; M represents a molybdenum atom or a tungsten atom; R*.sub.3 represents three hydrocarbon groups selected from a cyclohexyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.11), a methyl group (CH.sub.3), and a phenyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.5) and all three R* groups can be the same or different or two of the three groups can be the same; L represents a ligand; and A.sup.- represents an anion. In another embodiment, one, two or three of the R* groups can be an OR*.

  18. Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Doppler broadening of a tungsten candidate line was successfully measured and the ion ... TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DOPPLER BROADENING; ION TEMPERATURE; IONIZATION; ...

  19. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    material (PFM) in fusion reactor Development of tungsten coating on PFM (such as F82H) Bulk W is heavy Influences density control of fusion plasma, and safety ...

  20. Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Helium bubbles are detrimental to plasma-facing materials such as tungsten in fusion reactors, which could serve as a possible new power source. Thus, understanding how helium ...

  1. Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles Basic Energy Sciences (BES) ... LS, DP, and BPU acknowledge support by the DOE, Office of Science, Office of ...

  2. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henriksen, Gary L.

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  3. A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-ho; Irie, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2008-05-05

    A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

  4. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  5. Halogen-free benzoxazine based curable compositions for high TG applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan

    2015-03-10

    The present invention provides a halogen-free curable composition including a benzoxazine monomer, at least one epoxy resin, a catalyst, a toughening agent and a solvent. The halogen-free curable composition is especially suited for use in automobile and aerospace applications since the composition, upon curing, produces a composite having a high glass transition temperature.

  6. Corrosion and wear resistance of tungsten carbide-cobalt and tungsten carbide-cobalt-chromium thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quets, J.; Alford, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings provide wear surfaces to new and overhauled components for various industries. Their wear resistance is obtained by incorporating small tungsten carbide particles into a metal matrix. This presentation will show what parameters influence their corrosion resistance in the ASTM B-117 Salt Spray Corrosion Test,

  7. Measurement of uptake and release of tritium by tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakayama, M.; Torikai, Y.; Saito, M.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Isobe, K.; Yamanishi, T.; Kurishita, H.

    2015-03-15

    Tungsten is currently contemplated as plasma facing material for the divertor of future fusion machines. In this paper the uptake of tritium by tungsten and its release behavior have been investigated. Tungsten samples have been annealed at various temperatures and loaded at also different temperatures with deuterium containing 7.2 % tritium at a pressure of 1.2 kPa. A specific system was designed to assess the release of tritiated water and molecular tritium by the samples. Due to the rather low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten it is particularly important to be aware of the presence of hydrogen traps or thin oxide films. As shown in this work, traps or oxide films may affect the retention capability of tungsten and lead to significantly modified release properties. It became clear that there were capture sites that had different thermal stability and different capture intensity in tungsten after polishing, or oxide films that were grown on the surface of tungsten and had barrier effects.

  8. Polaron absorption in amorphous tungsten oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Lars; Azens, Andris; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2001-08-15

    Amorphous thin films of tungsten oxide were deposited by sputtering onto glass substrates covered by conductive indium--tin oxide. The density and stoichiometry were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Lithium ions were intercalated electrochemically into the films. The optical reflectance and transmittance were measured in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 2.5 {mu}m, at a number of intercalation levels. The polaron absorption peak becomes more symmetric and shifts to higher energies until an intercalation level of 0.25 to 0.3 Li{sup +}/W, where a saturation occurs. The shape of the polaron peak is in very good agreement with the theory of Bryksin [Fiz. Tverd. Tela 24, 1110 (1982)]. Within this model, the shift of the absorption peak is interpreted as an increase in the Fermi level of the material as more Li ions are inserted. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  10. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerant | Department of Energy Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Callite Tungsten Co - NJ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of various available metallurgical processes; November 7, 1944 NJ.36-2 - DOE Letter; J.Wagoner to Mayor Walter; Information regarding status of Callite Tungsten site; April 3, 1995...

  12. Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solid solutions using radial X-ray diffraction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based solid solutions using radial X-ray diffraction Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 29, 2016 Title: Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based solid solutions using radial X-ray diffraction Authors: Xie, Miao [1] ; Mohammadi, Reza [2] ; Turner, Christopher L. [1]

  13. Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    solid solutions using radial X-ray diffraction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based solid solutions using radial X-ray diffraction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based solid solutions using radial X-ray diffraction In this work, we explore the hardening mechanisms in WB{sub 4}-based solid solutions upon addition of Ta, Mn, and Cr using in situ

  14. Ductile tungsten-nickel-alloy and method for manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludwig, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile elongation of a tungsten-nickel-iron alloy containing essentially 95 weight percent reprocessed tungsten, 3.5 weight percent nickel, and 1.5 weight percent iron is increased from a value of less than about 1 percent up to about 23 percent by the addition of less than 0.5 weight percent of a reactive metal consisting of niobium and zirconium.

  15. Effect of reinforcement phase on the mechanical property of tungsten nanocomposite synthesized by spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jin -Kyu; Kim, Song -Yi; Ott, Ryan T.; Kim, Jin -Young; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min -Ha

    2015-07-15

    Nanostructured tungsten composites were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of nanostructured composite powders. The composite powders, which were synthesized by mechanical milling of tungsten and Ni-based alloy powders, are comprised of alternating layers of tungsten and metallic glass several hundred nanometers in size. The mechanical behavior of the nanostructured W composite is similar to pure tungsten, however, in contrast to monolithic pure tungsten, some macroscopic compressive plasticity accompanies the enhanced maximum strength up to 2.4 GPa by introducing reinforcement. As a result, we have found that the mechanical properties of the composites strongly depend on the uniformity of the nano-grained tungsten matrix and reinforcement phase distribution.

  16. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Travaglini, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  17. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  18. VAPORIZATION OF TUNGSTEN-METAL IN STEAM AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2000-10-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate system. The aerosol formed a fine white smoke of tungsten-oxide which was visible to the eye as it condensed in the laminar boundary layer of steam which flowed along the surface of the rod. The aerosol continued to flow as a smoke tube downstream of the rod, flowing coaxially along the centerline axis of the quartz glass tube and depositing by impaction along the outside of a bend and at sudden area contractions in the piping. The vaporization rate data from the 17 experiments which exceeded the vaporization threshold temperature are shown in Figure 5 in the form of vaporization rates (g/cm{sup 2} s) vs. inverse temperature (K{sup {minus}1}). Two correlations to the present data are presented and compared to a published correlation by Kilpatrick and Lott. The differences are discussed.

  19. Tungsten dust impact on ITER-like plasma edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, R. D. Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2015-01-15

    The impact of tungsten dust originating from divertor plates on the performance of edge plasma in ITER-like discharge is evaluated using computer modeling with the coupled dust-plasma transport code DUSTT-UEDGE. Different dust injection parameters, including dust size and mass injection rates, are surveyed. It is found that tungsten dust injection with rates as low as a few mg/s can lead to dangerously high tungsten impurity concentrations in the plasma core. Dust injections with rates of a few tens of mg/s are shown to have a significant effect on edge plasma parameters and dynamics in ITER scale tokamaks. The large impact of certain phenomena, such as dust shielding by an ablation cloud and the thermal force on tungsten ions, on dust/impurity transport in edge plasma and consequently on core tungsten contamination level is demonstrated. It is also found that high-Z impurities provided by dust can induce macroscopic self-sustained plasma oscillations in plasma edge leading to large temporal variations of edge plasma parameters and heat load to divertor target plates.

  20. Ductile tungsten-nickel alloy and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a ductile, high-density tungsten-nickel alloy which possesses a tensile strength in the range of 100,000 to 140,000 psi and a tensile elongation of 3.1 to 16.5 percent in 1 inch at 25.degree.C. This alloy is prepared by the steps of liquid phase sintering a mixture of tungsten-0.5 to 10.0 weight percent nickel, heat treating the alloy at a temperature above the ordering temperature of approximately 970.degree.C. to stabilize the matrix phase, and thereafter rapidly quenching the alloy in a suitable liquid to maintain the matrix phase in a metastable, face-centered cubic, solid- solution of tungsten in nickel.

  1. Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Nan; Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 ; Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K.; Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong; Li, Xiao-Chun

    2013-12-15

    We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

  2. Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino[2,3,4- ij ]quinolin-4-ium triiodide (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino[2,3,4- ij ]quinolin-4-ium triiodide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino[2,3,4- ij ]quinolin-4-ium triiodide Two kinds of

  3. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothman, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  4. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  5. Fabrication of Gas-Filled Tungsten-Coated Glass Shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Baugh, W.; Steinman, D.A.

    2004-03-15

    Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx}0.15 {mu}m/hr coatings with {approx}2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {mu}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx}100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 deg. C.

  6. The OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeter front end electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.E.; Charalambous, A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, K. )

    1994-08-01

    A pair of small angle silicon-tungsten (Si-W) calorimeters has been built to measure the luminosity to a precision better than 0.1% in the OPAL experiment at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN near Geneva. Each calorimeter contains 19 layers of tungsten (W) plates and silicon (Si) detectors, corresponding to a total of 22 radiation lengths, sampled by about 1 m[sup 2] of detectors divided into 304 x64 independently read out channels. A complete electronics system has been developed, from the preamplifier up to the VME read out and control interface. It includes a fast trigger based on analogue sums. This paper describes how a large number of channels have been implemented in a dense environment, thanks to the use of ASIC's directly bonded on the detector.

  7. Amorphous copper tungsten oxide with tunable band gaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Le; Shet, Sudhakar; Tang Houwen; Wang Heli; Yan Yanfa; Turner, John; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Ahn, Kwang-soon

    2010-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of amorphous copper tungsten oxide thin films with tunable band gaps. The thin films are synthesized by the magnetron cosputtering method. We find that due to the amorphous nature, the Cu-to-W ratio in the films can be varied without the limit of the solubility (or phase separation) under appropriate conditions. As a result, the band gap and conductivity type of the films can be tuned by controlling the film composition. Unfortunately, the amorphous copper tungsten oxides are not stable in aqueous solution and are not suitable for the application of photoelectrochemical splitting of water. Nonetheless, it provides an alternative approach to search for transition metal oxides with tunable band gaps.

  8. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  9. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Lowell D.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  10. Deflection of light by using tungsten bronze crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jelsma, L.F.; McWright, G.M.; Schumacher, F.A.; Neurgaonkar, R.R.

    1988-07-05

    This paper reports our preliminary results on an electrooptical light deflector for streak camera applications that uses tungsten bronze SBN:60% crystals. We found the performance of these ferroelectric crystals to be an order of magnitude better than the best LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals currently available. We discuss the theory and performance of this crystal as well as other bronze crystals for application to the streak camera. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Effect of reinforcement phase on the mechanical property of tungsten nanocomposite synthesized by spark plasma sintering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Jin -Kyu; Kim, Song -Yi; Ott, Ryan T.; Kim, Jin -Young; Eckert, Jürgen; TU Dresden, Dresden; Lee, Min -Ha

    2015-07-15

    Nanostructured tungsten composites were fabricated by spark plasma sintering of nanostructured composite powders. The composite powders, which were synthesized by mechanical milling of tungsten and Ni-based alloy powders, are comprised of alternating layers of tungsten and metallic glass several hundred nanometers in size. The mechanical behavior of the nanostructured W composite is similar to pure tungsten, however, in contrast to monolithic pure tungsten, some macroscopic compressive plasticity accompanies the enhanced maximum strength up to 2.4 GPa by introducing reinforcement. As a result, we have found that the mechanical properties of the composites strongly depend on the uniformity of the nano-grainedmore » tungsten matrix and reinforcement phase distribution.« less

  12. Method of increments for the halogen molecular crystals: Cl, Br, and I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenbergen, Krista G.; Gaston, Nicola; Müller, Carsten; Paulus, Beate

    2014-09-28

    Method of increments (MI) calculations reveal the n-body correlation contributions to binding in solid chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Secondary binding contributions as well as d-correlation energies are estimated and compared between each solid halogen. We illustrate that binding is entirely determined by two-body correlation effects, which account for >80% of the total correlation energy. One-body, three-body, and exchange contributions are repulsive. Using density-fitting (DF) local coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples for incremental calculations, we obtain excellent agreement with the experimental cohesive energies. MI results from DF local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (LMP2) yield considerably over-bound cohesive energies. Comparative calculations with density functional theory and periodic LMP2 method are also shown to be less accurate for the solid halogens.

  13. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DUCTILE-PHASE TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Odette, George R.; Cunningham, Kevin; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-03-03

    The objective of this study is to develop the materials science of fiber-reinforced tungsten composites as candidates for plasma-facing components in future fusion reactors.

  14. 2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details...

  15. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald; Tu, Chia-Hao; Chang Chi; Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Hsin-Li; Tzeng, Yonhua; Auciello, Orlando

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  17. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  18. Characterization of tungsten films and their hydrogen permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemani?, Vincenc Kova?, Janez; Lungu, Cristian; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Zajec, Bojan

    2014-11-01

    Prediction of tritium migration and its retention within fusion reactors is uncertain due to a significant role of the structural disorder that is formed on the surface layer after plasma exposure. Tungsten films deposited by any of the suitable methods are always disordered and contain a high density of hydrogen traps. Experiments on such films with hydrogen isotopes present a suitable complementary method, which improves the picture of the hydrogen interaction with fusion relevant materials. The authors report on the morphology, composition, and structure of tungsten films deposited by the thermionic vacuum arc method on highly permeable Eurofer substrates. Subsequently, hydrogen permeation studies through these films were carried out in a wide pressure range from 20 to 1000 mbars at 400?C. The final value of the permeation coefficient for four samples after 24?h at 400?C was between P?=?3.2??10{sup ?14}?mol?H{sub 2}/(m?s?Pa{sup 0.5}) and P?=?1.1??10{sup ?15}?mol H{sub 2}/(m s Pa{sup 0.5}). From the time evolution of the permeation flux, it was shown that diffusivity was responsible for the difference in the steady fluxes, as solubility was roughly the same. This is confirmed by XRD data taken on these samples.

  19. A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

    1999-07-01

    This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

  20. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2000-01-01

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  1. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  2. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  3. Employee Spotlight: Alessandro Cattaneo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office PDF icon Employee Job Task Analysis (EJTA) PIA, Richland Operations Office More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - GovTrip (DOE data)

  4. Employee Spotlight: Amy Spears

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Amy Spears Amy Spears-Inspired by the "dark place" Amy proved how tough she is on the CMT channel's grueling Broken Skull Challenge. But in everyday life, she's driven to help those around her achieve their fitness goals. spears spears spears spears spears spears 12 3 4 "I'm a mother, but I am also still Amy. I have big goals and dreams and it is so important for me to work towards those while I am raising my kids and, in turn, I think I am a better mom for it." Inspired by

  5. Employee Spotlight: Billy Turney

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Billy Turney Billy Turney-Devotion to song For the last 40-plus years, Billy Turney has been performing live music in churches, pubs, farmers markets, and a dozen other places from Santa Fe to Rome to Dublin. turney turney turney turney turney turney turney 12 3 4 5 6 7 "To understand how Billy Turney came to embrace both sacred music and Irish folk songs, you have to consider two ends of the keyboard continuum: the biggest of all, the pipe organ, and the most portable, the accordion."

  6. Employee Spotlight: Gene Ortega

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gene Ortega May 4, 2016 The eyes have it Gene Ortega paints portraits rich in color and symbolism. "My style is chaotic with a bit of refinement," says Gene, a systems engineer in Facility System Engineering. "It can be almost photo-realistic, but you can see the brushstrokes and the texture in it, and the chaos and the anger." Gene's vivid paintings explore religious iconography and Day of the Dead motifs in portraits, often drawing on the imagery of saints, the Virgin Mary,

  7. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janice Lovato March 10, 2015 A gift for imagination While the Associate Directorate for Nuclear and High Hazard Operations' Janice Lovato was still working as a cashier at Smith's Food and Drug Center in Los Alamos over a decade ago, a regular, usually friendly customer came through her line one day, but this time in an obviously disgruntled mood. As the shopper slowly placed his purchases on the cash register counter, he looked at Lovato in exasperation and told her that standing at the cash

  8. Employee Spotlight: Jeff Martin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Martin Jeff Martin-Going feral Two long-distance solo hikes on the breathtaking Colorado Plateau took Martin into the vicinity of Canyonlands National Park, the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Lake Powell martin martin martin martin martin martin martin martin martin 12 3 45 6 789 "There is not much sound down here, just the light crunch of my steps on the canyon floor's natural gravel and the occasional scrape of my pack as it touches the walls." Going feral It usually

  9. Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jonathan Engle August 14, 2014 "You have cancer" are among the most feared words one can imagine hearing from one's physician, but if Jonathan (Jon) Engle, Reines Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at the Laboratory, has anything to do with it cancer patients may someday hope for a new and improved treatment option: Killing cancer cells from inside the body with the help of nuclear energy. "The three cancer remedies primarily used today-surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy

  10. Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Torrez August 26, 2014 Michael (Miguél) Torrez, by day a research technologist in the Laboratory's Materials Physics and Applications Division, spends much of his free time researching New Mexico's family histories and helping interested parties verify or fill in their family tree by complementing any existing document trail with the genetic testing that has become available in recent years. Torrez conducts research at the New Mexico State Library (photo courtesy of the Albuquerque

  11. Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monika Bittman June 2, 2014 Monika Bittman has wanted to be an artist ever since she was a little girl in Prague, Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic. Today Bittman applies her creative eye and attention to detail in her work as a web designer at the Laboratory and on weekends spends as much time as possible painting in her Santa Fe studio. Expressing herself artistically is a way to learn about herself and the world for Bittman. The upheavals of growing up in a Soviet-controlled country,

  12. Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ron Barber September 9, 2014 Ron Barber, a mechanical engineer in the Laboratory's Accelerator Operations and Technology Division, has always enjoyed the great outdoors for fun and exploration, but six or seven years ago he began to combine his love of nature and open spaces with a personal interest in researching the astronomical knowledge of long-ago civilizations that once inhabited the American Southwest and the Sierra Madre Mountains in Mexico. "People have been watching, and to some

  13. Employee Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bryant Roybal February 18, 2015 Champion chile New Mexico's first green chile stew champion, Bryant Roybal, is proud to add first prize at the First Annual Great Bowls of Fire...

