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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Student Spotlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spotlight Mekena McGrew Single-shot, Second Harmonic Generation Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (SHG FROG) system for damage testing. Nick Zobrist Optics inspection algorithms...

3

Spotlights Archive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lm/spotlights-archive Office of Legacy Management 1000 lm/spotlights-archive Office of Legacy Management 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-3559 en Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines http://energy.gov/lm/articles/agencies-assist-lm-develop-reports-defense-related-uranium-mines Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines

4

Spotlight Archives | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Spotlight Archives Spotlight Archives These lists provide links to the archives of individual universities and community colleges with connections to DOE scientific research programs that have previously been "spotlighted" by OSTI. The universities and community colleges are listed by Spotlight date. University Archive University of California Berkeley September 2013 University of Missouri July 2013 The University of Rochester May 2013 The University of Maryland March 2013 Delaware State University January 2013 Washington University in St. Louis November 2012 The University of Tennessee - Knoxville September 2012 Clemson University July 2012 Pennsylvania State University May 2012 University of Florida March 2012 1 2 3 next › last » Community College Archive

5

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT ON NUCLEAR POWER ... TOUGHER RULES are needed to improve the safety of U.S. nuclear power facilities and to better protect the public from the type of disaster that occurred this spring at Japans Fukushima Daiichi nuclear energy plant, says a preliminary report released by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on July 12. ...

GLENN HESS

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

6

Type II halogen???halogen contacts are halogen bonds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cl/Br/I alternative substitutions in a series of dihalophenols indicate that type I and type II halogen???halogen contacts have different chemical nature. Only the latter ones qualify as true halogen bonds, according to the recent IUPAC definition.

Metrangolo, P.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our People In The Spotlight In The Spotlight Berni Alder, 2009 National Medal of Science Winner Berni Alder Role: Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence...

8

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels September 20, 2011 - 7:13am Addthis These...

9

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. February 2013 issue covers John Hopkins University Former Worker Program.

10

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spotlights Archive Spotlights Archive Spotlights Archive RSS January 9, 2014 Agencies Assist LM to Develop Reports on Defense-Related Uranium Mines The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) has made substantial progress researching and consulting with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), other relevant federal agencies, affected states and tribes, and the interested public to obtain data and other technical information that will inform the Report to Congress on defense-related legacy uranium mines. October 23, 2013 Legacy Management Work Progresses on Defense-Related Uranium Mines Report to Congress The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work on a report to Congress regarding defense-related legacy uranium

11

Lab Spotlight: Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab Spotlight: Argonne National Laboratory Lab Spotlight: Argonne National Laboratory ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) technology Researchers John Carlisle (left) and Orlando Auciello (right) are developing an ultrathin biocompatible coating for the device. Creating Diamond Coatings for the Retinal Implant Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) plays a critical role in the success of the electrode implants used in the Artificial Retina Project. That's where researchers Orlando Auciello and colleague John Carlisle are using their patented ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) technology to apply a revolutionary new coating to the retinal prosthetic device. The new packaging promises to provide a very thin, ultrasmooth film that will be far more compact and biocompatible than the bulky materials used to encase

12

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 8  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Screening Program. July/August issue covers Site Information Sessions, Joint Outreach Task Group Meeting, and National Supplemental Screening Program Low-Dose CT Program.

13

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. March 2013 issue covers Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2012 Annual Report and University of Iowa - Former Worker Program.

14

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. September/October 2013 issue covers Former Worker Medical Screening Program Milestone, United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and John Hopkins Former Worker Program in New Mexico.

15

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Worker's Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. January/February 2014 issue covers audiogram, the American Museum of Science and Energy, and trivia.

16

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 14  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. July/August/September issue covers Director's Note, 2014 Sylvia Kieding Award, National Atomic Testing Museum, and Calendar of Events.

17

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 13  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Worker's Spotlight Newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. May/June 2014 issue covers the Director's Note, the Cold War Patriots' Remembrance Quilt, Staff, the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, Chest X-ray B-reading, and Calendar of Events.

18

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter- Issue 12  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. March/April 2014 issue covers Joint Outreach Task Group town hall meeting video, the Bradbury Science Museum, and spirometry.

19

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

5 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 OctoberNovemberDecember 2014, Issue 15 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the...

20

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 December 2012, Issue 2 Workers' Spotlight newsletter is a monthly publication that provides information regarding the Energy Employees...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues April 23, 2014 - 10:38am Addthis...

22

Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy...

23

Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the Program Work for Contractors...

24

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels September 20, 2011 - 7:13am Addthis These structural insulated panels consist of foam insulation sandwiched between oriented strand boards. (Courtesy of Michael Bacchler) These structural insulated panels consist of foam insulation sandwiched between oriented strand boards. (Courtesy of Michael Bacchler) Alexis Powers EDITOR'S NOTE: Originally posted on the Solar Decathlon News Blog on September 19, 2011. Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements

25

Impending U.S. lighting standards will boost market for halogen-infrared lamps: New product line expanding  

SciTech Connect

Many of the incandescent floodlights and spotlights manufactured today will not meet lighting efficiency standards taking effect in the US in 1995. As these models cease production, demand will grow for higher efficiency units to fill this huge market, which now totals about 100 million lamps per year. One prime contender is a new class of halogen lamps that use a spectrally selective coating to reflect heat back onto the filament, reducing the amount of electricity needed to generate light. GE Lighting`s Halogen-IR line is the only series of such lamps currently available to replace the conventional floodlights and spotlights that will be banned by the new standards. Other manufacturers may adopt the technology, however, and the Japanese producer Ushio already sells in the US a line of smaller halogen lamps with a similar heat-reflective coating. In terms of efficacy and lifetime, Halogen-IR lamps out perform standard incandescents and standard halogens, but fall far short of fluorescent, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium sources. These other lighting systems are more appropriate and cost-effective than incandescents for many ambient lighting applications. For accent lighting and other tasks that are best suited to incandescent lighting, however, the Halogen-IR lamp is often a superior choice.

Sardinsky, R.; Shepard, M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog In The Spotlight Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight In The Spotlight Berni Alder, 2009 National Medal of Science Winner Berni Alder Role: Retired lab physicist and computational pioneer, Lawrence Livermore

27

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 97 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 115 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness January 6, 2014 - 1:06pm Addthis Libby Wayman Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative Director Advancing the nation's clean energy manufacturing industry helps to capture the value of U.S. innovation in clean energy technologies, fosters further innovation right here in America, and makes U.S. manufacturers more competitive by reducing their energy costs - all while creating jobs and building a more sustainable planet for future generations. Industry and government are working together to expand American leadership in this sector by bringing new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and making manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

32

SPOTLIGHT on: Ellen Messer Biomedical (Mechanical) Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT on: Ellen Messer Biomedical (Mechanical) Engineering Undergraduate Hometown: Easthampton of Biomedical Engineering, Undergraduate Research Assistant Program at the Brain and Creativity Institute, MA Involvement at USC: USC Marathon Team, Society of Women Engineers, Associated Students

Wang, Hai

33

SPOTLIGHT on: Kelly Phillips Engineering Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT on: Kelly Phillips Engineering Management Graduate Student Hometown: La Canada, CA-a-lifetime experiences have been a part of my life as a Trojan the past five years." Why she is a vWOW: "Kelly has made

Wang, Hai

34

SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology) Undergraduate Hometown.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis in nanotechnology. Lindsay stands out as a very well-balanced student

Wang, Hai

35

Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Spotlights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of these compounds, 88 were tested in vitro for their ability to inhibit the binding of RalA-GTP to RALBP1; ultimately, dihydropyranopyrazoles RBC8 and BQU57 were found to significantly block RalA activity as well as bind to RalB (as confirmed by NMR studies). ... The authors hope that these positive results expedite safety testing in humans and facilitate the compassionate use of ZMapp for managing the current Ebola outbreak. ... Breath Test Confirms TB Drug Metabolism ...

Heidi A. Dahlmann; Jason G. Underwood; Sarah A. Webb

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Tungsten and tungsten-alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications-excluding lamps. November 1971-July 1989 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for November 1971-July 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys including various applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying-element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of various cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 60 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Spotlighting Howard University | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Spotlighting Howard University Spotlighting Howard University Spotlighting Howard University February 27, 2012 - 2:45pm Addthis Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant. Students at Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy. | Photo by Jim Pleasant. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist Students at Washington, D.C.'s Howard University are helping to solve one of the biggest challenges facing renewable energy: how to introduce renewable resource-integrated networks to the nation's electricity grid. Thanks in part to funding by the Energy Department's Minority University Research Associates (MURA) Program, the hands-on research of students at

39

Children's School March 2011 Family Spotlight: Zoom !  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Children's School March 2011 Family Spotlight: Zoom ! My name is Golan Levin, and I'm a professor- bugging eye-tracking software and multi-touch gestural input devices since he was a baby. I enjoy learning - the Marshall Building, 6300 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (412-361-0873) Tuesday-Saturday: 10am-5pm, Sunday

40

DONOR SPOTLIGHT BUSINESS LINKAGE STROKE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DONOR SPOTLIGHT BUSINESS LINKAGE STROKE TREATMENT BRAIN CANCER FUNDRAISER German Australian for more information and to book your table, please contact events@qbi.uq.edu.au now. What is stroke? Stroke occurs when the supply of blood to the brain is disrupted. A stroke caused by a blocked artery

Goodhill, Geoffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

griculture is in the spotlight as a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, cyclone exhaust, facility or mine. Fugitive emissions -- Air pollutants that escape unplanned, as fromA griculture is in the spotlight as a potential contribu- tor to air pollution. Animal feeding emit air pollutants. Clean Air Act -- The law passed in 1970 (and subsequent amendments) that created

Mukhtar, Saqib

42

Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First...

43

High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana This four-page case study describes Green Coast Enterprises efforts to rebuild hurricane-ravaged New Orleans through Project Home Again. green_coast_enterprises.pdf More Documents & Publications High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact Sheet), Integrated Deployment: Disaster Recovery (ID) Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact

44

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

May 2013 issue covers: WHPP and BTMed Roster Updates Director's Note Staff Trivia WHPP Video Acknowledgement. Calendar Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 More Documents &...

45

Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Focus Series: Maine-Residential Direct Install Program...

46

Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Incentives Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Focus Series: Maine-Residential Direct Install Program...

47

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get...

48

Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and...

49

Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better...

50

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Technology Spotlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Spotlights Technology Spotlights Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the Technology Spotlights archive, sorted by date. Technology Spotlight: Solar Water Heating Friday, September 27, 2013 By Solar Decathlon Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Solar water heating systems make hot water for residential uses such as bathing, laundering, and dish washing. Generally less expensive than photovoltaic panels, these systems provide homeowners with a cost-effective way to harness the sun's energy. Photo of a wooden house with PV panels and a solar hot water system on the roof. Middlebury College's U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 211 entry,

51

Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions

52

Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives

53

Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

HSO SPOTLIGHT No 01 2012 HSO Meeting Schedule for 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSO SPOTLIGHT No. 01-2012: 2012 Schedule of Quarterly HSO Meetings HSO SPOTLIGHT No. 01-2012: 2012 Schedule of Quarterly HSO Meetings What is the issue? Meeting and Training Schedule Why do we need this? Informational Who is impacted? HSOs What does the HSO need to do? This is an informational Spotlight only NOTICE: The information in all HSO Spotlights applies only at Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters facilities in the Washington, DC area. They are not intended to apply at DOE field sites, which may have entirely different local procedures. The HSO Program Manager has established the schedule below for quarterly HSO meetings in 2012. Please note that the topics listed are subject to change. HSO Quarterly Meeting and Training Schedule 2011 10:00 to Noon each day FORS Date / Room

55

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Technology Spotlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Technology Spotlights' 'Technology Spotlights' Technology Spotlight: Solar Water Heating Friday, September 27, 2013 By Solar Decathlon Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Solar water heating systems make hot water for residential uses such as bathing, laundering, and dish washing. Generally less expensive than photovoltaic panels, these systems provide homeowners with a cost-effective way to harness the sun's energy. Photo of a wooden house with PV panels and a solar hot water system on the roof. Middlebury College's U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 211 entry, Self-Reliance, had two roof-mounted solar hot water collector arrays (right) that circulated glycol through vacuum-insulated borosilicate glass

56

SPOTLIGHT on: Jennifer Dowling Industrial and Systems Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPOTLIGHT on: Jennifer Dowling Industrial and Systems Engineering Hometown: La Mirada, CA Involvement at USC: Society of Women Engineers- Corporate Affairs Committee member, Institute of Industrial Engineers- President, Viterbi Graduate Admissions Office- student staff member, Song Girl 2007 Favorite

Wang, Hai

57

White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In case you missed it, last Thursdays White House Solar Champions of Change and Solar Summit shed a spotlight on all the amazing work that solar innovators around country are doing to speed...

58

Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna October 22, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler presents at the Uranium Mining Remediation Exchange Group meeting in Germany in September 2011. Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler

59

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BY BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS: SPOTLIGHT ON GINER AND PROTON US DOE WEBINAR (May 23, 2011) 2 Webinar Outline *Water Electrolysis H 2 Production Overview DOE-EERE-FCT: Eric L. Miller *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Giner Giner Electrochemical Systems: Monjid Hamdan *Spotlight: PEM Electrolysis R&D at Proton Proton OnSite: Kathy Ayers *Q&A 3 DOE EERE-FCT Goals and Objectives Develop technologies to produce hydrogen from clean, domestic resources at a delivered and dispensed cost of $2-$4/gge Capacity (kg/day) Distributed Central 100,000,000 100,000 50,000 10,000 1,000 10 Natural Gas Reforming Photo- electro- chemical Biological Water Electrolysis (Solar) 2015-2020 Today-2015 2020-2030 Coal Gasification (No Carbon Capture) Electrolysis Water (Grid) Coal Gasification (Carbon Capture)

60

ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight March 1, 2011 - 1:49pm Addthis William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. William Mouat explains the PolyPlus battery technology. | Energy Department photo, credit Ken Shipp. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Last night, we had the chance to visit with a few of the researchers and scientists behind the exciting projects on display at the 2011 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit Technology Showcase. The following projects represent a few of the highlights we found: PolyPlus At Berkeley, CA-based PolyPlus Battery Company, researchers are developing a lithium-air battery that could enable an electric car to travel 500 miles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

September 2009 Spotlight on Energy & the Environment Discovery Tour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the farm's energy use is provided by more than 400 solar panels on the southern roof of his turkey barnSeptember 2009 Spotlight on Energy & the Environment Discovery Tour On September 21, dozens Discovery Tour: Energy and the Environment. Part of the Discovery Initiative launched earlier this year

Goodman, Robert M.

63

E-Print Network 3.0 - active halogen species Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

organo-halogen gases or solvents. The most abundant... Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxinsfurans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, dioxinsfurans 7... .1 Introduction The...

64

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated exploratory work towards the development of new field screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of carbon-halogen bonds. Commercially available heated diode and corona discharge leak detectors were procured and evaluated for halogenated VOC response. The units were modified to provide a digital readout of signal related to VOC concentration. Sensor response was evaluated with carbon tetrachloride and tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene, PCE), which represent halogenated VOCs with and without double bonds. The response characteristics were determined for the VOCs directly in headspace in Tedlar bag containers. Quantitation limits in air were estimated. Potential interferences from volatile hydrocarbons, such as toluene and heptane, were evaluated. The effect of humidity was studied also. The performance of the new devices was evaluated in the laboratory by spiking soil samples and monitoring headspace for halogenated VOCs. A draft concept of the steps for a new analytical method was outlined. The results of the first year effort show that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work towards the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Tungsten Cathode Catalyst for PEMFC  

SciTech Connect

Final report for project to evaluate tungsten-based catalyst as a cathode catalyst for PEM cell applications.

Joel B. Christian; Sean P. E. Smith

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

66

Rare Earth Tungsten Bronzes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rare Earth Tungsten Bronzes ... Trivalent Rare Earth Ion Conduction in the Rare Earth Tungstates with the Sc2(WO4)3-Type Structure ... Trivalent Rare Earth Ion Conduction in the Rare Earth Tungstates with the Sc2(WO4)3-Type Structure ...

Werner Ostertag

1966-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) ElectrolysisSpotlight on Giner and Proton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Slides presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) ElectrolysisSpotlight on Giner and Proton" on May 23, 2011.

68

Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) ElectrolysisSpotlight on Giner and Proton  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) ElectrolysisSpotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

69

Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Version 2 2011 Version 2 betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success Service Delivery The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is part of the national Better Buildings Initiative led by the U.S. Department of Energy. To learn how the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is making homes more comfortable and businesses more lucrative and to read more from this Spotlight series, visit betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods. 1 A Sweeping Experiment: Better Buildings Tests Offerings in Michigan Neighborhoods BetterBuildings for Michigan is a statewide program using an innovative neighborhood "sweeps" delivery model to reach its residential target audience. Sweeps target one 420-home neighborhood at a time with a blitz of outreach, contractor scheduling, and

70

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Technology Spotlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Water Heating Solar Water Heating http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/2504 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/2504#comments Sat, 28 Sep 2013 00:49:13 +0000 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/?p=2504 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/2504/feed 0 Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1530 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1530#comments Mon, 19 Sep 2011 17:42:18 +0000 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/?p=1530 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1530/feed 1 Technology Spotlight: Radiant Heating Systems http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1418 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/archives/1418#comments Thu, 15 Sep 2011 19:52:35 +0000 http://www.solardecathlon.gov/blog/?p=1418

71

Crystallographic studies on enzymatic halogenation of natural products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halogenated natural products are common and serve roles as hormones, pesticides, antibiotics, and anti-tumor agents. The incorporation of a halogen atom into an organic scaffold can tune the molecule's potency and selectivity, ...

Blasiak, Leah Cameron

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change Print E-mail EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change Print E-mail EPA's Science Matters Newsletter Puts Spotlight on Climate Change Friday, July 26, 2013 Featured by EPA, a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Heat waves. Drought. "Super" storms. Flooding. How do we put such events into perspective? And more importantly, how do we take collective action to mitigate and adapt to the increasingly clear evidence that the effects of climate change are unfolding? As the nation did decades ago when faced with threats to its air, water, and land-the first steps toward meeting environmental challenges start with science. These are the issues addressed in a full edition of Science Matters, a publication put out by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The newsletter explores the impacts of climate change and highlights the foundational role played by science to advance an understanding of the impacts of global change.

73

Better Buildings- Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incentives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings.

74

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, dioxins/furans 7 in Figure 7.1. The polychlorinated dibenzo -(p) dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs) that are found in PCBs and may, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-2 2,3,7,8 tetrachloro dibenzo - p- dioxin PCB furan 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo

Zevenhoven, Ron

75

Method and apparatus for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) detector is formed from a silent discharge (also called a dielectric barrier discharge) plasma generator. A silent discharge plasma device receives a gas sample that may contain one or more HHCs and produces free radicals and excited electrons for oxidizing the HHCs in the gas sample to produce water, carbon dioxide, and an acid including halogens in the HHCs. A detector is used to sensitively detect the presence of the acid. A conductivity cell detector combines the oxidation products with a solvent where dissociation of the acid increases the conductivity of the solvent. The conductivity cell output signal is then functionally related to the presence of HHCs in the gas sample. Other detectors include electrochemical cells, infrared spectrometers, and negative ion mobility spectrometers.

Monagle, Matthew (Los Alamos, NM); Coogan, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Computational investigation of the SN2 reactivity of halogenated pollutants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The SN2 displacement reaction, in which a halide is displaced from a molecule by a nucleophile represents an important mechanism by which halogenated pollutants can (more)

Stanford University, Dept. of Civil and Environmental; Engineering

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights January 3, 2014 - 1:35pm Addthis Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Here are past webinars and materials from Home Energy Score. July 30, 2013: Home Energy Score Program Overview for the American Gas Association U.S. DOE is getting ready to launch a new version of the Home Energy Scoring Tool, building on lessons learned and feedback received during the last year of nationwide program implementation. Participants on this webinar had the opportunity to engage with DOE, view a demo of the Scoring Tool, and learn about the plans for its future. Joan Glickman, Home Energy Score Program Manager, was joined by Home Energy Score Partner New Jersey

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - anesthesiques halogenes pendant Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Chemistry 38 HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Halogens, dioxinsHalogens, dioxinsfuransfurans Summary: HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153...

79

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward the goal of developing a portable test kit for screening halogenated VOCs in the field.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO); Davis, John W. (Ballwin, MO)

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Date Event Topic Speaker Description 6-Aug-07 Spotlight on Science Making the Most of the Postdoc Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Poster Session The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and the Office of Postdoctoral Education posters highlighting their research from 4-6 PM in the Alumni Center. 15-Oct-07 Spotlight on ScienceDate Event Topic Speaker Description 6-Aug-07 Spotlight on Science Making the Most of the Postdoc

82

Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO)

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques  

SciTech Connect

Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

Goodman, Mark M. (Atlanta, GA); Faraj, Bahjat (Lithonia, GA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Technology Spotlight:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Spotlight: Solar Water Heating Technology Spotlight: Solar Water Heating Friday, September 27, 2013 By Solar Decathlon Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Solar water heating systems make hot water for residential uses such as bathing, laundering, and dish washing. Generally less expensive than photovoltaic panels, these systems provide homeowners with a cost-effective way to harness the sun's energy. Photo of a wooden house with PV panels and a solar hot water system on the roof. Middlebury College's U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 211 entry, Self-Reliance, had two roof-mounted solar hot water collector arrays (right) that circulated glycol through vacuum-insulated borosilicate glass

87

Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking Shipments Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking Shipments August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis James Shuler, manager of DOE’s Packaging Certification Program, within EM's Office of Packaging and Transportation, discusses the radiofrequency identification technology he developed. At left is RFID Team Leader Yung Liu, with Argonne National Laboratory. James Shuler, manager of DOE's Packaging Certification Program, within EM's Office of Packaging and Transportation, discusses the radiofrequency identification technology he developed. At left is RFID Team Leader Yung Liu, with Argonne National Laboratory. The radiofrequency identification technology EM's James Shuler developed is shown here, attached to a waste shipment.

88

The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency July 30, 2012 - 9:19am Addthis Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Founding Partners of Los Angeles Better Buildings Challenge sign commitments to reduce energy use in their buildings. | Photo courtesy of the City of Los Angeles. Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and the Founding Partners of Los Angeles Better Buildings Challenge sign commitments to reduce energy use in their buildings. | Photo courtesy of the City of Los Angeles. John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy What are the key facts? As part of the Better Buildings Challenge, Los Angeles pledged to improve energy efficiency in 30 million square feet of public and private.

89

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Technology Spotlight:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Monday, September 19, 2011 Alexis Powers Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. Made of foam insulation sandwiched between two layers of structural board, SIPs provide a more airtight dwelling than a standard stud-frame house. This creates a quieter and more energy-efficient interior space. Various types of insulation can be used in SIPs in homes. The most common insulating material is polystyrene or polyisocyanurate foam. Foam insulation is added between two sheets of oriented strand board (an

90

Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights Here are past webinars and materials from Home Energy Score. July 30, 2013: Home Energy Score Program Overview for the American Gas Association U.S. DOE is getting ready to launch a new version of the Home Energy Scoring Tool, building on lessons learned and feedback received during the last year of nationwide program implementation. Participants on this webinar had the opportunity to engage with DOE, view a demo of the Scoring Tool, and learn about the plans for its future. Joan Glickman, Home Energy Score Program Manager, was joined by Home Energy Score Partner New Jersey Natural Gas, who has completed more than 2,300 scores to date. The webinar is geared specifically to natural gas utilities' interests. Download the

91

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

92

Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Synthesis of tungsten nano composites  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten-copper composites are currently used as thermal management substrates on a commercial basis. Properties such as high corrosion/erosion resistance, good thermal and electrical conductivity and sufficient mechanical strength and thermal shock resistance make tungsten-copper based composites attractive as electrode materials in automobile sparkplugs. These composites are mostly manufactured through infiltration and mechanical alloying. The products, however, generally lack compositional homogeneity. In this study, chemical approaches were used to synthesize W-Cu and W-Cu-TiB{sub 2} composites. The powders obtained had an average agglomerate size of 1.2 {mu}m and consisted of 50--200 mn sized primary particles. The W and Cu distribution was uniform on at least the submicron level. Consolidation studies on a W-Cu-TiB{sub 2} sample showed no substantial grain growth at 1,350 C under 500 MPa pressure for 2 minutes. The morphology of the grains, however, underwent noticeable changes.

Yu, C.C.; Kumar, R.; Sudarshan, T.S. [Materials Modification, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) in the Norwestern Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) are a distinctive class of marine organic compounds. They are naturally produced, they have a unique carbon structure, they are highly halogenated, and they bioaccumulate in ...

Pangallo, Kristin C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electrical conductivity of warm dense tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The electrical conductivity of warm dense tungsten plasma has been investigated successfully by a linear mixture rule considering various interactions of electrons with electrons, atoms, and ions. The plasma composition is calculated by the nonideal Saha equation. The interesting regime for tungsten plasma spans from weakly coupled and nondegenerate regime to strongly coupled and partial degenerate state. The electrical conductivity calculated is in reasonable agreement with the exploding wire experiments and other theoretical models. The present result demonstrates that the theoretical model is valid for the electrical conductivity of tungsten plasma in the warm dense matter regime.

Zhijian Fu; Lijun Jia; Xiaowei Sun; Qifeng Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2011 Version 2 April 2011 Version 2 betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Driving Demand The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is part of the national Better Buildings Initiative led by the U.S. Department of Energy. To learn how the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is making homes more comfortable and businesses more lucrative and to read more from this Spotlight series, visit betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods. Neighbors Excel in Spreading the Value of Energy Efficiency in Rutland, Vermont Building on their understanding of homeowners in Rutland County, Vermont, NeighborWorks of Western Vermont (NWWVT) has enlisted well-respected local citizens and organizations to spread the word about home energy efficiency

98

Tungsten wire for incandescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten wire for incandescent lamp filaments must operate at high temperatures and for long times. To meet these requirements, the grain morphology of the wire must be controlled to reduce the propensity for grain boundary sliding. The morphology is a function of the distribution of very small pockets of potassium in the wire and the mechanical processing from ingot to wire. The behavior of the filament is directly related to the grain morphology. This paper describes the mechanism by which the potassium is incorporated into and distributed in the ingot. The elongation and spheroidization of the bubbles during hot rolling and swaging is also examined and related to the grain morphology of wire. Some indications of the relationship between grain morphology and filament behavior are also given.