  14. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and are hitting the ground running spreading the word about topics such as sea ice, supernovae, or aquatic biology. These conversations are for ANY age audience, so bring your...

  15. Employee Spotlight: Alessandro Cattaneo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alessandro Cattaneo Alessandro Cattaneo-One thing leads to another The first time the Laboratory's post-doctoral mechanical engineer Alessandro Cattaneo arrived in the United States from his native Italy, he was a regular tourist taking a road trip through the American West with three Italian friends. April 12, 2015 Alessandro Cattaneo Cattaneo and companions in Millennium Park, Chicago. "Los Alamos' Engineering Institute is considered one of the structural health monitoring leaders in the

  16. Employee Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bryant Roybal Bryant Roybal-Champion chile The Associate Directorate for Project Management's Bryant Roybal has been a chile competition contestant ever since entering the Hot Chili Days, Cool Mountain Nights Cookoff in Red River in 2011 and immediately taking first prize. February 18, 2015 Bryant Roybal Bryant Roybal's award-winning chile stew recipe features different types of chile in what he calls his Harvest Blend. "It's been a fun few years, and winning the inaugural state-wide Green

  17. Employee Spotlight: Gene Ortega

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gene Ortega Gene Ortega-The eyes have it Painting with a style that mixes chaos and refinement, Gene Ortega has found a way to blend his technical and artistic sides. May 4, 2016 gene ortega gene ortega gene ortega gene ortega "I focus on the eyes because they give the painting a soul." The eyes have it gene ortega Gene Ortega paints portraits rich in color and symbolism. "My style is chaotic with a bit of refinement," says Gene, a systems engineer in Facility System

  18. Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jon Engle Jonathan Engle-Saving lives with nuclear energy Jonathan (Jon) Engle, Reines Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at the Laboratory, is helping lay the scientific groundwork for a new and improved cancer treatment that uses the energy produced by radioactive isotopes. August 14, 2014 Jon Engle Jonathan (Jon) Engle, Reines Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at the Laboratory Los Alamos has been making radioisotopes since the 1970s and today is a global leader in the production of

  19. Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kristen Honig Kristen Honig-The evolution of a wildfire photographer Honig realized that she wanted to document the beauty and destructiveness of wildfires and the sacrifices, challenges and camaraderie of the men and women protecting communities in the path of scorching blazes. June 24, 2014 Helicopter releasing red fire retardant A helicopter drops fire retardant on wildfire during 2011 Las Conchas fire in New Mexico. ...the crews think of me as 'press,' someone who is going to take a few

  20. Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Torrez Michael Torrez-Tracing family lineages to colonial New Mexico Michael Torrez, by day a research technologist in the Laboratory's Materials Physics and Applications Division, spends much of his free time researching New Mexico's family histories. August 26, 2014 Michael Torrez Michael Torrez in front of a family tree he is researching. "Tracing one's family history is quite tricky. ...But nowadays we have much greater access to genealogical information than ever before, and

  1. Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monika Bittman Monika Bittman-The vitality of artistic creation Monika Bittman has wanted to be an artist ever since she was a little girl in Prague, Czechoslovakia, now the Czech Republic. Today Bittman applies her creative eye and attention to detail in her work as a web designer at the Laboratory. June 2, 2014 Monika Bittman Monika Bittman, web designer/developer "By working with thin paint on small panels, moving them around and manipulating them, I allow the properties and dynamics of

  2. Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ron Barber Ron Barber-The hobby that got out of hand Ron Barber, a mechanical engineer in the Laboratory's Accelerator Operations and Technology Division, combines his love of nature and open spaces with a personal interest in researching the astronomical knowledge of long-ago civilizations that once inhabited the American Southwest. September 9, 2014 Ron Barber The ancient stone calendars Ron Barber and his friends have located during their weekend treks mark summer and winter solstices,

  3. Scientist in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    live in regional fresh water supplies. You'll also have an opportunity to talk to Jane about her interest in microbiology and see cool stuff normally invisible to the human eye...

  4. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology, engineering, or math (STEM) subject. Conversations are intended for all ages and include interactive hands-on activities that make learning easy and fun. To learn...

  5. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineering, or math (STEM) subject. These conversations are intended for all ages, so bring your kids and stop by the museum for a chat. While you're here, be sure to...

  6. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the science of computer software and hardware. These conversations are intended for all ages and include interactive hands-on activities that make learning more fun. Be sure to...

  7. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiography to learn more about explosives. These conversations are intended for all ages, so bring your kids and stop by the museum for a chat. While you're here, be sure to...

  8. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology, engineering, or math (STEM) subject. Conversations are intended for all ages and include interactive hands-on activities that make learning easy and fun. On...

  9. Spotlight: Jenna Casias

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working with organizations to bring together other women at the Lab in construction, maintenance and project management so there's not only a support system for those already doing ...

  10. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    talking to visitors about their favorite STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) topics. Featured in December: Teri Roberts and Isaac Salazar Stop by the Bradbury on...

  11. Spotlight: Claudia Mora

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a stable-isotope geochemist whose research spans the traditional fields of geology, soil science and climate science. At Los Alamos, she heads the Earth and Environmental...

  12. Spotlight: Christopher Lee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Under the program, researchers based at DOE national laboratories will receive financial ... strength and leadership of the nuclear theory group and the Laboratory as a whole, to ...

  13. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    development specialist and Nicole Lloyd-Ronning, an astrophysicist, both at Los Alamos National Laboratory will talk to people about computers and the electromagnetic spectrum....

  14. Employee Spotlight: Jeff Martin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    twice as high as the previous day-crotch-deep instead of knee-deep, with plenty of chest-deep sections, or deeper yet, interspersed with rapids. In addition, the river looks...

  15. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ann Schlenker

    2013-06-10

    Ann Schlenker, Director for the Center for Transportation Research, discusses mentoring and working at Argonne.

  16. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    development specialist and Nicole Lloyd-Ronning, an astrophysicist, both at Los Alamos National Laboratory will talk to people about computers and the electromagnetic spectrum.

  17. Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and used spring break 2002 to complete the basic firefighting courses and physical fitness test." Honig was fortunate as well. "My mom was volunteering at Bandelier National...

  18. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    what seems like another owl prompts them to respond, letting the visitor know that the space is already occupied. Dave Keller with bird From the end of March into early May,...

  19. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    what seems like another owl prompts them to respond, letting the visitor know that the space is already occupied. From the end of March into early May, near the beginning of the...

  20. Employee Spotlight: Jos Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mechanic and my brother Bento runs a paint and body shop like our dad. Cars are in our blood." Most evenings, and certainly most weekends, find Jos Valdez in his garage,...

  1. Employee Spotlight: Jos Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mechanic and my brother Bento runs a paint and body shop like our dad. Cars are in our blood." Valdez tends to be drawn to the rarer and less popular of the classic cars, which...

  2. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2014 Sustainability Awards.

  3. Employee Spotlight: Michelle Ferran

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division. Photos of Michelle Ferran courtesy of Louis Leray. Photos of Michelle Ferran's art courtesy of Patrick Carr. Resource Ferran Fine Arts (Ferran's website) Disclaimer: The...

  4. Employee Spotlight: James Hunter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are even more noteworthy among cave explorers and rock climbers in general. "The art of cave climbing is a special skill in the caving community," Hunter says, "and...

  5. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    informative, but fun too On Saturday, June 13 from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, Teri Roberts, a software quality engineering and development specialist and Mandie Gehring, a physicist,...

  6. Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun; Yan, Qingzhi Lang, Shaoting

    2014-05-14

    A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

  7. Mechanisms of gas precipitation in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. D. Kolasinski; D. F. Cowgill; D. C. Donovan; M. Shimada

    2012-05-01

    Precipitation in subsurface bubbles is a key process that governs how hydrogen isotopes migrate through and become trapped within plasma-exposed tungsten. We describe a continuum-scale model of hydrogen diffusion in plasma-exposed materials that includes the effects of precipitation. The model can account for bubble expansion via dislocation loop punching, using an accurate equation of state to determine the internal pressure. This information is used to predict amount of hydrogen trapped by bubbles, as well as the conditions where the bubbles become saturated. In an effort to validate the underlying assumptions, we compare our results with published positron annihilation and thermal desorption spectroscopy data, as well as our own measurements using the tritium plasma experiment (TPE).

  8. Recent progress on gas tungsten arc welding of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossbeck, M.L.; King, J.F.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on welding 6.4 mm plate, primarily by gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The weld properties were tested using blunt notch Charpy testing to determine the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Erratic results were attributed to hydrogen and oxygen contamination of the welds. An improved gas clean-up system was installed on the welding glove box and the resulting high purity welds had Charpy impact properties similar to those of electron beam welds with similar grain size. A post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) of 950{degrees}C for two hours did not improve the properties of the weld in cases where low concentrations of impurities were attained. Further improvements in the gas clean-up system are needed to control hydrogen contamination.

  9. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to ...

  10. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  11. Molybdenum and tungsten nanostructures and methods for making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotaro, Sasaki; Chen, Wei-Fu; Muckerman, James T; Adzic, Radoslav R

    2015-01-06

    The present invention provides molybdenum and tungsten nanostructures, for example, nanosheets and nanoparticles, and methods of making and using same, including using such nanostructures as catlysts for hydrogen evolution reactions.

  12. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

    1990-12-11

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

  13. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David A.; Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Blewer, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

  14. Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten ions at low

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ionization stages in large helical device based on vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in wavelength range of 500-2200 Å (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten ions at low ionization stages in large helical device based on vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in wavelength range of 500-2200 Å Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten ions at low ionization stages in large helical

  15. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  16. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A.; Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  17. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert T.; Jackson, Kenneth J.; Duba, Alfred G.; Chen, Ching-I

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  18. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  19. Tungsten coating for improved wear resistance and reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Mani, Seethambal S.; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Blewer, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    A process is disclosed whereby a 5-50-nanometer-thick conformal tungsten coating can be formed over exposed semiconductor surfaces (e.g. silicon, germanium or silicon carbide) within a microelectromechanical (MEM) device for improved wear resistance and reliability. The tungsten coating is formed after cleaning the semiconductor surfaces to remove any organic material and oxide film from the surface. A final in situ cleaning step is performed by heating a substrate containing the MEM device to a temperature in the range of 200-600 .degree. C. in the presence of gaseous nitrogen trifluoride (NF.sub.3). The tungsten coating can then be formed by a chemical reaction between the semiconductor surfaces and tungsten hexafluoride (WF.sub.6) at an elevated temperature, preferably about 450.degree. C. The tungsten deposition process is self-limiting and covers all exposed semiconductor surfaces including surfaces in close contact. The present invention can be applied to many different types of MEM devices including microrelays, micromirrors and microengines. Additionally, the tungsten wear-resistant coating of the present invention can be used to enhance the hardness, wear resistance, electrical conductivity, optical reflectivity and chemical inertness of one or more semiconductor surfaces within a MEM device.

  20. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

  1. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  2. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, Shane J.; McCarley, Robert E.; Schrader, Glenn L.; Xie, Xiaobing

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

  3. Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

    1985-07-18

    The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  4. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  5. Development of a steady state creep behavior model of polycrystalline tungsten for bimodal space reactor application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purohit, A.; Hanan, N.A.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Gruber, E.E.

    1995-02-01

    The fuel element for one of the many reactor concepts being currently evaluated for bimodal applications in space consists of spherical fuel particles clad with tungsten or alloys of tungsten. The fuel itself consists of stabilized UO{sub 2}. One of the life limiting phenomena for the fuel element is failure of the cladding because of creep deformation. This report summarizes the information available in literature regarding the creep deformation of tungsten and its alloys and proposes a relation to be used for calculating the creep strains for elevated temperatures in the low stress region ({sigma} {le} 20 MPa). Also, results of the application of this creep relation to one of the reactor design concepts (NEBA-3) are discussed. Based on the traditional definition of creep deformation, the temperatures of 1500 K to 2900 K for tungsten and its alloys are considered to be in the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} temperature range. In this temperature range, the rate controlling mechanisms for creep deformation are believed to be non-conservative motion of screw dislocations and short circuit diffusional paths. Extensive theoretical work on creep and in particular for creep of tungsten and its alloys have been reported in the literature. These theoretical efforts have produced complex mathematical models that require detailed materials properties. These relations, however, are not presently suitable for the creep analysis because of lack of consistent material properties required for their use. Variations in material chemistry and thermomechanical pre-treatment of tungsten have significant effects on creep and the mechanical properties. Analysis of the theoretical models and limited data indicates that the following empirical relation originally proposed by M. Jacox of INEL and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory, for calculating creep deformation of tungsten cladding, can be used for the downselection of preliminary bimodal reactor design concepts.

  6. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungstengraphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungstengraphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungstengraphenecopper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900?C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900?C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650?C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900?C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  7. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates through a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using λpump < 2.4 eV forms only trion T1, which implies that the electron that remains from the dissociation of exciton XA is involved in the creation of this trion with a binding energy ~ 10 meV with respect to XA. The absorption peak that corresponds to trion T2 appears when λpump > 2.4 eV, which is just sufficient to excite exciton XB. The dynamics of trion T2 formation are found to correlate with the disappearance of the bleach of XB exciton, which indicates the involvement of holes participating in the bleach dynamics of exciton XB. Static electrical-doping photoabsorption measurements confirm the presence of an induced absorption peak similar to that of T2. Since the proposed trion formation process here involves exciton dissociation through hole-trapping by defects in the 2D crystal or substrate, this discovery highlights the strong role that defects have in defining the optical and electrical properties of 2D metal chalcogenides, which is relevant to a broad spectrum of basic science and technology applications.

  8. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; et al

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates throughmore » a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using λpump < 2.4 eV forms only trion T1, which implies that the electron that remains from the dissociation of exciton XA is involved in the creation of this trion with a binding energy ~ 10 meV with respect to XA. The absorption peak that corresponds to trion T2 appears when λpump > 2.4 eV, which is just sufficient to excite exciton XB. The dynamics of trion T2 formation are found to correlate with the disappearance of the bleach of XB exciton, which indicates the involvement of holes participating in the bleach dynamics of exciton XB. Static electrical-doping photoabsorption measurements confirm the presence of an induced absorption peak similar to that of T2. Since the proposed trion formation process here involves exciton dissociation through hole-trapping by defects in the 2D crystal or substrate, this discovery highlights the strong role that defects have in defining the optical and electrical properties of 2D metal chalcogenides, which is relevant to a broad spectrum of basic science and technology applications.« less

  9. Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Department of Chemical Engineering, Urmia University of Technology, Urmia 57155-419 ; Ghiaci, M.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (712 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ? An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ? WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 712 nm. ? Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ? WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ? Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UVvisible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 712 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 624 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

  10. Characterization of selective tungsten films prepared by photo-chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Y.K.; Hwang, S.B.; Sun, C.Y. )

    1991-06-01

    This paper reports on selective photo-chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten films decomposed by direct photoexcitation of WF{sub 6}. Film deposition rate increased with increasing temperature but was only slightly dependent on WF{sub 6} gas concentration. The selectivity deteriorated with increasing deposition temperature, WF{sub 6} concentration, and deposition time. Typically, in order to achieve selectivity, the flow rate of WF{sub 6} must be lower than 35 sccm and the deposition temperature must be lower than 230{degrees}C. No encroachment and self-limited thickness problems were found as in the low-pressure chemical vapor deposition method. In general, tungsten films prepared by photo-CVD were amorphous as observed by x-ray diffraction analysis. After annealing, the tungsten had a polycrystalline structure with a resistivity of 18 {mu}{Omega}-cm.

  11. The impact of poloidal asymmetries on tungsten transport in the core of JET H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angioni, C.; Pütterich, T.; Bilato, R.; Casson, F. J.; Giroud, C.; Mantica, P.; Helander, P.

    2015-05-15

    Recent progress in the understanding and prediction of the tungsten behaviour in the core of JET H-mode plasmas with ITER-like wall is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the impact of poloidal asymmetries of the impurity density. In particular, it is shown that the predicted reduction of temperature screening induced by the presence of low field side localization of the tungsten density produced by the centrifugal force is consistent with the observed tungsten behaviour in a JET discharge in H-mode baseline scenario. This provides first evidence of the role of poloidal asymmetries in reducing the strength of temperature screening. The main differences between plasma parameters in JET baseline and hybrid scenario discharges which affect the impact of poloidally asymmetric density on the tungsten radial transport are identified. This allows the conditions by which tungsten accumulation can be avoided to be more precisely defined.

  12. Mass transport of tungsten and molybdenum during production of leucosapphire by horizontal directional crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samsonov, A.L.

    1986-05-01

    This paper investigates the mass-transport mechanism of tungsten and molybdenum in the heating unit of an apparatus of the SGVK-Sapphire type, intended for producing leucosapphire by the HDC method. Logarithms of the constants for reactions are presented. However high compared to tungsten oxides, the volatility of molybdenum oxides is determined by the considerable range of mass transport. A possible reason for the co-deposition of amorphous deposit of Mo and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ surface from dissociation in the system is examined.

  13. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    priority research and development for ITER (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER Experiments in Alcator C-Mod tokamak plasmas in the Enhanced D-alpha H-mode regime with ITER-like mid-radius plasma density peaking and Ion

  14. Nanostructured tungsten carbide/cobalt alloys: Processing and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Li

    1993-12-31

    This research represents an extension of previous work on the synthesis and processing of nanostructured WC/Co alloys. The earlier work resulted in a novel thermochemical process for making nanostructured WC/Co powders (3-30 wt% Co), which involved the reductive decomposition and gas phase carburization of homogeneous precursor powders, prepared by spray drying aqueous solution mixtures of W and Co salts. A shortcoming of the process was the formation of a relatively large amount of uncombined carbon during gas phase carburization using pre CO. AnOtherr unsolved problem was the rapid coarsening of WC particles during liquid phase sintering, making it difficult to achieve the desired nanostructures in the fully consolidated materials. In the present work, both problems have been addressed and successfully overcome. Carburization in CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures has been shown to be superior to carburization in pure CO, in that it avoids the formation of excess carbon without sacrificing the desirable high carburization rate. Another advantage is the finer WC grain size achieved, because of the shorter reaction time at relatively low temperatures, 650-750{degrees}C. Othe carbon source gases, such as CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/H{sub 2} gas mixtures, cannot produce tungsten monocarbide at such low temperatures. Thus, carburization in CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures appears to be optimal for synthesizing nanostructured WC/Co powders. As to liquid phase sintering of powder compacts, it has been demonstrated that mechanical mixing of a small amount of VC powder with the nanograined WC/Co powder inhibits grain growth. A striking result was the linear increase in hardness of WC/7 wt% Co with the amount of VC added, at least up to the solubility limit (about 10 wt%) of VC in liquid cobalt at the sintering temperature. Preliminary work has also demonstrated the feasibility of plasma spraying low-density nanostructured powders to produce dense, wear resistant coatings.

  15. Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

  16. SPS Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys in Support of NTR Fuels Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan A. Webb; Indrajit Charit; Cory Sparks; Darryl P. Butt; Megan Frary; Mark Carroll

    2011-02-01

    Abstract. Tungsten metal slugs were fabricated via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of powdered metals at temperatures ranging from 1575 K to 1975 K and hold times of 5 minutes to 30 minutes, using powders with an average diameter of 7.8 ?m. Sintered tungsten specimens were found to have relative densities ranging from 83 % to 94 % of the theoretical density for tungsten. Consolidated specimens were also tested for their Vickers Hardness Number (VHN), which was fitted as a function of relative density; the fully consolidated VHN was extrapolated to be 381.45 kg/mm2. Concurrently, tungsten and rhenium powders with average respective diameters of 0.5 ?m and 13.3 ?m were pre-processed either by High-Energy-Ball-Milling (HEBM) or by homogeneous mixing to yield W-25at.%Re mixtures. The powder batches were sintered at temperatures of 1975 K and 2175 K for hold times ranging from 0 minutes to 60 minutes yielding relative densities ranging from 94% to 97%. The combination of HEBM and sintering showed a significant decrease in the inter-metallic phases compared to that of the homogenous mixing and sintering.

  17. Biomass-derived high-performance tungsten-based electrocatalysts on graphene for hydrogen evolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Fanke; Hu, Enyuan; Zhang, Lihua; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-08-05

    We report a new class of highly active and stable tungsten-based catalysts to replace noble metal materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte. The catalyst is produced by heating an earth-abundant and low-cost mixture of ammonium tungstate, soybean powder and graphene nanoplatelets (WSoyGnP). The catalyst compound consists of tungsten carbide (W₂C and WC) and tungsten nitride (WN) nanoparticles decorated on graphene nanoplatelets. The catalyst demonstrates an overpotential (η₁₀, the potential at a current density of 10 mA cm⁻²) of 0.105 V, which is the smallest among tungsten-based HER catalysts in acidic media. The coupling with graphenemore » significantly reduces the charge transfer resistance and increases the active surface area of the product, which are favorable for enhancing the HER activity. Therefore, the approach of employing biomass and other less expensive materials as precursors for the production of catalysts with high HER activity provides a new path for the design and development of efficient catalysts for the hydrogen production industry.« less

  18. Biomass-derived high-performance tungsten-based electrocatalysts on graphene for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Fanke; Hu, Enyuan; Zhang, Lihua; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-08-05

    We report a new class of highly active and stable tungsten-based catalysts to replace noble metal materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte. The catalyst is produced by heating an earth-abundant and low-cost mixture of ammonium tungstate, soybean powder and graphene nanoplatelets (WSoyGnP). The catalyst compound consists of tungsten carbide (W?C and WC) and tungsten nitride (WN) nanoparticles decorated on graphene nanoplatelets. The catalyst demonstrates an overpotential (???, the potential at a current density of 10 mA cm?) of 0.105 V, which is the smallest among tungsten-based HER catalysts in acidic media. The coupling with graphene significantly reduces the charge transfer resistance and increases the active surface area of the product, which are favorable for enhancing the HER activity. Therefore, the approach of employing biomass and other less expensive materials as precursors for the production of catalysts with high HER activity provides a new path for the design and development of efficient catalysts for the hydrogen production industry.

  19. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 m) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 m) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 C/min up to 900 C, and the samples were annealed at 900 C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 C samples) and four (for 500 C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 C to 600 C after 1st annealing for the sample exposed to TPE at 500 C. Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) analysis reveals that the detrapping energy decreases from 1.8 eV to 1.4 eV, indicating the changes in trapping mechanisms. This paper also summarizes deuterium behavior studies in HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten under US-Japan TITAN program.

  20. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J.; Anderson, Brian L.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  1. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  2. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub-micron filter assemblies. There was no aerosol generation for the case of all air, so the plateout, condensate and smoke were all zero. For the case of all steam, there was very little plateout in the superheated regions (several percent) and the rest of the aerosol was collected in the condensate from the condenser. There was no smoke discharge into the filters. For the experiments with intermediate air-steam fractions, there was some aerosol plateout, considerable aerosol in the condensate and aerosol smoke discharged from the condenser with the escaping air.

  3. TUNGSTEN SHIELDS FOR CS-137 INLINE MONITORS IN THE CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V; Mark Hogue, M; Javier Reyes-Jimenez, J; Paul Filpus-Luyckx, P; Timothy Riley, T; Fred Ogden, F; Donald Pak, D

    2007-05-10

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The CSSX process is a continuous process that uses a novel solvent to extract cesium from highly radioactive waste and concentrate it in dilute nitric acid. In-line analyses are performed with gamma-ray monitors to measure the C-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and in the strip effluent (SE). Sodium iodide (NaI) monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration before the DSS Hold Tank, while Geiger-Mueller (GM) monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the SE hold tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to provide the needed reduction of the process background radiation at the detector positions. A one-inch tungsten cylindrical shield reduced the background radiation by a factor of fifty that was adequate for the GM detectors, while a three-and-one-half-inch tungsten cylindrical shield was required for the NaI detectors. Testing of the NaI shield was performed at the SRS Instrument Calibration Facility. Based on this testing, the as-built shield is predicted to be able to detect the MCU DSS stream at concentrations above 0.003 Ci/gal under the ''worst case'' field conditions with a MCU feed solution of 1.1 Ci/gal and all of the process tanks completely full. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, testing and implementation of the tungsten shields in the MCU facility.

  4. ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

    2000-11-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

  5. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  6. Dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack velocity in tungsten: Pt. II. Bicrystals and polycrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liv, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1986-06-01

    The experimental techniques for crack velocity measurements have been applied to bicrystals of tungsten with twist orientations about (100) and polycrystals. The hesitation of the propagating cleavage crack in the vicinity of the grain boundary is examined. The contributions to energy dissipation from deformation and fracture processes in the grain boundary region as well as the in direct effects of crack deceleration are discussed. These findings have been applied to explain th dynamic fracture resistance and crack arrest in polycrystals.

  7. Dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack velocity in tungsten: Pt. 1. Single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liv, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack propagation velocity on (100) in tungsten has been examined. A correlation is obtained between the measured local crack velocity with the surfac and subsurface deformations. Based on the experimental results on one pass, two passes, and prestrained, electron beam zone refined single crystals, a discussion is given on the slip modes activated at the crack tip, the contributions to the dynamic fracture resistance from dislocations and surface features and from the preexisting deformed microstructure.

  8. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  9. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutronmore » irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.« less

  10. Helium bubble formation in ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten under different extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-atwani, O.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Hinks, J. A.; Greaves, G.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-12-25

    We investigated the effects of helium ion irradiation energy and sample temperature on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten. Irradiations were performed at displacement and non-displacement energies and at temperatures above and below that required for vacancy migration. Microstructural investigations were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) combined with either in-situ or ex-situ ion irradiation. Under helium irradiation at an energy which does not cause atomic displacements in tungsten (70 eV), regardless of temperature and thus vacancy migration conditions, bubbles were uniformly distributed with no preferential bubble formation on grain boundaries. Moreover, at energies that can cause displacements, bubbles were observed to be preferentially formed on the grain boundaries only at high temperatures where vacancy migration occurs. Under these conditions, the decoration of grain boundaries with large facetted bubbles occurred on nanocrystalline grains with dimensions less than 60 nm. Finally, we discuss the importance of vacancy supply and the formation and migration of radiation-induced defects on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks and the resulting irradiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten to bubble formation.

  11. The effects of tungsten's pre-irradiation surface condition on helium-irradiated morphology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garrison, Lauren M.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2015-07-17

    Erosion is a concern associated with the use of tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. To compare the damage progression, polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) and (110) single crystal tungsten (SCW) samples were prepared with (1) a mechanical polish (MP) with roughness values in the range of 0.018–0.020 μm and (2) an MP and electropolish (MPEP) resulting in roughness values of 0.010–0.020 μm for PCW and 0.003–0.005 μm for SCW samples. Samples were irradiated with 30 keV He+ at 1173 K to fluences between 3 × 1021 and 6 × 1022 He/m2. The morphologies that developed after low-fluence bombardment weremore » different for each type of sample—MP SCW, MPEP SCW, MP PCW, and MPEP PCW. At the highest fluence, the SCW MPEP sample lost significantly more mass and developed a different morphology than the MP SCW sample. The PCW samples developed a similar morphology and had similar mass loss at the highest fluence. Surface preparation can have a significant effect on post-irradiation morphology that should be considered for the design of future fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO.« less

  12. Properties of powders of a tungsten-free alloy produced by explosion mechanochemical synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popovich, A.A.; Maslyuk, V.A.

    1994-07-01

    Intensified milling is used extensively in conventional technology of production of tungsten-free hard alloys to produce a homogeneous mixture of titanium carbide with a binding component. The refining process lasts tens of hours and is energy-consuming. However, intensified milling can also be used for other purposes, in particulra for explosion mechanochemical synthesis (EMS). In this case, the role of mechanical activation is to initiate an exothermic reaction which then takes place spontaneously. It was shown that in mechanoactivation of the Ti-C-Ni composition in an enregy-stressed vibromill it is possible to synthesize a tungsten-free hard alloy over a short period of time (20-30 min). EMS of a tungsten-free hard alloy is characterized by the generation of a large amount of heat sufficient for melting the metallic binder - nickel, cobalt, and iron. Therefore, the resultant powder should differ from the powder produced by conventional technology, both in its structure and properties. The aim of this work was to examine these special features.

  13. Helium bubble formation in ultrafine and nanocrystalline tungsten under different extreme conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    El-atwani, O.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Hinks, J. A.; Greaves, G.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2014-12-25

    We investigated the effects of helium ion irradiation energy and sample temperature on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks in ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten. Irradiations were performed at displacement and non-displacement energies and at temperatures above and below that required for vacancy migration. Microstructural investigations were performed using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) combined with either in-situ or ex-situ ion irradiation. Under helium irradiation at an energy which does not cause atomic displacements in tungsten (70 eV), regardless of temperature and thus vacancy migration conditions, bubbles were uniformly distributed with no preferential bubble formation on grain boundaries. Moreover,more » at energies that can cause displacements, bubbles were observed to be preferentially formed on the grain boundaries only at high temperatures where vacancy migration occurs. Under these conditions, the decoration of grain boundaries with large facetted bubbles occurred on nanocrystalline grains with dimensions less than 60 nm. Finally, we discuss the importance of vacancy supply and the formation and migration of radiation-induced defects on the performance of grain boundaries as helium sinks and the resulting irradiation tolerance of ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline tungsten to bubble formation.« less

  14. Collisional-radiative modeling of tungsten at temperatures of 1200–2400 eV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Colgan, James; Fontes, Christopher; Zhang, Honglin; Abdallah, Jr., Joseph

    2015-04-30

    We discuss new collisional-radiative modeling calculations of tungsten at moderate temperatures of 1200 to 2400 eV. Such plasma conditions are relevant to ongoing experimental work at ASDEX Upgrade and are expected to be relevant for ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) collisional-radiative modeling ATOMIC code. These calculations formed part of a submission to the recent NLTE-8 workshop that was held in November 2013. This series of workshops provides a forum for detailed comparison of plasma and spectral quantities from NLTE collisional-radiative modeling codes. We focus on the LANL ATOMIC calculations for tungsten that weremore » submitted to the NLTE-8 workshop and discuss different models that were constructed to predict the tungsten emission. In particular, we discuss comparisons between semi-relativistic configuration-average and fully relativistic configuration-average calculations. We also present semi-relativistic calculations that include fine-structure detail, and discuss the difficult problem of ensuring completeness with respect to the number of configurations included in a CR calculation.« less

  15. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stakeholders and regulators to gather input on the effectiveness of DOE LM community communication strategies. www.lmsurveyaddress.com Survey ad for Quarterly Newsletter...

  16. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 19, 2016 Watershed Protection at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Ohio Environmental Protection ...

  17. Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find out how the Energy Department is helping bring new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and make manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

  18. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Business Center (LMBC) in Morgantown, West Virginia, is now guarded by a state-of-the-art FM-200 Fire Suppression System. Installation of the new system began on June 11,...

  19. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    expanding tribal educational programs. July 2, 2015 Environmental Justice: Made-for-Television-Climate Change: A Global Reality The U.S. Department of Energy was invited to be a...

  20. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a trip to the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History, teamwork and personal development training, as well as site visits within the Grants Mining District. October 15,...

  1. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    as a tribute to the nation's armed forces (see bottom of page for a history of the Blue Star Memorials). July 12, 2013 Next Generation (NextGen) Geospatial Information System...

  2. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    visitor to the Fernald Preserve in Ohio, enjoying activities like trail walks and bird watching. July 10, 2014 DOE Partners with Other Federal Agencies Working on the Wind...

  3. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hosted a Northern Saw-Whet Owl banding demonstration by master bander, Tim Tolford. Bird banding is a technique used to study wild birds by attaching a tag to their leg to...

  4. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sites located in 26 states. LM is also responsible for the administration of contractor pension plans and post-retirement benefits for over 10,000 former contractor workers...

  5. Measurement of quasiparticle transport in aluminum films using tungsten transition-edge sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, J. J. Shank, B.; Cabrera, B.; Moffatt, R.; Redl, P.; Young, B. A.; Tortorici, E. C.; Brink, P. L.; Cherry, M.; Tomada, A.; Kreikebaum, J. M.

    2014-10-20

    We report on experimental studies of phonon sensors which utilize quasiparticle diffusion in thin aluminum films connected to tungsten transition-edge-sensors (TESs) operated at 35 mK. We show that basic TES physics and a simple physical model of the overlap region between the W and Al films in our devices enables us to accurately reproduce the experimentally observed pulse shapes from x-rays absorbed in the Al films. We further estimate quasiparticle loss in Al films using a simple diffusion equation approach. These studies allow the design of phonon sensors with improved performance.

  6. Remote reactor repair: GTA (gas tungsten Arc) weld cracking caused by entrapped helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A repair patch was welded to the wall of a nuclear reactor tank using remotely controlled thirty-foot long robot arms. Further repair was halted when gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds joining type 304L stainless steel patches to the 304 stainless steel wall developed toe cracks in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The role of helium in cracking was investigated using material with entrapped helium from tritium decay. As a result of this investigation, and of an extensive array of diagnostic tests performed on reactor tank wall material, helium embrittlement was shown to be the cause of the toe cracks.

  7. Adhesion of diamond coatings synthesized by oxygen-acetylene flame CVD on tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, S.; Stankovic, S.; Dekanski, A.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a study concerned with chemical vapor deposition of diamond on tungsten carbide cutting tools using an oxygen-acetylene flame in a normal ambient environment are presented. Effects of preparation conditions on the adhesion of the coating have been investigated, including different surface treatment, different position of the flame with respect to the coated surface, effect of an intermediate poorly crystalline diamond layer, etc. In particular, effect of polishing and ultrasonic lapping with diamond powder was compared with that of a corresponding treatment with SiC powder.

  8. Progress report on a fully automatic Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daumeyer, G.J. III

    1994-12-01

    A plan to develop a fully automatic gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) system that will utilize a vision-sensing computer (which will provide in-process feedback control) is presently in work. Evaluations of different technological aspects and system design requirements continue. This report summaries major activities in the plan`s successful progress. The technological feasibility of producing the fully automated GTAW system has been proven. The goal of this process development project is to provide a production-ready system within the shortest reasonable time frame.

  9. Detrapping of tungsten nanoparticles in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coudel, L. Kumar, K. Kishor; Arnas, C.

    2014-12-15

    Nanoparticles are grown from the sputtering of a tungsten cathode in a direct current argon glow discharge. Laser light scattering of a vertical laser sheet going through the plasma reveals that the dust particle cloud is compressed and pushed towards the anode during the discharge. Scanning electron microscopy images of substrates exposed to the plasma for given durations show that dust particles are continuously falling down on the anode during the discharge. These observations are explained by the fact that the electrostatic force at the negative glow-anode sheath boundary cannot balance the ion drag, gravity, and thermophoresis forces for particles of more than a few tens of nanometres in diameter.