Walter, J.L.; Briant, C.L. (General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract: The structure and catalytic activity of tungsten oxide clusters formed via sublimation of monodispersed cyclic (WO3)3 onto FeO(111)Pt(111) surface has been studied...

100

Alkali-metal-halogen charge-exchange collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approximate quasiclassical treatment is presented for calculating the cross sections for charge transfer from a neutral alkali-metal atom colliding with a halogen atom (chlorine or fluorine). The electron is treated by the time-dependent perturbation in the two-state approximation. The two states are the ground (or the first-excited) state of alkali-metal atom and the ground state of the halogen negative ion. Charge-transfer cross sections are calculated as a function of relative velocity (v) of collision between v=0.01and5 a.u. Qualitative features of these cross sections are compared with an earlier work on alkali-metal-oxygen collisions. An asymptotic formula at low velocities of collision v?0 is obtained, which compares with the earlier formula obtained by Bates. At higher velocities cross sections are found to vary as 1v2, as in the Born approximation.

D. Arora; J. E. Turner; P. G. Khubchandani

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High-temperature stress measurement on chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten silicide and tungsten films  

SciTech Connect

Stresses in chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten silicide and tungsten films at high temperatures were measured. Tungsten silicide films were formed from WF/sub 6/ and SiH/sub 4/ or Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/. Tungsten films were formed from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/. The stress in tungsten silicide films is tensile and in the order of 10/sup 9/--10/sup 10/ dynes/cm/sup 2/. For a composition ratio of Si/Wless than or equal to2.6, the stress of a film of more than 1000 A has a maximum at about 500 /sup 0/C. On the other hand, for a composition Si/W>2.9, the stress has no maximum. The maximum of the stress is caused by crystallization of the film. The stress has two components. One component is related to the difference of the thermal expansion coefficients between the film and the Si substrate. Another is related to the film crystallization. It was found that the stress concentrates in the portion of the film nearest the substrate. The stress in tungsten films also reaches a maximum at 550 /sup 0/C, similar to the tungsten silicide films. However, the cause of this behavior is not clear.

Shioya, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Maeda, M.; Yanagida, K.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy  

SciTech Connect

Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

Holden,N.E.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

104

Plasma focus assisted damage studies on tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten is being considered as a front runner choice for the plasma facing component material of next generation fusion reactor because of its superior thermophysical and mechanical properties. Therefore, it is essential to study the ion material interaction of this material for its response to severe conditions of fusion reactor. In this work, we have used an ingenious ion source a namely plasma focus to study the effect of proton irradiation on tungsten under various experimental conditions. Exposed and reference tungsten samples were analyzed using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness tester. Surface analyses confirm the formation of microcracks, bubbles, blisters, holes, etc. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the development of compressive stress on the sample due to thermal load and formation of other phases or some expanded phases. A slight reduction in hardness values is observed in case of the exposed sample than the reference sample.

M. Bhuyan; S.R. Mohanty; C.V.S. Rao; P.A. Rayjada; P.M. Raole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers  

SciTech Connect

New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Efficient and Regioselective Halogenations of 2-Amino-1,3-thiazoles with Copper Salts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient and Regioselective Halogenations of 2-Amino-1,3-thiazoles with Copper Salts Fabrice G. Halogenations proceed easily in the presence of copper(I) or copper(II) chlorides, bromides, or iodides directly in solution or with supported copper halides. 1,3-Thiazole rings appear in many compounds that exhibit

Shen, Jun

107

Process for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal, the process comprising: (a) forming an aqueous slurry of tungsten carbide having a particle size of no greater than - 100 mesh, and zinc metal powder; (b) adding ammonia to the slurry with the amount of the ammonia being sufficient so that the slurry is basic after the subsequent addition of cobalt chloride in step c; (c) adding to the resulting ammoniated slurry, a solution of cobalt chloride with agitation, to form a coating of partially reduced cobalt on the tungsten carbide; (d) removing the resulting cobalt coated tungsten carbide from the resulting liquor; and (e) heating the cobalt coated tungsten carbide in a reducing atmosphere to effect the essentially complete reduction of the cobalt and to produce a cobalt metal coating on the tungsten carbide, the coating making up no greater than about 15% of weight of the tungsten carbide.

Ritsko, J.E.; Lee, J.S.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Tungsten Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

109

Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients  

SciTech Connect

The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

John Scott O'Dell

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods 1 Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives With support from the U.S. Energy Department's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, a diverse coalition of partners under the banner of BetterBuildings for Michigan designed 27 neighborhood "sweeps" across the state. These targeted outreach campaigns applied varying incentives and outreach strategies to designated neighbor- hoods with a goal to understand which incentives and strategies work best in the target communities. In the earliest sweeps, program staff focused on maximizing the number of participants receiving a diagnostic energy assessment and some energy efficiency measures, called the program's "base package." Program staff

112

ORNL, Industry Collaboration Puts Spotlight on Solar T DOING BUSINESS WITH ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Collaboration Industry Collaboration Puts Spotlight on Solar T DOING BUSINESS WITH ORNL PREPARING FOR THE FUTURE The ORNL Partnerships Directorate seeks to foster economic development and the growth of business and industry by mak- ing available the most innovative equipment, the latest technol- ogy, and the expertise of ORNL researchers to technology-based companies and research universities throughout the nation. F our manu- facturers of solar energy components are working with Oak Ridge National Labo- ratory to address some of their biggest challenges. Through individual cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs), the companies hope to advance solar cell materials and processing technologies. The $880,000 effort is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment

113

Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li Lithium-halogen exchange reactions are essentially inert. 2 t-BuLi t-BuI + RLi t-BuLi isobutene + isobutane + LiI Lithium-halogen exchange reactions, and lithium iodide. H OEtBr H H OEtLi H1.1 eq n-BuLi Et2O, !80 °C Lau, K. S.; Schlosser, M. J. Org. Chem. 1978

114

Employee Spotlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Youth Olympics in Moscow, and today coaches soccer in his spare time.102214 Sheila Armstrong Sheila Armstrong-Helping hospice patients and their loved ones say good-bye Sheila...

115

Student Spotlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mekena McGrew Mekena McGrew First-year physics PhD student University of California, Merced Area of NIF: Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Project: Created a Single-shot,...

116

Student Spotlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as well. You received an award for your work here. I presented a poster at the Student Poster Symposium on identifying reflections on images taken by the "FODI" camera...

117

Student Spotlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

particularly tents Project: Optimization of Ultrathin Films Tell us about your student internship experience. I was first here two years ago, also working with tents. As a...

118

Student Spotlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Name: Image Analysis Classification algorithm to automatically classify NIF optics damage sites Project Description: Develop a classification system of potential damage...

119

Thiophene Hydrogenation to Tetrahydrothiophene over Tungsten Sulfide Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Independent reactions of thiophene reduction to tetrahydrothiophene and thiophene hydrogenolysis to form hydrogen sulfide...4...hydrocarbons are shown to occur over supported tungsten sulfide catalysts and unsupp...

A. V. Mashkina

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst  

SciTech Connect

A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

Kim, Young-ho [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Irie, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Corrosion and wear resistance of tungsten carbide-cobalt and tungsten carbide-cobalt-chromium thermal spray coatings  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings provide wear surfaces to new and overhauled components for various industries. Their wear resistance is obtained by incorporating small tungsten carbide particles into a metal matrix. This presentation will show what parameters influence their corrosion resistance in the ASTM B-117 Salt Spray Corrosion Test,

Quets, J.; Alford, J.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Spotlight SAR interferometry for terrain elevation mapping and interferometric change detection  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we employ an approach quite different from any previous work; we show that a new methodology leads to a simpler and clearer understanding of the fundamental principles of SAR interferometry. This methodology also allows implementation of an important collection mode that has not been demonstrated to date. Specifically, we introduce the following six new concepts for the processing of interferometric SAR (INSAR) data: (1) processing using spotlight mode SAR imaging (allowing ultra-high resolution), as opposed to conventional strip-mapping techniques; (2) derivation of the collection geometry constraints required to avoid decorrelation effects in two-pass INSAR; (3) derivation of maximum likelihood estimators for phase difference and the change parameter employed in interferometric change detection (ICD); (4) processing for the two-pass case wherein the platform ground tracks make a large crossing angle; (5) a robust least-squares method for two-dimensional phase unwrapping formulated as a solution to Poisson`s equation, instead of using traditional path-following techniques; and (6) the existence of a simple linear scale factor that relates phase differences between two SAR images to terrain height. We show both theoretical analysis, as well as numerous examples that employ real SAR collections to demonstrate the innovations listed above.

Eichel, P.H.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation was observed at SO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppmv and higher. In contrast, SO{sub 2} concentrations as low as 50 ppmv significantly reduced mercury oxidation by bromine, this reduction could be due to both gas and liquid phase interactions between SO{sub 2} and oxidized mercury species. The simultaneous presence of chlorine and bromine in the flue gas resulted in a slight increase in mercury oxidation above that obtained with bromine alone, the extent of the observed increase is proportional to the chlorine concentration. The results of this study can be used to understand the relative importance of gas-phase mercury oxidation by bromine and chlorine in combustion systems. Two temperature profiles were tested: a low quench (210 K/s) and a high quench (440 K/s). For chlorine the effects of quench rate were slight and hard to characterize with confidence. Oxidation with bromine proved sensitive to quench rate with significantly more oxidation at the lower rate. The data generated in this program are the first homogeneous laboratory-scale data on bromine-induced oxidation of mercury in a combustion system. Five Hg-Cl and three Hg-Br mechanisms, some published and others under development, were evaluated and compared to the new data. The Hg-halogen mechanisms were combined with submechanisms from Reaction Engineering International for NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. The homogeneous kinetics under-predicted the levels of mercury oxidation observed in full-scale systems. This shortcoming can be corrected by including heterogeneous kinetics in the model calculations.

Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: The electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical components of the nanocomposite, and is also affected by the property of electrolyte. A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. Highlights: {yields} Electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite with core-shell structure. {yields} Activity is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical component of the nanocomposite. {yields} The property of electrolyte affects the electrocatalytic activity. {yields} A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. -- Abstract: Tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite was prepared by combining a reduced-carbonized approach with a mechanochemical approach. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope under scanning mode and X-ray energy dispersion spectrum. The results show that the crystal phases of the samples are composed of anatase, rutile, nonstoichiometry titanium oxide, monotungsten carbide, bitungsten carbide and nonstoichiometry tungsten carbide, and they can be controlled by adjusting the parameters of the reduced-carbonized approach; tungsten carbide particles decorate on the surface of titania support, the diameter of tungsten carbide particle is smaller than 20 nm and that of titania is around 100 nm; the chemical components of the samples are Ti, O, W and C. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples was measured by a cyclic voltammetry with three electrodes. The results indicate that the electrocatalytic activities of the samples are related to their crystal phases and the property of electrolyte in aqueous solution. A synergistic effect between titania and tungsten carbide is reported for the first time.

Hu, Sujuan; Shi, Binbin; Yao, Guoxing [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Li, Guohua, E-mail: nanozjut@zjut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Ma, Chunan [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Processing and properties of extruded tungsten-hafnium and tungsten-steel composites  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the processing behavior and properties of tungsten-hafnium (W-Hf) and W-steel composites produced by hot extrusion of canned powders. The W-Hf composite was consolidated by extrusion of blended powders with preheat temperatures over the temperature range of 1100 to 1400{degrees}C. All extrusions produced fully dense material which exhibits elongation of the tungsten phase within the hafnium matrix. The flow stress, as characterized by the extrusion constant, decreases with increasing temperature up to 1300{degrees}C and increases substantially at 1400{degrees}C as significant quantities of intermetallic phase are formed during preheating. The room-temperature (RT) hardness and compressive yield stress increase modestly with increased extrusion ratio and are not affected by extrusion temperature in the range 1100 to 1300{degrees}C. The microstructures are essentially fully recrystallized at the 1300{degrees}C preheat temperature and partially recrystallized at lower temperatures. Additionally, a mixture of tungsten and steel powder was consolidated to full density by hot extrusion at a 1000{degrees}C preheat temperature and a reduction ratio of 4.2. Increased reduction of the W-steel composite results in increased RT hardness.

Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kapoor, D. [Army Armament Research and Development Engineering Center, Dover, NJ (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mtn Geothermal Project Mtn Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.723055555556°, -118.08027777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.723055555556,"lon":-118.08027777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

129

Rhenium alloying of tungsten heavy alloys  

SciTech Connect

Alloying experiments were performed using rhenium additions to a classic 90 mass % tungsten heavy alloy. The mixed-powder system was liquid phase sintered to full density at 1500 C in 60 min The rhenium-modified alloys exhibited a smaller grain size, higher hardness, higher strength, and lower ductility than the unalloyed system. For an alloy with a composition of 84W-6Re-8Ni-2Fe, the sintered density was 17, 4 Mg/m{sup 3} with a yield strength of 815 MPa, tensile strength of 1180 MPa, and elongation to failure of 13%. This property combination results from the aggregate effects of grain size reduction and solid solution hardening due to rhenium. In the unalloyed system these properties require post-sintering swaging and aging; thus, alloying with rhenium is most attractive for applications where net shaping is desired, such as by powder injection molding.

German, R.M.; Bose, A.; Jerman, G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series 68. Halogenated Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Compounds C3C14 With Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series 68. Halogenated Aliphatic Hydrocarbon Compounds C3­C14 With Water 16, 1999 This volume covers the solubilities of halogenated aliphatic C3­C14 compounds with water, heavy water, and electrolyte solutions. All data were critically examined for their reliability and best

Magee, Joseph W.

131

Growth of Ordered Ultrathin Tungsten Oxide Films on Pt(111)....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tungsten oxide ultra-thin films were prepared on a Pt(111) substrate at 700 K via direct sublimation of monodispersed cyclic (WO3)3 trimers. The surface composition, structure and...

132

Electrochemistry of (Dihapto-Buckminster-Fullerene) Pentacarbonyl Tungsten(0)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cyclic voltammetry experiments on [60]fullerene, (C60), and (dihapto-[60]fullerene) pentacarbonyl tungsten(0), (?2-C60)W(CO)5, constitute an educational experiment for the inorganic chemistry laboratory with a primary objective to teach the chemical ...

Elvin Igarta-Nieves; Yessenia Ocasio-Delgado; Jos Rivera-Pagn; Jos E. Corts-Figueroa

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Microstructured tungsten thermophotovoltaic selective emitters c by Natalija (Zorana) Jovanovi?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the fabrication, modeling, characterization, and application of tungsten two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structures as selective emitters and means of achieving higher efficiencies ...

Jovanovic, Natalija Zorana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface Coating of Tungsten Carbide by Electric Exploding of Contact  

SciTech Connect

Electric exploding of a tungsten carbide--cobalt material near-by high-speed steel surface forms on it a hardening coating. The essential structure properties of the formed coatings are determined by parameters of contact exploding electrode at the pulse current amplitude from above 106 A/cm2 and duration less than 10-4 s. The metallographic investigations of coating structures were done by microscope 'Neophot-24'. They have shown that the contact electric exploding caused the transfer of tungsten carbide and cobalt on the surface of high-speed steel. The breakdown of tungsten carbide--cobalt material took place during electrical exploding. The hardening layers of tungsten carbide and pure nanocrystalline tungsten have been formed upon the surface of high-speed steel as a result of electric exploding. Crystalline grains of tungsten have an almost spherical form and their characteristic size less than 400 nanometers. Micro hardness of the coating layers and high-speed steel structures was measured.

Grigoryev, Evgeny G. [General Physics Department, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Contents|Director's Message 2|Honors and Awards 3|Project 4|Distinguished Lecture 6|Activities 7| Lab Profile 8|Project 10|Great Idea 12|Spotlight 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in order to meet the big data challenges of bioinformatics. The Spotlight section describes Distinguished Council, the 2013 Outstanding Young Electrical Engineer Award from the Chinese Institute of Electrical of Information & Computing Machinery. Dr. De-Nian Yang receiving the Outstanding Youth Electrical Engineer Award

Chen, Sheng-Wei

136

GREEN LIVING Replace incandencent and halogen light bulbs with LED and CLFs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREEN LIVING GUIDE ENERGY TRAVEL FOOD sustain yosef WATER Replace incandencent and halogen light POWER STRIPS! for you electronics, and turn them off when not in use Adjust your thermostat UP IN SUMMER Bicycle Initiative http://boonebikeinitiative.org LEAVE YOUR CAR AT HOME - save $ on a parking pass

Thaxton, Christopher S.

137

VAPORIZATION OF TUNGSTEN-METAL IN STEAM AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.  

SciTech Connect

The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate system. The aerosol formed a fine white smoke of tungsten-oxide which was visible to the eye as it condensed in the laminar boundary layer of steam which flowed along the surface of the rod. The aerosol continued to flow as a smoke tube downstream of the rod, flowing coaxially along the centerline axis of the quartz glass tube and depositing by impaction along the outside of a bend and at sudden area contractions in the piping. The vaporization rate data from the 17 experiments which exceeded the vaporization threshold temperature are shown in Figure 5 in the form of vaporization rates (g/cm{sup 2} s) vs. inverse temperature (K{sup {minus}1}). Two correlations to the present data are presented and compared to a published correlation by Kilpatrick and Lott. The differences are discussed.

GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Magnetoresistive conductive polymer-tungsten trioxide nanocomposites with ultrahigh sensitivity at low magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanoparticles. These nanocomposites have demonstrated ultrahigh MRMagnetoresistive conductive polymer-tungsten trioxide nanocomposites with ultrahigh sensitivity polymers and their nanocomposite systems has attracted intense interests due to their easy synthesis, low

Guo, John Zhanhu

139

Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60GPa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest in transition metal borides (TMs) as potential new avenues for synthesizing hard materials.1­4 Tungsten borides, WBx, which include WB, WB2, and WB4 and are analogous to tungsten carbides, have been

Duffy, Thomas S.

140

Space-Variant Post-Filtering for Wavefront Curvature Correction in Polar-Formatted Spotlight-Mode SAR Imagery  

SciTech Connect

Wavefront curvature defocus effects occur in spotlight-mode SAR imagery when reconstructed via the well-known polar-formatting algorithm (PFA) under certain imaging scenarios. These include imaging at close range, using a very low radar center frequency, utilizing high resolution, and/or imaging very large scenes. Wavefront curvature effects arise from the unrealistic assumption of strictly planar wavefronts illuminating the imaged scene. This dissertation presents a method for the correction of wavefront curvature defocus effects under these scenarios, concentrating on the generalized: squint-mode imaging scenario and its computational aspects. This correction is accomplished through an efficient one-dimensional, image domain filter applied as a post-processing step to PF.4. This post-filter, referred to as SVPF, is precalculated from a theoretical derivation of the wavefront curvature effect and varies as a function of scene location. Prior to SVPF, severe restrictions were placed on the imaged scene size in order to avoid defocus effects under these scenarios when using PFA. The SVPF algorithm eliminates the need for scene size restrictions when wavefront curvature effects are present, correcting for wavefront curvature in broadside as well as squinted collection modes while imposing little additional computational penalty for squinted images. This dissertation covers the theoretical development, implementation and analysis of the generalized, squint-mode SVPF algorithm (of which broadside-mode is a special case) and provides examples of its capabilities and limitations as well as offering guidelines for maximizing its computational efficiency. Tradeoffs between the PFA/SVPF combination and other spotlight-mode SAR image formation techniques are discussed with regard to computational burden, image quality, and imaging geometry constraints. It is demonstrated that other methods fail to exhibit a clear computational advantage over polar-formatting in conjunction with SVPF. This research concludes that PFA in conjunction with SVPF provides a computationally efficient spotlight-mode image formation solution that solves the wavefront curvature problem for most standoff distances and patch sizes, regardless of squint, resolution or radar center frequency. Additional advantages are that SVPF is not iterative and has no dependence on the visual contents of the scene: resulting in a deterministic computational complexity which typically adds only thirty percent to the overall image formation time.

DOREN,NEALL E.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten  

SciTech Connect

We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

Liu, Yi-Nan [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China) [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland); Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland)] [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland); Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China)] [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Li, Xiao-Chun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

A history of tungsten- and molybdenum-base alloys  

SciTech Connect

The development of tungsten and molybdenum alloys was initiated in the early 1900s in search of a better electric lamp filament with tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, and osmium being the prime candidates. The efforts required for accomplishment of the task led to refining oxides to high purity, reduction of the oxides to metal powders, forming green product forms by extrusion or pressing, and finally sintering by electric furnace and self-heating by direct current almost to the melting point. The technology required for producing lamp filaments led to the development of the powder metallurgy field and early research on high-melting-temperature metals. During the period 1909 through 1959, most of the tungsten-molybdenum, high-melting-temperature element alloys were developed and produced in almost any product form required.

Heestand, R.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A history of tungsten- and molybdenum-base alloys  

SciTech Connect

The development of tungsten and molybdenum alloys was initiated in the early 1900s in search of a better electric lamp filament with tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, and osmium being the prime candidates. The efforts required for accomplishment of the task led to refining oxides to high purity, reduction of the oxides to metal powders, forming green product forms by extrusion or pressing, and finally sintering by electric furnace and self-heating by direct current almost to the melting point. The technology required for producing lamp filaments led to the development of the powder metallurgy field and early research on high-melting-temperature metals. During the period 1909 through 1959, most of the tungsten-molybdenum, high-melting-temperature element alloys were developed and produced in almost any product form required.

Heestand, R.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard University of Wisconsin proposing an all-tungsten divertor for their tokamak designs. In designing such a component, fracture a series of fracture mechanics-based analyses to demonstrate the feasibility of using an all- tungsten

145

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

betterbuildings.energy.gov/neighborhoods 1 June 2012 Financing and Incentives Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Key Takeaways ■■ Use performance-based incentives to nudge customers toward greater energy savings ■■ Promote recurring, limited- time bonus rebates to grab customers' attention, even when reducing incentive levels ■■ Approve financing early and make it an integral part of the program to reduce barriers to customer participation C i i r p l e m B t o i t f m c The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is a U.S. Energy Department program that is improving lives and communities across the country through energy efficiency. To learn how the Better Buildings Neighborhood

146

Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten  

SciTech Connect

To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

147

Halogen adsorption on transition-metal surfaces: A case study of Cl on Ta(110)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through a series of ab initio calculations, we not only predict the atomic and electronic structure of Cl on Ta(110), but also provide a quantitative basis for understanding a number of controversial questions regarding halogen adsorption on transition-metal surfaces. We demonstrate that a simple dipole layer model accurately describes the unexpected decrease in the work function upon halogen absorption, and that our proposed overlayer structure explains the one-dimensional streaking in the low-energy electron-diffraction pattern of the adsorbate-covered surface. An analysis of the electronic structure suggests that transition metals such as Ta look like simple metals from the point of view of highly electronegative adsorbates such as Cl.

Christine J. Wu and John E. Klepeis

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

The chemistry of halogens on diamond: effects on growth and electron emission  

SciTech Connect

Diamond growth using halogenated precursors was studied in several diamond growth reactors. In a conventionao plasma reactor, diamond growth using the following gas mixtures was studied: CF{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}F/H{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}CL/H{sub 2}. Both the diamond growth measurements demonstrated ineffective transport of halogen radicals to the diamond surface during the growth process. In order to transport radical halogen species to the diamond surface during growth, a flow-tube reactor was constructed which minimized gas phase reactions. Also, the flow-tube reactor enabled pulsed gs transport to the diamond surface by fast-acting valves. Molecular beam mass spectroscopy was used to find condition which resulted in atomic hydrogen and/or atomic fluorine transport to the growing diamond surface. Although such conditions were found, they required very low pressures (0.5 Torr and below); these low pressures produce radical fluxes which are too low to sustain a reasonable diamond growth rate. The sequential reactor at Stanford was modified to add a halogen-growth step to the conventinoal atomic hydrogen/atomic carbon diamond growth cycle. Since the atomic fluorine, hydrogen and carbon environments are independent in the sequential reactor, the effect of fluorine on diamond growth could be studied independently of gas phase reactions. Although the diamond growth rate was increased by the use of fluorine, the film quality was seen to deteriorate as well as the substrate surface. Moreover, materials incompatibilities with fluorine significantly limited the use of fluorine in this reactor. A diamond growth model incorporating both gas phase and surface reactions was developed for the halocarbon system concurrent with the film growth efforts. In this report, we review the results of the growth experiments, the modeling, and additional experiments done to understand fluorine with diamond surfaces.

Hsu, W.L.; Pan, L.S.; Brown, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Organic halogens in unpolluted waters and large bodies of water receiving bleach plant effluents  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors review and update recently performed studies of organic halogens in unpolluted waters and two large bodies of water receiving bleach plant effluents---Lake Vattern in Sweden and the Baltic Sea. All water samples contained measurable amounts of adsorbable organic halogens (AOX); the highest concentrations (up to 200 {mu}g Cl/L) were observed in humic lakes not exposed to any industrial discharges. Analysis of chlorophenols revealed that there is a long-distance transport ({gt} 100 km) of chloroguaiacols from bleach plants to remote parts of receiving waters. However, there was no evidence of chlorinated organics from bleach plants accumulating over several years in the water phase. One chlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and its methylated analogue, 2,4,6-trichloroanisole, were also detected in surface waters considered to be unpolluted. Mass balance calculations showed that different processes in terrestrial environments make large contributions of AOX; enzyme-mediated chlorination of humic substances is a plausible explanation to the widespread occurrence of organic halogens.

Grimvall, A.; Jonsson, S.; Karlsson, S.; Savenhed, R.; Boren, H. (Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies, Linkoping Univ., S-58183 Linkoping (SE))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. (Contains a minimum of 109 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Atomistic modeling of diffusion coefficient in fusion reactor first wall material tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tungsten is remarkable for its robustness, especially it has the highest melting point of all the nonalloyed metals. Metallic material tungsten and tungsten alloys have been widely used in aerospace, weapon, nuclear industries and fusion reactor. Tungsten is expected to be the fusion reactor first wall material for this reason. In this paper, self-diffusion coefficients of metallic material tungsten have been investigated via molecular dynamics simulation method using the modified embedded atom potential model. Diffusion activation energy of tungsten can be gotten according to Arrhenius relation between the self-diffusion coefficients simulation results and temperatures. The dipole interaction model is introduced to analyze metallic material tungsten self-diffusion process in a uniform magnetic field. The strong magnetic field increases diffusion activation energy by 34.52% and limits self-diffusion coefficient by 1.15% in 2T uniform magnetic field.