  10. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  11. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential suggested by the analysis of the experiments actually reflect two chemically meaningful contributions, namely, a stabilizing interaction arising from the anisotropy of the charge distribution around the Cl atom in CCl{sub 4} and a stereospecific electron transfer that occurs at the intermolecular distances mainly probed by the experiments. Our model calculations suggest that the largest effect is for the vertex geometry of CCl{sub 4} while other geometries appear to play a minor to negligible role.

  12. Microstructural characterization of LPCVD (low pressure chemical vapor deposition) tungsten interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paine, D.C.; Bravman, J.C.; Saraswat, K.C.

    1985-01-01

    Three important interfacial morphologies are observed in LPCVD tungsten on silicon: lateral encroachment, interface roughness, and wormhole structures. They have been shown to be, in part at least, a result of defect condition. Defects positively identified using XTEM include residual native oxide and dislocations from ion implantation. A third phase, possibly tungsten silicide, has been observed but not uniquely identified. Extensive lateral encroachment has been shown to be related to the presence of residual implant damage. Specifically, dislocation loops under oxide grown over arsenic-implanted silicon were implicated. Interface roughness appears to result from both residual native oxide patches on the silicon surface as well as to the formation of small protrusions of a third, probably silicide phase. The electron-microscopy techniques of microdiffraction and Moire analysis were used in an attempt to identify the third phase. The presence of a third phase has led to the proposal of a mechanism for formation of the wormhole structure. Additional work, currently underway, will establish the identity of both the interfacial phase and the wormhole particles.

  13. Dynamics of tungsten hexacarbonyl, dicobalt octacarbonyl, and their fragments adsorbed on silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Valent, Roser; Jeschke, Harald O.

    2014-05-14

    Tungsten and cobalt carbonyls adsorbed on a substrate are typical starting points for the electron beam induced deposition of tungsten or cobalt based metallic nanostructures. We employ first principles molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamics and vibrational spectra of W(CO){sub 6} and W(CO){sub 5} as well as Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} and Co(CO){sub 4} precursor molecules on fully and partially hydroxylated silica surfaces. Such surfaces resemble the initial conditions of electron beam induced growth processes. We find that both W(CO){sub 6} and Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} are stable at room temperature and mobile on a silica surface saturated with hydroxyl groups (OH), moving up to half an Angstrm per picosecond. In contrast, chemisorbed W(CO){sub 5} or Co(CO){sub 4} ions at room temperature do not change their binding site. These results contribute to gaining fundamental insight into how the molecules behave in the simulated time window of 20 ps and our determined vibrational spectra of all species provide signatures for experimentally distinguishing the form in which precursors cover a substrate.

  14. Microsegregation in high-molybdenum austenitic stainless steel laser beam and gas tungsten arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujanpaeae, V.P.; David, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel with 6% molybdenum (thickness 6 mm) was welded using laser beam (LB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) processes at various welding speeds. Depending on the welding speed the primary dendrite spacing ranged from 12 to 17 ..mu..m and from 2 to 7 ..mu..m for the GTA and LB welds, respectively. Extensive segregation of molybdenum was observed in the GTA welds. The segregation ratio for molybdenum, C/sub ID//C/sub D/, was found to be 1.9 in the GTA weld, and 1.2 in the LB weld. Distribution of iron, chromium and nickel was found nearly uniform in both welds. A recovered microstructure was observed after a post-weld annealing heat treatment. Annealing had a profound effect on the molybdenum segregation ratio in the laser weld. The critical pitting temperature (CPT) determined by a standard test was 55/sup 0/C for welds made using both processes, whereas it was 75/sup 0/C for the base metal. Upon homogenization the CPT of the laser beam weld increased to the base metal value, while that of the gas tungsten arc weld remained at 60/sup 0/C.

  15. A Conceptual Multi-Megawatt System Based on a Tungsten CERMET Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan A. Webb; Brian Gross

    2011-02-01

    Abstract. A conceptual reactor system to support Multi-Megawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion is investigated within this paper. The reactor system consists of a helium cooled Tungsten-UN fission core, surrounded by a beryllium neutron reflector and 13 B4C control drums coupled to a high temperature Brayton power conversion system. Excess heat is rejected via carbon reinforced heat pipe radiators and the gamma and neutron flux is attenuated via segmented shielding consisting of lithium hydride and tungsten layers. Turbine inlet temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1500 K are investigated for their effects on specific powers and net electrical outputs ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW. The reactor system is estimated to have a mass, which ranges from 15 Mt at 1 MWe and a turbine inlet temperature of 1500 K to 1200 Mt at 100 MWe and a turbine temperature of 1300 K. The reactor systems specific mass ranges from 32 kg/kWe at a turbine inlet temperature of 1300 K and a power of 1 MWe to 9.5 kg/kW at a turbine temperature of 1500 K and a power of 100 MWe.

  16. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 C twice at the ion fluence of 510? m? to reach a total ion fluence of 110? m? in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 m depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 m depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 m depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10? m?.

  17. Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten ions at low ionization stages in large helical device based on vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in wavelength range of 500–2200 Å

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oishi, T. Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Huang, X. L.; Zhang, H. M.

    2014-11-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet spectra of emissions released from tungsten ions at lower ionization stages were measured in the Large Helical Device (LHD) in the wavelength range of 500–2200 Å using a 3 m normal incidence spectrometer. Tungsten ions were distributed in the LHD plasma by injecting a pellet consisting of a small piece of tungsten metal and polyethylene tube. Many lines having different wavelengths from intrinsic impurity ions were observed just after the tungsten pellet injection. Doppler broadening of a tungsten candidate line was successfully measured and the ion temperature was obtained.

  18. Transforming dielectric coated tungsten and platinum wires to gaseous state using negative nanosecond-pulsed-current in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen Wang, Kun; Yang, Zefeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici; Li, Zhenghong

    2014-11-15

    With the help of thin dielectric coatings, corona free explosions were achieved in the region of about half a wire length (2?cm) for tungsten wires and nearly the whole wire length for platinum wires under a fast rising (46170?A/ns) negative polarity current in vacuum. Expansion velocity of the tungsten gas was over 10?km/s. Current waveforms from exploding coated wires were similar to those from bare wires in the air including a current pause stage. Coated wires with different coating parameters had a similar joule energy deposition before voltage collapsed, but a quite different scenario in the region near the electrodes. The axial field under negative current was the main reason for the axial inhomogeneity of coated tungsten wires. Tungsten or platinum gases in the vaporized region were tightly encompassed by the dielectric coating, while gaps or probably low density gases, were observed between the coating and the edge of the dense wire core in the core-corona structure region.

  19. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of nickel to nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2301-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel, NO2200 or NO2201 (P-41) to nickel-copper NO4400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  20. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-1302-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper NO4400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  1. Stepped-anneal and total helium/hydrogen measurements in high-energy proton-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, B.M.; Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Maloy, S.A.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-12-31

    To provide structural material design data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, a 1 mA, 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) was used to irradiate a large number of metal samples, including a tungsten target similar to that being considered as the neutron source for the tritium production. The maximum proton fluence to the tungsten target was {approximately} 10{sup 21} protons/cm{sup 2}. An unavoidable byproduct of spallation reactions is the formation of large amounts of hydrogen and helium. Postulated accident scenarios for APT involving the use of tungsten rods clad with Alloy 718, raise concerns as to the amount and rate of release of these gases due to temperatures increases from afterheat accumulation, with the major concern being pressurizing and possibly failure of the cladding. To address these issues, portions of the LANSCE tungsten rods were subjected to temperature histories calculated as likely to occur, and the time-dependent evolution of helium and hydrogen gases was measured. Stepped-anneal and total helium/hydrogen measurements were conducted on multiple samples of the tungsten material. Helium measurements were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using a high-sensitivity magnetic-sector isotope-dilution helium analysis system. Stepped-anneal measurements were conducted at temperatures from {approximately} 25 C to {approximately} 1,600 C in {approximately} 100 C steps. Total helium measurements were conducted by rapid vaporization after completion of the stepped-anneal process, and are compared with Monte Carlo calculations performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the LAHET code system. Hydrogen measurements were conducted between {approximately} 750 C and {approximately} 1,200 C using a high-temperature furnace that had been extensively modified for the application. Hydrogen detection was accomplished by periodic sampling of the furnace gas using a separate quadrupole analyzer. Hydrogen measurements are also compared with LANL calculations.

  2. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  3. Growth of tungsten bronze family crystals. Final technical report, 6 May 1985-30 November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neurgaonkar, R.R.; Cross, L.E.

    1988-03-01

    A systematic investigation of tungsten bronze crystals for electro-optic and photorefractive applications was carried out successfully. The Sr{sub 1-X}BaXNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) and Ba{sub 2-X}SrXK{sub 1-y}NaYNb{sub 5}O{sub 15} (BSKNN) system crystals were grown in optical quality with and without specific impurities whose purpose is to enhance photorefractive coupling and speed. Both SBN and BSKNN crystals appear to be excellent hosts for electro-optic applications, e.g., modulators, waveguides, and spatial light modulators (SLM) and photorefractive applications, e.g., phase conjugation, image processing, optical computing and laser hardening. For photorefractive applications, cerium and chromium doping show the largest effects on photorefractive coupling and speed.

  4. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene [Plus Supplemental Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S.; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Wallace, Robert M.; Mayer, Theresa S.; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. We report the direct growth of highly crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG). Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence confirms high-quality WSe2 monolayers; while transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that a tunnel barrier exists due to the van der Waals gap, and is supported by density functional theory that predicts a 1.6 eV barrier for transport from WSe2 to graphene.

  5. A continuum-scale model of hydrogen precipitate growth in tungsten plasma-facing materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causey, Rion A.; Cowgill, Donald F.; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-05-01

    The low solubility of hydrogen in tungsten leads to the growth of near-surface hydrogen precipitates during high-flux plasma exposure, strongly affecting migration and trapping in the material. We have developed a continuum-scale model of precipitate growth that leverages existing techniques for simulating the evolution of {sup 3}He gas bubbles in metal tritides. The present approach focuses on bubble growth by dislocation loop punching, assuming a diffusing flux to nucleation sites that arises from ion implantation. The bubble size is dictated by internal hydrogen pressure, the mechanical properties of the material, as well as local stresses. In this article, we investigate the conditions required for bubble growth. Recent focused ion beam (FIB) profiling studies that reveal the sub-surface damage structure provide an experimental database for comparison with the modeling results.

  6. Development of an improved GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld temperature monitor fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollar, D.L.

    1990-05-01

    An initial design weld temperature control fixture was implemented into final closure of an electronic assembly in November 1986. Use of this fixture indicated several areas that could be improved. Review of these areas with the process engineer and the weld operator provided the ideas to be incorporated into the new design Phase 2 fixture. Some primary areas of change and improvement included fixture mobility to provide better accessibility to the weld joint area, automatic timed blow cooling of the weld joint, and a feature to assure proper thermocouple placement. The resulting Phase 2 fixture design provided all of the essential weld temperature monitoring features in addition to several significant improvements. Technology developed during this project will pave the way to similar process monitoring of other manual gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding applications. 9 figs.

  7. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene [Plus Supplemental Information

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S.; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; et al

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. We report the direct growth of highly crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG). Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence confirms high-quality WSe2 monolayers; while transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that a tunnel barrier exists due to the van der Waals gap, and is supported by density functional theorymore » that predicts a 1.6 eV barrier for transport from WSe2 to graphene.« less

  8. High resolution electron microscopy study of as-prepared and annealed tungsten-carbon multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Gronsky, R.; Kortright, J.B.

    1988-12-01

    A series of sputtered tungsten-carbon multilayer structures with periods ranging from 2 to 12 nm in the as-prepared state and after annealing at 500/degree/C for 4 hours has been studied with high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The evolution with annealing of the microstructure of these multilayers depends on their period. As-prepared structures appear predominantly amorphous from TEM imaging and diffraction. Annealing results in crystallization of the W-rich layers into WC in the larger period samples, and less complete or no crystallization in the smaller period samples. X-ray scattering reveals that annealing expands the period in a systematic way. The layers remain remarkably well-defined after annealing under these conditions. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²⁵ m⁻² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²⁶ m⁻² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Finalmore » thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10²⁶ m⁻².« less

  10. Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum catalysts with increased lifetimes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bullock, R. Morris; Kimmich, Barbara F. M.; Fagan, Paul J.; Hauptman, Elisabeth

    2003-09-02

    The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes and the catalyst used in the process. The reactants include a functional group which is selected from groups represented by the formulas R*(C.dbd.O)R' and R*(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R* and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The process includes reacting the organic compound in the presence of hydrogen and a catalyst to form a reaction mixture. The catalyst is prepared by reacting Ph.sub.3 C.sup.+ A.sup.- with a metal hydride. A.sup.- represents an anion and can be BF.sub.4.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, CF.sub.3 SO.sub.3.sup.- or Bar'.sub.4.sup.-, wherein Ar'=3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl. The metal hydride is represented by the formula: HM(CO).sub.2 [.eta..sup.5 :.eta..sup.1 --C.sub.5 H.sub.4 (XH.sub.2).sub.n PR.sub.2 ] wherein M represents a molybdenum (Mo) atom or a tungsten (W) atom; X is a carbon atom, a silicon atom or a combination of carbon (C) and silicon (Si) atoms; n is any positive integer; R represents two hydrocarbon groups selected from H, an aryl group and an alkyl group, wherein both R groups can be the same or different. The metal hydride is reacted with Ph.sub.3 C.sup.+ A.sup.- either before reacting with the organic compound or in the reaction mixture.

  11. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Tungsten halogen lamps are more energy-efficient than standard incandescent lamps. They ... Fluorescent lights are about 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent lighting and last ...

  12. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",4657,4172,2193,3778,607,430,572 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  13. Growth of selective tungsten films on self-aligned CoSi/sub 2/ by low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Putte, P.; Sadana, D.K.; Broadbent, E.K.; Morgan, A.E.

    1986-12-22

    The selective deposition of tungsten films onto CoSi/sub 2/ and onto Co by low pressure chemical vapor deposition and their material properties have been investigated with Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering. When using WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/, uniformly thick tungsten films can be deposited onto CoSi/sub 2/ without substrate alteration. In patterned structures, however, void formation was found at the perimeters of CoSi/sub 2/ contacts to silicon, indicating encroachment of WF/sub 6/ down the edge of the silicide-Si interface. In WF/sub 6/ and Ar, the film thickness was limited to 10 nm and some Si was locally consumed from the upper part of the CoSi/sub 2/ film. Transmission electron diffraction showed evidence of Co/sub 2/Si formation in these areas.

  14. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of selfdamaged ITERgrade tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaeva, A. I. Savchenko, A. A.; Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V.

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and longterm sputtering on the surface relief of ITERgrade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutroninduced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20?MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600?eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJIG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  15. Direct measurement of the work of fracture for grain boundaries of twist misorientation about (100) in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The authors report results on the direct measurement of the work of fracture in twist boundaries in electron beam zone refined bicrystals of tungsten. The work of fracture is referred to as the energy required for crack extension. This approach may be used to advantage when the effects of impurities are present, for example, in problems related to grain boundary embrittlement in steels, copper and nickel.

  16. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  17. Resistive switching phenomena of tungsten nitride thin films with excellent CMOS compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Seok Man; Kim, Hee-Dong; An, Ho-Myoung; Kim, Tae Geun

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: The resistive switching characteristics of WN{sub x} thin films. Excellent CMOS compatibility WN{sub x} films as a resistive switching material. Resistive switching mechanism revealed trap-controlled space charge limited conduction. Good endurance and retention properties over 10{sup 5} cycles, and 10{sup 5} s, respectively - Abstract: We report the resistive switching (RS) characteristics of tungsten nitride (WN{sub x}) thin films with excellent complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compatibility. A Ti/WN{sub x}/Pt memory cell clearly shows bipolar RS behaviors at a low voltage of approximately 2.2 V. The dominant conduction mechanisms at low and high resistance states were verified by Ohmic behavior and trap-controlled space-charge-limited conduction, respectively. A conducting filament model by a redox reaction explains the RS behavior in WN{sub x} films. We also demonstrate the memory characteristics during pulse operation, including a high endurance over >10{sup 5} cycles and a long retention time of >10{sup 5} s.

  18. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  19. Beta (β) tungsten thin films: Structure, electron transport, and giant spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Qiang; Chen, Wenzhe; Xiao, Gang

    2015-05-04

    We use a simple magnetron sputtering process to fabricate beta (β) tungsten thin films, which are capable of generating giant spin Hall effect. As-deposited thin films are always in the metastable β-W phase from 3.0 to 26.7 nm. The β-W phase remains intact below a critical thickness of 22.1 nm even after magnetic thermal annealing at 280 °C, which is required to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a layered structure of β-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO. Intensive annealing transforms the thicker films (>22.1 nm) into the stable α-W phase. We analyze the structure and grain size of both β- and α-W thin films. Electron transport in terms of resistivity and normal Hall effect is studied over a broad temperature range of 10 K to at least 300 K on all samples. Very low switching current densities are achieved in β-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO with PMA. These basic properties reveal useful behaviors in β-W thin films, making them technologically promising for spintronic magnetic random access memories and spin-logic devices.

  20. Decomposition pathways of C2 oxygenates on Rh-modified tungsten carbide surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Thomas G.; Ren, Hui; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-03-27

    Ethanol decomposition on tungsten monocarbide (WC) and Rh-modified WC was investigated using ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations indicated that the binding energies of ethanol and its decomposition intermediates on WC(0001) were modified by Rh, with Rh/WC(0001) showing similar values to those on Rh(111). Through temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on polycrystalline WC and Rh-modified WC, it was shown that the selectivity for ethanol decomposition was different on these surfaces. On WC, the C-O bond of ethanol was preferentially broken to produce ethylene; on Rh-modified WC, the C-C bond was broken to produce carbon monoxide and methane. In addition, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to determine likely surface intermediates. On Rh-modified WC, ethanol first formed ethoxy through O-H scission, then reacted through an aldehyde intermediate to form the C1 products.

  1. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  2. Decomposition pathways of C2 oxygenates on Rh-modified tungsten carbide surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kelly, Thomas G.; Ren, Hui; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-03-27

    Ethanol decomposition on tungsten monocarbide (WC) and Rh-modified WC was investigated using ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations indicated that the binding energies of ethanol and its decomposition intermediates on WC(0001) were modified by Rh, with Rh/WC(0001) showing similar values to those on Rh(111). Through temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on polycrystalline WC and Rh-modified WC, it was shown that the selectivity for ethanol decomposition was different on these surfaces. On WC, the C-O bond of ethanol was preferentially broken to produce ethylene; on Rh-modified WC, the C-C bond was broken to producemore » carbon monoxide and methane. In addition, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to determine likely surface intermediates. On Rh-modified WC, ethanol first formed ethoxy through O-H scission, then reacted through an aldehyde intermediate to form the C1 products.« less

  3. Submersion criticality safety of tungsten-rhenium urania cermet fuel for space propulsion and power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.E. Craft; R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear thermal rockets are the preferred propulsion technology for a manned mission to Mars, and tungsten–uranium oxide cermet fuels could provide significant performance and cost advantages for nuclear thermal rockets. A nuclear reactor intended for use in space must remain subcritical before and during launch, and must remain subcritical in launch abort scenarios where the reactor falls back to Earth and becomes submerged in terrestrial materials (including seawater, wet sand, or dry sand). Submersion increases reflection of neutrons and also thermalizes the neutron spectrum, which typically increases the reactivity of the core. This effect is typically very significant for compact, fast-spectrum reactors. This paper provides a submersion criticality safety analysis for a representative tungsten/uranium oxide fueled reactor with a range of fuel compositions. Each submersion case considers both the rhenium content in the matrix alloy and the uranium oxide volume fraction in the cermet. The inclusion of rhenium significantly improves the submersion criticality safety of the reactor. While increased uranium oxide content increases the reactivity of the core, it does not significantly affect the submersion behavior of the reactor. There is no significant difference in submersion behavior between reactors with rhenium distributed within the cermet matrix and reactors with a rhenium clad in the coolant channels. The combination of the flooding of the coolant channels in submersion scenarios and the presence of a significant amount of spectral shift absorbers (i.e. high rhenium concentration) further decreases reactivity for short reactor cores compared to longer cores.

  4. A Review of Tungsten Heavy Alloy Utilization in Isotope Transport Containers - 13380

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, Steven G. [ATI Firth Sterling, Madison, AL (United States)] [ATI Firth Sterling, Madison, AL (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A common requirement for radioisotope transport containers is that they provide both durable and efficient shielding of penetrating gamma radiation. This is the case for transport of both spent nuclear fuel as well as intentionally created radioisotopes for medical or other uses. Tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) provides a unique engineering property set for such shielding - easily surpassing more commonly used lead alloys in both strength and attenuation. This family of alloys contains typically 90-98 wt.% W in combination with transition metals such as Ni and Fe. WHA is manufactured in near net shape blanks by liquid phase sintering of compacted powder shapes to full metallurgical density parts. This powder metallurgy approach is described in its ability to provide excellent material utilization and affords efficient manufacturing of various shapes required for gamma shields or collimators. WHAs offer very high density (approaching 19 g/cc) in combination with relatively high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, ambient corrosion resistance, and can be provided with mechanical properties comparable to many medium carbon steels. As such, they can be machined to complex, damage resistant geometries using common metal cutting tools and methods. WHA additionally provides a lower toxicity alternative to Pb- or U-based gamma shielding. Given the specialty nature of WHA, specific metallurgical characteristics are reviewed to assist shielding designers who may otherwise encounter difficulties locating important alloy selection and fabrication details. Contained within this materials and applications overview are guidelines for WHA component design, alloy selection, and practical machining, finishing, and assembly considerations. The microstructure of WHA is that of a metal matrix composite. This factor has specific implications in the design of components for stress service as well as their protection in the presence of electrolytes. WHA is also discussed in the broader context of materials compatibility, as it is rarely used in isolated monolithic shapes. Alloy selection for new applications is often made primarily on the basis of density. An alternative strategy to this selection approach is presented which proposes that mechanical requirements for a given shielding use be the primary selection criterion over density. Standard commercial grades of WHA for radiation shielding are defined by specifications such as AMS-T-21014 and ASTM B777. These specifications define 4 density classes of as-sintered WHA. Compositional options, as well as post-sinter processing of WHA, are discussed for shielding components that must exhibit higher levels of ductility or very low magnetic permeability. In addition to the mechanical advantages over Pb-based shielding, the higher linear attenuation of energetic photons for various grades of WHA (as calculated by the NIST XCOM routine) are presented for selected photon energies of interest to illustrate the shield volume reduction generally possible through the use of tungsten-based shielding. While W provides inefficient attenuation of neutrons in a mixed radiation environment, its secondary role in shielding gamma radiation produced as a result of neutron capture is also described. (authors)

  5. Fracture Toughness and Strength in a New Class of Bainitic Chromium-Tungsten Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, S. X.; Sikka, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    This project dealt with developing an understanding of the toughening and stengthening mechanisms for a new class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with Nooter Corporation and other industrial partners. The new steele had 50% higher tensile strength up to 650 degrees Celsius than currently used steels and the potential for not requiring any postweld heat treatment (PWHT) and for reducing equipment weight by 25%. This project was closely related to the Nooter project described in the report Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic steels for Industrial Process Applications (ORNL/TM-2005/82). The project was carried out jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and ORNL. The University of Pittsburgh carried out fracture toughness measurements and microstructural analysis on base metal and welded plates prepared at ORNL. The project focused on three areas. The first dealt with detailed microstructural analysis of base compositions of 3Cr-3WV and 3Cr-3WBV(Ta) in both normalized (N) and normalized and tempered (NT) conditions. The second aspect of the prject dealt with determining tensile properties and fracture toughness values of K{subIC} at room temperature for both 3Cr-3Wv and 3Cr-3WV(Ta) compositions. The third focus of the project was to measure the fracture toughness values of the base metal and the heat-affectged zone (HAZ) of a plate of Fe-3Cr-W(Mo)V steel plate welded by the gas tungsten are (GTA) process. The HAZ toughness was measured in both the as-welded and the PWHT condition.

  6. Generation of WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts from solid solutions of tungsten in zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cortes-Jacome, Maria A.; Angeles-Chavez, Carlos; Bokhimi, Xim; Toledo-Antonio, J.A. . E-mail: jtoledo@imp.mx

    2006-08-15

    WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} samples were obtained by precipitating zirconium oxynitrate in presence of WO{sub 4} {sup =} species in solution from ammonium metatungstate at pH=10.0. Samples were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy filtered-TEM. The ammonia retained in the dried sample produced a reductive atmosphere to generate W{sup 5+} ions coexisting with W{sup 6+} ions to produce a solid solution of tungsten in the zirconia lattice to stabilize the zirconia tetragonal phase when the sample was annealed at 560 deg. C. When the sample was annealed at 800 deg. C, the W atoms near crystallite surface were oxidized to W{sup 6+}, producing patches of WO{sub 3} on the zirconia crystallite. The HR-TEM analysis confirmed the existence of the solid solution when the sample was annealed at 560 deg. C, and two types of crystalline regions were identified: One with nearly spherical morphology, an average diameter of 8 nm and the atomic distribution of tetragonal zirconia. The second one had a non-spherical morphology with well-faceted faces and dimensions larger than 30 nm, and the atom distribution of tetragonal zirconia. When samples were annealed at 800 deg. C two different zirconia crystallites were formed: Those where only part of the dissolved tungsten atoms segregated to crystallite surface producing patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} on the crystallite surface of tetragonal zirconia stabilized with tungsten. The second type corresponded to monoclinic zirconia crystallites with patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} on their surface. The tungsten segregation gave rise to the WO{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts. - Graphical abstract: WO {sub x} -ZrO{sub 2} catalysts were obtained by precipitating zirconium oxynitrate in presence of WO{sub 4} {sup =}species. Initially, the W atoms remained inside the crystallite after annealing at 560 deg. C in a reduced oxidation state (W{sup 5+}), whereas, the sample annealed at 800 deg. C, the W atoms migrate from the bulk to the surface, forming a layer of W atoms on a ZrO{sub 2} core, with the consequent oxidation to W{sup 6+}, producing patches of nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} with dimension smaller than 3 nm.

  7. Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoseinpur, Arman; Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ? Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ? By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ? XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ? TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

  8. Influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of magnetron sputtered tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, J. C.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2006-11-15

    The influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of tungsten thin films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering was studied using 310 steel (AISI), Fecralloy registered and Invar registered substrates. Besides elemental tungsten, only residual amounts of contamination elements (O, C, Ar, etc.) were detected by electron probe microanalysis. Only the {alpha}-W crystalline structure, with a preferential <110> orientation, was detected in all the films by x-ray diffraction. The highest lattice parameters were measured for the films deposited on 310 steel substrates, while the smallest values were obtained for the films deposited on Invar registered substrates. These results are closely related to the thermal expansion coefficients of the substrates. All the as-deposited films were in a compressive stress state independent of the substrate type (-3 GPa for 310 steel and Fecralloy registered substrates and -2 GPa for Invar registered substrates). The residual compressive stresses of the films deposited on Fecralloy registered substrates strongly decrease with annealing temperatures up to {approx_equal}-8 GPa at 1175 K. This result shows that the measured compressive stresses are not real, and they are a direct consequence of plastic deformation of the substrate. On the contrary, the compressive stresses measured in the films deposited on Invar registered and 310 steel substrates are real as plastic deformation of the substrates is not observed.

  9. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  10. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  11. Protonation Studies of a Tungsten Dinitrogen Complex Supported by a Diphosphine Ligand Containing a Pendant Amine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Charles J.; Egbert, Jonathan D.; Chen, Shentan; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-05-12

    Treatment of trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)] (dppe = Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2; PEtNMePEt = Et2PCH2N(Me)CH2PEt2) with three equivalents of tetrafluoroboric acid (HBF4?Et2O) at -78 C generated the seven-coordinate tungsten hydride trans-[W(N2)2(H)(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)][BF4]. Depending on the temperature of the reaction, protonation of a pendant amine is also observed, affording trans-[W(N2)2(H)(dppe)(PEtNMe(H)PEt)][BF4]2, with formation of the hydrazido complex, [W(NNH2)(dppe)(PEtNMe(H)PEt)][BF4]2, as a minor product. Similar product mixtures were obtained using triflic acid (HOTf). Upon acid addition to the carbonyl analogue, cis-[W(CO)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)], the seven-coordinate carbonyl-hydride complex, trans-[W(CO)2(H)(dppe)(PEtN(H)MePEt)][OTf]2 was generated. The mixed diphosphine complex without the pendant amine in the ligand backbone, trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(depp)] (depp = Et2P(CH2)3PEt2), was synthesized and treated with HBF4?Et2O, selectively generating a hydrazido complex, [W(NNH2)(F)(dppe)(depp)][BF4]. Computational analysis was used to probe proton affinity of three sites of protonation, the metal, pendant amine, and N2 ligand in these complexes. Room temperature reactions with 100 equivalents of HOTf produced NH4+ from reduction of the N2 ligand (electrons come from W). The addition of 100 equivalents HOTf to trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)] afforded 0.88 0.02 equivalents NH4+, while 0.36 0.02 equivalents of NH4+was formed upon treatment of trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(depp)], the complex without the pendant amine. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  12. Analysis of a tungsten sputtering experiment in DIII-D and code/data validation of high redeposition/reduced erosion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wampler, William R.; Brooks, J. N.; Elder, J. D.; McLean, A. G.; Rudakov, D. L.; Stangeby, P. C.

    2015-03-29

    We analyze a DIII-D tokamak experiment where two tungsten spots on the removable DiMES divertor probe were exposed to 12 s of attached plasma conditions, with moderate strike point temperature and density (~20 eV, ~4.5 × 1019 m–3), and 3% carbon impurity content. Both very small (1 mm diameter) and small (1 cm diameter) deposited samples were used for assessing gross and net tungsten sputtering erosion. The analysis uses a 3-D erosion/redeposition code package (REDEP/WBC), with input from a diagnostic-calibrated near-surface plasma code (OEDGE), and with focus on charge state resolved impinging carbon ion flux and energy. The tungsten surfacesmore » are primarily sputtered by the carbon, in charge states +1 to +4. We predict high redeposition (~75%) of sputtered tungsten on the 1 cm spot—with consequent reduced net erosion—and this agrees well with post-exposure DiMES probe RBS analysis data. As a result, this study and recent related work is encouraging for erosion lifetime and non-contamination performance of tokamak reactor high-Z plasma facing components.« less

  13. Employee Spotlight: Carolyn Phillips | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Share Topic Operations Human Resources Diversity Programs Mathematics, computing, & ... & interface studies --Tribology -Mathematics, computing, & computer science --Cloud ...

  14. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Baldwin Homes Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Baldwin Homes of Arnold, Maryland, built a HERS 55 Builders Challenge-certified house as an Eco-Model home to showcase 69 green and energy-efficient features.

  15. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs.

  16. Intern Spotlight: Kevin Banks | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kevin Banks is a freshman at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, where he studies biomedical engineering. As an intern within the Chicago Scholars Argonne Future Research...

  17. LANFILGAS(sm) process. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The United States is facing a garbage crisis. Several areas of the country have already run out of landfill space, and recent studies indicate that many other areas will be experiencing the same problem with the next ten years. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has patented an advanced biogasification technology called LANFILGAS that accelerates the stabilization of landfills through anaerobic composting and recovers the methane gas for its energy value. Anaerobic composting, or digestion, is a natural process that takes place in every landfill. It is generally uncontrolled, however, and can take up to 30 years to stabilize a landfill.

  18. Employee Spotlight: Sarah Owens | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sarah Owens Share Topic Environment Biology Operations Human Resources Diversity Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Powertrain research --Building design ---Construction --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Solar energy --Fossil fuels ---Natural Gas --Nuclear energy

  19. Employee Spotlight: Sarah Soltau | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diana Anderson at media@anl.gov or (630) 252-4593. Connect Find an Argonne expert by subject. Follow Argonne on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn. For inquiries on...

  20. Intern Spotlight: Elise Burton | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diana Anderson at media@anl.gov or (630) 252-4593. Connect Find an Argonne expert by subject. Follow Argonne on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn. For inquiries on...

  1. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Clifton View Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Clifton View Homess remodel of a 1962 rambler, on Whidbey Island in Washington State, cut energy costs by two-thirds.

  2. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Imagine Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Imagine Homes, working with the DOE's Building America research team member IBACOS, has developed a system that can be replicated by other contractors to build affordable, high-performance homes. Imagine Homes has used the system to produce more than 70 Builders Challenge-certified homes per year in San Antonio over the past five years.

  3. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Treasure Homes Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Treasure Homes, Inc., achieved a HERS rating of 46 without PV on its prototype Gem home, located on the shores of Lake Michigan in northern Indiana, thanks in part to training received from a Building America partner, the National Association of Home Builders Research Center.

  4. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. Made of foam insulation sandwiched between two layers of ...

  5. Employee Spotlight: Beth Drewniak | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contest --Science Careers in Search of Women -Site environmental protection --Site waste management -Site sustainability Operations -Business diversity -Technology transfer...

  6. spotlight1115 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NETL Director Grace Bochenek told them that, contrary to some perceptions, the game is not over for coal and fossil energy and, with the innovation that continues at...

  7. Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ali Erdemir Share Topic Operations Business diversity Human Resources Programs Materials science Nanoscience Tribology...

  8. Shining a spotlight on intact proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Masselon, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Cells react to cues from their environment using various mechanisms that include changes in metabolites, gene expression, protein binding partners, protein localization, and protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs), all of which contribute to altered cellular signatures that enable appropriate cellular responses. Given the seemingly infinite number of mechanisms available to affect protein function and modulate biological processes, the question arises as to how cells manage to interpret protein readouts to accomplish the appropriate cell-type specific response to a particular stimulus.

  9. Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to learn how to actually do research and adapt a very high-caliber research culture.'" To watch the video, click on the image at right. Ali Erdemir is an Argonne...

  10. Intern Spotlight: Gabrielle Kane | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the different potential accidents. For example, maybe the vent is blocked with trash debris or there is a backflow from the sump pump. I created a fault tree to organize...

  11. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simultaneously, CPW is set to achieve significant energy, climate, and economic development goals with its 40 partners-setting the city up for program sustainability. Leverage ...

  12. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Best Practices Series Volume 15: 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Humid ...

  13. Sambamurti Memorial Lecture: Spotlight on the Gluon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Begelas

    2010-09-01

    Begel uses results from the Fermilab D0 and E706 experiments to explain how the production rate and energy spectrum of photons produced during proton collisions helped to clarify how the energy inside the proton is shared between quarks and gluons.

  14. Employee Spotlight: Jennifer Hogan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    --Photosynthesis & biomimetics -Materials science --Complex oxides --Nanoscience --Materials simulation & theory --Surface & interface studies --Tribology -Mathematics,...