Zenghui Wang; Kaixuan Zhao; Weiming Chen; Xiaodi Chen; Longyan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Synthesis and characterization of reduced tungsten sulfide cluster complexes  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of tungsten(IV) chloride with metals was studied in order to find a high-yield and convenient preparation of {alpha}-tungsten (II) chloride. The reduction of tungsten(IV) chloride with iron metal proved to be the most convenient and reliable synthesis, with a good yield of 60%. The reactions between {alpha}-tungsten(II) chloride and sodium hydrosulfide were investigated. Complete substitution of sulfide for chloride in W{sub 6}Cl{sub 8}{sup 4+} was achieved in the presence of sodium n-butoxide in pyridine solution. Single crystals were grown at elevated temperature (200{degrees}C) in pyridine, and the structure of W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(py){sub 6} was determined by single crystal x-ray techniques. The triethylphosphine (PEt{sub 3}) and tetrahydrothiophene (THT) complexes of W{sub 6}S{sub 8} were established by ligand displacement of pyridine in W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(py){sub 6}. Structures for both W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(PEt{sub 3}){sub 6}. 1.44CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(THT){sub 6} were determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. These molecular complexes of the W{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster were also characterized by infrared spectroscopy. 86 refs., 19 figs., 22 tabs.

Zhang, Xiang.

1991-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

153

Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons  

SciTech Connect

This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Author's personal copy Tungsten in Hawaiian picrites: A compositional model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form 15 April 2009; available online 3 May 2009 Abstract Concentrations of tungsten (W) and uranium (U is three-times as enriched as the Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM; 3.0 � 2.3 ng/g). The relatively high of the recycling of W-rich oceanic crust and sediment into a depleted mantle source, such as the depleted MORB

Mcdonough, William F.

155

Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

Rothman, Albert J. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Glass Based on the oxides of Molybdenum, Tungsten and Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN previous publications from this Laboratory, attention has been directed to glasses of unusual composition based on the oxides of tellurium and vanadium1-4. This article ... the oxides of tellurium and vanadium1-4. This article describes the development of further unusual glasses based on the oxides of molybdenum, tungsten and uranium.

P. L. BAYNTON; H. RAWSON; J. E. STANWORTH

1956-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer ({mu}M) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 {mu}m W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 {mu}m W powder blends; 10{mu}m W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W.

Gurwell, W.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Concentration-Dependent Kohn Effect in Cubic Tungsten Bronzes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of cubic NaxWO3 reveal a large concentration-dependent Kohn anomaly in the [100] longitudinal acoustic-phonon dispersion curve. The results demonstrate the two-dimensional character of the Fermi surface, support the rigid-band model for 0.56tungsten bronzes.

W. A. Kamitakahara, B. N. Harmon, J. G. Taylor, L. Kopp, H. R. Shanks, and J. Rath

1976-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Synthesis, characterization, and structure of reduced tungsten chalcogenide cluster complexes  

SciTech Connect

Over the previous twenty years, ternary molybdenum chalcogenides of the general formula M{sub x}Mo{sub 6}Y{sub 8} (M = ternary metal cation; Y = chalcogenide), known as Chevrel phases, have been extensively studied. Many of these compounds have been found to have superconductivity, catalytic activity and ionic conductivity. The rich chemistry of the Chevrel phases raises considerable interest in finding the tungsten analogues of these phases. However, no such analogue has ever been synthesized, although the Chevrel phases are usually prepared directly from elements at high temperatures above 1000{degrees}C. The absence of the tungsten analogues may be caused by their thermodynamic instability at such high temperatures. Thus it might be necessary to avoid high-temperature synthetic procedures in order to establish the ternary and binary tungsten chalcogenides. A major focus of the McCarley research group has been on the preparation of M{sub 6}Y{sub 8}L{sub 6} (M = Mo, W; Y = S, Se, Te) cluster complexes as low temperature pathways to the Chevrel phases.

Xiaobing, Xie

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Deoxybenzoin-Based Polyarylates as Halogen-Free Fire-Resistant Kenneth A. Ellzey, T. Ranganathan, Joseph Zilberman, E. Bryan Coughlin,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, processing, and engineering of halogen-free, low heat release, fire-resistant materials present important with high carbon monoxide emis- sion.7,8 Ideal flame-retardant polymers would possess high thermal stabilityDeoxybenzoin-Based Polyarylates as Halogen-Free Fire-Resistant Polymers Kenneth A. Ellzey, T

162

Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Introduction The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction ® The Fiber-Lite MI-150 is a 150 Watt quartz halogen fiber optic illuminator designed for general microscopy use. When used with specialty fiber optic cables the MI-150 illuminator can also Illuminator from the carton and retain the manual and any additional documents. ! Remove the fiber optic cable

Kleinfeld, David

164

Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\ Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten· Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld Image. EAGAR ABSTRACT. An experimental study was carried out to map the light emissions from a gas tungsten arc. The emissions were found to be dramat- ically different with different shielding gases, welding current and base

Eagar, Thomas W.

165

Conductive Polypyrrole/Tungsten Oxide Metacomposites with Negative Permittivity Jiahua Zhu,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) nanocomposites reinforced with tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanorods (NRs) are fabricatedConductive Polypyrrole/Tungsten Oxide Metacomposites with Negative Permittivity Jiahua Zhu, Suying techniques to form PNCs. Therefore, synthesis techniques have been developed and optimized to incorporate

Guo, John Zhanhu

166

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes S. S. Harilal,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes S. S. Harilal,1 N. Farid,1,2 A tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features for a cost effective way for various applica- tions. Typical synthesis methods for nanoparticles are liquid

Harilal, S. S.

167

The Activation Energy of the para-Hydrogen Conversion on Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Activation Energy of the para-Hydrogen Conversion on Tungsten A. Couper D. D. Eley...has been made of the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, B , for the conversion of para-hydrogen on tungsten...

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J. Keinonen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J-principles calculations were used in determining the binding and trapping properties of hydrogen to point defects in tungsten. Hydrogen zero-point vibrations were taken into account. It was concluded that the monovacancy can

Nordlund, Kai

169

Nanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a possibility of replacing precious metal anode catalysts with transition metal compounds for hydrogen oxidation density of states of tungsten carbides resembles that of noble metal platinum.4,5 FundamentalNanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga and C. Y

170

Heat of combustion of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composites  

SciTech Connect

The heat of combustion of two distinctly synthesized stoichiometric tantalum-tungsten oxide energetic composites was investigated by bomb calorimetry. One composite was synthesized using a sol-gel (SG) derived method in which micrometric-scale tantalum is immobilized in a tungsten oxide three-dimensional nanostructured network structure. The second energetic composite was made from the mixing of micrometric-scale tantalum and commercially available (CA) nanometric tungsten oxide powders. The energetic composites were consolidated using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique under a 300 MPa pressure and at temperatures of 25, 400, and 500 C. For samples consolidated at 25 C, the density of the CA composite is 61.65 {+-} 1.07% in comparison to 56.41 {+-} 1.19% for the SG derived composite. In contrast, the resulting densities of the SG composite are higher than the CA composite for samples consolidated at 400 and 500 C. The theoretical maximum density for the SG composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 81.30 {+-} 0.58% and 84.42 {+-} 0.62%, respectively. The theoretical maximum density of the CA composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 74.54 {+-} 0.80% and 77.90 {+-} 0.79%, respectively. X-ray diffraction analyses showed an increase of pre-reaction of the constituents with an increase in the consolidation temperature. The increase in pre-reaction results in lower stored energy content for samples consolidated to 400 and 500 C in comparison to samples consolidated at 25 C. (author)

Cervantes, Octavio G. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Munir, Zuhair A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the metalworking, mining, oil- and gas-drilling, and construction industries. The remaining tungsten was consumed inventory inventory for disposal FY 2007 FY 2007 Ferrotungsten 6 136 Metal powder 268 268 136 34 Ores

172

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kozhevin, V. M. [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation  

SciTech Connect

The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

Sun, Shih-Jye [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Ju, Shin-Pon, E-mail: jushin-pon@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electrochemistry of chemical vapor deposited tungsten films with relevance to chemical mechanical polishing  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical behavior of chemically vapor deposited tungsten films in solutions of interest to tungsten chemical mechanical polishing has been investigated using dc potentiodynamic polarization, linear polarization, and Tafel methods. It was found that in the absence of an oxidizer, the tungsten surface was passivated most effectively at acidic pH values. At pH 2 or 4, a WO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} duplex oxide layer of less than 50 A thickness was detected over the tungsten layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide layer formed at pH 2 was much thicker, and had better passivity compared to the oxide formed at pH 4. Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 or 4 resulted in a dramatic increase in tungsten dissolution.

Kneer, E.A.; Raghunath, C.; Raghavan, S. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Jeon, J.S. [Advanced Micro Devices Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

176

In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The effect of phosphorus on the formation of tungsten dioxide: A novel morphology  

SciTech Connect

The industrial production of tungsten is based on the hydrogen reduction of tungsten oxides, ammonium paratungstate (APT) or ammonium tungsten oxide bronze (ATOB). Hydrogen reduction is applied when high purity tungsten is required and when the addition of other elements or compounds (dopants) is desired for modification of the properties of the metal powder. The first stage of the reduction is finished when WO{sub 2} is formed and it seems that the efficient incorporation of the additives starts mainly at this reduction step. The study reported here was undertaken to investigate the effect of phosphorus dope on the morphology of the intermediate tungsten dioxide and analyze its influence on the grain size of the final tungsten metal powder. The authors observed star shaped morphology of WO{sub 2}, a structure which has not been describe in the literature. Contrary to the well-known cauliflower shaped tungsten dioxide, these starlets are not pseudomorphic to the initial ATOB particles; they grow separately and have a great influence on the grain size of the final metal powder.

Hegedus, E.; Neugebauer, J. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Research Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science] [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Research Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science

1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Institute of Powder Metallurgy and Advanced Ceramics, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111, 1st Section, Northern 2nd Ring Road, Chengdu (China); Yan, Qingzhi, E-mail: qzyan@ustb.edu.cn; Lang, Shaoting [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Microsoft Word - Lamellae tungsten tile design thermal and electromagnetic stress analysis_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lamellae tungsten tile design transient Lamellae tungsten tile design transient thermal/ electromagnetic stress analysis Thomas Willard*, Rui Vieira, Samuel Pierson MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 8 June 2006 Abstract A transient thermal/ electromagnetic stress analysis of the lamellae tungsten tile design has been performed to determine if the design is adequate to meet the maximum design load conditions of 12 MW/ m 2 uniform heat flux for 5 seconds (single pulse, no Diverter Plate temperature ratcheting) , superimposed on the electromagnetic body load due to eddy currents generated by disruptions. The results show that the design is adequate, with the stresses in the tungsten lamellae and the TZM molybdenum hardware less than the ultimate strength of

182

Tungsten-Titanium as Advanced Material for RF-MEMS Switches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present first results on the development of high temperature stable tungsten-titanium (WTi) based MEMS cantilevers, using conventional sputter ... and wet chemical etching. By synthesizing two WTi

Stefan Klein; Helmut Seidel; Ulrich Schmidt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions  

SciTech Connect

The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

Multiphysics Design and Simulation of a Tungsten-Cermet Nuclear Thermal Rocket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel safety have sparked interest in an NTR core based on tungsten-cermet fuel. This work investigates the capability of modern CFD and neutronics codes to design a cermet NTR, and makes specific recommendations for the configuration of channels...

Appel, Bradley

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Tantalumtungsten oxide thermite composites prepared by solgel synthesis and spark plasma sintering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energetic composite powders consisting of solgel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and the results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High-Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the solgel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The solgel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (TaWO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17gcm?3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

Joshua D. Kuntz; Octavio G. Cervantes; Alexander E. Gash; Zuhair A. Munir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Electropolymerized Polyaniline Stabilized Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposite Films: Electrochromic Behavior and Electrochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electropolymerized Polyaniline Stabilized Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposite Films: Electrochromic. The optical properties and electrochemical capacitive behaviors of the composite films for electrochromic (EC electrochromism at both positive and negative potentials arising from PANI and WO3, respectively. A coloration

Guo, John Zhanhu

187

Method of producing tungsten-titanium sputter targets and targets produced thereby  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for preparing a tungsten-titanium sputter target having substantially no [beta](Ti,W) phase present and exhibiting improvement in reduction of particulate emission upon sputtering, comprising: (a) providing powders of said tungsten and titanium wherein said titanium powder is present in an amount of about 1-20 wt. % based on the total weight of said tungsten and titanium powders provided; (b) compacting said powders at a pressure of from about 200 to 1,000 MPa; and (c) heating said powders at a temperature from about 600-882 C. A method for preparing a tungsten-titanium sputtering target having substantially no [beta](Ti,W) phase present and exhibiting improvement in reduction of particulate emission upon sputtering.

Wickersham, C.E. Jr.; Mueller, J.J.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

188

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline tungsten matrix Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to be easily resolved (P. Piccoli and B. Stuller). WDS map of tungsten in a titanite (CaTiSiO5) grain from... the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, Yosemite National Park. The...

189

Biomarker sensitivity for polynuclear and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in fish species from Galveston Bay  

SciTech Connect

The Galveston Bay estuary exhibits a contamination gradient for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, which is useful for comparing biomarker response sensitivity in fish taken from different bay locations. Two fish species, hardhead catfish (Arius felis) and Atlantic croaker (Micropogon undulatus), were collected from four stations where sediment total PAHs ranged from 68 to > 1,000 ng/g. Hardhead catfish showed no consistent CYP1A mediated responses (hepatic ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity (EROD), CYP1A mRNA levels, or CYP1A immunoreactive protein) in the field collected fish or in fish dosed with up to 15 mg/kg benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). Significant differences were seen in field collected hardhead catfish in biliary concentrations of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and BaP metabolites. Conversely, in croakers taken from the same four Galveston Bay locations, there were significant elevations IN EROD and glutathione-S-transferase activities, CYP1A immunoreactive protein, and biliary PAH metabolites at the contaminated stations. These studies suggest that croaker is a good monitoring species especially with respect to induction of CYP1A mediated responses by PAHs. Biliary PAH metabolites and PAH-DNA adducts were sensitive to PAH contamination in both species.

Willett, K.; McDonald, S.; Steinberg, M.; Beatty, K.; Safe, S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

DEP - Spotlight Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summer Institute on Sustainability and Energy Summer Institute on Sustainability and Energy The Summer Institute on Sustainability and Energy (SISE) is a two-week intensive workshop and lecture series geared towards individuals interested in the title subjects: sustainability and energy. From August 5-16, a diverse body of participants will converge on the UIC campus and immerse itself in a broad spectrum of sustainability and energy related topics. Issues presented will be of interest to scientists, economists, political scientists, urban planners, engineers, architects, and entrepreneurs. Participants will engage these issues through interactive and interdisciplinary lectures and panel discussions, collaborative research projects that stress scientific innovation and entrepreneurship, networking opportunities with academics and professionals, and tours of sustainability and energy related sites in the Chicago area. This experience leaves graduates of the Summer Institute with a firm foundation for future careers in sustainability and energy, and inspires them to lead the next generation as thoughtful and informed global citizens. For 2013, SISE will look at sustainability and energy through the lens of transportation.

192

MEISPP Internship Spotlight  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 8, 2008, DOE interns embarked on a scenic July 8, 2008, DOE interns embarked on a scenic trip to Morgantown, West Virginia, to tour the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). As we boarded the bus early in the morning to begin our journey, the buzz of interns filled the air. What might we see at this National Laboratory? Would we stumble onto anything top secret? How on earth did we all manage to make it to Forrestal by seven o'clock in the morning? The ride took us down the road and through the mountains all the way to Morgantown, West Virginia. The trip also offered ample opportunities for MEISPP and the Office of Human Capital interns to get to know one another better. 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Rm. 5B-110 Washington, DC 20585 Phone: 202-586-8383 Fax: 202-586-3075

193

Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker  

SciTech Connect

Ann Schlenker, Director for the Center for Transportation Research, discusses mentoring and working at Argonne.

Ann Schlenker

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jon Engle Jonathan Engle-Saving lives with nuclear energy Jonathan (Jon) Engle, Reines Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow at the Laboratory, is helping lay the scientific groundwork...

195

Spotlight, September 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), newspapers, magazines, plastics #1-7, and aluminum cans can all be recycled in your buildings recycling bins. KU Recycling is a multiple stream recycler, and asks that you sort your items at the bin. Most buildings have sort centers that contain... already overwhelming me, I find myself discouraged by the thought of having to sort out things that can be recycled or donated and take it somewhere, even though I know its the right thing to do. Generally my sense of guilt overcomes...

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Robot learning [TC Spotlight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

Tedrake, Russell Louis

197

Spotlight, November 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- and water-use decisions in a changing climate, highlighting elements of the Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmers' Land Use Decisions (BACC: FLUD) project. Engineering faculty and others across multiple social and natural science disciplines from... both KU and K-State are working on this collaborative project researching farmers decisions to grow biofuel crops as feedstocks for renewable energy production and their adaptation to climate change. Dr. Sturms focus was on irrigation demands...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Spotlight, June 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

notice. The Biofuels and Climate Change: Farmers Land Use Decisions (BACC:FLUD) project has brought together an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from The University of Kansas, Kansas State University, and Emporia State University... policies that promote or restrain certain land uses; and economic factors, such as food crop prices and biofuel crop prices. These data sets will be integrated with data from other sources into a rich, longitudinal database on land use decisions...

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Spotlight: Schools Expert Panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also covers teacher education and initial teacher...systems used by local education authorities and schools...on current practice. Posters and leaflets on ICT...Panel reports to the BCS Education and Training Forum...Department for Education and Science, the Office for Standards......

Spotlight: Schools Expert Panel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monika Bittman Jon Engle Jos Valdez Kristen Honig Michael Torrez Ron Barber Sheila Armstrong Darleen Vigil A.J. Herrera Christina Martos Hilton Phil & Monica Noll Elena Giorgi...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monika Bittman Jon Engle Jos Valdez Kristen Honig Michael Torrez Ron Barber Sheila Armstrong Darleen Vigil A.J. Herrera Christina Martos Hilton Phil & Monica Noll Elena Giorgi...

202

Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monika Bittman Jon Engle Jos Valdez Kristen Honig Michael Torrez Ron Barber Sheila Armstrong Darleen Vigil A.J. Herrera Christina Martos Hilton Phil & Monica Noll Elena Giorgi...

203

Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monika Bittman Jon Engle Jos Valdez Kristen Honig Michael Torrez Ron Barber Sheila Armstrong Darleen Vigil A.J. Herrera Christina Martos Hilton Phil & Monica Noll Elena Giorgi...

204

Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monika Bittman Jon Engle Jos Valdez Kristen Honig Michael Torrez Ron Barber Sheila Armstrong Darleen Vigil A.J. Herrera Christina Martos Hilton Phil & Monica Noll Elena Giorgi...

205

Spotlight, August 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to attend conferences and events that promote sustainability on campus. Click here for a complete list of funded projects. Galileo Pavilion Studio 804, a class of KU architecture students, was finishing up construction of the Galileo Pavilion at JCCC...August 2012 Page 1 KU Center for Sustainability Hertz on Demand also helps save the environment while saving its members money, by lessening harmful emissions and reducing congestion. Fewer cars on the road means lower CO2 emissions...

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Spotlight, March 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

family size" to a choice system that (continued on page 2) By Thelma Simons, Project Coordinator for Information Technology and KU Advocate for Just Food 2 Page 2 KU Center for Sustainability March 2013 Kansas Dialogue Focuses Discussion at a...-4 PM Downtown Lawrence & South Park 4/23 Sustainability Leadership Award & Green Office Recognition Event, 3:30 PM Kansas Union 4/23 The Environment & Energy: The Role of Free Enterprise and the Government, 7:30 PM Dole Institute...

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Spotlight, October 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measures not yet complete and receive communication materials and other tools to maintain sustainability initiatives in Fraser. At the end of the pilot project, the approach will be assessed to determine the time and resources that would be needed... review the recommendations and implement maintenance projects where funding is identified. (continued on next page) Last year, Fraser Hall consumed over 800,000 kWh of electricity and 400,000 gallons of steam and generated nearly 720 cubic yards...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dave Keller June 2, 2014 It's 2 o'clock in the morning and pitch black. While most Laboratory employees are getting a good night's sleep, wildlife biologist Dave Keller and a...

209

Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

right, but in a way that would allow her to document the beauty and destructiveness of wildfires and the sacrifices, challenges and camaraderie of the men and women protecting...

210

Spotlight, March 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Assessment & Rating System, measures and encourages sustainability in all aspects of higher education. This is KUs first year completing the STARS self ?assessment. Building Sustainable Traditions, introduced last fall, is framed around the principles of... STARS and is guiding our path towards making sustainability an inherent part of everything we do at KU, said Chancellor Bernadette Gray?Little. We are proud of achieving a Bronze rating, but more importantly STARS helps us identify opportunities to build...

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

SPOTLIGHT ON SUNSCREENS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ATEMPEST IN A TEAPOT? YES, SAY MANUFACTURERS OF organic sunscreens, who in March suddenly found themselves reacting to a report that certain sunscreens were potential endocrine disrupters. ...

MARC S. REISCH

2001-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten carbide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbide coatings using an axially fed DC-plasmatron S. Sharafata,U , A. Kobayashib , S. Chena , N spraying; Nickel; Tungsten carbide 1. Introduction 1.1. General Since the mid-1990s, the market share of cemented Z .carbides has surpassed that of high-speed steels HSS , Z .with tungsten carbide WC having 50

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

216

Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (712 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ? An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ? WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 712 nm. ? Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ? WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ? Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UVvisible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 712 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 624 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

Ghoreishi, S.M., E-mail: ghoreshi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meshkat, S.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, Urmia University of Technology, Urmia 57155-419 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghiaci, M. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadkhah, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen bombardment of tungsten carbide surfaces P. Trskelin,1 N. Juslin,1 P. Erhart,2 and K. Nordlund1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen bombardment of tungsten carbide surfaces P. Träskelin,1 and tungsten carbide WC is of interest both due to the use of hydrogen-containing plasmas in thin. INTRODUCTION Tungsten carbide WC exhibits extraordinary hardness and temperature resistance. It has long been

Nordlund, Kai

218

Quantitative structureactivity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: Wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

Karel Chroust; Martina Pavlov; Zbyn?k Prokop; Jan Mendel; Kate?ina Bokov; Zden?k Kubt; Veronika Zaj??kov; Ji?? Damborsk

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Water molecules insert into N-HCl-M hydrogen bonds while M-ClX-C halogen bonds remain intact in dihydrates of halopyridinium hexachloroplatinates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crystals of the dihydrates of three halopyridinium hexachloroplatinate salts form networks that are propagated via N-HO and O-HCl-Pt hydrogen bonds and Pt-ClX-C halogen bonds. The water molecules can be considered to have been inserted into N-HCl-Pt hydrogen bonds anticipated in the anyhdrous form of such salts.

Zordan, F.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated-carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 giL potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent adsorption tube breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. Linear response was checked using both non-volatile TOX species (trichlorophenol) an

JG DOUGLAS; HK MEZNARICH, PHD; JR OLSEN; GA ROSS PHD; M STAUFFER

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)  

SciTech Connect

Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S&GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively remove inorganic chloride from the activated carbon adsorption tubes. With the TOX sample preparation equipment and TOX analyzers at WSCF, the nitrate wash recommended by EPA SW-846 method 9020B was found to be inadequate to remove inorganic chloride interference. Increasing the nitrate wash concentration from 10 grams per liter (g/L) to 100 g/L potassium nitrate and increasing the nitrate wash volume from 3 milliliters (mL) to 10 mL effectively removed the inorganic chloride up to at least 100 ppm chloride in the sample matrix. Excessive purging of the adsorption tubes during sample preparation was eliminated. These changes in sample preparation have been incorporated in the analytical procedure. The results using the revised sample preparation procedure show better agreement of TOX values both for replicate analyses of single samples and for the analysis of replicate samples acquired from the same groundwater well. Furthermore, less apparent column breakthrough now occurs with the revised procedure. One additional modification made to sample preparation was to discontinue the treatment of groundwater samples with sodium bisulfite. Sodium bisulfite is used to remove inorganic chlorine from the sample; inorganic chlorine is not expected to be a constituent in these groundwater samples. Several other factors were also investigated as possible sources of anomalous TOX results: (1) Instrument instability: examination of the history of results for TOX laboratory control samples and initial calibration verification standards indicate good long-term precision for the method and instrument. Determination of a method detection limit of 2.3 ppb in a deionized water matrix indicates the method and instrumentation have good stability and repeatability. (2) Non-linear instrument response: the instrument is shown to have good linear response from zero to 200 parts per billion (ppb) TOX. This concentration range encompasses the majority of samples received at WSCF for TOX analysis. (3) Improper sample preservation: ion-chromatographic analysis of several samples wit

DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Submersion Criticality Safety Analysis of Tungsten-Based Fuel for Nuclear Power and Propulsion Applications  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is developing tungsten-encapsulated fuels for space nuclear applications. Aims to develop NTP fuels that are; Affordable Low impact on production and testing environment Producible on a large scale over suitable time period Higher-performance compared to previous graphite NTP fuel elements Space nuclear reactors remain subcritical before and during launch, and do not go critical until required by its mission. A properly designed reactor will remain subcritical in any launch abort scenario, where the reactor falls back to Earth and becomes submerged in terrestrial material. Submersion increases neutron reflection and thermalizes the neutrons, which typically increases the reactivity of the core. This effect is usually very significant for fast-spectrum reactors. This research provided a submersion criticality safety analysis for a representative tungsten/uranium oxide fueled reactor. Determine the submersion behavior of a reactor fueled by tungsten-based fuel. Considered fuel compositions with varying: Rhenium content (wt% rhenium in tungsten) Fuel loading fractions (UO2 vol%)

A.E. Craft; R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Difference in formation of hydrogen and helium clusters in tungsten K. O. E. Henriksson,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Difference in formation of hydrogen and helium clusters in tungsten K. O. E. Henriksson,a K online 12 October 2005 The experimentally observed large difference in the depths of hydrogen and helium and He embrittlement of materials. Yet many of the basic properties of such systems are not well

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

225

Thermal shock and fatigue resistance of tungsten materials under transient heat loading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Transient heat loading tests were performed on rolled pure tungsten (PW) and lanthanum oxide doped tungsten (WL10) as well as swaged+rolled potassium doped tungsten (W-K) samples using an electron beam. In thermal shock tests, the cracking threshold was 0.440.66, 0.170.22 and 0.440.66GW/m2 for PW, WL10 and W-K, respectively. The melting threshold was over 1.1GW/m2 for PW and W-K while 0.660.88GW/m2 for WL10. In thermal fatigue tests, the obvious roughening threshold was over 1000 cycles for PW and WL10 while 1100cycles for W-K. The cracking threshold was 1001000cycles for PW, 1100cycles for WL10 and over 1000cycles for W-K alloy. WL10 displayed worse thermal and fatigue resistance while W-K exhibited better properties compared with PW, which was attributed to differences in thermalmechanical properties of the three tungsten alloys, in addition to the size and number density of La2O3 particles and potassium bubbles.

Xiaoxin Zhang; Qingzhi Yan; Shaoting Lang; Min Xia; Xiang Liu; Changchun Ge

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Tungsten carbide synthesized by low-temperature combustion as gas diffusion electrode catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 2014 Keywords: Low-temperature combustion syn- thesis Tungsten carbide Electrocatalyst Gas burning on the environment, and reduce dependence on fossil fuels, development of pure electric and fuel of highly efficient low-cost electrode catalysts for the oxygen reduction cathode, metaleair batteries have

Volinsky, Alex A.

227

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D W. Zhou*, T. Z. Long and C. K ductility, and the HAZ was found to be the `weakest link'. Keywords: Magnesium alloy, AZ91D, TIG welding, Hot cracking, Liquation, Fracture Introduction Magnesium alloys have high strength/weight ratio

Zhou, Wei

229

Tungsten black absorber for solar light with wide angular operation range Eden Rephaeli1,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tungsten black absorber for solar light with wide angular operation range Eden Rephaeli1,a of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2936997 In solar-thermal applications, one aims to convert sun- light to heat that displays near-complete absorptivity throughout the entire solar spectrum over a wide angular range

Fan, Shanhui

230

SPS Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys in Support of NTR Fuels Development  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Tungsten metal slugs were fabricated via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of powdered metals at temperatures ranging from 1575 K to 1975 K and hold times of 5 minutes to 30 minutes, using powders with an average diameter of 7.8 ?m. Sintered tungsten specimens were found to have relative densities ranging from 83 % to 94 % of the theoretical density for tungsten. Consolidated specimens were also tested for their Vickers Hardness Number (VHN), which was fitted as a function of relative density; the fully consolidated VHN was extrapolated to be 381.45 kg/mm2. Concurrently, tungsten and rhenium powders with average respective diameters of 0.5 ?m and 13.3 ?m were pre-processed either by High-Energy-Ball-Milling (HEBM) or by homogeneous mixing to yield W-25at.%Re mixtures. The powder batches were sintered at temperatures of 1975 K and 2175 K for hold times ranging from 0 minutes to 60 minutes yielding relative densities ranging from 94% to 97%. The combination of HEBM and sintering showed a significant decrease in the inter-metallic phases compared to that of the homogenous mixing and sintering.

Jonathan A. Webb; Indrajit Charit; Cory Sparks; Darryl P. Butt; Megan Frary; Mark Carroll

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tungsten nano-tendril growth in the Alcator C-Mod divertor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils ('fuzz') has been observed for the first time in the divertor region of a high-power density tokamak experiment. After 14 consecutive helium L-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod, the tip of ...

Baldwin, M.J.

232

Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0) concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH{sub 3} addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH{sub 3} reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation. 30 refs., 4 figs.

Yan Cao; Zhengyang Gao; Jiashun Zhu; Quanhai Wang; Yaji Huang; Chengchung Chiu; Bruce Parker; Paul Chu; Wei-ping Pan [Western Kentucky University (WKU), Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology (ICSET)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The effect of spin-orbit splitting on the association kinetics of barrierless halogen atom-hydrocarbon radical reactions.  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the geometry dependence of spin-orbit splitting on transition state theory (TST) predictions for radical-radical recombination rate coefficients is examined. The effects are illustrated with direct ab initio variable-reaction-coordinate (VRC)-TST calculations for the reactions of two types of hydrocarbon radicals (R = CH{sub 3} and CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2}) with three halogen atoms (X = F, Cl, and Br). These halogen atoms exhibit a range of spin-orbit interaction strengths, while their interactions with the two hydrocarbon radicals exhibit a range of attractiveness. The transition state dividing surfaces for these barrierless reactions occur over a range of R-X fragment separations ({approx}3-7 {angstrom}) where the magnitude of the spin-orbit splitting is strongly geometry dependent. Perturbative models for incorporating the energetic effect of spin-orbit splitting into barrierless kinetics are presented and tested. Simply neglecting the variation in the spin-orbit splitting is demonstrated to contribute an error of less than 15% to the predicted rate coefficients for all but the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, where its neglect increases the rate by up to a factor of 2. For the CH{sub 2}CHCH{sub 2} + Br reaction, the effect of spin-orbit splitting is not perturbative and instead qualitatively changes the long-range interaction potential and association dynamics. The present theoretical predictions are compared with available experimental measurements and previous theoretical work. For the CH{sub 3} + F association reaction, the errors associated with limitations in the basis set and in the active space are studied, and a detailed comparison is made between VRC-TST and rigid rotor-harmonic oscillator variational TST.

Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (SNL)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "To test if it would have been possible to find the Tungsten Mountain geothermal system with a shallow temperature survey, more than 80 2-meter-deep temperatures were recorded during a two week period in late June and early July, 2007. These measurements spanned an 8-km-long zone parallel to the range front and extended eastward from the range front up to 2 km towards the playa's edge (Figure 1). Two-meter temperatures ranged from 14.0°C up to a maximum of 26.7° C. The higher temperatures correspond to the area of exploration drilling, although anomalously high temperatures extend northeastward beyond the area of drilling. These

235

2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Coolbaugh et al. (2007), Sladek et al. (2007), and Kratt, et al. (2008, this volume) describe a shallow temperature survey system in which temperatures can be measured quickly and inexpensively at 2 m depths. This system was tested at Desert Queen based on its structural setting and availability of thermal gradient well data obtained in the 1970's from which to make thermal anomaly comparisons. The system was subsequently used at Tungsten Mountain and Teels and Rhodes Marshes to help locate blind geothermal systems. Of the new, blind geothermal sites identified through collaboration with the minerals industry, shallow temperature surveys were

236

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Figure 1) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web site (www.nbmg.unr.edu/geothermal/gtmap.pdf), and from a PowerPoint presentation titled 'Geothermal Exploration Short Stories' posted on the Geothermal Resources Council web site

237

ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Electrical conductivities of aluminum, copper, and tungsten observed by an underwater explosion  

SciTech Connect

Conductivities of dense aluminum, copper, and tungsten are evaluated using exploding wire discharges in water. Evolutions of the radius and the electrical resistance of exploding wire are measured together with direct pyrometric estimation of the temperature. The conductivities are evaluated based on the measurements and their density dependence is compared with theoretical predictions at a fixed temperature. The results indicate that regardless of materials, the conductivity has a minimum around 3% of solid density at temperature of 5000 K.

Sasaki, Toru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kamitomioka 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fracture and Creep in an All-Tungsten Divertor for ARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture and Creep in an All- Tungsten Divertor for ARIES Jake Blanchard University of Wisconsin by these designs Fracture Thermal creep #12;The Design #12;Major Input Parameters Parameter Value Units Surface c/a=10 Fracture Results 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 StressIntensity(MPa-m1/2) Crack Depth (mm) c

California at San Diego, University of

240

Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles  

SciTech Connect

Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of WNiCo and WNiFe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? WNiCo and WNiFe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? WNiCo induces a greater oxidative burst response than WNiFe in lung macrophages.

Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Tungsten oxide nanowire-reduced graphene oxide aerogel for high-efficiency visible light photocatalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A light, 3-D, porous aerogel was fabricated by way of a simple approach from 1-D tungsten oxide nanowires and 2-D reduced graphene oxide sheets. The as-prepared graphene oxide, tungsten oxide nanowires, and tungsten oxide-reduced graphene oxide (W18O49-RGO) aerogel were characterised. The photocatalytic activities of as-prepared aerogel under visible light irradiation were investigated through the degradation of six different organic dyes including Rhodamine B, reactive black 39, reactive yellow 145, weak acid black BR, methyl orange, and weak acid yellow G. In comparison with the pure W18O49 nanowires, the prepared W18O49-RGO aerogel had significantly improved photocatalytic efficiency. Also, the photocatalysis of W18O49-RGO aerogel maintained its efficiency after 30 cycles for each of the six dyes. The photocatalytic mechanism was studied by adding hole and radical scavengers: the results confirmed that the holes generated in W18O49-RGO aerogel played a key role in the visible light photocatalytic process.

Xiubing Li; Siwei Yang; Jing Sun; Peng He; Xuguang Xu; Guqiao Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Study of electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten as hydrogen electrodes in alkaline water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten were characterized for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the electrolysis of 30 w/o KOH alkaline water at 25 C. The rate-determining step (rds) of the HER was suggested based on the Tafel slope of polarization and the capacitance of electrode-solution interface determined by ac impedance measurement. The HER on the nickel- and cobalt-based codeposits was enhanced significantly compared with that o the electrolytic nickel and cobalt with comparable deposit loadings. The decrease in the HER overpotential was more pronounced on the molybdenum-containing codeposits, particularly on cobalt-molybdenum which also showed a high stability. The enhancement of the HER was attributed to both the synergetic composition and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of te electrodes and the effect of their and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes and the effect of their surface increase were distinguished quantitatively. The linear relations between HER overpotential and surface roughness factor of the electrodes on a Y-log(X) plot were obtained experimentally and interpreted based on the Tafel law.

Fan, C.; Piron, D.L.; Sleb, A.; Paradis, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

ITO-free organic solar cells with roll-to-roll coated organic functional layers from non-halogenated solvents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work reports on indium tin oxide (ITO)-free organic solar cells with roll to roll (R2R) processed organic functional layers. The device stack comprises a chromiumaluminumchromium (CrAlCr) electron contact layer on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film, a photoactive layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): (6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM), a hole transport layer of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and a silver (Ag) grid for current collection. For the photoactive layer the non-halogenated solvent o-Xylene was used in order to reduce the impact on health and environment for R2R coating on ambient atmospheric conditions. The CrAlCr layers were sputtered onto the PET rolls in a batch process while the photoactive layer as well as the hole transport layer were applied in a continuous R2R process by slot die coating. The Ag grid was either thermally evaporated through a shadow mask as reference process or deposited by aerosol printing as a more production compatible process. Device efficiencies up to 2.9% on an active area of 1.1cm2 were obtained with no difference for the method of grid processing. These experimental results demonstrate that R2R coated organic functional layers in ITO-free devices obtain the same device performance as compared to spin coated laboratory cells.

Deepak Kaduwal; Hans-Frieder Schleiermacher; Jan Schulz-Gericke; Thomas Kroyer; Birger Zimmermann; Uli Wrfel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

genBRDF: Synthesizing Novel Analytic BRDFs with Genetic Programming Figure 1: Comparison of BRDFs modeling the tungsten carbide material from the MERL BRDF database. Each scene consists of a sphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of BRDFs modeling the tungsten carbide material from the MERL BRDF database. Each scene consists that remains between state-of-the-art analytic BRDFs and measured data in the case of tungsten carbide

Weimer, Westley

245

The self-propagation high-temperature synthesis (SHS) of ultrafine high purity tungsten powder from scheelite  

SciTech Connect

High-purity tungsten was prepared by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) process from a mixture of CaO{center_dot}WO{sub 3} and Mg. The complete reduction of CaO{center_dot}WO{sub 3} required a 33{percent} excess of magnesium over the stoichiometric molar ratio Mg/CaO{center_dot}WO{sub 3} of 3:1. The MgO and CaO in the product was leached with an HCl solution. The product tungsten had a purity of 99.980{percent} which was higher than that of the reactants. The high purity results because the non tungsten reactants and products are volatilized by the high temperatures generated during the rapid exothermic SHS reaction and are dissolved during HCl leaching of the product. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

Jung, J.C.; Ko, S.G.; Won, C.W.; Cho, S.S.; Chun, B.S. [Engineering Research Center for Rapidly Solidified Materials, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Subchannel thermal-hydraulic modeling of an APT tungsten target rod bundle  

SciTech Connect

The planned target for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) neutron source consists of an array of tungsten rod bundles through which D{sub 2}O coolant flows axially. Here, a scoping analysis of flow through an APT target rod bundle was conducted to demonstrate that lateral cross-flows are important, and therefore subchannel modeling is necessary to accurately predict thermal-hydraulic behavior under boiling conditions. A local reactor assembly code, FLOWTRAN, was modified to model axial flow along the rod bundle as flow through three concentric heated annular passages.

Hamm, L.L.; Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effect of demagnetization on magnetic resonance line shapes in bulk samples: Application to tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A calculation of the contribution of a bulk specimen's nonuniform demagnetizing field to the inhomogeneous broadening of magnetic resonance lines is described. Demagnetization effects are of particular importance for substances with large bulk magnetic susceptibilities located in large static magnetic fields. Application is made to the nuclear acoustic resonance of W183 spins in a bulk cylindrical specimen of tungsten. In addition to explaining the observed inhomogeneous line broadening, the calculation predicts a "satellite" line which is also observed experimentally. Although attention is paid to specifically acoustic considerations, the calculation is applicable to magnetic resonance in general.

George Mozurkewich; H. I. Ringermacher; D. I. Bolef

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Deposition of tungsten nitride on stainless steel substrates using plasma focus device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten nitride (WN) films were deposited on the stainless steel-304 substrate by a 2kJ Mather-type plasma focus device. The preparation method and characterization data are presented. X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed for the characterization of the samples obtained with different number of focus shots, respectively. The average size of crystallites (from XRD), sub-micro-structures (from SEM) and particles (from AFM images) increase when the number of shots increase from 10 to 20 then 30, then they decrease when the substrate is exposed to 40 shots.

G.R. Etaati; M.T. Hosseinnejad; M. Ghoranneviss; M. Habibi; M. shirazi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An Electrical Instrument for Detecting Invisible Flaws in Nonmagnetic Conductors Such as Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this instrument the conductor being inspected is passed axially through a coil forming a part of the tuned circuit of an oscillator. Any flaws in the conductor cause a change in the tuning and thus in the frequency generated which is conveniently observed through heterodyning with a fixed frequency. By using high frequency of the order of 6000 kilocycles the response is limited to flaws near the surface of the conductor. This instrument is used in the factory inspection of tungsten wire particularly for the location of longitudinal cracks and is also effective in the determination of asymmetry of coated wires.

D. W. Dana

1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

StefanBoltzmann law for the tungsten filament of a light bulb: Revisiting the experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A classical laboratory experiment to verify the Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law with the tungsten filaments of commercial incandescent lamps has been fully revisited collecting a fairly large amount of data with a computer-controlled four-channel power supply. In many cases the total power dissipated by the lamp is well described by a sum of two power-law terms with one exponent very close to 4 as predicted by the radiation law and the other very close to 1 as for simple heat conduction. This result was true even for filament surfaces with a shiny metallic appearance whose emissivity should vary with temperature.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Coupled motion of grain boundaries in bcc tungsten as a possible radiation-damage healing mechanism under fusion reactor conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a potential first-wall fusion reactor material, tungsten will be subjected to high radiation flux and extreme mechanical stress. We propose that under these conditions, coupled grain boundary (GB) motion, in some cases enhanced by interstitial loading, can lead to a radiation-damage healing mechanism, in which a large stress activates coupled GB motion, and the GB sweeps up the defects, such as voids and vacancies, as it passes through the material. The stress-induced mobility characteristics of a number of GBs in tungsten are examined to investigate the likelihood of this scenario.

Valery Borovikov; Xian-Zhu Tang; Danny Perez; Xian-Ming Bai; Blas P. Uberuaga; Arthur F. Voter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 11, 2013 April 11, 2013 C-SR-10 Uintah Mine, Colorado, LM Uranium Lease Tracts Abandoned Uranium Mines Report to Congress: LM Wants Your Input The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is seeking stakeholder input on an abandoned uranium mines report to Congress. January 9, 2013 LM Continues to Work with the Navajo Nation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) continues to work with the Navajo Nation to perform long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) at four Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I sites located on the Navajo Nation January 8, 2013 A Northern Saw-Whet Owl is captured for banding during the banding demonstration at the Fernald Preserve in Ohio in November Saw What? Saw Whet!

253

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 16, 2012 October 16, 2012 LM Co-Hosts Internatonal Workshop on Uranium Legacy Sites The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) co-hosted, with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a week of visits to DOE sites in Colorado and Utah, and a 4-day workshop in Grand Junction, Colorado. October 16, 2012 LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood A team representing two Federal agencies-the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management and the U.S. Geological Survey-is evaluating redistribution of contaminants at the Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site October 16, 2012 LM's New Role for the DOE Title X Reimbursement Program In May 2011, the Title X claim review and audit function was transferred

254

Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia National Laboratories Sandia National Laboratories Illustration of integrated circuit Figure 1. An application-specific integrated circuit being developed for advanced artificial retinas. Click on image to enlarge. Microscale Enablers More advanced artificial retinas are relying on miniaturized electronics for processing incoming images and activating the corresponding electrodes to communicate with retinal cells and ultimately the brain. The goal of these devices, being developed through a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) collaboration, is to continually improve their visual resolution so that implanted individuals eventually will be able to read large print, recognize faces, and move about without aid. Sandia National Laboratories' expertise in the development, fabrication, and production

255

Spotlights on Recent JACS Publications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Future work focused on the further characterization of this designed enzyme will ultimately shed light on its suitability for use as a therapeutic, the authors write. ... Novel Fluorescent Probe Lights Up Human Cancer Cells ... Finally, because the probe can be seen by the unaided eye, it is a promising candidate for medical applications such as the surgical resection of cancerous tissues. ...

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

Spotlights on Recent JACS Publications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small Bonds a Big Deal in Perovskite Solar Cells ... While digital computers encode data into binary digits known as bits, quantum computers use quantum bits, or qubits, and chemists are stepping up to create molecular candidates to fill this role. ... Perovskite solar cells are a promising type of photovoltaic cella device or material able to convert the energy of light into electricitybecause they are inexpensive and easy to make and have a high conversion efficiency. ...

ACS Contributing Correspondents

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Employee Spotlights | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Maglev systems ---Powertrain research ---Vehicle testing --Building design ---Construction...

258

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) co-hosted, with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a week of visits to DOE sites in Colorado and Utah, and a 4-day...

259

Spotlights on Recent JACS Publications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renewable Energy: Photochemical Hydrogen Production with Low-Cost Catalysts ... Here, the hydrogen is released via a hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), usually at high temperature, using costly, often platinum-based, metal catalysts. ...

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

260

Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

site managers, along with Navajo Nation technical staff, visited five reclaimed uranium-mine sites on tribal lands to share expertise in the use of technical approaches...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Tungsten Nanowire Based Hyperbolic Metamaterial Emitters for Near-field Thermophotovoltaic Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, near-field radiative heat transfer enhancement across nanometer vacuum gaps has been intensively studied between two hyperbolic metamaterials (HMMs) due to unlimited wavevectors and high photonic density of state. In this work, we theoretically analyze the energy conversion performance of a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell made of In0.2Ga0.8Sb when paired with a HMM emitter composed of tungsten nanowire arrays embedded in Al2O3 host at nanometer vacuum gaps. Fluctuational electrodynamics integrated with effective medium theory and anisotropic thin-film optics is used to calculate the near-field radiative heat transfer. It is found that the spectral radiative energy is enhanced by the epsilon-near-zero and hyperbolic modes at different polarizations. As a result, the power output from a semi-infinite TPV cell is improved by 1.85 times with the nanowire HMM emitter over that with a plain tungsten emitter at a vacuum gap of 10 nm. Moreover, by using a thin TPV cell with 10 um thickness, the conversion eff...

Chang, Jui-Yung; Wang, Liping

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Five percent platinum-tungsten oxide-based electrocatalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes  

SciTech Connect

A Pt-tungsten oxide-based electrocatalyst has been fabricated by an inexpensive chemical route for use as an oxygen cathode in 99% phosphoric acid at 180 C. The effect of %WO{sub 3} (wt/wt) on the Pt-tungsten oxide/C-based electrode performance was studied. The electrocatalytic properties for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), e.g., exchange current density and mass activity of a 5% Pt-40% WO{sub 3}-based electrode were found to be twice as high as those of 10% Pt, which contains double the amount of platinum. The Tafel slope and specific activity of the two electrodes are similar. It was shown that an increase in its electrochemically active surface area was the only reason for the performance of the 5% Pt-40% WO{sub 3}-based electrode. The electrocatalytic parameters of the 5% Pt-40% WO{sub 3}-based electrode for the ORR were compared to those of the 2% Pt-1% H{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-based electrode.

Savadogo, O.; Beck, P. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Lab. d`Electrochimie et de Materiaux Energetiques

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor: Experimental measurements, model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor-wafer, lamp-heated chemical vapor deposition system were used to study the wafer temperature response to gas composition. A physically based simulation procedure for the process gas and wafer temperature was developed

Rubloff, Gary W.

264

Solution Processed Tungsten Oxide Interfacial Layer for Efficient Hole-Injection in Quantum Dot Light-Emitting Diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2/2014 Solution Processed Tungsten Oxide Interfacial Layer for Efficient Hole-Injection in Quantum Layer for Efficient Hole-Injection in Quantum Dot Light- Emitting Diodes Xuyong Yang, Evren Mutlugun-based devices, the organic interfacial buffer layers have inferior thermal stability. Efforts to replace PEDOT

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

265

By Earle B. Amey Tungsten's unique high-temperature in Metal Bulletin (London). ferrotungsten, carbide powder blends, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). ferrotungsten, carbide powder blends, and properties can be utilized advantageously in the As a result properties of its carbide continue to scrap, and sodium tungstate and away from the provide important items increased in all imported tungsten materials. the cemented carbide end-use sectors that A summary

266

In Situ Synthesized Economical Tungsten Dioxide Imbedded in Mesoporous Carbon for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells As Counter Electrode Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Synthesized Economical Tungsten Dioxide Imbedded in Mesoporous Carbon for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells As Counter Electrode Catalyst ... As a novel photovoltaic device to convert solar energy to electricity directly, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have developed considerably over the last 20 years. ...

Mingxing Wu; Xiao Lin; Liang Wang; Wei Guo; Yudi Wang; Jinqiu Xiao; Anders Hagfeldt; Tingli Ma

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Above: Power deposition in the superconducting magnets and the tungsten-carbide + water shield inside them, according to a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet will disrupt the pool, unless mitigated by a splash suppressor. A SOLENOID CAPTURE SYSTEM Collider (MC) Comments Beam Power 4 MW No existing target system will survive at this power Ep 8 GeV yieldAbove: Power deposition in the superconducting magnets and the tungsten-carbide + water shield

McDonald, Kirk

268

Thermal degradation of acrylonitrilebutadienestyrene (ABS) containing flame retardants using a fluidized bed reactor: The effects of Ca-based additives on halogen removal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the thermal degradation of a waste fraction of acrylonitrilebutadienestyrene containing brominated flame retardants was performed to reduce halogen content in the pyrolysis oil. Thermal degradation was completed using Ca-based additives (calcium oxide, calcium hydroxide and oyster shells) in a bench-scale pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized bed reactor and char separation system. Pyrolysis was carried out in a temperature range of 430510C. In the absence of any additive, the oil yield amounted to about 77wt.%. With the additives, the oil yield was markedly reduced to within a range of 4564wt.%. The principle compounds in the oils were toluene, ethylbenzene, styrene, cumene, ?-methylstyrene, phenol and heteroatom-containing compounds. When Ca(OH)2 was applied, total bromine and chlorine contents in the oil decreased to 0.05 and 0.04wt.%, respectively. In addition, Ca(OH)2 reduced the antimony content in the oil to below 0.001ppm. Most of the halogens and antimony in the feed material were present in the char obtained after pyrolysis.

Su-Hwa Jung; Seon-Jin Kim; Joo-Sik Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes twenty-three gold exploration holes were drilled by Newcrest Resources, Inc. during 2005 and 2006 along the range front. These holes approached or exceeded 300 m in depth and all holes encountered hot water and/or steam. Despite the high temperatures encountered at relatively shallow depths, there are no active geothermal features such as hot springs or steam vents at the surface. The presence of small outcrops of argillic alteration containing anomalous gold attracted the interest of exploration geologists. References Christopher Kratt, Mark Coolbaugh, Chris Sladek, Rick Zehner, Robin

270

On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fabrication of ultrafine tungsten-based alloy powders by novel soda reduction process  

SciTech Connect

A novel reduction method has been developed to fabricate ultrafine tungsten heavy alloy powders, with ammonium metatungstate (AMT), iron(II) chloride tetrahydrate (FeCl{sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O), nickel(II) chloride hexahydrate (NiCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O) as source materials and sodium tungstate dihydrate (Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O) as a reductant. In the preparation of mixtures the amounts of the source components were chosen so as to obtain alloy of 93W-5Ni-2Fe composition (wt.%). The obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, XPS, field-emission scanning microscope (FESEM), and chemical composition was analyzed by EDX.

Lee, Dong-Won [Powder Technology Research Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Kyungnam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of)] [Powder Technology Research Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Kyungnam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Turaev, Farkhod, E-mail: farkhod_2002@yahoo.com [Powder Technology Research Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Kyungnam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of)] [Powder Technology Research Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Kyungnam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ju-Hyeong [Powder Technology Research Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Kyungnam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of)] [Powder Technology Research Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon, Kyungnam, 641-010 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Mingchuan [W-base Heavy Alloy Research Group, Institute of Metal Research (IMR), 72 Wenhua-road, Shenyang, 110016 (China)] [W-base Heavy Alloy Research Group, Institute of Metal Research (IMR), 72 Wenhua-road, Shenyang, 110016 (China)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

A study of tungsten nanopowder formation by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Molten salt-assisted self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of nanocrystalline W powder was studied experimentally. The technique involves the reduction of WO{sub 3} in the presence of sodium chloride using three different reducing agents: magnesium (Mg), sodium azide (NaN{sub 3}), and sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}). The effects of the mole fraction of sodium chloride on temperature distributions, combustion parameters, phase compositions, and morphology of the final products were determined. The sodium chloride-assisted method reported here has been found to be effective for lowering combustion temperature and producing uniform and spherical W nanopowders of average particle size around 20-200, 100-200, and 20-50 nm. The effect of combustion temperature on tungsten particle size is discussed, and a sketch describing the chemistry of combustion is proposed.