  15. Doe Sustainability SPOtlight - 2014 Sustainability Awards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sustainability Performance Office MESSAGE FROM THE SUSTAINABILITY PERFORMANCE OFFICE The DOE Sustainability Performance Office is pleased to present the fourth annual DOE Sustainability Awards to 14 teams and individuals representing DOE sites and National Laboratories. These winners are being recognized for their outstanding sustainability contributions, including accomplishments in managing pollution, waste, energy, water, and vehicle fleets. The extraordinary efforts of our award winners

  16. High-Heat Flux Testing of Irradiated Tungsten based Materials for Fusion Applications using Infrared Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans Jr, James O; Schaich, Charles Ross; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Byun, Thak Sang

    2014-01-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research has proved challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat flux testing facility based on water-wall Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) is now being used for materials and small component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12,000 C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, are currently in use. The first PAL system provides a maximum incident heat flux of 4.2 MW/m2 over an area of 9x12 cm2. The second PAL available at ORNL provides a maximum incident heat flux of 27 MW/m2 over an area of 1x10 cm2. The absorbed heat fluxes into a tungsten target for the two PALs are approximately 1.97 and 12.7 MW/m2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design of the new PAL facilities as well as the design and implementation of the Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interested, such as those for plasma facing components. Moreover, IMTS designs are underway to extend the testing of small mock-ups for assessing the combined heating and thermomechanical effects of cooled, irradiated components. For the testing of material coupons , the specimens are placed in a shallow recess within the molybdenum holder that is attached to a water-cooled copper alloy rod. As the measurement of the specimen temperature for PAL is historically challenging since traditional approaches of temperature measurement cannot be employed due to the infrared heating and proximity of the PAL reflector to the specimen that does not allow a direct line of site, experiments for temperature calibration are presented. Finally, results for the high-heat flux testing of tungsten-based materials using the PAL are presented. As a demonstration of the system, results will be shown of thermal fatigue and high-heat flux testing of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in the HFIR reactor to neutron dose consistent to ITER lifetime.

  17. High-Heat Flux Testing of Irradiated Tungsten based Materials for Fusion Applications using Infrared Plasma Arc Lamps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jr, James O; Schaich, Charles Ross; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Byun, Thak Sang

    2014-01-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research has proved challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat flux testing facility based on water-wall Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) is now being used for materials and small component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12,000 C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, are currently in use. The first PAL system provides a maximum incident heat flux of 4.2 MW/m2 over an area of 9x12 cm2. The secondmore » PAL available at ORNL provides a maximum incident heat flux of 27 MW/m2 over an area of 1x10 cm2. The absorbed heat fluxes into a tungsten target for the two PALs are approximately 1.97 and 12.7 MW/m2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design of the new PAL facilities as well as the design and implementation of the Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interested, such as those for plasma facing components. Moreover, IMTS designs are underway to extend the testing of small mock-ups for assessing the combined heating and thermomechanical effects of cooled, irradiated components. For the testing of material coupons , the specimens are placed in a shallow recess within the molybdenum holder that is attached to a water-cooled copper alloy rod. As the measurement of the specimen temperature for PAL is historically challenging since traditional approaches of temperature measurement cannot be employed due to the infrared heating and proximity of the PAL reflector to the specimen that does not allow a direct line of site, experiments for temperature calibration are presented. Finally, results for the high-heat flux testing of tungsten-based materials using the PAL are presented. As a demonstration of the system, results will be shown of thermal fatigue and high-heat flux testing of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in the HFIR reactor to neutron dose consistent to ITER lifetime.« less

  18. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Liming; Fu, Honggang; Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt. The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  19. Evaluation of vost and semivost methods for halogenated compounds in the Clean Air Act amendments title III. Validation study at fossil fuel plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.D.; Knoll, J.E.; Midgett, M.R.; McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), Title III, present a need for stationary source sampling and analytical methods for the list of 189 toxic air pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has used VOST and SemiVOST sampling and analytical methods for a wide variety of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the past, but these methodologies have been completely validated for only a few of the organic compounds. The applicability of VOST and SemiVOST techniques to the halogenated organic compounds listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has been evaluated under laboratory conditions for chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric response, sorbent recovery and analytical method detection limit. Dynamic spiking techniques for the sampling trains (both gaseous and liquid dynamic spiking) were also evaluated in the laboratory. In the study, the VOST and SemiVOST methods were evaluated in the field at a fossil fuel power plant. The source was selected to provide actual stationary source emissions with the compounds of interest present in trace amounts or not present. The paper presents the results of the field validation of the VOST and SemiVOST sampling and analytical methods.

  20. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Letant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.; Levie, H. W.; Kuhl, A. L.; Murphy, G. A.; Alves, S. W.; Vandersall, K. S.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-12-17

    We found that energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemicalcode. Temperatures in the range of 2300–2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly themore » full 4 ms pressure observation time. After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. These results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%–1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide andaluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. Our results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.« less

  1. Influence of deposition variables on LPCVD tungsten films deposited by the WF/sub 6//Si reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    In an effort to isolate and study the Si reduction of WF/sub 6/ by the reduction reaction 2 WF/sub 6/ + 3 Si ..-->.. 2 W + 3 SiF/sub 4/, a systematic study of the influence of temperature, substrate doping, deposition time and variable flow rates of tungsten hexafluoride (WF/sub 6/) was conducted. The effect of varying these parameters on film thickness, layer resistivity, encroachment and adhesion was investigated. A set of operating conditions has been defined that yield stable, adherent, self-limiting films of -100A thickness that are free from encroachment. Film quality was found to be relatively insensitive to moderate variations in process parameters, a favorable indication in terms of process integration and manufacturability.

  2. Abnormal macropore formation during double-sided gas tungsten arc welding of magnesium AZ91D alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Jun You Guoqiang; Long Siyuan; Pan Fusheng

    2008-08-15

    One of the major concerns during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of cast magnesium alloys is the presence of large macroporosity in weldments, normally thought to occur from the presence of gas in the castings. In this study, a double-sided GTA welding process was adopted to join wrought magnesium AZ91D alloy plates. Micropores were formed in the weld zone of the first side that was welded, due to precipitation of H{sub 2} as the mushy zone freezes. When the reverse side was welded, the heat generated caused the mushy zone in the initial weld to reform. The micropores in the initial weld then coalesced and expanded to form macropores by means of gas expansion through small holes that are present at the grain boundaries in the partially melted zone. Macropores in the partially melted zone increase with increased heat input, so that when a filler metal is used the macropores are smaller in number and in size.

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  4. Tungsten-rhenium composite tube fabricated by CVD for application in 1800/sup 0/C high thermal efficiency fuel processing furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svedberg, R.C.; Bowen, W.W.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposit (CVD) rhenium was selected as the muffle material for an 1800/sup 0/C high thermal efficiency fuel processing furnace. The muffle is exposed to high vacuum on the heater/insulation/instrumentation side and to a flowing argon-8 V/0 hydrogen gas mixture at one atmosphere pressure on the load volume side. During operation, the muffle cycles from room temperature to 1800/sup 0/C and back to room temperature once every 24 hours. Operational life is dependent on resistance to thermal fatigue during the high temperature exposure. For a prototypical furnace, the muffle is approximately 13 cm I.D. and 40 cm in length. A small (about one-half size) rhenium closed end tube overcoated with tungsten was used to evaluate the concept. The fabrication and testing of the composite tungsten-rhenium tube and prototypic rhenium muffle is described.

  5. Welding procedure specification. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests. Gas tungsten arc welding of chromium-nickel steel to nickel-copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2602-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of 300 series Cr-Ni steels (P-8-1) to nickel-copper N04400 (P-42), in thickness range 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  6. Welding procedure specification: gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper to nickel-chromium-iron. Supplement 1. Records of procedure qualification tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodtke, C.H.; Frizzell, D.R.; Plunkett, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    Procedure WPS-2303-ASME-3 is qualified under Section IX of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for gas tungsten arc welding of nickel-copper N04400 (P-42) to nickel-chromium-iron N06600 (P-43), in thickness range of 0.035 to 0.432 inch; filler metal is ERNiCu-7 (F-42); shielding gas is argon.

  7. A multi-technique analysis of deuterium trapping and near-surface precipitate growth in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masashi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Cowgill, Donald F.; Donovan, David; Friddle, Raymond William; Michibayashi, Katsu; Sato, Misaki

    2015-08-17

    We examine how deuterium becomes trapped in plasma-exposed tungsten and forms near-surface platelet-shaped precipitates. How these bubbles nucleate and grow, as well as the amount of deuterium trapped within, is crucial for interpreting the experimental database. Here, we use a combined experimental/theoretical approach to provide further insight into the underlying physics. With the Tritium Plasma Experiment, we exposed a series of ITER-gradetungsten samples to high flux D plasmas (up to 1.5 × 1022 m-2 s-1) at temperatures ranging between 103 and 554 °C. Retention of deuterium trapped in the bulk, assessed through thermal desorption spectrometry, reached a maximum at 230 °C and diminished rapidly thereafter for T > 300 °C. Post-mortem examination of the surfaces revealed non-uniform growth of bubbles ranging in diameter between 1 and 10 μm over the surface with a clear correlation with grain boundaries. Electron back-scattering diffraction maps over a large area of the surface confirmed this dependence; grains containing bubbles were aligned with a preferred slip vector along the <111> directions. Focused ion beam profiles suggest that these bubbles nucleated as platelets at depths of 200 nm–1 μm beneath the surface and grew as a result of expansion of sub-surface cracks. Furthermore, to estimate the amount of deuterium trapped in these defects relative to other sites within the material, we applied a continuum-scale treatment of hydrogen isotope precipitation. Additionally, we propose a straightforward model of near-surface platelet expansion that reproduces bubble sizes consistent with our measurements. For the tungsten microstructure considered here, we find that bubbles would only weakly affect migration of D into the material, perhaps explaining why deep trapping was observed in prior studies with plasma-exposed neutron-irradiated specimens. We foresee no insurmountable issues that would prevent the theoretical framework developed here from being extended to a broader range of systems where precipitation of insoluble gases in ion beam or plasma-exposed metals is of interest.

  8. A multi-technique analysis of deuterium trapping and near-surface precipitate growth in plasma-exposed tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masashi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Cowgill, Donald F.; Donovan, David; Friddle, Raymond William; Michibayashi, Katsu; Sato, Misaki

    2015-08-17

    We examine how deuterium becomes trapped in plasma-exposed tungsten and forms near-surface platelet-shaped precipitates. How these bubbles nucleate and grow, as well as the amount of deuterium trapped within, is crucial for interpreting the experimental database. Here, we use a combined experimental/theoretical approach to provide further insight into the underlying physics. With the Tritium Plasma Experiment, we exposed a series of ITER-gradetungsten samples to high flux D plasmas (up to 1.5 1022 m-2 s-1) at temperatures ranging between 103 and 554 C. Retention of deuterium trapped in the bulk, assessed through thermal desorption spectrometry, reached a maximum at 230 C and diminished rapidly thereafter for T > 300 C. Post-mortem examination of the surfaces revealed non-uniform growth of bubbles ranging in diameter between 1 and 10 ?m over the surface with a clear correlation with grain boundaries. Electron back-scattering diffraction maps over a large area of the surface confirmed this dependence; grains containing bubbles were aligned with a preferred slip vector along the <111> directions. Focused ion beam profiles suggest that these bubbles nucleated as platelets at depths of 200 nm1 ?m beneath the surface and grew as a result of expansion of sub-surface cracks. Furthermore, to estimate the amount of deuterium trapped in these defects relative to other sites within the material, we applied a continuum-scale treatment of hydrogen isotope precipitation. Additionally, we propose a straightforward model of near-surface platelet expansion that reproduces bubble sizes consistent with our measurements. For the tungsten microstructure considered here, we find that bubbles would only weakly affect migration of D into the material, perhaps explaining why deep trapping was observed in prior studies with plasma-exposed neutron-irradiated specimens. We foresee no insurmountable issues that would prevent the theoretical framework developed here from being extended to a broader range of systems where precipitation of insoluble gases in ion beam or plasma-exposed metals is of interest.

  9. A multi-technique analysis of deuterium trapping and near-surface precipitate growth in plasma-exposed tungsten

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kolasinski, Robert; Shimada, Masashi; Oya, Yasuhisa; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Chikada, Takumi; Cowgill, Donald F.; Donovan, David; Friddle, Raymond William; Michibayashi, Katsu; Sato, Misaki

    2015-08-17

    We examine how deuterium becomes trapped in plasma-exposed tungsten and forms near-surface platelet-shaped precipitates. How these bubbles nucleate and grow, as well as the amount of deuterium trapped within, is crucial for interpreting the experimental database. Here, we use a combined experimental/theoretical approach to provide further insight into the underlying physics. With the Tritium Plasma Experiment, we exposed a series of ITER-gradetungsten samples to high flux D plasmas (up to 1.5 × 1022 m-2 s-1) at temperatures ranging between 103 and 554 °C. Retention of deuterium trapped in the bulk, assessed through thermal desorption spectrometry, reached a maximum at 230more » °C and diminished rapidly thereafter for T > 300 °C. Post-mortem examination of the surfaces revealed non-uniform growth of bubbles ranging in diameter between 1 and 10 μm over the surface with a clear correlation with grain boundaries. Electron back-scattering diffraction maps over a large area of the surface confirmed this dependence; grains containing bubbles were aligned with a preferred slip vector along the <111> directions. Focused ion beam profiles suggest that these bubbles nucleated as platelets at depths of 200 nm–1 μm beneath the surface and grew as a result of expansion of sub-surface cracks. Furthermore, to estimate the amount of deuterium trapped in these defects relative to other sites within the material, we applied a continuum-scale treatment of hydrogen isotope precipitation. Additionally, we propose a straightforward model of near-surface platelet expansion that reproduces bubble sizes consistent with our measurements. For the tungsten microstructure considered here, we find that bubbles would only weakly affect migration of D into the material, perhaps explaining why deep trapping was observed in prior studies with plasma-exposed neutron-irradiated specimens. We foresee no insurmountable issues that would prevent the theoretical framework developed here from being extended to a broader range of systems where precipitation of insoluble gases in ion beam or plasma-exposed metals is of interest.« less

  10. Mechanical properties and microstructures of a magnesium alloy gas tungsten arc welded with a cadmium chloride flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.D.; Liu, L.M. Shen, Y.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-15

    Gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds were prepared on 5-mm thick plates of wrought magnesium AZ31B alloy, using an activated flux. The microstructural characteristics of the weld joint were investigated using optical and scanning microscopy, and the fusion zone microstructure was compared with that of the base metal. The elemental distribution was also investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Mechanical properties were determined by standard tensile tests on small-scale specimens. The as-welded fusion zone prepared using a CdCl{sub 2} flux exhibited a larger grain size than that prepared without flux; the microstructure consisted of matrix {alpha}-Mg, eutectic {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17}. The HAZ was observed to be slightly wider for the weld prepared with a CdCl{sub 2} flux compared to that prepared without flux; thus the tensile strength was lower for the flux-prepared weld. The fact that neither Cd nor Cl was detected in the weld seam by EPMA indicates that the CdCl{sub 2} flux has a small effect on convection in the weld pool.

  11. Aging characteristics of electron beam and gas tungsten arc fusion zones of Al-Cu-Li alloy 2090

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunwoo, A.J. . Center for Advanced Materials); Morris, J.W. Jr. . Dept of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-04-01

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) fusion zones of 2090 indicates that in both the as-welded and aged conditions, the EB and GTA fusion zones lack the volume fraction and the homogeneity of strengthening precipitates found in the base metal. In the underaged and peak-aged conditions, the [delta][prime] phase is the primary strengthener, the volume fraction of T[sub 1] present being too low to be effective. The T[sub 1] precipitates are found either in the vicinity of other inclusions or at the dendrite boundaries. As the strength increases with postweld aging, the elongation decreased to 1%. The presence of the boundary phases and Cu- and Cl-containing inclusions at the boundaries leads to poor elongation. The joint efficiencies of the peak-aged EB and GTA weldments (EBWs and GTAWs, respectively) are 75 and 55% at 293 K and 75 and 50% at 77 K, respectively. Both EBWs and GTAWs have relatively low elongations.

  12. Microstructure formation in partially melted zone during gas tungsten arc welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu Tianping Chen, Zhan W.; Gao Wei

    2008-11-15

    During gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of AZ91 Mg cast alloy, constitutional liquid forms locally in the original interdendritic regions in the partially melted zone (PMZ). The PMZ re-solidification behaviour has not been well understood. In this study, the gradual change of the re-solidification microstructure within PMZ from base metal side to weld metal side was characterised. High cooling rate experiments using Gleeble thermal simulator were also conducted to understand the morphological change of the {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phase interface formed during re-solidification after partial melting. It was found that the original partially divorced eutectic structure has become a more regular eutectic phase in most of the PMZ, although close to the fusion boundary the re-solidified eutectic is again a divorced one. Proceeding the eutectic re-solidification, if the degree of partial melting is sufficiently high, {alpha}-Mg re-solidified with a cellular growth, resulting in a serrated interface between {alpha}-Mg and {alpha}-Mg/{beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} in the weld sample and between {alpha}-Mg and {beta}-Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} (fully divorced eutectic) in Gleeble samples. The morphological changes affected by the peak temperature and cooling rate are also explained.

  13. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H.; Deeney, Christopher E.; Douglas, Melissa R.; Chittenden, Jerry

    2011-11-15

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  14. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (?) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, ? increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, ?{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, ?{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  15. A photon shield capsule design for an {sup 241}Am/Be ({alpha},n) source using high density tungsten alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clement, R.S.; Hsu, H.H.; Olsher, R.S.; Aikin, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    A photon shield capsule made of high density tungsten alloy was designed for a 400 GBq {sup 241}Am/Be ({alpha},n) NIST-traceable source using Monte Carlo calculations. The {sup 241}Am/Be ({alpha},n) source replaces a {sup 239}Pu/Be ({alpha},n) source used in the Los Alamos Neutron Well for dose rate calibrations of portable and fixed neutron rem meters. Potential operator exposure due to {sup 241}Am photon emission (E{sub {gamma}} = 59.5 keV, Y{sub {gamma}} = 0.357 {gamma} d{sup -1}) is a major practical concern in using this type of source. This has been recognized by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO 8529:1989), which recommends wrapping the source in a 1 mm thick lead shield. However, the optimum photon shield capsule design depends on source construction and other considerations. These considerations include minimizing source spectrum degradation and inelastic gamma production from shielding, structural integrity, toxicity, and cost effectiveness of available materials and construction. Investigations of several materials and combinations using stainless steel, high density tungsten alloy (composed of 90%W, 6% Ni and 4% Cu) and lead with various capsule thicknesses were simulated using the Los Alamos Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code. The final design was based on a 2 mm thick capsule using the high density tungsten alloy. This material resulted in a small change in the neutron spectrum accompanied with only a slight increase in inelastic gamma production, and unobservable 59.5 keV photon emissions compared to the bare {sup 241}Am/Be ({alpha},n) source.

  16. Parity violation in nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of chiral tetrahedral tungsten complexes NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrwold, Sophie Berger, Robert; Clemens-Schöpf-Institute, Technical University Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 22, D-64287 Darmstadt ; Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Fachbereich Chemie, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Hans-Meerwein-Str., D-35032 Marburg

    2014-01-14

    Density functional theory within the two-component quasi-relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used to predict parity violation shifts in {sup 183}W nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of chiral, tetrahedrally bonded tungsten complexes of the form NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I), as well as for the heavier systems NWHAtF and NWH(117)F for comparison. The calculations reveal that sub-mHz accuracy is required to detect such tiny effects in this class of compounds, and that parity violation effects are very sensitive to the choice of ligands.

  17. Temperature dependence of helium-implantation-induced lattice swelling in polycrystalline tungsten: X-ray micro-diffraction and Eigenstrain modelling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Broglie, I.; Beck, C. E.; Liu, W.; Hofmann, Felix

    2015-05-30

    Using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction and Eigenstrain analysis the distribution of lattice swelling near grain boundaries in helium-implanted polycrystalline tungsten is quantified. Samples heat-treated at up to 1473 K after implantation show less uniform lattice swelling that varies significantly from grain to grain compared to as-implanted samples. An increase in lattice swelling is found in the vicinity of some grain boundaries, even at depths beyond the implanted layer. As a result, these findings are discussed in terms of the evolution of helium-ion-implantation-induced defects.

  18. Relaxor nature in lead-free Sr{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} tetragonal tungsten bronze ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhu, Xiao; Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro ; Li, Kun; Qiang Liu, Xiao; Ming Chen, Xiang; Asif Rafiq, Muhammad

    2013-09-28

    Lead-free tetragonal tungsten bronze Sr{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} ceramics were prepared and the correlation of the relaxor nature and crystal structure was studied using dielectric spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. Three dielectric relaxations were observed below the deviation temperature T{sub D}? 330 K. Relaxation I and II followed the Vogel-Fulcher law with the freezing temperatures of 189 K and ?90 K. Low temperature relaxation III, which was first observed in filled tungsten bronze, followed well the Arrhenius law. Dielectric response becomes static below 50 K. Polarization-field (P-E) hysteresis loops were evaluated from 183 K to 298 K. P{sub r} value of 0.41?C/cm{sup 2} was observed at 183 K. Deviation of lattice parameter c from the linear contraction and increasing of tetragonality (c/a ratio) were observed below T{sub D}, reflecting the structure change during the formation of polar nanoregions and the following freezing process. Opposite tendency was observed below 100 K for all the lattice parameters, corresponding to relaxation III. Generally, the main dielectric relaxation I and II were attributed to flipping and breathing of polar nanoregions along c axis, while the concerted rotations of the oxygen octahedra in the ab plane were suggested as the origin of relaxation III.

  19. Implementation of nitrogen-doped titanium-tungsten tunable heater in phase change random access memory and its effects on device performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Chun Chia; Zhao, Rong Chong, Tow Chong; Shi, Luping

    2014-10-13

    Nitrogen-doped titanium-tungsten (N-TiW) was proposed as a tunable heater in Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM). By tuning N-TiW's material properties through doping, the heater can be tailored to optimize the access speed and programming current of PCRAM. Experiments reveal that N-TiW's resistivity increases and thermal conductivity decreases with increasing nitrogen-doping ratio, and N-TiW devices displayed (∼33% to ∼55%) reduced programming currents. However, there is a tradeoff between the current and speed for heater-based PCRAM. Analysis of devices with different N-TiW heaters shows that N-TiW doping levels could be optimized to enable low RESET currents and fast access speeds.

  20. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba{sub 6−x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolodiazhnyi, T. Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H.; Mozharivskyj, Y.

    2014-03-17

    Ba{sub 6−x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30} solid solution with 0 ≤ x ≤ 6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal “tungsten bronze” structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2–400 K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x ≥ 3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T ≈ 10–30 K) “plateau” region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

  1. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The residential upgrade rebates issued by RACF can take two to four weeks to be paid to ... County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Because ...

  2. SSL in America: Spotlight on SAES Pure Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pure Gas does all of its manufacturing at its headquarters, which is located in beautiful San Luis Obispo, about halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco and just a few...

  3. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... "Getting on the landscape fast with some successes built positive momentum. There will be ... Most contractors perform a free visual assessment (without blower door or infrared ...

  4. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approve financing early and make it an integral part of the program to reduce barriers ... CEWO has ound that it is important to make financing an integral part of the program. ...

  5. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The team is also working diligently to help DOE improve ZERH specifications for California and elsewhere. As David Springer, ARBI team manager, explains, "We have coordinated with ...

  6. Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Program staff found this to be an effective approach to ... maturing, it is hard to get that quality learning going on." ... CBOs also mitigated language barriers in non-English ...

  7. Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Evaluation of the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Synthesis Report, Volume 1 Process Evaluation of the Better Buildings Neighborhood ...

  8. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Sweeping Experiment: Better Buildings Tests Offerings in Michigan Neighborhoods ... Each of 27 sweeps is a "mini-experiment" that tests customer responses to vari- ous ...

  9. High Performance Builder Spotlight: GreenCraft, Lewisville, TX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    In October and November 2009, the TimberCreek Zero Energy House in Lewisville, Texas, opened as a Building America Demonstration House. The 2,538-foot,three-bedroom, 2½-bath custom-built home showed a home energy rating score (HERS) of 56 without the solar photovoltaics and a HERS score of 1 with PV.

  10. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight Tommy Williams Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-05

    Builders Challenge fact sheet highlighting performance and energy-efficiency features of Tommy Williams Homes, Longleaf case study, Gainesville, FL

  11. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Improving business practices and gaining the experience needed to do quality work takes ... projects, up to 100,000. Recruitment events bring interested new contractors ...

  12. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  13. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The questionnaire even reminds the contractors to establish rapport by smiling, ... In initial evaluation interviews with a dozen chief executive officers (CEOs) from various ...

  14. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises- New Orleans, Louisiana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This four-page case study describes Green Coast Enterprises efforts to rebuild hurricane-ravaged New Orleans through Project Home Again.

  15. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to greater solar deployment. At this session, pre-selected participants will have the opportunity to make five-minute business pitch presentations to an expert panel of judges ...

  16. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2010-09-01

    This case study describes Green Coast Enterprises efforts to rebuild hurricane-ravaged New Orleans through Project Home Again.

  17. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy DOE Sustainability Performance Office FY14 Budget At-a-Glance DOE Sustainability Performance Office FY14 Budget At-a-Glance DOE Sustainability Performance Office FY14 Budget At-a-Glance, a publication of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon spo_ataglance_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications Sustainability Performance Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance Federal Energy Management Program FY14 Budget At-a-Glance Federal Energy

  18. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes of Fresno, CA, has worked with Building America team member IBACOS to apply building science to production homes. Even without solar panels, the companys Jordan model exceeds Californias building efficiency standard by 36%.

  19. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The team won another Top Innovation award for its cost-effective advanced framing techniques that ... hydronic systems to improve tenant comfort and lower operating costs. ...

  20. 1994 OTC spotlights fall on technology, world operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-09

    Expanding offshore technical capabilities and growing international cooperation were the key-notes last week at the 26th Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) in Houston. Sponsored by the Society of Petroleum Engineers, sessions heard many of the 244 technical papers presented this year focus on field-ready technology considered crucial to more efficient, safer, environmentally sound offshore oil and gas operations. Economic development of satellite and marginal fields was the topic at special technical sessions on the conference's first two mornings. Three dimensional seismic technology was thoroughly discussed in a day-long series of papers presented during the gathering's third day. OTC 1994 topical luncheons included descriptions by Shell Offshore Inc. of its record setting auger field development project in the Gulf of Mexico, offshore turnkey drilling by a panel of drilling contractors, and the international exploration and production alliance formed in 1990 by BP Exploration and Den norske stats oljeselskap AS. Highlights of the melting are discussed.

  1. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... for programs is often as much art as science. "The incentive needs to be high enough ... Applying this philosophy, Efficiency Maine launched a new incentive program, the ...

  2. High Performance Builder Spotlight: G.W. Robinson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    G.W. Robinson of Gainesville, Florida, worked with Building America partners Florida Solar Energy Center and Florida HERO to achieve a true net zero energy home in 2010.

  3. High Performance Builder Spotlight: LifeStyle Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    LifeStyle Homes of Melbourne, Florida, is aiming for affordable net zero energy homes with help from Building America research partner Florida Solar Energy Center.

  4. Thermal reclamation of used blast grit. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Naval shipyards and other domestic port facilities generate thousands of tons of used blast grit annually. There are also thousands of steel bridges in the United States on a repaint schedule that requires grit blasting for surface preparation. All the used grit, along with the paint residue it contains, is currently disposed of in landfills. Cleaning and recycling used blast grit is an attractive alternative. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed a fluidized-bed sand calciner that is well suited for cleaning and recycling used blast grit. Essentially, IGT researchers applied a transfer/adaptation of fluidized-bed calcination originally developed for the reclamation of foundry sand. The calciner has a patented sloped-grid design that enhances the combustion of paint residues and promotes the isolation of reusable material.

  5. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Neighbors Excel in Spreading the Value of Energy Efficiency in Rutland, Vermont Building on their understanding of homeowners in Rutland County, Vermont, NeighborWorks of Western ...

  6. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual site energy use intensities (EUIs) for the "reheat and heating" category were 108.4 kBtuft2-yr at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Gray Building and 52.0 kBtu...

  7. High Performance Builder Spotlight: KB Home GreenHouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Located in the Lake Burden community in Windermere, FL, the KB Home GreenHouse is expected to produce as much energy as it consumes.

  8. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn29.5Al0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn29.5Al0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard MgAl intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated AlMgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the MgAl dissimilar joint. - Highlights: Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. The formation of MgAl intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  9. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of CO{sub 2} laser and gas tungsten arc welds of an Al-Li-Cu alloy 2195

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, K.H.; Baeslack, W.A. III; Szabo, A.

    1994-12-31

    Lithium-containing aluminum alloys offer an attractive combination of low density and high strength and stiffness and have been the focus of vigorous research for their promising aerospace applications. To achieve the full potential advantages in using these alloys, the integrity of welded joints, both n the fusion zone and the heat-affected zone, must be ensured. In the present study, Weldalite{sup TM} 049 (designated as alloy 2195) with nominal composition of Al-1.0Li-4.0Cu-0.4Mg0.4Ag-0.14Zr (wt%) was welded autogenously using the gas tungsten-arc (GTA) and CO{sub 2} laser beam (LB) welding processes. The average ultimate tensile strengths for as-welded, 160{degrees}C/16 h-aged, and 190{degrees}C/16 h-aged GTA welds were 296.4 MPa, 304.6 MPa, and 336.8 MPa, and corresponded to joint efficiencies of 61.4%, 48.1% and 56.0%, respectively. Porosity was found occasionally in the laser welds and slightly affected the performance of the aluminum weldments. For laser welds, average ultimate tensile strengths and corresponding joint efficiencies for a-welded, 160{degrees}C/16 h-aged, and 190{degrees}C/16 h-aged weldments were 293.2 MPa (60.8%) 305.9 MPa (48.3%), and 331.0 MPa (55.0%), respectively. Scanning electron fractography revealed that failure of the GTA and LB tensile specimens occurred either within the weld metal or along the fusion boundary. The latter was related to the existence of an equiaxed band along the fusion boundary.

  10. THE PUZZLE OF TWO DIFFERENT SUB-MICROMETER TUNGSTEN-RICH DEPOSITS IN BULK YBCO: ONE ACTS AS PINNING CENTERS AND THE OTHER DOES NOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Gandini, Alberto [Beam Particle Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Physics, and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, 77204 (United States)

    2010-04-08

    Two types of large grain YBCO samples doped with tungsten oxide, one with platinum and the other without, were produced using a slow cooling process. Observations of the trapped magnetic flux density showed that the flux density of the W-doped, Pt-free samples did not change with W doping levels of up to 2.1 mol%. In contrast, the (W+Pt)-doped samples resulted in a monotonic improvement in trapped magnetic flux density as a function of W doping. Microstructure studies indicate that both types of samples contain profuse sub-micrometer deposits of a W-rich compound. The Pt-free samples contain (W{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} deposits while the (W+Pt)-doped samples contain deposits of a (W{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6} compound. Both types of deposits are of essentially the same size and have comparable number density. The results are strikingly similar to an earlier experiment in which uranium doped, Pt-free, large grain YBCO also did not show any improvement in trapped magnetic flux density. The U-doped, Pt-free samples contain profuse sub-micrometer deposits of a (U{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} compound, which have been shown to be ferromagnetic. The inability of both the (W{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} and (U{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} sub-micrometer deposits to act as pinning centers in self-field, suggest that this behavior is systematic.

  11. Seeing Green: 1663 Science and Technology Magazine | Los National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparing the Primordial Soup A RECIPE FOR PREBIOTIC METABOLISM Spotlight THE (LIGHTWEIGHT) HEAVY HITTER Spotlight SOLAR SYSTEM SURPRISE Spotlight REACTION TO FUKUSHIMA Spotlight ...

  12. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J.R.; Dominguez, F.; Johnson, A.W.; Omstead, T.R.

    1997-09-02

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten. 2 figs.

  13. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall; Dominguez, Frank; Johnson, A. Wayne; Omstead, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

  14. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ...

  15. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File ...

  16. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations You ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, ...

  17. Modified iridium-tungsten alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T.; Inouye, Henry

    1976-01-01

    A novel iridium alloy composition containing dopant level additions of aluminum, iron, nickel, rhodium and thorium is useful as a containment vessel for isotopic heat sources.

  18. Incommensurate and commensurate modulations of Ba{sub 5}RTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} (R?=?La, Nd) tungsten bronzes and the ferroelectric domain structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Min Min; Li, Kun; Zhu, Xiao Li; Chen, Xiang Ming

    2015-04-07

    Incommensurate and commensurate structural modulations of Ba{sub 5}RTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} (R?=?La, Nd) tungsten bronze ceramics were investigated by using a cooling holder equipped transmission electron microscopy in the temperature range from 100?K to 363?K. The incommensurate modulation was observed in both Ba{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} and Ba{sub 5}NdTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} at room temperature, while there was a transition from incommensurate tilted structure to commensurate superstructure for Ba{sub 5}NdTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} with decreasing temperature. The incommensurate and commensurate modulations were determined by the A-site occupancy of Ba and R cations. The A-site disorder resulted in larger incommensurability parameter ? and the diffusion of the satellite reflection spots. The effect of A-site disorder on the coupling between long-range dipolar order and the commensurate modulation was also discussed. The obvious ferroelectric 180 domains with spike-like shape parallel to c axis were observed for Ba{sub 5}NdTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30}, while no macro ferroelectric domain was determined for Ba{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30}.

  19. Photoluminescence and electrical characterization of unfilled tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba{sub 4}La{sub 1?x}Eu{sub x}TiNb{sub 9}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, T.; Wang, Y.Q.; Zhao, C.Z.; Zhan, L.Q.

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: PL spectra of the unfilled TTB structure BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x samples (x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00) excited by 399 nm. The inset is a schematic diagram of the unfilled TTB structure. - Highlights: Unfilled TTB structure BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x ceramics have been synthesized. Photoluminescenct properties of the BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x ceramics have been first reported. Bright red emission excited by NUV light has been observed at room temperature. Obvious variations of dielectric characteristics have been confirmed. Relaxor-like ferroelectric phase transitions have been detected. - Abstract: Unfilled tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) structure Ba{sub 4}LaTiNb{sub 9}O{sub 30} doped by Eu{sup 3+} (BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x) with different x have been prepared, and their structural, photoluminescence, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties are carefully investigated in this work. Bright red emission, originating from {sup 5}D{sub 0} ? {sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0} ? {sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+} ions, has been observed by naked eyes at room temperature under near ultraviolet (NUV) light excitation. Optimized emission intensity is obtained when x = 1.00 for present unfilled TTB-type BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x samples. Furthermore, with increasing x, the dielectric and ferroelectric characteristics of the unfilled TTB-type BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x samples also display remarkable variation. When x ? 0.50 relaxor-like ferroelectric phase transitions are detected above room temperature, it is believed that unfilled TTB-type BLTN: Eu{sup 3+}x = 1.00 involving bright photoluminescence and enhanced ferroelectric properties may act as a potentially multifunctional optical-electro material.