Nersisyan, H.H.; Won, C.W. [Rapidly Solidified Materials Research Center, Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-Dong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 150 Duckjin-Dong, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effect of the militarily-relevant heavy metals, depleted uranium and heavy metal tungsten-alloy on gene expression in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) and heavy-metal tungsten alloys ... in military applications. Chemically similar to natural uranium, but depleted of the higher activity 235U and 234U...in vitro. Using insoluble DU-UO2 and ...

Alexandra C. Miller; Kia Brooks; Jan Smith

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Properties of chemical vapor deposited tungsten silicide films using reaction of WF/sub 6/ and Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten silicide films were formed by the chemical vapor deposition method using the reaction WF/sub 6/ and Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/. The deposition rate, resistivity, composition, stress, crystal structure, and content of impurities were studied and compared with tungsten silicide films deposited by reaction of WF/sub 6/ and SiH/sub 4/. The tungsten silicide films made using Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ have a higher deposition rate and higher Si concentration than those made by using SiH/sub 4/ at the same substrate temperature. For these reasons, the tungsten silicide films made by using Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ were found to have a resistivity that is a little higher and, after annealing, a stress that is smaller than that made by SiH/sub 4/.

Shioya, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Kobayashi, I.; Maeda, M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5859,2946,5154,738,245,600 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7464,4047,6722,1108,663,991 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,10393,6055,9815,1759,1701,1996 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",9311,9053,5004,8344,2296,2224,1611

277

Electric Discharge Sintering and Joining of Tungsten Carbide--Cobalt Composite with High-Speed Steel Substrate  

SciTech Connect

Simultaneous electro discharge sintering of high strength structure of tungsten carbide-cobalt composite and connection it with high-speed steel substrate is investigated and suitable operating parameters are defined. Tungsten carbide-cobalt and high-speed steel joining was produced by the method of high voltage electrical discharge together with application of mechanical pressure to powder compact. It was found that the density and hardness of composite material reach its maximum values at certain magnitudes of applied pressure and high voltage electrical discharge parameters. We show that there is an upper level for the discharge voltage beyond which the powder of composite material disintegrates like an exploding wire. Due to our results it is possible to determine optimal parameters for simultaneous electro discharge sintering of WC-Co and bonding it with high-speed steel substrate.

Grigoryev, Evgeny G. [General Physics Department, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Deuterium trapping at defects created with neutron and ion irradiations in tungsten  

SciTech Connect

The effects of neutron and ion irradiations on deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) were investigated. Specimens of pure W were irradiated with neutrons to 0.3 dpa at around 323 K and then exposed to high-flux D plasma at 473 and 773 K. The concentration of D significantly increased by neutron irradiation and reached 0.8 at% at 473 K and 0.4 at% at 773 K. Annealing tests for the specimens irradiated with 20 MeV W ions showed that the defects which play a dominant role in the trapping at high temperature were stable at least up to 973 K, while the density decreased at temperatures equal to or above 1123 K. These observations of the thermal stability of traps and the activation energy for D detrapping examined in a previous study (1.8 eV) indicated that the defects which contribute predominantly to trapping at 773 K were small voids. The higher concentration of trapped D at 473 K was explained by additional contributions of weaker traps. The release of trapped D was clearly enhanced by the exposure to atomic hydrogen at 473 K, though higher temperatures are more effective for using this effect for tritium removal in fusion reactors.

Y. Hatano; M. Shimada; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; V.Kh. Alimov; M. Hara; J. Shi; M. Kobayashi; T. Oda; G. Cao; K. Okuno; T. Tanaka; K. Sugiyama; J. Roth; B. Tyburska-Pschel; J. Dorner; N. Yoshida; N. Futagami; H. Watanabe; M. Hatakeyama; H. Kurishita; M. Sokolov; Y. Katoh

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films for application in advanced energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Inherent processes in coal gasification plants produce hazardous hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which must be continuously and efficiently detected and removed before the fuel is used for power generation. An attempt has been made in this work to fabricate tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films by radio-frequency reactive magnetron-sputter deposition. The impetus being the use of WO{sub 3} films for H{sub 2}S sensors in coal gasification plants. The effect of growth temperature, which is varied in the range of 30-500 deg. C, on the growth and microstructure of WO{sub 3} thin films is investigated. Characterizations made using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) indicate that the effect of temperature is significant on the microstructure of WO{sub 3} films. XRD and SEM results indicate that the WO{sub 3} films grown at room temperature are amorphous, whereas films grown at higher temperatures are nanocrystalline. The average grain-size increases with increasing temperature. WO{sub 3} films exhibit smooth morphology at growth temperatures {<=}300 deg. C while relatively rough at >300 deg. C. The analyses indicate that the nanocrystalline WO{sub 3} films grown at 100-300 deg. C could be the potential candidates for H{sub 2}S sensor development for application in coal gasification systems.

Gullapalli, S. K.; Vemuri, R. S.; Manciu, F. S.; Enriquez, J. L.; Ramana, C. V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thermal-hydraulic criteria for the APT tungsten neutron source design  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the thermal-hydraulic design criteria (THDC) developed for the tungsten neutron source (TNS). The THDC are developed for the normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis accidents. The requirements of the safety analyses are incorporated into the design criteria, consistent with the integrated safety management and the safety-by-design philosophy implemented throughout the APT design process. The phenomenology limiting the thermal-hydraulic design and the confidence level requirements for each limit are discussed. The overall philosophy of the uncertainty analyses and the confidence level requirements also are presented. Different sets of criteria are developed for normal operations, operational transients, anticipated accidents, unlikely accidents, extremely unlikely accidents, and accidents during TNS replacement. In general, the philosophy is to use the strictest criteria for the high-frequency events. The criteria is relaxed as the event frequencies become smaller. The THDC must be considered as a guide for the design philosophy and not as a hard limit. When achievable, design margins greater than those required by the THDC must be used. However, if a specific event sequence cannot meet the THDC, expensive design changes are not necessary if the single event sequence results in sufficient margin to safety criteria and does not challenge the plant availability or investment protection considerations.

Pasamehmetoglu, K.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optical Spectroscopy of Tungsten Carbide for Uncertainty Analysis in Electron Electric Dipole Moment Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform laser induced fluorescence(LIF) spectroscopy on a pulsed supersonic beam of tungsten carbide(WC) molecules, which has been proposed as a candidate molecular system for a permanent Electric Dipole Moment(EDM) search of the electron in its rovibrational ground state of the X3Delta1 state. In particular, [20.6]Omega=2, v'=4 <- X3Delta1,v"=0 transition at 485nm was used for the detection. The hyperfine structure and the Omega-doublet of the transition are measured, which are essential for estimating the size of the potential systematic uncertainties for electron EDM measurement. For further suppression of the systematic uncertainty, an alternative electron EDM measurement scheme utilizing the g factor crossing point of the Omega-doublet levels is discussed. On the other hand, flux and internal temperature of the molecular beam are characterized, which sets the limit on the statistical uncertainty of the electron EDM experiment. With the given results, the prospect of electron EDM experiment with the...

Lee, J; Skripnikov, L V; Petrov, A N; Titov, A V; Mosyagin, N S; Leanhardt, A E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Deposition of tungsten nitride thin films by plasma focus device at different axial and angular positions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten nitride thin films were deposited on stainless steel304 substrates by using a low energy (2kJ) Mather type plasma focus device. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and microhardness are used to study the surface of treated samples. The XRD analysis shows that the degree of crystallinity of deposited thin films strongly depends on axial and angular positions of samples. The SEM micrographs of the deposited films at different angular positions (0, 10 and 30) and axial position of 8cm show that the content of WN sub-micro crystalline structures on the surface of deposited films decreased with increasing the angle with respect to anode axis. From AFM results we observe that for the sample deposited at 8cm and 0 axial and angular positions, respectively, the most uniform surface and the most homogenous distribution of grains are obtained. Also the hardness results show that the highest mechanical hardness is obtained when the film is deposited at 8cm and 0 axial and angular positions, respectively.

M.T. Hosseinnejad; M. Ghoranneviss; G.R. Etaati; M. Shirazi; Z. Ghorannevis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thickness measurement of aluminum, titanium, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films by x-ray fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

X-ray fluorescence (XRF) has received a great deal of attention in the last few years as a quantitative means of determining both the stoichiometry and thickness of many different kinds of films. Examples include Ag and Cu films on mica substrates, Sn-Pb alloys on steel substrates, Al-Ti multilayers on Cu substrates and oxide films on silicon substrates. In XRF the sample is irradiated with x-rays which in turn cause x-rays to be given off by the sample. These x-rays that are given off by the sample can then be analyzed both for energy and intensity. The energy of the x-rays is characteristic of the elemental makeup of the sample and the intensity of the x-rays is dependent on how much of the particular element is present. The intensity then can be related to the thickness of a film if the stoichiometry of the film can be assumed constant. With the increased interest in silicides and more recently, the self-aligned silicide (salicide) process (8-10) for VLSI applications, in-line process monitoring of silicide film thickness has become important to integrated circuit manufacturing. In this study, the number of x-ray photons given of by Al, Ti, titanium silicide, and tungsten silicide films on silicon-based substrates was quantified so that a film thickness for an unknown sample could then be determined easily. In addition, XRF is a more accurate technique, limited principally by the accuracy technique, limited principally by the accuracy of the reference used and the amount of time the x-ray photons are counted.

Ernst, S.; Lee, C.O.; Lee, J.J. (Motorola, Inc., Advanced Products Research and Development Lab., Austin, TX (US))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fracture Toughness and Strength in a New Class of Bainitic Chromium-Tungsten Steels  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with developing an understanding of the toughening and stengthening mechanisms for a new class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with Nooter Corporation and other industrial partners. The new steele had 50% higher tensile strength up to 650 degrees Celsius than currently used steels and the potential for not requiring any postweld heat treatment (PWHT) and for reducing equipment weight by 25%. This project was closely related to the Nooter project described in the report Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic steels for Industrial Process Applications (ORNL/TM-2005/82). The project was carried out jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and ORNL. The University of Pittsburgh carried out fracture toughness measurements and microstructural analysis on base metal and welded plates prepared at ORNL. The project focused on three areas. The first dealt with detailed microstructural analysis of base compositions of 3Cr-3WV and 3Cr-3WBV(Ta) in both normalized (N) and normalized and tempered (NT) conditions. The second aspect of the prject dealt with determining tensile properties and fracture toughness values of K{subIC} at room temperature for both 3Cr-3Wv and 3Cr-3WV(Ta) compositions. The third focus of the project was to measure the fracture toughness values of the base metal and the heat-affectged zone (HAZ) of a plate of Fe-3Cr-W(Mo)V steel plate welded by the gas tungsten are (GTA) process. The HAZ toughness was measured in both the as-welded and the PWHT condition.

Mao, S. X.; Sikka, V. K.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Synthesis of Nanosize Tungsten Oxide and Its Evaluation as an Electrocatalyst Support for Oxygen Reduction in Acid Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most critical challenge in the development of PEMFCs is the discovery of low cost, high activity, stable electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). ... (11) Thus, tungsten oxides are considered to be a promising candidate for the electrocatalyst support at the PEMFC cathode, and several groups have already reported enhanced methanol oxidation activity for Pt/WO3x anode electrocatalysts. ... Basic concepts for quantifying the electronic interaction at metal/oxide interfaces are compared to well-developed contact theories and calcn. ...

Ying Liu; Sujan Shrestha; William E. Mustain

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance of Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide-Based Electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, the properties of a series of non-platinum based nanoscale tantalum oxide/tungsten oxide-carbon composite catalysts was investigated for potential use in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the cathode side of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. Electrochemical performance was measured using a half-cell test set up with a rotating disc electrode and compared with a commercial platinum-on-carbon (Pt/C) catalyst. Overall, all of the oxide-based composite catalysts exhibit high ORR on-set potentials, comparable to that of the baseline Pt/C catalyst. The addition of tungsten oxide as a dopant to tantalum oxide greatly improved mass specific current density. Maximum performance was achieved with a catalyst containing 32 mol% of tungsten oxide, which exhibited a mass specific current density ~8% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.6 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) and ~35% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.2 V vs. NHE. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the tungsten cations in the composite catalysts exist in the +6 oxidation state, while the tantalum displays an average valence of +5, suggesting that the addition of tungsten likely creates an oxygen excess in the tantalum oxide structure that influences its oxygen absorption kinetics. When the 32mol% tungsten doped catalyst loading on the working electrode was increased to five times that of the original loading (which was equivalent to that of the baseline Pt/C catalyst), the area specific current density improved four fold, achieving an area specific current density ~35% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.6 V vs. NHE.

Oh, Tak Keun; Kim, Jin Yong; Shin, Yongsoon; Engelhard, Mark H.; Weil, K. Scott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Structural and chemical phase transitions in tungsten carbide films evidenced by the analysis of their stiffness tensors  

SciTech Connect

Brillouin light scattering (BLS) is used to provide a comprehensive study of thin tungsten carbide films deposited on single crystal silicon substrates whose distinctive nature depends critically on the deposition parameters. The use of stepped films in these slow-on-fast systems provides enhanced data sets and allows the velocity dispersion of the observed surface excitations, including the discrete Rayleigh and Sezawa modes to be studied in detail. Comprehensive and powerful methods of data analysis and interpretation including the recently developed Monte Carlo (MC) method, the surface Green's function, and classical approaches are applied to extract the effective elastic constants and density of each of the films. The MC and Green's function methods are used to remove ambiguities in Sezawa mode assignments and to identify a mode-crossing event. Auger electron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction investigations confirm conclusions about chemical composition and microstructure obtained by BLS including a structural phase transition, thus leading to a consistent description of elastic, structural, and chemical properties of tungsten carbide films as a function of their deposition conditions. The anisotropic elastic tensors of the various films are employed for an analysis of the angular dependent Young's modulus and the shear modulus, suggesting implications for the film performance in wear protection. Finally, an estimate of the elastic anisotropy of the {alpha}-W{sub 2}C single crystal is provided on the basis of the effective elastic constants of a nanocrystalline W{sub 2}C film.

Wittkowski, T.; Jung, K.; Hillebrands, B.; Comins, J. D. [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungsschwerpunkt MINAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin Schroedinger-Strasse 56, D-67663 Kaiserlautern (Germany); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa) and Materials Physics Research Institute, School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Measurement of Leakage Neutron Spectra for Tungsten with D-T Neutrons and Validation of Evaluated Nuclear Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$ by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60$^{\\circ}$, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120$^{\\circ}$ in the elastic...

Zhanga, S; Nie, Y; Wada, R; Ruan, X; Han, R; Liu, X; Lin, W; Liu, J; Shi, F; Ren, P; Tian, G; Luo, F; Ren, J; Bao, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ? Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ? By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ? XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ? TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

Hoseinpur, Arman, E-mail: arman.hoseinpur@stu-mail.um.ac.ir [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 91775-1111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 91775-1111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 91775-1111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad 91775-1111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

Indrajit Charit; Darryl Butt; Megan Frary; Mark Carroll

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of Leakage Neutron Spectra for Tungsten with D-T Neutrons and Validation of Evaluated Nuclear Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$ by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60$^{\\circ}$, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120$^{\\circ}$ in the elastic scattering peak, caused by a slight difference in the oscillation pattern of the elastic angular distribution at angles larger than 20$^{\\circ}$. However, the calculated spectra using data from ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries showed larger discrepancies with the measured ones, especially around 8.5-13.5 MeV. Further studies are presented for these disagreements.

S. Zhanga; Z. Chen; Y. Nie; R. Wada; X. Ruan; R. Han; X. Liu; W. Lin; J. Liu; F. Shi; P. Ren; G. Tian; F. Luo; J. Ren; J. Bao

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Control of thermal emittance of stainless steel using sputtered tungsten thin films for solar thermal power applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Low thermal emittance is the key factor of a solar collector. For high temperature solar thermal applications, low emittance is an important parameter, because the thermal radiative losses of the absorbers increase proportionally by T4. Our primary motivation for carrying out this work has been to lower the thermal emittance of stainless steel substrate (intrinsic emittance=0.120.13) by coating a thin film of high infrared (IR) reflecting tungsten (W). Tungsten thin films were deposited on stainless steel substrates using a glow discharge direct current magnetron sputtering system. Emittance as low as 0.03 was obtained by varying the thickness of W coating on stainless steel substrate. The influences of structural, morphological and electrical properties of the W coating on its emittance values are studied. The effect of substrate roughness on the emittance of W coating is also examined. Thermal stability of the W coatings is studied in both vacuum and air. In order to demonstrate the effect of W interlayer, solar selective coating of AlTiN/AlTiON/AlTiO tandem absorber was deposited on W coated stainless steel substrates, which exhibited absorptance of 0.955 and emittance of 0.08 with a thermal stability up to 600C in vacuum.

K.P. Sibin; Siju John; Harish C. Barshilia

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate monoliths synthesized by directed soft template method for highly sensitive NO{sub 2} gas sensor applications  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Mesoporous WO{sub 3} nanoplate monoliths were obtained by direct templating synthesis. ? Enable effective accession of the analytic molecules for the sensor applications. ? The WO{sub 3} sensor exhibited a high performance to NO{sub 2} gas at low temperature. -- Abstract: Controllable synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide semiconductors with nanocrystalline size, porous structure, and large specific surface area is one of the key issues for effective gas sensor applications. In this study, crystalline mesoporous tungsten oxide nanoplate-like monoliths with high specific surface areas were obtained through instant direct-templating synthesis for highly sensitive nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sensor applications. The copolymer soft template was converted into a solid carbon framework by heat treatment in an inert gas prior to calcinations in air to sustain the mesoporous structure of tungsten oxide. The multidirectional mesoporous structures of tungsten oxide with small crystalline size, large specific surface area, and superior physical characteristics enabled the rapid and effective accession of analytic gas molecules. As a result, the sensor response was enhanced and the response and recovery times were reduced, in which the mesoporous tungsten oxide based gas sensor exhibited a superior response of 21,155% to 5 ppm NO{sub 2}. In addition, the developed sensor exhibited selective detection of low NO{sub 2} concentration in ammonia and ethanol at a low temperature of approximately 150 C.

Hoa, Nguyen Duc, E-mail: ndhoa@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam); Duy, Nguyen Van [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam)] [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam); Hieu, Nguyen Van, E-mail: hieu@itims.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST) (Viet Nam)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Interface strength measurement of tungsten coatings on F82H substrates Hyoungil Kim *, Jaafar El-Awady, Vijay Gupta, Nasr Ghoniem, Shahram Sharafat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for IFE power reactors. Two of the proposed techniques to apply tungsten coat- ings on F82H ferritic steel of pores produced in the process of coating, the mechanical reliability of the VPS W-coatings is a crit and the absence of plastic effects when performing failure analysis. This technique relates the failure strength

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

296

The spatial distribution of organochlorine pesticides and halogenated flame retardants in the surface sediments of an Arctic fjord: The influence of ocean currents vs. glacial runoff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Selected organochlorine pesticides (OCs) and halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) were analyzed in surficial fjord sediments collected down the length of Kongsfjorden, Svalbard in the Norwegian high Arctic. Hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCHs) was found to be the most abundant OC in the sediment, followed by BDE-209>chlordane>?-endosulfan>Dechlorane Plus (anti-DP)>trifluralin concentration ranges were high over the relatively small study area of the fjord (e.g. ?HCH: 7.2100pgg?1 dry weight (dw)), with concentrations broadly similar to, or lower than, measurements conducted in other parts of the Arctic. Concentrations of legacy OCs, including both HCH isomers and chlordane showed a decreasing trend from the outer, seaward end of the fjord to the inner, glacier end of the fjord. Conversely, sediment concentrations of ?- and ?-endosulfan (0.112.5pgg?1 dw) increased from the outer fjord to the inner fjord. This contrasting pattern may be attributed to the influence of historical vs. contemporary sources of these chemicals to the fjord area, whereby the North Atlantic/West Spitzbergen oceanic current dominates the transport and input of the legacy OCs, whereas atmospheric deposition and meltwater runoff from the glaciers influence the inner fjord sediments for endosulfan. Interestingly, BDE-209 and Dechlorane Plus did not reveal any clear spatial trend. It is plausible that both glacial runoff and oceanic current end members are playing a role in introducing these chemicals to the fjord sediments. The relatively low fractional abundance of the syn-DP isomer (fsyn), however, indicates the long-range transport of this chemical to this Arctic site.

Yuxin Ma; Zhiyong Xie; Crispin Halsall; Axel Mller; Haizhen Yang; Guangcai Zhong; Minghong Cai; Ralf Ebinghaus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Effect of tungsten addition on the toughness and hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in wear-resistant Fe-B-C cast alloy  

SciTech Connect

The effects of tungsten additions of 0%, 1.12%, 2.04%, and 3.17% (in wt.%) on the morphology, fracture toughness and micro-hardness of Fe{sub 2}B in Fe-B-C cast alloy were investigated. The results indicate that, with the increase of tungsten addition, the morphology and distribution of Fe{sub 2}B have no change and a new W-containing phase, except the (Fe, W){sub 2}B with a certain tungsten solution, does not form, and that the fracture toughness of Fe{sub 2}B increases first and then decreases, while the hardness increases first and then has a little change. Compared with the fracture toughness (3.8 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}) of Fe{sub 2}B without tungsten addition, the toughness at 2.04 wt.% tungsten can be improved by about above 80% and achieves about 6.9 MPa{center_dot}m{sup 1/2}, and variation characteristics of hardness and toughness of Fe{sub 2}B were also testified by viewing the indentation marks and cracks on the Fe{sub 2}B, respectively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Poor toughness of Fe2B decreases obviously the wear resistance of the alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's toughness increases first and then decreases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer As W content increases, Fe2B's hardness first increases and then has little change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The toughness at 2.04 % W can be improved by above 80% more than that at 0% W.

Huang, Zhifu, E-mail: hzf@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xing, Jiandong; Lv, Liangliang

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants Background The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) University Coal Research (UCR) Program seeks to further develop the understanding of coal utilization. Since the program's inception in 1979, its primary objectives have been to improve our understanding of the chemical and physical processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner; maintain and upgrade the coal research capabilities and facilities of U.S. colleges and

299

Characteristics of Some Radionuclides of Tungsten, Rhenium, and Osmium Formed by Second-Order Thermal Neutron Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The identification and characteristics of several beta-emitting nuclides are reported. The half-life of W188 is 65 days, Os194 about 700 days, while Re189 might be either of two isotopes having half-lives of about 150 days or of at least five years. The mass assignment of W181 has been confirmed in view of its presence in thermal-neutron irradiated tungsten. Re188 was found to have a half-life of 16.9 hours. No gamma-radiation could be found by absorption measurements to be associated with the 18-hour Ir194 daughter of Os194. Thermal-neutron activation cross sections are reported for most of the nuclides.

Manfred Lindner

1951-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Influence of earth gravity on reaction engineering of tubular reactor for high concentration tungsten ion-exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of gravity on the reaction engineering of tubular reactor is studied by analyzing the residence time distribution curves. The results show that upflow-feeding mode is more beneficial compared with downflow-feeding mode, since the flow pattern of the fluid in the reactor is closer to plug flow. The result of dynamic experiment conducted in ion-exchange of tungsten metallurgy is as good as that in reaction engineering of ion-exchange column. Whether downflow-feeding or upflow-feeding mode is adopted, breakthrough time decreases when solution concentration increases. Upflow-feeding mode has longer breakthrough time and greater improvement in adsorption capacity especially with high WO3 concentration in ion-exchange.

Zhong-wei ZHAO; Lu-ping XIAO; Chi-hao GUO; Xing-yu CHEN; Ai-liang CHEN; Guang-sheng HUO; Hong-gui LI

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage mediate the cytotoxicity of tungsten-nickel-cobalt alloys in vitro  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten alloys (WA) have been introduced in an attempt to find safer alternatives to depleted uranium and lead munitions. However, it is known that at least one alloy, 91% tungsten-6% nickel-3% cobalt (WNC-91-6-3), causes rhabdomyosarcomas when fragments are implanted in rat muscle. This raises concerns that shrapnel, if not surgically removable, may result in similar tumours in humans. There is therefore a clear need to develop rapid and robust in vitro methods to characterise the toxicity of different WAs in order to identify those that are most likely to be harmful to human health and to guide development of new materials in the future. In the current study we have developed a rapid visual in vitro assay to detect toxicity mediated by individual WA particles in cultured L6-C11 rat muscle cells. Using a variety of techniques (histology, comet assay, caspase-3 activity, oxidation of 2'7'-dichlorofluorescin to measure the production of reactive oxygen species and whole-genome microarrays) we show that, in agreement with the in vivo rat carcinogenicity studies, WNC-91-6-3 was the most toxic of the alloys tested. On dissolution, it produces large amounts of reactive oxygen species, causes significant amounts of DNA damage, inhibits caspase-3, triggers a severe hypoxic response and kills the cells in the immediate vicinity of the alloy particles within 24 h. By combining these in vitro data we offer a mechanistic explanation of the effect of this alloy in vivo and show that in vitro tests are a viable alternative for assessing new alloys in the future.

Harris, R.M.; Williams, T.D.; Hodges, N.J.; Waring, R.H., E-mail: R.H.Waring@bham.ac.uk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Employee Spotlight: Matt Kasa | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Matt Kasa Matt Kasa Share Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Powertrain research --Building design ---Construction --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Solar energy --Fossil fuels ---Natural Gas --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ---Reactors -Energy usage --Energy storage ---Batteries ----Lithium-ion batteries ----Lithium-air batteries --Electricity transmission --Smart Grid Environment -Biology --Computational biology --Environmental biology ---Metagenomics ---Terrestrial ecology --Molecular biology ---Interventional biology -Environmental science & technology --Atmospheric

303

Workers' Spotlight Newsletters | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Worker Medical Screening Program. May 2013 issue covers BTMed takes aim at COPD, Lung Cancer and Pantex Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. March 26, 2013 Workers'...

304

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about large medical imaging equipment energy results.

305

Employee Spotlight: Damla Eroglu | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

--Workplace pipeline Search Show All All Videos Argonne OutLoud: "Computation, Big Data, and the Future of Cities" David Danielson - Assistant Secretary for Energy...

306

NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles (by tag) Lineman shares life-saving skills with electrical workers in Suriname Thursday, January 08, 2015 Platform for a modern grid: customer engagement Friday,...

307

Perspective Genetical Genomics: Spotlight on QTL Hotspots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de Haan5 , Andrew I. Su3 *, Ritsert C. Jansen1,2 * 1 Groningen Bioinformatics Centre, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, Kerklaan 30, Haren, The Netherlands, 2 Department of Human Genetics, Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen

Breitling, Rainer

308

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the fan and pump energy results.

309

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Reheat and Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. Read highlights from monitoring heating and reheating energy.

310

Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

design ---Construction --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Solar energy --Fossil fuels ---Natural Gas --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling &...

311

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the chiller plant energy results.

312

Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle August 14, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a very small volume near the site of radioactive decay, sparing nearby healthy tissue." IPF target stack separation and purification process. But the attempt to treat cancer with accelerator-produced, alpha-emitting radioisotopes on a large scale is relatively new. Engle, who has a doctorate in medical physics, joined

313

Overview of the US-Japan collaborative investigation on hydrogen isotope retention in neutron-irradiated and ion-damaged tungsten  

SciTech Connect

Plasma-facing components (PFCs) will be exposed to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions, and tungsten, a candidate PFC for the divertor in ITER, is expected to receive a neutron dose of 0.7 displacement per atom (dpa) by the end of operation in ITER. The effect of neutron-irradiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. While this prior database of results is quite valuable for understanding the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in PFCs, it does not encompass the full range of effects that must be considered in a practical fusion environment due to short penetration depth, damage gradient, high damage rate, and high PKA energy spectrum of the ion bombardment. In addition, neutrons change the elemental composition via transmutations, and create a high radiation environment inside PFCs, which influence the behavior of hydrogen isotope in PFCs, suggesting the utilization of fission reactors is necessary for neutron irradiation. Therefore, the effort to correlate among high-energy ions, fission neutrons, and fusion neutrons is crucial for accurately estimating tritium retention under a neutron-irradiation environment. Under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program, tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by neutron in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), ORNL, at 50 and 300C to 0.025, 0.3, and 1.2 dpa, and the investigation of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiation was performed in the INL Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), the unique high-flux linear plasma facility that can handle tritium, beryllium and activated materials. This paper reports the recent results from the comparison of ion-damaged tungsten via various ion species (2.8 MeV Fe2+, 20 MeV W2+, and 700 keV H-) with that from neutron-irradiated tungsten to identify the similarities and differences among them.

Masashi Shimada; Y. Hatano; Y. Oya; T. Oda; M. Hara; G. Cao; M. Kobayashi; M. Sokolov; H. Watanabe; B. Tyburska; Y. Ueda; P. Calderoni

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Analysis of effect of temperature gradients on surface-tension phenomena in gas-tungsten-arc welds  

SciTech Connect

Fluid motion directed by surface tension is considered as a contributor to heat penetration in a weld pool. The potential phenomena at the gas-liquid interface were analyzed, and the dependence of surface motion on temperature in the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding process was examined. An existing heat-transfer model was used and was able to predict weld size to +- 50% of the actual value. A momentum-transfer equation was derived by considering the contribution of Lorentz force. The momentum boundary condition was developed and was able to predict the Marangoni effect. The magnitude of surface-tension-driven force is comparable to the gravitational force on one gram. An empirical approach was proposed to couple heat-transfer and momentum-transfer phenomena. A dimensional analysis identified the pertinent dimensionless groups as Reynolds, Weber, Froude, Peclet, and Power numbers and a dimensionless velocity. A simplified form of the correction was developed by combining dimensionless groups to yield a correlation with the Bond, Prandtl, and modified power numbers. Future experimental work was proposed to test the functionality of the dimensionless groups.

Lee, H.A.; Chien, P.S.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fabrication of sharp tungsten-coated tip for atomic force microscopy by ion-beam sputter deposition  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten (W) is significantly suitable as a tip material for atomic force microscopy (AFM) because its high mechanical stiffness enables the stable detection of tip-sample interaction forces. We have developed W sputter-coating equipment to compensate the drawbacks of conventional Si cantilever tips used in AFM measurements. By employing an ion gun commonly used for sputter cleaning of a cantilever tip, the equipment is capable of depositing conductive W films in the preparation chamber of a general ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-AFM system without the need for an additional chamber or transfer system. This enables W coating of a cantilever tip immediately after sputter cleaning of the tip apex and just before the use in AFM observations. The W film consists of grain structures, which prevent tip dulling and provide sharpness (<3 nm in radius of curvature at the apex) comparable to that of the original Si tip apex. We demonstrate that in non-contact (NC)-AFM measurement, a W-coated Si tip can clearly resolve the atomic structures of a Ge(001) surface without any artifacts, indicating that, as a force sensor, the fabricated W-coated Si tip is superior to a bare Si tip.

Kinoshita, Yukinori; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Li, Yan Jun; Sugawara, Yasuhiro [Department of Applied Physics, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Investigations of early stage precipitation in a tungsten-rich nickel-base superalloy using SAXS and SANS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Characterization of the early stage precipitation is an important issue as it controls the emerging microstructure developed on Ni-based superalloys which are used as single crystal blades in gas turbines. The difficulty is that the gamma prime precipitation occurs at high temperatures and the reaction kinetic is very fast. Therefore, experimental methods with high time resolution are needed to monitor ?? precipitation. By using the high flux synchrotron instrument HARWI-II set up of the HelmholtzZentrum Geesthacht with a fast data collection detector, it was possible to observe the creation of fine precipitates and their early growth in a tungsten-rich Ni-base superalloy. The cooling down of the superalloy from the single-phase region to lower temperatures already leads to the formation of precipitates in the size range of a few nm. The formation and growth of the precipitates at this early stage is described in detail. In addition, SANS measurements were performed at the new SANS-1 instrument at MaierLeibnitz Zentrum (MLZ) in Garching to extend the results to larger precipitate sizes. DSC experiments were used to determine the critical temperatures of the formation of these fine precipitates, as well as the temperature at which they dissolve during heating (?? solvus temperature).

R. Gilles; D. Mukherji; H. Eckerlebe; L. Karge; P. Staron; P. Strunz; Th. Lippmann

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measurements of electrical resistivity of heavy ion beam produced high energy density matter: Latest results for lead and tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The high-intensity heavy ion beams provided by the accelerator facilities of the Gesellschaft fr Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt are an excellent tool to produce large volumes of high energy density (HED) matter. Thermophysical and transport properties of HED matter states are of interest for fundamental as well as for applied research. During the last few years development of new diagnostic techniques allowed for a series of measurements of the electrical resistivity of heavy ion beam generated HED matter. In this report we present the most recent results on electrical resistivity of HED matter at GSI. The experiments on which we report have been performed with targets consisting of tungsten wires and lead foils, respectively. Uranium and argon beam pulses with durations of a few hundred ns, intensities of about 2 10 9 and 1 10 11 ions / bunch , respectively, and an initial ion energy of 300350AMeV have been used as a driver. An energy density deposition of about 1kJ/g has been achieved by focusing the ion beam down to 1mm FWHM or less.

Serban Udrea; Vladimir Ternovoi; Nikolay Shilkin; Alexander Fertman; Vladimir E. Fortov; Dieter H.H. Hoffmann; Alexander Hug; Michail I. Kulish; Victor Mintsev; Pavel Ni; Dmitry Nikolaev; Naeem A. Tahir; Vladimir Turtikov; Dmitry Varentsov; Denis Yuriev

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

X-ray emission current scaling experiments for compact single-tungsten-wire arrays at 80-nanosecond implosion times  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of a series of current scaling experiments with the Z accelerator for the compact, single, 20-mm diameter, 10-mm long, tungsten-wire arrays employed for the double-ended hohlraum ICF concept [M. E. Cuneo et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 48, R1 (2006)]. We measured the z-pinch peak radiated x-ray power and total radiated x-ray energy as a function of the peak current, at a constant implosion time ?imp=80ns. Previous x-ray emission current scaling for these compact arrays was obtained at ?imp=95ns in the work of Stygar et al. [Phys. Rev. E 69, 046403 (2004)]. In the present study we utilized lighter single-tungsten-wire arrays. For all the measurements, the load hardware dimensions, materials, and array wire number (N=300) were kept constant and were the same as the previous study. We also kept the normalized load current spatial and temporal profiles the same for all experiments reported in this work. Two different currents, 11.20.2MA and 17.00.3MA, were driven through the wire arrays. The average peak x-ray power for these compact wire arrays increased by 26%7%to15826TW at 170.3MA from the 12524TW obtained at a peak current of 18.80.5MA with ?imp=95ns. The higher peak power of the faster implosions may possibly be attributed to a higher implosion velocity, which in turn improves the implosion stability, and/or to shorter wire ablation times, which may lead to a decrease in trailing mass and trailing current. Our results show that the scaling of the radiated x-ray peak power and total radiated x-ray energy scaling with peak drive current to be closer to quadratic than the results of Stygar et al. We find that the x-ray peak radiated power is Pr?I1.570.20 and the total x-ray radiated energy Er?I1.90.24. We also find that the current scaling exponent of the power is sensitive to the inclusion of a single data point with a peak power at least 1.9? below the average. If we eliminate this particular shot from our analysis (shot 1608), the power and energy scaling becomes closer to quadratic. Namely, we find that the dependence on the peak load current of the peak x-ray radiated power and the total x-ray radiated energy become Pr?I1.710.10 and Er?I2.010.21, respectively. In this case, the power scaling exponent is different by more than 2? from the previously published results of Stygar et al. Larger data sets are likely required to resolve this uncertainty and eliminate the sensitivity to statistical fluctuations in any future studies of this type. Nevertheless, with or without the inclusion of shot 1608, our results with ?imp=80ns fall short of an I2 scaling of the peak x-ray radiated power by at least 2?. In either case, the results of our study are consistent with the heuristic wire ablation model proposed by Stygar et al. (Pr?I1.5). We also derive an empirical predictive relation that connects the power scaling exponent with certain array parameters.

Michael G. Mazarakis; Michael E. Cuneo; William A. Stygar; Henry C. Harjes; Daniel B. Sinars; Brent M. Jones; Christopher Deeney; Eduardo M. Waisman; Thomas J. Nash; Kenneth W. Struve; Dillon H. McDaniel

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Thermal-hydraulic performance of a water-cooled tungsten-rod target for a spallation neutron source  

SciTech Connect

A thermal-hydraulic (T-H) analysis is conducted to determine the feasibility and limitations of a water-cooled tungsten-rod target at powers of 1 MW and above. The target evaluated has a 10-cm x 10-cm cross section perpendicular to the beam axis, which is typical of an experimental spallation neutron source - both for a short-pulse spallation source and long-pulse spallation source. This report describes the T-H model and assumptions that are used to evaluate the target. A 1-MW baseline target is examined, and the results indicate that this target should easily handle the T-H requirements. The possibility of operating at powers >1 MW is also examined. The T-H design is limited by the condition that the coolant does not boil (actual limits are on surface subcooling and wall heat flux); material temperature limits are not approached. Three possible methods of enhancing the target power capability are presented: reducing peak power density, altering pin dimensions, and improving coolant conditions (pressure and temperature). Based on simple calculations, it appears that this target concept should have little trouble reaching the 2-MW range (from a purely T-H standpoint), and possibly much higher powers. However, one must keep in mind that these conclusions are based solely on thermal-hydraulics. It is possible, and perhaps likely, that target performance could be limited by structural issues at higher powers, particularly for a short-pulse spallation source because of thermal shock issues.

Poston, D.I.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten Yi-Nan Liu, T. Ahlgren, L. Bukonte, K. Nordlund, Xiaolin Shu, Yi Yu, Xiao-Chun Li, and Guang-Hong Lu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plants due to its high melting point and low erosion yield. However, the hydrogen blistering induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We a quite low concentration of the order of 10-4 below the melting point under thermal equilibrium

Nordlund, Kai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The relationship between structural evolution and electrical percolation of the initial stages of tungsten chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline TiN  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental results and a geometric model of the evolution of sheet resistance and surface morphology during the transition from nucleation to percolation of tungsten chemical vapor deposition over ultrathin polycrystalline titanium nitride (TiN). We observed two mechanisms of reduction in sheet resistance. At deposition temperatures higher than 310 deg. C, percolation effect is formed at {approx}35% of surface coverage, {theta}, and characterized with a sharp drop in resistance. At temperature below 310 deg. C, a reduction in resistance occurs in two steps. The first step occurs when {theta} = 35% and the second step at {theta} = 85%. We suggest a geometric model in which the electrical percolation pass is modulated by the thickness threshold of the islands at the instant of collision.

Rozenblat, A. [Micron Semiconductors Israel Ltd., Qiryat-Gat 82109 (Israel); Department of Physical Electronics, Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Haimson, S. [Material Science Program, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Horvitz, D. [Micron Semiconductors Israel Ltd., Qiryat-Gat 82109 (Israel)

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba{sub 6?x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30}  

SciTech Connect

Ba{sub 6?x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30} solid solution with 0???x???6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal tungsten bronze structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2400?K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T???1030?K) plateau region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

Kolodiazhnyi, T., E-mail: kolodiazhnyi.taras@nims.go.jp; Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Mozharivskyj, Y. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4M1 (Canada)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

323

Airborne Infrared Target Tracking with the Nintendo Wii Remote Sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to target. 3.2 Design Rather than design for a particular distance, the highest-output available infrared source was selected for the beacon: a 500 W quartz tungsten halogen incandescent lamp. Determining the radiant power in the detectable spectrum...://terpconnect.umd.edu/ toh/models/Blackbody.html. [17] Forsythe, W. and Worthing, A., \\The Properties of Tungsten and the Character- istics of Tungsten Lamps," Astrophysics Journal , Vol. 61, April 1925, pp. 146{ 185. 34 ...

Beckett, Andrew 1984-

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Mechanism of WO{sub 3} reduction and carburization in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} mixtures leading to bulk tungsten carbide powder catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The mechanism of bulk tungsten carbide catalysts synthesis from WO{sub 3} in CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} mixtures has been studied using temperature programmed reactions associated with CH{sub 4}/D{sub 2} exchange reaction and in situ X-ray diffraction. Various experimental parameters have been studied such as partial pressures of reactants, heating rate, mass of precursor, or flow rate in order to determine the most important steps occurring during the transformation of WO{sub 3} to WC. It is shown that at temperatures below 900--923 K the diffusion within the solid particles is slow with respect to the rate of reduction of the surface, allowing the carburization of the surface in the presence of a core still partially oxidized. At higher temperatures, the diffusion is rapid, leading to a uniform reduction within the solid. In this case, the surface is continuously replenished in oxygen thus inhibiting the activation of methane and allowing the carburization to proceed only when the solid is deeply reduced. An inhibiting effect of hydrogen pressure on the interaction of methane with the surface has also been evidenced, an effect which excludes the possibility of an independent control of the reduction process from that of carburization. Finally the role of space velocity has also been elucidated.

Loefberg, A.; Frennet, A.; Leclercq, G.; Leclercq, L.; Giraudon, J.M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

7, 42854403, 2007 Halogens and polar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Cambridge CB3 0ET, UK 5 McGill University, Canada 6 Environment Canada, Toronto, Canada 7 Institute-friendly Version Interactive Discussion EGU 11 School of Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS29JT, UK 12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

4, 53675380, 2004 Halogens and Free  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the formation of the stratospheric ozone hole (John- ston and Podolske, 1978; Cicerone et al., 1983; Farman et

Boyer, Edmond

327

Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Halogenated Quinoline Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hexamethyldisilazane at the beginning of each day. A column of QF-1 was prepared using a silated support (Chromosorb W-DMSC) to observe the activity of the support. The resolution was poor and undefined for all the chloroquinolines indicating the......

Paul C. Goodley; Marshall Gordon

1972-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Gas Chromatographic Analysis of Halogenated Quinoline Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in the procedure section. Standard Mixtures The mixtures were...factors were calculated from five standard mixtures. These were calculated...QF-1 at 155 C (Analysis) Standard) Average Mole % Mole % (Average...silated support (Chromosorb W-DMSC) to observe the activity of......

Paul C. Goodley; Marshall Gordon

1972-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

Creighton, J. Randall (Albuquerque, NM); Dominguez, Frank (Albuquerque, NM); Johnson, A. Wayne (Albuquerque, NM); Omstead, Thomas R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effect of mechanical processing and heat treatment of powders on their sinterability characteristics linked with their method of manufacture. IV. The v/v vs tau function in a temperature jump in the sintering of porous bodies from molybdenum and tungsten carbide powders  

SciTech Connect

Use was made of molybdenum and tungsten carbide powders, which exhibit fairly high densification rates. The main object of the sintering of specimens from a molybdenum powder was to find out to what extent the behavior in a temperature jump of a metal differing markedly in physical properties (and electronic shell structure) from the metals investigated earlier resembled or differed from that of those metals. A molybdenum powder produced by the reduction of molybdenum trioxide with hydrogen at 800 C was chosen for investigation and experiments with tungsten carbide were carried out on two batches of powders produced at low and high carbidization temperatures. The study showed that the behavior of a porous specimen from the molybdenum powder did not differ from that of other metal powders. The behavior of tungsten carbide specimens in a temperature jump was similar to that of the metal powders studied in a previous investigation.

Ivensen, V.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greening the Gulf Coast Greening the Gulf Coast Green Coast Enterprises, through its work on Project Home Again, is the largest developer of U.S. Department (DOE) of Energy Builders Challenge-qualified homes in Louisiana. By June 2010, the team had constructed 45 homes that meet DOE's Builders Challenge criteria, with an additional 55 homes in the forecast, including 25 begun in July 2010. The energy-efficient, storm-resilient, single- family homes achieve average Home Energy Rating System (HERS) scores of 66, and Will Bradshaw, president of Green Coast Enterprises, estimates that the efficiency features of the homes will save residents an average of 30%-40% annually in energy savings in comparison to their previous homes. These homes are being constructed through a successful community-scale

332

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Worker Medical Screening Program. May 2013 issue covers: BTMed takes aim at COPD, Lung Cancer Director's Note Staff Trivia Pantex Former Worker Medical Surveillance Program. Trivia...

333

Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Note National Day of Remembrance Secure Electronic Records Transfer (SERT) Early Lung Cancer Detection What's Going on Around the Complex (Richland) NIOSH Advisory Board on...

334

Celebrity Power: Spotlighting and Persuasion in the Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

celebrities abilities to sell products (Atkin and Block 1983; Boorstin 1992, 162; Gamson 2007; Miciah and Shanklin 1994). Far less has been written about whether a celebrity can sell anything of a political nature. Among this literature, the most common...

Harvey, Mark A.

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are quickly becoming a commercially viable sustainable transportation option for Americans. Unlike gasoline-powered cars, these cutting-edge vehicles are fueled by hydrogen and emit only water. The latest and greatest FCEVs are on display this week at the Washington Auto Show. Learn more about how FCEVs work and what the Energy Department is doing to make them even more energy efficient and cost effective.

336

Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

set of consumer incentives, ncluding free assessments, access to an independent energy advisor, performance-based ebates, limited-time bonus rebates, and affordable financing. The...

337

Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the lighting and plug load energy results.

338

High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises- New Orleans, Louisiana  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This four-page case study describes Green Coast Enterprises efforts to rebuild hurricane-ravaged New Orleans through Project Home Again.

339

Spotlights on Recent JACS Publications FLUORESCENT PROBES LIGHT UP AMYLOID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the conductance, or transport, of ions across the membrane. Researchers have exploited the efficient transport investigated the mechanism of ion transport through several structural variants of fluorescent oligoester: the channel's ion transport activity slowly decreased over time. The researchers used steady-state and time

Theodorakis, Emmanuel

340

Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

inputs for zero carbon footprint - PEM technology can be integrated with solar and wind power Cost competitive with current commercial delivered hydrogen costs - Currently...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

{ alumni spotlight } 54 DiviDenD spring 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

football team, a powerhouse in Florida. And once his career as a Wolverine kicked in, he gained national

Shyy, Wei

342

DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability Awards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2013 Sustainability Awards.

343

Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

explore specific technology areas that can radically improve home performance. BARA communication projects include Building America outreach products and activities (see...

344

Whispering gallery modes in quantum dot-embedded dielectric microspheres for tagless remote refractometric sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 80 ?m yields a wavelength resolution of 0.08 nm. A tungsten halogen lamp (Ocean Optics Inc. LS-1) is coupled into the optical fiber 27 as bright field illumination source. A condenser lens collimates the light out of the optical fiber onto... the sample. Fig. 12. Experimental setup. Pulsed Laser, Coherent Mira 900F; P1 and P2, polarizer; M, mirror; DM, dichroic Mirror; L, Ocean Optics tungsten halogen lamp; OBJ, objective Nikon 50X/0.85NA; TL, tube lens; XYZ, XYZ stage; CL, condenser lens...

Pang, Shuo

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

Uranium-carbon multiple-bond chemistry. 8. Reaction of tungsten hexacarbonyl with Cp3U:CHP(Ph)(R)(Me) to form (OC)5WC(OUCp3)CHP(Ph)(R)(Me) and its isomerization to Cp3UOCH:CHP(Ph)(R)CH2W(CO)5  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

8. Reaction of tungsten hexacarbonyl with Cp3U:CHP(Ph)(R)(Me) to form (OC)5WC(OUCp3)CHP(Ph)(R)(Me) and its isomerization to Cp3UOCH:CHP(Ph)(R)CH2W(CO)5 ...

Roger E. Cramer; Jong Hwa. Jeong; John W. Gilje

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Halogens, dioxins/Halogens, dioxins/furansfurans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OrimulsionTM ~700 Petroleum coke, "petcoke" ~ 300 Natural gas - * Iodine 0.5 - 1.5 mg/kg #12;HELSINKI

Zevenhoven, Ron

347

Tungsten Status Chris Densham (RAL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typical fusion neutron spectrum #12;W5Ta microcantilever sample (D. Armstrong) 04/11/2014 D.E.J Armstrong 2013 1313 5mm #12;Tested microcantilever (D. Armstrong) 04/11/2014 D.E.J Armstrong 2013 14 #12;0 1 2 3 [Useful to measure increases in DBTT] Elevated Temperature Results (D. Armstrong) 04/11/2014 D

McDonald, Kirk

348

K Series Spectrum of Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The source of x-rays is a General Electric Pyrex tube operated at a constant potential...and the tube adjusted until the counter discharge rate was a maximum. The crystal used...served to oscillate the crystal through an arc of five minutes. Thus both a lines are...

J. C. Hudson; H. G. Vogt

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

1 000 000 "C/s thin film electrical heater: ln situ resistivity measurements of Al and Ti/Si thin films during ultra rapid thermal annealing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

introduce a new technique for rapidly heating (10' "C/s) thin films using an electrical thermal annealing- ently, most commercial RTA systems use radiation-heating techniques via tungsten-halogen lamps. These systems typi- cally have a maximum heating rate of 100-300 "C/s. We introduce an alternative methodfor

Allen, Leslie H.

350

Application of a nonisothermal thermogravimetric method to the kinetic study of the reduction of metallic oxides: Part 2. A theoretical treatment of powder bed reduction and its application to the reduction of tungsten oxide by hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical treatment of nonisothermal kinetic studies has been extended in the present work to gas-solid reactions in powder beds. An expression for the activation energies for the reaction has been derived on the basis that the reaction proceeds by the movement of the reaction front, the velocity of the movement being kept constant. The reliability of the method has been tested by applying the same to the reduction of tungsten oxide by hydrogen. The experiments were carried out using thermogravimetric technique under both isothermal and nonisothermal conditions. The reaction front is considered to consist of a thin layer of small particles. The rate of the reduction seems to be controlled by the chemical reaction between the product and the unreacted core existing in each of the small particles. Using the expression derived in the present work, the activation energy of the reaction was calculated from the results of the nonisothermal experiments to be 83.62 kJ/mol. This value is in good agreement with the value of 83.17 kJ/mol evaluated from isothermal experiments.

Bustnes, J.A.; Sichen, D.; Seetharaman, S. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Theoretical Metallurgy)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

352

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

353

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

355

Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

356

Synthesis and Characterization of Halogen-Free Antiflammable Polyphosphonates Containing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flammability. Polyethylene and polypropylene, for example, possess heat of combustion properties on par exhibited low combustion heat release rate and total heat of combustion, which we believe arises from

357

Halogen bonds in some dihalogenated phenols: applications to crystal engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The preference of Br to form type II contacts over type I is explored by various techniques. The mechanical properties of some dihalogenated phenols are correlated with their structures.

Mukherjee, A.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

358

Atmospheric Lifetimes of Long-Lived Halogenated Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...i) passage through high-temperature combustors, (ii) lightning...separately in what follows. High-temperature combustors. A fraction of all of...is processed through high-tem-perature combustors such as power plants...

A. R. Ravishankara; S. Solomon; A. A. Turnipseed; R. F. Warren

1993-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

Transient x-ray absorption spectroscopy of hydrated halogen atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy has been used to observe the transient species generated by one-photon detachment of an electron from aqueous bromide. The K-edge spectrum of the short-lived Br(0) atom exhibits a resonant 1s-4p transition...

Elles, Christopher G.; Shkrob, Ilya A.; Crowell, Robert A.; Arms, Dohn A.; Landahl, Eric C.

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Kinetics of the Dissolution of Scheelite in Groundwater: Implications for Environmental and Economic Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acids, tungsten carbide, tungsten metal powder, and more.tungsten carbide, ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, and

Montgomery, Stephanie Danielle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electrical Properties of Tungsten Oxide Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... appear that the mechanism of electron emission with oxide films is different from that with roughened electrodes. This would be the case for short gaps if the electrons were drawn ... located on the upper surface of the film, as envisaged by Paetov1, while with roughened electrodes it is possible that photo-ionization can take place throughout the gap due to ...