  20. The first mixed-halide zirconium cluster compounds: Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.6}I{sub 10.4}Be, Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.3}I{sub 10.7}B, and Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 11.5}I{sub 1.5}B. Matrix effects and halogen substitution in compact network structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeckerling, M.; Qi, R.Y.; Corbett, J.D.

    1996-03-13

    Investigations of the effect of halogen size on structure stability have been conducted in well-reduced and heavily interbridged zirconium chloride-iodide cluster systems. The title compounds are obtained in good yields from reactions of Zr, ZrCl{sub 4}, ZrI{sub 4}, and B or Be in sealed Ta tubes for {approximately} 4 weeks at 850 {degrees}C. Single-crystal diffraction at room temperature established these as Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.65(4)}I{sub 10.35(4)}Be and Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.27/(3)}. These are derivatives of the Zr{sub 6}I{sub 12}C and orthorhombic Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 13}B structures, respectively, the latter containing unusual linear chains of clusters interbridged by Cl{sup i-i} that are in turn interconnected by three-bonded Cl{sup a-a-a} atoms. The random substitution of fractional Cl at specific I sites in the first two, and I for certain Cl in the third, was positionally resolved in all cases. The replacement always occurs at two-bonded X{sup i}, so that single types of halogen are left in sites that interconnected clusters and generate the three-dimensional array. Structural changes seen in both structures are specifically related to relief of X{hor_ellipsis}X crowding in the parent structure (matrix effects). Substitution of Cl for I{sup i} in the Zr{sub 6}I{sub 12}C type greatly reduces intercluster I{hor_ellipsis}I repulsions and allows, among other things, a 0.20 {Angstrom} (5.8*5) reduction in Zr-I{sup 1-i} intercluster bond lengths. Increased Cl{hor_ellipsis}I repulsions caused by I substitution in orthorhombic Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 11.5}I{sub 1.5}B. Phase widths found are 0{le} x {le} 1.4 for Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub x}I{sub 12-x}Z (Z=B, Be) and 0 {le} x {le} 1.5 for Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 13-x}I{sub x}B. The limit for iodine substitution in the chlorine-rich rhombohedral Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 12-x}I{sub x}Be is about x=2.5.

  1. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Then the trench is filled with liquid foam insulation. This measure has broad market potential and is applicable to tens of millions of homes with uninsulated foundations. Homes ...

  2. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Yavapai College, Chino Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Yavapai College of Chino Valley, Arizona. These college students built a Building America Builders Challenge house that achieved the remarkably low HERS score of -3 and achieved a tight building envelope.

  3. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Martha Rose Construction, Inc., Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Martha Rose Construction, an energy-efficient home builder in marine climate using the German Passiv Haus design, improved insulation, and solar photovoltaics.

  4. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Rural Development Inc., Turner Falls, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Rural Development Inc, an energy-efficient home builder in cold climate using radiant floor heat, solar hot water, and PV. Examines cost impacts.

  5. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... during emergencies, advancing international relations, strengthening environmental ... computer network servers, and satellite- or cellular-based communication channels. ...

  6. Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VIENNA – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has kept the United States at the forefront of characterization, remediation, and end-state reuse of uranium millsites around the world.

  7. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - NextGen Home, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on the NextGen demo home built in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44 with R-40 spray foam attic insulation, R-40 insulated concrete walls, and a 4kW DC solar laminate

  8. Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight, July, August, September 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Issue 14 July/August/September 2014 Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : Director's Note 1 Awards 1 Museum 2 Trivia 3 Calendar 4 A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR By Greg Lewis In the past few months there have been a number of changes that have taken place at DOE Headquarters, which have affected the Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support, both with our organizational structure and with our staffing. First, the DOE Office of 2014 SYLVIA KIEDING

  9. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking Shipments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM’s James Shuler felt honored being named a technology innovation award finalist for developing radiofrequency identification (RFID) technology to track and monitor radioactive material shipments.

  10. Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainabil...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Photo: The team members are Sam McCord, Ralph Wrons, Sean Naegle, Debra Clifford, Ben St. Clair, Lynda Innis, Charles Snider, Chadwick Johnson, Matthew Smith, Jason Loyd, and Gabe ...

  11. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Palm Harbor Homes - Bimini II, Plant City, FL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-05-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Palm Harbor Homes, an energy-efficient home builder in hot-humid climate using solar hot water, spray foam insulation, and SEER14 HVAC.

  12. Under the OWASS Spotlight: Interview with Paul Azunre | MIT-Harvard Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Russian Nuclear Warheads Arrives in United States and Will Be Used for U.S. Electricity | National Nuclear Security Administration Under U.S.-Russia Partnership, Final Shipment of Fuel Converted From 20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads Arrives in United States and Will Be Used for U.S. Electricity December 11, 2013 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The United States and Russia are today commemorating the completion of the 1993 U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement, commonly known as the Megatons to Megawatts

  13. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mountain time. The webinar, which will build on previous webinars offered as part of the series, will focus on the various programs available from DOE's Office of Indian Energy, ...

  14. Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Replacement Wells: Average Temperature of Geofluid: Sanyal Classification (Wellhead): Reservoir Temp (Geothermometry): Reservoir Temp (Measured): Sanyal Classification...

  15. GRAIN BOUNDARY STRENGTHENING PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2012-10-10

    Density functional theory was employed to investigate grain boundary (GB) properties of W alloys. A range of substitutional solutes across the Periodic Table was investigated to understand the behavior of different electronic orbitals in changing the GB cleavage energy in the Σ27a[110]{525} GB. A number of transition metals were predicted to enhance the GB cohesion. This includes Ru, Re, Os, Ir, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb. While lanthanides, s and p elements were tended to cause GB embrittlement.

  16. Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA, Department of ...

  17. Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow Rate: "f" is not declared as a valid unit of measurement for this property. The given value was not understood. Flow Test Comment:...

  18. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  19. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  20. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  1. Max Tech Electric HPWH with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Matthew Ringer - Laboratory Program Manager, National Renewable Energy Laboratory ringer.png Matthew Ringer is a Laboratory Program Manager at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He has worked at NREL for more than 11 years. In his current role, Matt oversees the Lab-Corps Program, SBV CAP, and the Energy Innovation Portal. Additionally, he works with EERE on various commercialization initiatives, assists companies interested in commercializing NREL IP, and improving many of NREL's

  2. Insensitive explosive composition of halogenated copolymer and triaminotrinitrobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benziger, Theodore M.

    1976-01-01

    A highly insensitive and heat resistant plastic-bonded explosive containing 90 wt % triaminotrinitrobenzene and 10 wt % of a fully saturated copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride is readily manufactured by the slurry process.

  3. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  4. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  5. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  6. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  7. Voluntary Initiative: Designing Incentives Toolkit | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards Better Buildings Network View | March 2015 Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best...

  8. It's Academic: BetterBuildings for Michigan Partners With University...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives

  9. Working With Weatherization Assistance Programs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives ...

  10. NEAMS Quarterly Report April-June 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) quarterly report includes highlights, a spotlight on personal achievements, accomplishments, milestones and a technical spotlight on...

  11. Duke University | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy into Electric Power Research at Duke - a spotlight video Knowledge in Service to Society - a spotlight video Peter Lange, Provost Making leadership a part of education

  12. Diversity & Inclusion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2015 Employee Spotlight: Muge Acik November 17, 2015 Employee Spotlight: Peter Friedman September 25, 2015 Diversity & Inclusion Argonne is home to a vibrant, diverse...

  13. RADBALLTECHNOLOGY TESTING AND MCNP MODELING OF THE TUNGSTEN COLLIMATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall{trademark}, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall{trademark} consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall{trademark} technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall{trademark} testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  14. Metal oxides of molybdenum of molybdenum or molybdenum and tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carcia, P.F.; McCarron, E.M.

    1988-06-28

    A method for preparing a composition of matter comprising ..beta..-Mo/sub 1-chi/W/sub chi/O/sub 3/, wherein 0less than or equal tochi<1.0, comprising spray-drying a solution of molybdic acid or molybdic and tungstic acids in appropriate concentrations and heating the resulting powder at a temperature of from about 275/sup 0/C to about 450/sup 0/C.

  15. Decomposition of silane on tungsten or other materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiesmann, H.J.

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH/sub 4/) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a W or foil heated to a temperature of about 1400 to 1600/sup 0/C, in a vacuum of about 10-/sup 6/ to 10-/sup 4/ torr. A gaseous mixture is formed of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon. The gaseous mixture is deposited onto a substrate independent of and outside the source of thermal decomposition. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is formed. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  16. Solid state consolidation nanocrystalline copper-tungsten using cold spray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher; Sarobol, Pylin; Argibay, Nicolas; Clark, Blythe; Diantonio, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that nanostructured metals can exhibit significantly improved properties compared to metals with conventional grain size. Unfortunately, nanocrystalline metals typically are not thermodynamically stable and exhibit rapid grain growth at moderate temperatures. This severely limits their processing and use, making them impractical for most engineering applications. Recent work has shown that a number of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metal alloys exist. These alloys have been prepared as powders using severe plastic deformation (e.g. ball milling) processes. Consolidation of these powders without compromise of their nanocrystalline microstructure is a critical step to enabling their use as engineering materials. We demonstrate solid-state consolidation of ball milled copper-tantalum nanocrystalline metal powder using cold spray. Unfortunately, the nanocrystalline copper-tantalum powder that was consolidated did not contain the thermodynamically stable copper-tantalum nanostructure. Nevertheless, this does this demonstrates a pathway to preparation of bulk thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Furthermore, it demonstrates a pathway to additive manufacturing (3D printing) of nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Additive manufacturing of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metals is attractive because it enables maximum flexibility and efficiency in the use of these unique materials.

  17. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced ActivationFerritic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Overview of tritium activity in Japan Tritium Plasma Experiment and Its Role in PHENIX Program...

  18. Proceedings of the Tungsten Workshop for Hard Target Weapons Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W.; Davis, R.M.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to review and exchange information and provide technical input for improving technologies relevant to the Hard Target Weapons Program. This workshop was attended by representatives from 17 organizations, including 4 Department of Defense (DoD) agencies, 8 industrial companies, and 5 laboratories within DOE. Hard targets are defined as reinforced underground structures that house enemy forces, weapon systems, and support equipment. DOE-ORO and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) have been involved in advanced materials research and development (R&D) for several DOE and DoD programs. These programs are conducted in close collaboration with Eglin AFB, Department of the Army`s Picatinny Arsenal, and other DoD agencies. As part of this ongoing collaboration, Eglin AFB and Oak Ridge National Laboratory planned and conducted this workshop to support the Hard Target Weapons Program. The objectives of this workshop were to (1) review and identify the technology base that exists (primarily due to anti-armor applications) and assess the applicability of this technology to the Hard Target Weapons Program requirements; (2) determine future directions to establish the W materials, processing, and manufacturing technologies suitable for use in fixed, hard target penetrators; and (3) identify and prioritize the potential areas for technical collaboration among the participants.

  19. Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Nano Letters Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United...

  20. Process for fabricating articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.; Snyder, Jr., William B.

    1976-01-01

    A high density W--Ni--Fe alloy of composition 85-96% by weight W and the remainder Ni and Fe in a wt. ratio of 5:5-8:2 having enhanced mechanical properties is prepared by compacting the mixed powders, sintering the compact in reducing atmosphere to near theoretical density followed by further sintering at a temperature where a liquid phase is present, vacuum annealing, and cold working to achieve high uniform hardness.

  1. Scientists gain insight into origin of tungsten ditelluride's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jared Sagoff at (630) 252-5549 or media@anl.gov. Connect Find an Argonne expert by subject. Follow Argonne on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and LinkedIn. For inquiries on...

  2. Topical Report Tantalum 2.5% Tungsten Machinability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. J. Lazarus

    2009-09-02

    Protection Association (NFPA). NFPA 484, Standard for Combustible Metals, Chapter 9 Tantalum and Annex E, supplemental Information on Tantalum require cutting oil be used when machining tantalum because it burns at such a high temperature that it breaks down the water in a water-based metalworking fluid (MWF). The NFPA guide devotes approximately 20 pages to this material. The Kansas City Plant (KCP) uses Fuchs Lubricants Ecocut Base 44 LVC as a MWF. This is a highly chlorinated oil with a high flash point (above 200 F). The chlorine is very helpful in preventing BUE (Built Up Edge) that occurs frequently with this very gummy material. The Ecocut is really a MWF additive that Fuchs uses to add chlorinated fats to other non-chlorinated MWF.

  3. Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community ...

  4. Collisional-radiative modeling of tungsten at temperatures of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) ... Jr., Joseph 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM ...

  5. AB INITIO STUDY OF GRAIN BOUNDARY PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2012-04-17

    Density functional theory was employed to investigate the grain boundary (GB) property of W-TM alloys (TM: fifth and sixth row transition metals). GB strengthening was found for Hf, Ta, Nb, Ru, Re, Os and Ir for 27{l_brace}525{r_brace} and to a lesser degree for 11{l_brace}323{r_brace}. Lower valence solutes strengthen the GB at certain substitutional sites, while higher valence elements enforce it at other positions. For 3{l_brace}112{r_brace}, the alloys exhibit reduced cleavage energies. Hence, allowing with TMs increases the GB cohesion more effectively for large-angle GBs whose cleavage energy is, in general, inherently lower than the low-angle ones. Electron density analysis elucidates the mechanism of charge addition or depletion of the GB bonding region upon TM substitution at various positions leading to stronger or weaker intergranular cohesion, respectively.

  6. Collisional-Radiative Modeling of Tungsten at Temperatures of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We finally constructed another model calculation which was based on Model C, but also allowed two-electron promotions from the n 4 shell into the n 6 shell (as well as one ...

  7. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature...

  8. Microsoft Word - Lamellae tungsten tile design thermal and electromagn...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stress Profile: von Mises; Screw Assy View 1 Temp Profile (281 C) (275 C) (207 C) (440 C) (440 C) (456 C) (484 C) 31 Fig. 3.2.7 - Thermal Stress Profile: von Mises, Screw...

  9. Nudged Elastic Band Simulations of Kink Pairs in Tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cereceda, D.; Marian, J.

    2015-01-16

    Atomistic techniques have been used to calculate energy barriers for dislocation motion that control the strength (yield stress and flow stress) of the material. In particular, the calculations focus on the change in enthalpy as a straight dislocation moves through the crystal lattice (the Peierls barrier) and kink pair formation enthalpy that controls the thermally activated double-kink mechanism important at low to moderate stresses. A novel means of assessing kink widths within atomistic simulations is introduced.

  10. Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the...

  11. Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes twenty-three gold exploration holes were drilled by Newcrest Resources, Inc. during 2005 and 2006 along...

  12. LED Surgical Task Lighting Scoping Study: A Hospital Energy Alliance Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-01-17

    Tungsten-halogen (halogen) lamps have traditionally been used to light surgical tasks in hospitals, even though they are in many respects ill-suited to the application due to the large percentage of radiant energy outside the visible spectrum and issues with color rendering/quality. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology offers potential for adjustable color and improved color rendition/quality, while simultaneously reducing side-effects from non-visible radiant energy. It also has the potential for significant energy savings, although this is a fairly narrow application in the larger commercial building energy use sector. Based on analysis of available products and Hospital Energy Alliance member interest, it is recommended that a product specification and field measurement procedure be developed for implementation in demonstration projects.

  13. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC TUNGSTEN ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN ACID LEACHATES OF THE MURCHISON CHONDRITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR HAFNIUM-TUNGSTEN CHRONOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer; Kleine, Thorsten; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Progressive dissolution of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite with acids of increasing strengths reveals large internal W isotope variations that reflect a heterogeneous distribution of s- and r-process W isotopes among the components of primitive chondrites. At least two distinct carriers of nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies must be present, which were produced in different nucleosynthetic environments. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates follows a linear trend that is consistent with a mixing line between terrestrial W and a presumed s-process-enriched component. The composition of the s-enriched component agrees reasonably well with that predicted by the stellar model of s-process nucleosynthesis. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates provides a means for correcting the measured {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) for nucleosynthetic anomalies using the isotopic variations in {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W. This new correction procedure is different from that used previously, and results in a downward shift of the initial {epsilon}{sup 182}W of CAI to -3.51 {+-} 0.10 (where {epsilon}{sup 182}W is the variation in 0.01% of the {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W ratio relative to Earth's mantle). This revision leads to Hf-W model ages of core formation in iron meteorite parent bodies that are {approx}2 Myr younger than previously calculated. The revised Hf-W model ages are consistent with CAI being the oldest solids formed in the solar system, and indicate that core formation in some planetesimals occurred within {approx}2 Myr of the beginning of the solar system.

  14. Activation of water soluble amines by halogens for trapping methyl radioactive iodine from air streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deitz, Victor R.; Blachly, Charles H.

    1977-01-01

    Gas adsorbent charcoals impregnated with an aqueous solution of the reaction product of a tertiary amine and elemental iodine or bromine are better than 99 per cent efficient in trapping methyl iodine.sup.131. The chemical addition of iodine or bromine to the tertiary amine molecule increases the efficiency of the impregnated charcoal as a trapping agent, and in conjunction with the high flash point of the tertiary amine raises the ignition temperature of the impregnated charcoal.

  15. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat ... options, cycle configurations, and system designs to determine the best path ...

  16. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  17. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul H.; Morris, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  18. Method of dehalogenation using diamonds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Roslyn Harbor, NY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Lafayette, LA); Ladner, Edward P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Anderson, Richard R. (Brownsville, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  19. Leading the Charge: Doug MacCourt Advises Tribes on Energy Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Leading the Charge is a regular feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands.

  20. Stack Characterization System for Inspection of Contaminated Off-Gas Stacks

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6 | Department of Energy Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6 Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6 Final Report: Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Final Evaluation Volume 6, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, June 2015. PDF icon Spotlight on Key Program