F. LLEWELLYN JONES

1946-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

GRAIN BOUNDARY STRENGTHENING PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN ALLOYS  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory was employed to investigate grain boundary (GB) properties of W alloys. A range of substitutional solutes across the Periodic Table was investigated to understand the behavior of different electronic orbitals in changing the GB cleavage energy in the ?27a[110]{525} GB. A number of transition metals were predicted to enhance the GB cohesion. This includes Ru, Re, Os, Ir, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ti, Hf, Ta and Nb. While lanthanides, s and p elements were tended to cause GB embrittlement.

Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight, November/December 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Al Tseu, former US Paratrooper, speaks with visitors Al Tseu, former US Paratrooper, speaks with visitors to the National Atomic Testing Museum celebrating the National Day of Remembrance I I I s s s s s s u u u e e e 1 1 1 0 0 0 N N N o o o v v v e e e m m m b b b e e e r r r / / / D D D e e e c c c e e e m m m b b b e e e r r r 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 3 3 Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E : Director's Note 1 Remembrance 1 Staff 2 Beryllium 2 Trivia 2 SERT 3 FWP Milestone 4 Calendar 5 A NOTE FROM THE DIRECTOR By Greg Lewis I had the pleasure of attending and presenting at the recent Joint Outreach Task Group (JOTG) meetings in Livermore and Berkeley, California. Representatives from the Department of Labor (DOL), the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, the DOL Ombudsman, and the Worker Health Protection

365

NOx, SO{sub 3} in the spotlight at NETL's 2006 Environmental Controls conference  

SciTech Connect

As emissions caps drop, technological solutions must become increasingly effective and efficient. Researchers, equipment vendors, and plant operators are exploring alternatives to SCR and SNCR, with a view to reducing the overall costs of NOx reduction. They have also achieved 95% to 99% removal of SO{sub 3}, with no visible plume opacity. These topics were discussed at ECC 2006. The first conference session focussed on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) control of nitrogen oxide emissions; the second session addressed the related issue of reducing stack emissions and flue gas concentrations of sulfur trioxide. The article summarises many papers presented. Summaries and/or full versions of all the papers mentioned, and others, are posted at www.netl.doe.gov/publications/proceedings/06/ecc/index.html. 2 figs.

Mann, A.N.; Makovsky, L.E.; Sarkus, T.A. [Technology and Management Services Inc. (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

from leading women in the clean energy sector -- including Heather Foust-Cummings of Catalyst, a knowledge leader on gender, leadership and inclusive talent management; and...

367

Spotlight on the microbes that produce heat shock protein 90-targeting antibiotics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cause a strong activation of the heat shock response, leading to...induction of the anti-apoptotic heat shock response seen with drugs...Plasma membrane drug efflux pumps elevate the cellular resistances...inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 90. J. Med...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Attend the final webinar in the 2014 Tribal Renewable Energy Series on Wednesday, Oct. 29, to learn more about how all the pieces of the tribal energy development puzzle fit togetherplus suggest topics of interest for the 2014 series.

369

Spotlight on molecular profiling: Integromic analysis of the NCI-60 cancer cell lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sets, we adopted standard operating procedures...Cancer Genome Atlass plans are much less expansive...a comprehensive review, with apologies...Oxaliplatin is now a standard-of-care agent...hypothesis-driven paradigm as a standard of judgment. That...EA, Covell DG. Mining the National Cancer...

John N. Weinstein

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

oday the spotlight in the United States is on the increasing world demand for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to obtain 25 percent of the total energy consumed from U.S. croplands, forests and farms by 2025 and the high cost of oil and natural gas. This has heightened interest in alternative and renewable energy conversion to energy, familiarization with the following terms will help consumers understand the scientific

Mukhtar, Saqib

371

EECBG Success Story: The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Block Grant (EECBG) program and launch its commitment to the Department's Better Buildings Challenge. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Ajani Stewart was close to...

372

Researcher SPOTLIGHT The University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of knowledge, but also directly serves the critical needs of the nation. W hat does it mean to be human to under- stand how humans learn language in order to help people both acquire a second language in pitch can change the entire meaning of a word. Such subtleties make tonal languages particularly

Milchberg, Howard

373

Climate science in the spotlight may not be such a bad thing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from coastal inundation to changing water availability, changing ecosystems and knock­on effects asking other news presenters whether these controversies should affect political efforts to achieve there is another sense in which they are right, or at least sufficiently accurate, because they help us understand

Stevenson, Paul

374

Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for its broader potential. Other finalists were recognized for enhancing veterans' health care, boosting national security, saving lives during emergencies, advancing...

375

Spotlight on Mexico. The domino effect: crude price changes since December 1982  

SciTech Connect

While world crude prices continue their downward slide, the world is watching Mexico to see how it follows the trend. If the cut to be announced is too deep, petro-dollars will be sacrificed; if the cut is too modest, share of market may suffer. Just as Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), the state oil company, was the means for overextension in borrowing and for wrong-headed administration, at this moment PEMEX is becoming the means for Mexico's restoration. While Mexico confronts its worst financial crisis since the revolution, PEMEX confronts its most difficult challenge since nationalization of the oil industry in 1938. To stop the compromising flood of petro-dollars out of PEMEX, the national oil company has been made subordinate to the Ministry of Energy, Mines, and State Industries. What Mexico is doing about the PEMEX crisis may be promotive of Mexican nationalism and international bankers' security at the same time. This issue presents the Energy Detente (1) fuel price/tax series and (2) industrial fuel prices for February 1983 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. 5 figures, 7 tables.

Not Available

1983-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projects Agency CIP DARPA Electro-Dischargeprepared for CIP Diagram 2 - HIP0.0509 mm in diameter) in a CIP process at 345 MPa. Notice

Lucchese, Carl Joesph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chung, D. Silicon-Aluminum Network Composites Fabricated byFigure 95 - Fine model with initial aluminum matrix failure.slight necking of the aluminum matrix. Note failed elements

Lucchese, Carl Joesph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

NEAMS Quarterly Report April-June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) quarterly report includes highlights,a spotlight on personal achievements, accomplishments, milestones and a technical spotlight on...

379

NEAMS Quarterly Report for July-September 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The NEAMS quarterly report includes highlights, a spotlight on personal achievements, accomplishments, recent and upcoming milestones, and a technical spotlight on modeling precipitate nucleation.

380

Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article profiles the Building America teams, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Laser spotlight reveals machine 'climbing' DNA New imaging technology has revealed how the molecular machines that remodel genetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, MukBEF (which is made from several different protein molecules), inside the bacterium E.coli. DavidBEF, effectively creating a single dye tag for each component of these machines. Up until now conventional at the very tiny length scale for understanding the causes of many diseases in humans, and how to devise new

Leake, Mark C.

382

Mechanisms of tungsten carbide-cobalt nanoparticle-induced angiogenesis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hard metal or cemented carbide consists of a powder mixture of 80 to 90% oftungsten carbide (WC) and 5 to 10% of metallic cobalt (Co). (more)

Zhu, Yingxue.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

On the Alpha Activity of Natural Tungsten Isotopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The indication for the ? decay of 180W with a half-life T ? 1/2 =1.1+0.8 ?0.4(stat)0.3(syst)1018 yr has been observed for the first time with the help of the super-low background 116CdWO4 crystal scintillators. In conservative approach the lower limit on half-life of 180W has been established as T ? 1/2 (180W) ? 0.71018 yr at 90 % C.L. Besides, new T ? 1/2 bounds were set for ? decay of

F. A. Danevich A; A. Sh. Georgadze A; V. V. Kobychev A; S. S. Nagorny A; A. S. Nikolaiko A; W

384

THE SURFACE DIFFUSION OF TUNGSTEN AT VERY HIGH TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; 2. transport system ; 3. insulator ; 4. first anode; 5. first anode voltage supply; 6. measuring resistor; 7. refe- rence voltage; 8. integrator; 9. HV supply; 10. second anode; 11. insulated aperture;12

Boyer, Edmond

385

Organometallic complexes of tungsten and tantalum : synthesis, structure and reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W(NAr)(CH-t-Bu)(CH2-t-Bu)2 (Ar = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3) was synthesized in four steps starting from WCI6. The reaction of W(NAr)(CH-t-Bu)(CH2-t-Bu)2 with various alcohols (1-AdamantylOH, t-BuOH, ArOH, (CF3)2CHOH, (CF3)2MeCOH, ...

Lopez, Lourdes Pia H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fundamental Studies of Molybdenum and Tungsten Methylidene and Metallacyclobutane Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addition of ethylene to Mo(NAr)(CHCMe2Ph)(OHIPT)(Pyr) (NAr = N-2,6-i-Pr2C6H3, OHIPT = O-2,6-(2,4,6-i-Pr3C6H2)2C6H3, Pyr = NC4H4) led to the trigonal-bipyramidal metallacyclobutane complex Mo(NAr)(C3H6)(OHIPT)(Pyr), in which ...

Schrock, Richard Royce

387

The evolution of molybdenum and tungsten olefin metathesis catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1: Reaction of Mo(NR)(CHR')(OTf)2(dme) (R = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (Ar), 2,6-Me2C6H3 (Ar'), 2,6-Cl2C6H3 (ArCl), 1-adamantyl (Ad); R' = CMe2Ph, CMe3; dme = dimethoxyethane) with the lithium salt of ArCl-nacnac ([2,6-Cl2C6H ...

King, Annie Jinying Hannah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

AB INITIO STUDY OF GRAIN BOUNDARY PROPERTIES OF TUNGSTEN ALLOYS  

SciTech Connect

Density functional theory was employed to investigate the grain boundary (GB) property of W-TM alloys (TM: fifth and sixth row transition metals). GB strengthening was found for Hf, Ta, Nb, Ru, Re, Os and Ir for 27{l_brace}525{r_brace} and to a lesser degree for 11{l_brace}323{r_brace}. Lower valence solutes strengthen the GB at certain substitutional sites, while higher valence elements enforce it at other positions. For 3{l_brace}112{r_brace}, the alloys exhibit reduced cleavage energies. Hence, allowing with TMs increases the GB cohesion more effectively for large-angle GBs whose cleavage energy is, in general, inherently lower than the low-angle ones. Electron density analysis elucidates the mechanism of charge addition or depletion of the GB bonding region upon TM substitution at various positions leading to stronger or weaker intergranular cohesion, respectively.

Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

Halogen-elimination photochemistry and oxygen-activation chemistry of late transition-metal complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-electron reaction chemistry, from both ground- and excited-state species, is at the heart of many topics in renewable energy and catalysis. In this thesis, two classes of reactions central to the themes of energy ...

Teets, Thomas S. (Thomas Sebastian)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immunosorbent assay for triclosan. Application to wastewaterR. ; Letcher, R. J. , Triclosan in waste and surface watersformation of chlorinated triclosan derivatives in wastewater

Bulloch, Daryl Neil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Halogenation of Oils with Special Attention to the Method of Wijs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by him in the following manner: ! In the preparation of the solutions. HgCl 8 + 41 = Hg I a + 2 IC1 IC1 + H 20 5 HC1 + HIO 2. On keeping the solution. 2 HIO + C 2H 60 = 21 + 2H 20 + C 2H 40 3. In the absorption (oleic acid). C0 2H.Ci 7H a a + HIO... at once a substance capable of liberating iodine from potassium iodide. He expressed the chemical change by the following equation: HgCl + I 2 - Hg C1I + IC1 Ephraim regarded the fact that he could ob tain results identical to those of Hubl, by using...

Rhodes, Edmund Oliver

1913-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds from the Use of Chlorine-Bleach-Containing Household Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of household cleaning products (bleaches, mildew stain removers, toilet cleaners, cleaning sprays, gels, and scouring powders) contain sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, ?5%). ... Each tube was packed at the upstream (sampling) end with 3 mm silanized glass-wool followed by a series of sections of 150 mg Tenax TA (60/80 mesh) (Supelco, Bellefonte, PA, USA), 3 mm silanized glass-wool, 100 mg Carboxen 1000 (Supelco, Bellefonte, PA), and finally, 3 mm silanized glass-wool at the downstream end. ...

Mustafa Odabasi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gas ChromatographyMicrowave-Induced Plasma for the Determination of Halogenated Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Spectroscopic Microwave generator: Applied Research...helium and argon at atmospheric pressures. Spec...plasma in helium at atmospheric pressure as an element-selective...organic compounds in water by gas chromatography (atmospheric pres sure helium......

M.M. Abdillahi

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Photoelectron spectroscopy of the halogen oxide anions FO-, CIO-, BrO-, IO-, OCIO-, and OIO-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440 (Received 29 January 1992; accepted 28 February 1992, by Dotan et al." Vogt et a1.12measured the energy depend- ence of the ClO- product channel in the reaction

Lineberger, W. Carl

395

Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessments L. Niel Plummer1 ; Eurybiades Busenberg2 ; Sandra M. Eberts3 ; Laura M. Bexfield4 ; Craig J. Brown5 ; Lynne S. Fahlquist6 ; Brian G. Katz7 ; and Matthew K. Landon8 Abstract: Concentrations study areas in the United States. In each case, the untreated water sample was used for drinking

396

Evaporative evolution of Martian brines based on halogens in nakhlites and MER samples  

SciTech Connect

Comparison of Cl and Br from Nakhla viens to MER samples suggests two kinds of brine solutions existed on Mars, one early and one late in the evaporation sequence. These solutions precipitated the secondary salts at the Meridiani and Gusev sites. We have recently reported the Cl and Br abundances determined by APS X-ray Microprobe and EMPA analyses of secondary aqueous minerals in Nakhla veins and discussed the significance of Cl-Br correlations with respect to the evolution of brine solutions on Mars. In that study, we suggested that the low Br concentration ({approx}10 ppm) in Lafayette Iddingsite is indicative of early stage of evaporation during progressive evolution of Martian brine solutions, which is, in turn, consistent with the petrographic evidence of early deposition of salt sequence of carbonate-sulfate- and no halite in Lafayette. We showed that the high Br concentrations of {approx}240 ppm in secondary salts in Nakhla veins similarly indicate late stages of evaporation in evolving Martian brine solutions which is again consistent with petrographic evidence of late stage deposition of salt sequence i.e. carbonate-sulfate-halite in Nakhla. When sea water evaporates under equilibrium conditions, the most insoluble carbonates (siderite and calcite) deposit first, followed by sulfates (gypsum and anhydrite) and finally the water-soluble halides are precipitated when the water content is sufficiently low. In the present study, we make a detailed comparison of Cl/Br ratios in secondary minerals in nakhlites with those in MER soils and rocks at Gusev and Meridiani and show that the compositions of solutions that inundated Lafayette iddingsite (early stage) and Nakhla veins (late stage) include the range of solution-compositions that gave rise to a variety of secondary salts at Gusev and Meridiani sites. Further, the results obtained here suggest that two kinds of brine solutions (one, late and the other, early or intermediate stage) seem to have inundated most of the rocks and soils to varying degrees and precipitated the secondary salts at Meridiani and Gusev sites.

Rao, M.N.; Sutton, S.R.; McKay, D.S. (Lockheed); (UC); (NASA)

2005-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

397

Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Novel Field-Effect Transistor Gate Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Silicon Etching by a Cf4 Plasma. Journal of Vacuumplasma with the addition of CF4, Cl-2, and N-2. Japaneseet al. , The effect of CF4 addition on Ru etching with

Kiehlbaugh, Kasi Michelle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Estimating the climate significance of halogen-driven ozone loss in the tropical marine troposphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA 6 Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA, USA 7 Jet Propulsion

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Gas ChromatographyMicrowave-Induced Plasma for the Determination of Halogenated Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......microwave-induced plasma detector. The...generator (2450 MHz frequency) was...microwave-induced plasma in helium at atmospheric pressure as an...compounds with atmospheric pressure helium microwave induced plasma-atomic emission......

M.M. Abdillahi

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Carcinogenic Activities of Certain Halogen Derivatives of 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene in the Rat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was rearranged (19) by heating it at 47 to 50 C. for...cerelose), 77; and corn oil, 5. After analysis of...dissolved in the corn oil of the diet with mild...drop of halibut liver oil per month. In the first...P. Rusch and J. M. Price for the histological examinations...

J. A. Miller; R. W. Sapp; and E. C. Miller

1949-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

COLLISIONS OF HALOGEN (2P) AND RARE GAS (1S) ATOMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involving 2p excited states of alkali atoms, with groundstate rare gas atoms (RG), though other systems have been2p ) AND RARE GAS (IS) ATOMS Christopher Hank Becker (Ph. D.

Becker, Christopher Hank

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Solid-State Halogen Atom Source for Chemical Dynamics and Etching...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Br and Br* in controllable quantities and velocities, thus providing an attractive UHV compatible solid-state radical atom source. The solid-state atom source is in principle...

403

Selective Detection of Phosphorus, Sulfur, and Halogen Compounds in the Gas Chromatography of Drugs and Pesticides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ethane since higher hydrocarbons would inter- fere...presence of many hydrocarbons by using xenon as...passes through a combustion tube heated to 800...passage through the combustion tube and are not...PLUG- - TRANSITE HEAT SHIELD -- TO FURNACE...presentation of data. Thus, the high......

H. P. Burchfield; D. E. Johnson; J. W. Rhoades; R. J. Wheeler

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a Millipore water purification system (Billerica, MA).from a Millipore water purification system (Billerica, MA).

Bulloch, Daryl Neil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Investigating the biosynthesis of halogenated meroterpenoid natural products from marine actinomycetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.25 M lithium sulfate 0.2 M calcium acetate 0.2 M calciumlithium nitrate none none none none none none 0.3 M ammonium acetate

Winter, Jaclyn Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Investigating the Biosynthesis of Halogenated Meroterpenoid Natural Products from Marine Actinomycetes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.25 M lithium sulfate 0.2 M calcium acetate 0.2 M calciumlithium nitrate none none none none none none 0.3 M ammonium acetate

Winter, Jaclyn Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Crossover energetics for halogenated Si(100): Vacancy line defects, dimer vacancy lines, and atom vacancy lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated surface patterning of I-Si(100)-(21) both experimentally and theoretically. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we first examined I destabilization of Si(100)-(21) at near saturation. Dimer vacancies formed on the terraces at 600 K, and they grew into lines that were perpendicular to the dimer rows, termed vacancy line defects. These patterns were distinctive from those induced by Cl and Br under similar conditions since the latter formed atom and dimer vacancy lines that were parallel to the dimer rows. Using first-principles density functional theory, we determined the steric repulsive interactions associated with iodine and showed how the observed defect patterns were related to these interactions. Concentration-dependent studies showed that the vacancy patterns were sensitive to the I concentration. Dimer and atom vacancy lines that were elongated along the dimer row direction were favored at lower coverage. Atom vacancy lines dominated at ?0.8ML, they coexisted with dimer vacancy lines at ?0.6-0.7ML, and dimer vacancy lines were exclusively observed below ?0.5ML. These surface patterns reflect the mean strength of the adatom repulsive interactions.

G. J. Xu; N. A. Zarkevich; Abhishek Agrawal; A. W. Signor; B. R. Trenhaile; D. D. Johnson; J. H. Weaver

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Halogenated Hydrocarbons in Dutch Water Samples Over the Years 1969 1977  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of a surveillance program with respect to hexa-chlorobenzene, ?-, ?- and ?-hexachlorocyclohexane, heptachlor, heptachlorepoxide, dieldrin, endrin, o.p-DDT, p.p-DDT, p.p-DDE, TDE, ?- and ?-endosu...

Ronald C. C. Wegman; Peter A. Greve

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

U.S. Department of the Interior September 2012 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intermediate tungsten products, including metal powder and tungsten carbide powder, was 16% less during January of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten scrap, and other tungsten materials of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide

410

U.S. Department of the Interior April 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten scrap, and other tungsten materials for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported by producers. Includes estimates. 5 Data for ferrotungsten, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal powder, and tungsten scrap reported

411

U.S. Department of the Interior October 2012 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intermediate tungsten products, including metal powder and tungsten carbide powder, was 19% less during January of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten scrap, and other tungsten materials, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal powder, and tungsten scrap reported

412

Technical Standards Newsletter - June 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

s... 8 An Overview of the International Organization for Standardization... 11 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight......

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine 212 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Biology and Medicine ; Engineering 36 Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxinsfurans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, Summary: .1 Introduction The halogens are...

414

E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine chlorides Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 27 Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxinsfurans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, Summary: .1 Introduction The halogens are...

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine compounds Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Waterloo Collection: Chemistry 34 Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxinsfurans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, Summary: .1 Introduction The halogens are...

416

E-Print Network 3.0 - astatine 215 Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics Group Collection: Materials Science 35 Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxinsfurans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, Summary: .1 Introduction The halogens are...

417

U.S. Department of the Interior July 2012 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intermediate tungsten products, including metal powder and tungsten carbide powder, was 16% less during January of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten scrap, and other tungsten materials powder and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported

418

U.S. Department of the Interior September 2012 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of intermediate tungsten products, including metal powder and tungsten carbide powder, was 19% less during January of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten scrap, and other tungsten materials and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported by producers

419

Method of Dehalogenation using Diamonds  

SciTech Connect

A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

Farcasiu, Malvina; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Ladner, Edward P.; Anderson, Richard R.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

420

Speaker biographies for the Fuel Cell Technologies Program Webinar titled Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis … Spotlight on Giner and Proton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Professional Bios - Kathy Ayers and Monjid Hamdan Professional Bios - Kathy Ayers and Monjid Hamdan Kathy Ayers, Director of Research, Proton Energy Systems Kathy Ayers is the Director of Research at Proton Energy Systems. She is responsible for developing the long term research direction for improvements in performance, reliability, and cost of Proton's electrolyzer cell stack as well as overseeing Proton's military and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

UvA in the spotlight interview with Susan Bgels `Learning how to think really means learning how to exercise some control over how and what  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, so lame and unexciting on the surface, actually expresses a great and terrible truth.' David Foster

van Rooij, Robert

422

Halogenated Benzimidazole Carboxamides Target Integrin ?4?1 on T-Cell and B-Cell Lymphomas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...25). Docking simulations Compounds were docked...Nonetheless, molecular modeling studies revealed...Comparative protein modeling by satisfaction...Halliday RS, et al. Automated docking using a...field for molecular simulation of nucleic acids...report focuses on the rapid microwave preparation...

Richard D. Carpenter; Arutselvan Natarajan; Edmond Y. Lau; Mirela Andrei; Danielle M. Solano; Felice C. Lightstone; Sally J. DeNardo; Kit S. Lam; and Mark J. Kurth

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Halogen-driven low-altitude O3 and hydrocarbon losses in spring at northern high latitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Vogt et al., 1996; Foster et al., 2001]. HOBr þ Br? þ Hþ ! Br2 þ H2OðR3? HOBr þ Cl? þ Hþ ! BrCl þ H2Oð, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA. Copyright 2

Chance, Kelly

424

Kinetic Modeling of Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Complex Oxide Films and its Application to Predictive Feature Profile Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopic Diagnostics Of Cf4-O2 Plasmas During Si AndOf Oxygen Additions To Cf4 Plasmas." Journal Of AppliedAnd Silicon Etching Using Cf4 And Chf3." Journal Of Vacuum

Marchack, Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Preparation, heat capacity, and combustion characteristics of water-surfactant-halogenated hydrocarbon microemulsions suitable for combined fire-extinguishing means  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water-sodium dodecyl sulfate-triethanolamine-1-pentanol-1,1,2,2-tetrafluorodibromoethane (C2F4Br2) microemulsions differing in the H2O/C2F4Br2 ratio and content of surfactants were prepared. The principal possibi...

D. V. Batov; V. N. Kartsev; S. N. Shtykov

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Application of a Rapid Scanning Plasma Emission Detector and Gas Chromatography for Multi-Element Quantification of Halogenated Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Emission Detector and Gas Chromatography for...element-selective detector for gas chromatography...their insolubility in water, they accumulate...usually quantified by gas chromatographic separation...carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. This element selective...because of the moderate solubility of this compound......

Mantay Zerezghi; K.J. Mulligan; J.A. Caruso

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Kinetic model for predicting the concentrations of active halogens species in chlorinated saline cooling waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model has been developed for describing the speciation of chlorine-produced oxidants in seawater as a function of time. The model is applicable under a broad variety of conditions, including all pH range, salinities, temperatures, ammonia concentrations, organic amine concentrations, and chlorine doses likely to be encountered during power plant cooling water chlorination. However, the effects of sunlight are not considered. The model can also be applied to freshwater and recirculating water systems with cooling towers. The results of the model agree with expectation, however, complete verification is not feasible at the present because analytical methods for some of the predicted species are lacking.

Haag, W.R.; Lietzke, M.H.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Experimental and Computational Study of Flame Inhibition Mechanisms of Halogenated Compounds in C1-C3 Alkanes Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? = 0.5, (e) Ethane ? = 1.0, (f) Ethane ?=2.0, (g) Propane ? = 0.5, (h) Propane ? = 1.0, (i) Propane ? = 2.0 ............................................................................................ 69 Figure 12. Normalized, peak OH* at near...-atmospheric pressure; (a) Methane ?=0.5, (b) Methane ? = 1.0, (c) Methane ? = 2.0, (d) Ethane ? = 0.5, (e) Ethane ? = 1.0, (f) Ethane ?=2.0, (g) Propane ? = 0.5, (h) Propane ? = 1.0, (i) Propane ? = 2...

Osorio Amado, Carmen H

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Chem 350 Jasperse Ch. 6 Summary of Reaction Types, Ch. 4-6, Test 2 1. Radical Halogenation (Ch. 4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps. H Br Br · · Br·+ Br Br + H-Br slow step ready to repeat first step 2. SN2 Substitution OCH3 Br SN treatment with Anionic Nucleophile/Base. For 2º alkyl halides, SN2 is often accompanied by variable amounts to Inversion of Configuration Mech: Be able to draw completely. Only one concerted step! OCH3 Br SN2: 1º>2º>3º

Jasperse, Craig P.

430

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other Halogenated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environ. Sci. Technol. M92, 26,2454-2461 In-Situ Transformation of Carbon Tetrachloride and Other, California 94305-4020 Enhanced in-situ transformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) was observed under anoxic Chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs)with one or two carbon atoms are widely used as solvents, degreasing

Semprini, Lewis

431

U.S. Department of the Interior May 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

only. 4 Net production of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal powder, and tungsten scrap reported Metal powder W W W W 300 297 335 Tungsten carbide powder W W W W 353 318 r 325 Total 6,360 544 r 530 1

432

U.S. Department of the Interior July 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period in 2012. Total U.S. reported consumption of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide production of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal powder, and tungsten scrap reported by consumers

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - air act potential Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spotlight as a Summary: A griculture is in the spotlight as a potential contribu- tor to air pollution. Animal feeding... - eral public should be familiar with the terminol- ogy...

434

Scandium separation from tungsten crucibles : preliminary investigation into the separation of scandium metal from tungsten metal crucibles using an acid soak process.  

SciTech Connect

The first step in an attempt to isolate Sco from a Wo crucible was explored by soaking the samples in a series of organic (HOAc) and inorganic (HCl, H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3) acids. All samples, except the HOAc, yielded a powder. The weight loss suggests that HNO3 is the most efficient solvent; however, the powders were tentatively identified by PXRD and found to contain both W and Sc by-products. The higher weight loss may also indicate dissolution of the Wo crucible, which was further evidenced upon visual inspection of the crucible. The H3PO4 acid soak yielded the cleanest removal of Sc from the crucible. More work to understand the separation of the Sco from the Wo crucible is necessary but the acid routes appear to hold promise under not as of yet established criteria.

Boyle, Timothy J.; Hess, Ryan Falcone; Neville, Michael Luke; Howard, Panit Clifton

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining plan Disposals Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 1998 FY 1998 Carbide powder 871

436

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wear- resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining, and construction--9-30-006 Uncommitted Committed Authorized Disposal plan Disposals Material inventory inventory

437

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parts to be used as cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas plan Disposals Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 1999 FY 1999 Carbide powder 760 111 760 454

438

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining inventory inventory for disposal FY 1997 FY 1997 Carbide powder 871 -- -- -- -- Ferrotungsten 385

439

FY 2009 Strategic Plan for Minority Education Programs | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Education Programs More Documents & Publications Minority Educational Institutions Student Partnership Program (MEISPP) Internship Spotlight Environmental Justice Five-Year...

440

michalsky-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calibration of ARM Spectral Shortwave Radiometers Calibration of ARM Spectral Shortwave Radiometers J. J. Michalsky, J. L. Berndt, P. W. Kiedron, and L. C. Harrison Atmospheric Sciences Research Center State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Abstract Absolute calibration of spectral shortwave radiometers is typically performed using National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) or NIST-traceable spectral lamps. In this paper, we compare 18 spectral irradiance lamps from NIST and three commercial vendors all using the same spectrometer to assess their agreement with each other and the NIST standards. The NIST procedure is followed for the 1000W FEL lamps from NIST, Optronics, and EG&G. A modified calibration procedure developed by LI-COR is followed for their 200W tungsten-halogen lamps. Results

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Spectrally dependent photovoltages in Schottky photodiode based on (100) B-doped diamond  

SciTech Connect

Spectrally and spatially resolved photovoltages were measured by Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) on a Schottky photo-diode made of a 4?nm thin tungsten-carbide (WC) layer on a 500?nm oxygen-terminated boron-doped diamond epitaxial layer (O-BDD) that was grown on a Ib (100) diamond substrate. The diode was grounded by the sideways ohmic contact (Ti/WC), and the semitransparent Schottky contact was let unconnected. The electrical potentials across the device were measured in dark (only 650?nm LED of KPFM being on), under broad-band white light (halogen lamp), UV (365?nm diode), and deep ultraviolet (deuterium lamp) illumination. Illumination induced shift of the electrical potential remains within 210?mV. We propose that the photovoltage actually corresponds to a shift of Fermi level inside the BDD channel and thereby explains orders of magnitude changes in photocurrent.

?ermk, Jan, E-mail: cermakj@fzu.cz; Rezek, Bohuslav [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnick 10, 16200 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Koide, Yasuo [Sensor Materials Center, National Institute for Material Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Takeuchi, Daisuke [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Uncertainty Analysis of Spectral Irradiance Reference Standards Used for NREL Calibrations  

SciTech Connect

Spectral irradiance produced by lamp standards such as the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) FEL-type tungsten halogen lamps are used to calibrate spectroradiometers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Spectroradiometers are often used to characterize spectral irradiance of solar simulators, which in turn are used to characterize photovoltaic device performance, e.g., power output and spectral response. Therefore, quantifying the calibration uncertainty of spectroradiometers is critical to understanding photovoltaic system performance. In this study, we attempted to reproduce the NIST-reported input variables, including the calibration uncertainty in spectral irradiance for a standard NIST lamp, and quantify uncertainty for measurement setup at the Optical Metrology Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Campanelli, M.; Stoffel, T.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Infrared floodlight  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An infrared floodlight assembly designed particularly for security purposes and including a heat-conducting housing, a lens secured to the housing to provide a closure therefor, and a floodlight located within (and surrounded by) the housing. The floodlight combines the use of a tungsten halogen light source and dichroic hot and cold mirrors for directing substantially only infrared radiation toward the assembly's forward lens. Visible radiation is absorbed by the housing's interior wall(s) and, optionally, by a filter located between the floodlight and lens. An optional means may be used within the floodlight to reflect all forward radiation back toward the paraboloidal hot mirror or, alternatively, to reflect only visible radiation in this direction. The dichroic hot and cold mirrors preferably each comprise a glass substrate having multiple layers of titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thereon.

Levin, Robert E. (S. Hamilton, MA); English, George J. (Reading, MA)

1986-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

444

U.S. Department of the Interior March 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported by producers. Includes estimates. 5 Data for ferrotungsten, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal powder, and tungsten scrap reported are uncommitted material only. 4 Net production of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 2 #12

445

U.S. Department of the Interior April 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal powder, and tungsten scrap reported by consumers only. 4 Net production of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 2 #12;Product3 2011://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals TUNGSTEN IN NOVEMBER 2012 U.S. net production of intermediate tungsten products, including metal powder

446

U.S. Department of the Interior November 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period in 2012. Total U.S. reported consumption of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported by producers. Includes estimates. 5 Data for ferrotungsten, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten chemicals, tungsten metal

447

U.S. Department of the Interior April 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide January­October4 2011 September October Metal powder 3,330 W W W 273 350 257 Tungsten carbide powder 4://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals TUNGSTEN IN OCTOBER 2012 U.S. net production of intermediate tungsten products, including metal powder

448

Highly Conformal Thin Films of Tungsten Nitride Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition from a Novel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) deposition temperatures under 350 °C (due to the thermal instability of low-k materials); (8) good growth, and electrically conducting. All of the films showed good adhesion to the substrates, were acid-resistant, and did resistivity than aluminum, 1.7 versus 2.7 µ-cm, respectively (bulk values). This property of copper enables

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthocyanins facilitate tungsten Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

movement of water and chemi- cals applied directly... is expressed as KY 97,03. 12;82 Subcritical water and carbonated water extraction of anthocyanins from grape Source: Brye,...

450

Surface preparation effects on GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld penetration in JBK-75 stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of GTA welds on JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface (weld groove) preparation produced substantial changes in the penetration characteristics and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent weld penetration (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander result from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any improvement in penetration. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, and increase the surface oxide thickness. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Similar results were observed with changes in filler wire surface oxide thickness, caused by changes in wire production conditions. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

Campbell, R.D.; Heiple, C.R.; Sturgill, P.L.; Robertson, A.M.; Jamsay, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Transgenerational transmission of genetic damage by depleted uranium and tungsten alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Abstract 3464: Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human lung epithelial...Wise 1 1Univ. of Southern Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military applications...

Alexandra Miller

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Displacive Phase Transition of Vanadium Dioxide and the Effect of Doping with Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, comparison of the two structures in Figure 1 showed that it was possible to construct the tetragonal structure using the lower-symmetry but equivalent unit cell indicated by the green quadrilateral (each of whose corners is midway between two vanadium ions) in Figure 1a. ... Woodley, S. M.; Battle, P. D.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Gale, J. D. J. Phys. ...

Makondelele Netsianda; Phuti E. Ngoepe; C. Richard A. Catlow; Scott M. Woodley

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Well-Defined, Silica-Supported Tungsten Imido Alkylidene Olefin Metathesis Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

olefin metathesis catalyst. Bouchra Rhers, a Alain Salameh,active propene metathesis catalyst, which can achieve 16000W-based olefin metathesis catalyst through the reaction of [

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Evaluation of Nuclear Activation of Tungsten Plates for Future Modeling of a Medical Accelerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shielding Materials / Special Issue on the 11th International Conference on Radiation Shielding and the 15th Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division (Part 2) / Radiation Measurements and Instrumentation

Bin Han; Bryan Bednarz; Yaron Danon; Robert Block; X. George Xu

455

Physical properties of erbium implanted tungsten oxide films deposited by reactive dual magnetron sputtering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Inorganic Electrochromic Materials. Amsterdam:electrodes in electrochromic devices [4]. Particularly,optical, electrical and electrochromic properties [6-8],

Mohamed, Sodky H.; Anders, Andre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Fabrication of two-dimensional tungsten photonic crystals for high-temperature applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. D. Joannopoulos Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (Received 30 March 2011; accepted 10 September 2011 conversion, including solar- thermophotovoltaic and radioisotope-thermophotovoltaic generators,1 as well

Soljaèiæ, Marin

457

High-temperature tantalum tungsten alloy photonic crystals: Stability, optical properties, and fabrication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Soldier Nanotechnology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 3 H.C. Starck, Inc., Newton, Massachusetts 02461, USA (Received 24 July 2013; accepted 3 September in thermophotovoltaics (TPV), so- lar TPV, and solar-thermal energy conversion systems in general has led to new

Soljaèiæ, Marin

458

Structure and Bonding of Tungsten Oxide Clusters on Nanostructured Cu-O Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

(WO3)3 gas-phase clusters generated via vacuum sublimation are deposited under UHV and low temperature (5 K) conditions on a Cu(110) 'stripe' phase consisting of alternating Cu-O (2x1) and clean Cu regions. STM imaging shows that the clusters adsorb as intact units on both substrates, and the suggested adsorption geometries are confirmed by density-functional (DF) simulations. On the clean surface the overall distortion is minor and we are able to image the nodal structure of an individual molecular orbital in the STM at low bias, whereas on the Cu-O surface both the clusters and the substrate are significantly distorted, due to the strong oxygen affinity of W atoms. On both surfaces cluster and Cu electronic states are appreciably mixed, and electron charge is donated by the surface to the cluster. The experimentally STS-determined DOS signature of the adsorption complex consists in two peaks across the Fermi energy and is well reproduced by the DF calculations.

Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Ramsey, Michael; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Netzer, Falko P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Literature on fabrication of tungsten for application in pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels  

SciTech Connect

The pyrochemical processing of nuclear fuels requires crucibles, stirrers, and transfer tubing that will withstand the temperature and the chemical attack from molten salts and metals used in the process. This report summarizes the literature that pertains to fabrication (joining, chemical vapor deposition, plasma spraying, forming, and spinning) is the main theme. This report also summarizes a sampling of literature on molbdenum and the work previously performed at Argonne National Laboratory on other container materials used for pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuels.

Edstrom, C.M.; Phillips, A.G.; Johnson, L.D.; Corle, R.R.

1980-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

460

Discrete polyene oligomer synthesis and related polymer characterization : (Appendix I: Reduced tungsten dimeric compounds)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molybdenum complexes ... were used to synthesize polyene oligomeric compounds with up to 15 conjugated double bonds by reaction with aldehyde compounds in a Wittig-like fashion. The optical properties of highly nr-conjugated ...

Hafer, Jillian E. (Jillian Elizabeth)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Thermionic energy conversion with a preferentially oriented tungsten emitter. [Nb; W  

SciTech Connect

A Thermionic converter with a W(110) emitter was tested with updated instrumentation. The purpose was to verify and establish that the present setup was suitable for testing state of the art converters such as the advanced thermionic initiative converter in the near future. The experimental results were characterized and compared to computer simulations generated with a one dimensional computer code. Thermionic converter applications require an emitter that produces large current density and a collector that yields a high output voltage. Practical converters should be easy to fabricate from readily available materials and provide long service lives. In order to develop such a converter, programs to screen and test the numerous promising electrode combinations are absolutely necessary. The evaluation of rare and expensive thermionic materials became feasible with the introduction of this device because of the small size of its electrode. The present result showed that the maximum power output from the preferentially oriented W(110) diminode was 9.0 watts/cm{sup 2}.

Tsao, B.; Ramalingam, M.L. (Universal Energy Systems, Inc. 4401 Dayton-Xenia Road Dayton, OH (USA)); Donovan, B.D.; Cloyd, J.S. (Aerospace Power Division WRDC/POOC, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (USA))

1991-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

463

Tungsten-188/carrier-free rhenium-188 perrhenic acid generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator system has been invented for providing a carrier-free radioisotope in the form of an acid comprises a chromatography column in tandem fluid connection with an ion exchange column, the chromatography column containing a charge of a radioactive parent isotope. The chromatography column, charged with a parent isotope, is eluted with an alkali metal salt solution to generate the radioisotope in the form of an intermediate solution, which is passed through the ion-exchange column to convert the radioisotope to a carrier-free acid form. 1 figure.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Lisic, E.C.; Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

Transgenerational transmission of genetic damage by depleted uranium and tungsten alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Epigenetic mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation in human...Southern Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly used in military...research information on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. In our...

Alexandra Miller

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Transgenerational transmission of genetic damage by depleted uranium and tungsten alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...American Association for Cancer Research April 15, 2010...mechanism is involved in depleted uranium-induced transformation...Maine, Portland, ME. Depleted uranium (DU) is commonly...American Association for Cancer Research; 2010 Apr 17-21...

Alexandra Miller

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON PLASTIC FLOW AND FAILURE IN POLYCRYSTALLINE TUNGSTEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ation of kinetic energy penetrators: they were made of depleted uranium which has the desired density (r and analysis of such applications. Although the principal (non-uranium) technological materials developed

Meyers, Marc A.

467

Z-Selective Olefin Metathesis Reactions Promoted by Tungsten Oxo Alkylidene Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Addition of LiOHMT (OHMT = O-2,6-dimesitylphenoxide) to W(O)(CH-t-Bu)(PMe[subscript 2]Ph)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2] led to WO(CH-t-Bu)Cl(OHMT)(PMe[subscript 2]Ph) (4). Subsequent addition of Li(2,5-Me[subscript 2]C[subscript ...

Takase, Michael K.

468

High-oxidation-state molybdenum and tungsten monoalkoxide pyrrolide alkylidenes as catalysts for olefin metathesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1 describes work toward solid-supported W olefin metathesis catalysts. Attempts to tether derivatives of the known Z-selective catalyst W(NAr)(C?H?)(pyr)(OHIPT) (Ar = 2,6- diisopropylphenyl, pyr = pyrrolide; HIPT ...

Townsend, Erik Matthew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Highly coherent electron beam from a laser-triggered tungsten needle tip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a quantitative measurement of the spatial coherence of electrons emitted from a sharp metal needle tip. We investigate the coherence in photoemission using near-ultraviolet laser triggering with a photon energy of 3.1 eV and compare it to DC-field emission. A carbon-nanotube is brought in close proximity to the emitter tip to act as an electrostatic biprism. From the resulting electron matter wave interference fringes we deduce an upper limit of the effective source radius both in laser-triggered and DC-field emission mode, which quantifies the spatial coherence of the emitted electron beam. We obtain $(0.80\\pm 0.05)\\,$nm in laser-triggered and $(0.55\\pm 0.02)\\,$nm in DC-field emission mode, revealing that the outstanding coherence properties of electron beams from needle tip field emitters are largely maintained in laser-induced emission. In addition, the relative coherence width of 0.36 of the photoemitted electron beam is the largest observed so far. The preservation of electronic coherence du...

Ehberger, Dominik; Eisele, Max; Krger, Michael; Noe, Jonathan; Hgele, Alexander; Hommelhoff, Peter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Physical properties of erbium implanted tungsten oxide filmsdeposited by reactive dual magnetron sputtering  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous and partially crystalline WO3 thin films wereprepared by reactive dual magnetron sputtering and successively implantedby erbium ions with a fluence in the range from 7.7 x 1014 to 5 x 1015ions/cm2. The electrical and optical properties were studied as afunction of the film deposition parameters and the ion fluence. Ionimplantation caused a strong decrease of the resistivity, a moderatedecrease of the index of refraction and a moderate increase of theextinction coefficient in the visible and near infrared, while theoptical band gap remained almost unchanged. These effects could belargely ascribed to ion-induced oxygen deficiency. When annealed in air,the already low resistivities of the implanted samples decreased furtherup to 70oC, whereas oxidation, and hence a strong increase of theresistivity, was observed at higher annealing temperatures.

Mohamed, Sodky H.; Anders, Andre

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

471

Synthesis of full-density nanocrystalline tungsten carbide by reduction of tungstic oxide at room temperature  

SciTech Connect

Among the hard alloys, WC alloys find wide industrial applications as tips for cutting tools and wear-resistant parts. Their intrinsic resistance to oxidation and corrosion at high temperatures also makes them desirable as a protective coating for devices at elevated temperatures. In the industrial scale of production, WC is prepared by a direct union of the elements at a temperature of 3,273 to 3,473 K. Accordingly, the high cost of preparation is a disadvantage of this process. Here, the authors report a novel technique for preparing a large amount of WC powder using a simple method. This process is based on mechanical solid-state reduction (MSSR) followed y solid-state reaction (SSR) during room-temperature ball milling (a high energy ball mill, Fritsch P6, was used at a rotation speed of 4.2 s{sup {minus}1}) of a mixture of WO{sub 3}, Mg, and C powders.

El-Eskandarany, M.S.; Omori, M.; Ishikuro, M.; Konno, T.J.; Takada, K.; Sumiyama, K.; Hirai, T.; Suzuki, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. 2nd quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The completed geochemical analysis of groundwater in the Pine Creek area for evaluation of the geothermal potential of this location is presented. Also included is an environmental constraints analysis of Pine Creek noting any potential environmental problems if a geothermal system was developed onsite. Design of a geothermal system is discussed for site-specific applications and is discussed in detail with equipment recommendations and material specifications. A preliminary financial, economic, and institutional assessment of geothermal system located totally on Union Carbide property at Pine Creek is included. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Willens, C.A.; Walter, K.M.; Carrico, R.L.; Lowe, G.D.; Lacy, S.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Optical spectroscopy of tungsten carbide ,,WC... Shane M. Sickafoose, Adam W. Smith, and Michael D. Morse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transition-metal carbide, WC. A low-resolution scan revealed a five-member vibrational progression beginning to the isovalent molecule MoC and other transition-metal carbides. © 2002 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10 this end, we have embarked on a study of the diatomic transition-metal carbides, and have al- ready

Morse, Michael D.

474

Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video  

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Score Past Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid hcl solutions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collection: Chemistry 50 HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Halogens, dioxinsHalogens, dioxinsfuransfurans Summary: -related corrosionChlorine-related corrosion...

476

U.S. Department of the Interior April 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal powder and tungsten carbide powder, was 13% more than that produced in December 2012. Total U.S. reported consumption of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide powder, tungsten scrap carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported by producers

477

U.S. Department of the Interior November 2013 U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period in 2012. Total U.S. reported consumption of ferrotungsten, tungsten metal powder, tungsten carbide are uncommitted material only. 4 Net production of tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder. 6 Data for tungsten metal powder and tungsten carbide powder reported by producers. Includes estimates. 5 Data

478

Nitrogen, Aerosol Composition, and Halogens on a Tall Tower (NACHTT): Overview of a wintertime air chemistry field study in the front range urban corridor of Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continuous vertical pro?ling and low surface wind speeds. [campaign. (b) Wind speed at 300 m. Vertical pro?ling was not

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

K. Toyota et al.: Photochemistry of VOCs and halogens in the MBL (Supplement) 1 A supplement to "A box model study on photochemical interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J/mol and of negligible importance at atmospheric temperatures (Kaiser and Wallington, 1996a): Cl + C2H4 HCl + C2H3. (2 occurring in the reaction chamber, Wallington et al. (1990) de- rived the rate constant for Reaction (4

Meskhidze, Nicholas

480

The influence of a presence of a heavy atom on the spin-spin coupling constants between two light nuclei in organometallic compounds and halogen derivatives  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 1}J{sub CC} and {sup 1}J{sub CH} spin-spin coupling constants have been calculated by means of density functional theory (DFT) for a set of derivatives of aliphatic hydrocarbons substituted with I, At, Cd, and Hg in order to evaluate the substituent and relativistic effects for these properties. The main goal was to estimate HALA (heavy-atom-on-light-atom) effects on spin-spin coupling constants and to explore the factors which may influence the HALA effect on these properties, including the nature of the heavy atom substituent and carbon hybridization. The methods applied range, in order of reduced complexity, from Dirac-Kohn-Sham method (density functional theory with four-component Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian), through DFT with two- and one-component Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) Hamiltonians, to scalar non-relativistic effective core potentials with the non-relativistic Hamiltonian. Thus, we are able to compare the performance of ZORA-DFT and Dirac-Kohn-Sham methods for modelling of the HALA effects on the spin-spin coupling constants.

Wody?ski, Artur; Pecul, Magdalena, E-mail: mpecul@chem.uw.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)] [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteura 1, 02-093 Warszawa (Poland)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten halogen spotlights" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Peter Bernath University of York Satellite Observations of Halogen-Containing Molecules NE/I022663/1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Ice and Super-cooled Water Particles. NE/I023058/1 Gareth Chisham NERC British Antarctic Survey Quantifying the Effect of the Upper Atmospheric Electric Potential on Lower Atmospheric Temperature Orography) NE/I024984/1 Peter Jan van Leeuwen University of Reading Next generation Numerical Weather

482

EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES  

SciTech Connect

Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonate chimneys with brucite, blue amphiboles, phengite,partition coefficients. One brucite sample separated from ahigh ? 37 Cl value in the brucite separate sample probably

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

I/I ratios and halogen concentrations in pore waters of the Hydrate Ridge: Relevance for the origin of gas hydrates in ODP Leg 204  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in fluids associated with hydrocarbons, such as oil field brines (Moran et al., 1995) or coal-bed methane association of iodine with methane allows the identification of the organic source material responsible for iodine and methane in gas hydrates. In all cores, iodine concentrations were found to increase strongly

Fehn, Udo

485

Volatile Halogenated Hydrocarbons in River Water, Ground Water, Drinking Water and Swimming-Pool Water in the Federal Republic of Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With increasing shortage of ground water it becomes more and more necessary to use surface water as a resource for drinking water and swimming-pool water preparation. In the judgement of water...

M. Sonneborn; S. Gerdes; R. Schwabe

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Comparative Study of Sample Preparation Techniques Coupled to GC for the Analysis of Halogenated Acetic Acids (HAAs) Acids in Tap Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......SPE was studied as a possible alternative to LLE for the analysis of...was passed through the SPE car- tridge without a vacuum system...ization conditions were: ion energy 70 eV and mass range 10 to...dure can be proposed as an alternative accu- rate method for the......

Sadia Waseem; Md. Pauzi Abdullah

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Electronic structure and models of monooxygenase inductor receptor from a number of polychlorinated polycyclic compounds. 5. MNDO calculations of halogen derivatives of azoxybenzenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The MNDO method has been used to calculate the electronic and geometric structure of 3,3?,4,4?-tetraehloroazoxybenzene (TCAOB), 3,3?,4,4?-tetrachloro-6-hydroxyazobenzene (TCHAB), and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo...

A. V. Fokin; E. B. Bogachuk; N. P. Vorob'eva

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Electronic structure and models of receptor of monooxygenase inductors from a number of polychlorinated polycyclic compounds. IV. MNDO calculations of halogen-substituted azobenzenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electron and geometric structures of the cis and trans isomers of 3,3?,4,4?-tetrachloroazobenzene (3,3?,4,4?-TCAB) and the trans isomers of 3,3?,5,5?-TCAB and 3,3?-dichloro-4,4?-difluoroazobe...

A. V. Fokin; E. B. Bogachuk; N. I. Raevskii

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Development of Synthetic Phenol from Benzene Halides1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

William J. Hale , Edgar C. Britton ... Halogen-Containing Hydrocarbons from Petroleum and Natural Gas ...

William J. Hale; Edgar C. Britton

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

1663 Science and Technology Magazine | Los National Alamos Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSUMER A Chance to Save Lives A NEW VACCINE STRATEGY TO PROTECT AGAINST HIVAIDS Global Security THE GROWING CHALLENGE Spotlight - BOUNDING THE OIL SPILL - MAKING WAVES - DO THE...

491

Platform for a modern grid: customer engagement  

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stories engaging the customer when deploying new technologies in the nation's largest smart grid demonstration. Related Articles (by tag) NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors,...

492

Igor Aronson | Argonne National Laboratory  

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for a Job External Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities Benefits...

493

Ozgenur Kahvecioglu Feridun | Argonne National Laboratory  

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for a Job External Applicants Internal Applicants Postdoctoral Applicants Students Why Argonne Your Career Life at Argonne Employee Spotlights Amenities Social Activities Benefits...

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - air quality criteria Sample Search Results  

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is in the spotlight as a Summary: quality. Criteria pollutant -- One of six air pollutants that may adversely affect human health... Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) -- Air...

495

bpa.gov - Transmission Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 All Notices News Lineman shares life-saving skills with electrical workers in Suriname NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition Insulator damage endangers...

496

First BPA customer schedules energy in 15-minute increments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles (by tag) Lineman shares life-saving skills with electrical workers in Suriname Thursday, January 08, 2015 NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition...

497

Insulator damage endangers public, power reliability; ratepayers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles (by tag) Lineman shares life-saving skills with electrical workers in Suriname Thursday, January 08, 2015 NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition...

498

Indiana Jonesing at BPA: an archaeologist's passion for cultural...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Articles (by tag) Lineman shares life-saving skills with electrical workers in Suriname Thursday, January 08, 2015 NWPPA spotlights synchrophasors, energy-saving competition...

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - assets student talent Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

results for: assets student talent Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SPOTLIGHT on: Molly Simon Industrial and Systems Engineering Summary: , CA Involvement at USC: SWE Student Affairs...

500

November 27 Webinar to Feature Broad Array of Tribal Energy Developmen...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,...