National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tungsten halogen spotlights

  1. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  2. Laser photochemical etching of molybdenum and tungsten thin films by surface halogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothschild, M.; Sedlacek, J.H.; Ehrlich, D.J.

    1986-12-01

    Laser direct-write etching of the refractory metals Mo and W was developed using reactions in chlorine and nitrogen trifluoride vapors. Rate and high spatial resolution are simultaneously optimized using a two-vapor halogenation/development sequence, based on surface modification. Local-area laser chlorination of the metal surface is used to predispose areas to subsequent bulk etching.

  3. Applications of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral particles on ITO glass in photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants under a halogen tungsten lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Wei; Sun, Fengqiang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lihe; Min, Zhilin; Li, Weishan

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photocatalytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals on ITO glass was studied. • They showed high abilities in degradation of methylene blue in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount could affect the degradation efficiency. • Such particles could be easily recycled and still kept high activity. • Many dye pollutants and their mixtures could be efficiently degraded. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals were prepared on the ITO glass by galvanostatic electrodeposition in CuSO{sub 4} solution with poly(vinylpryrrolidone) as the surfactant. By controlling the electrodeposition time, the microcrystals could be randomly distributed on the ITO glass and separated from each other, resulting in as many as possible (1 1 1) crystalline planes were exposed. Such microcrystals immobilized on ITO glass were employed in photodegradation of dye pollutants in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under a 150 W halogen tungsten lamp. The photodegradation of methylene blue was taken as an example to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the octahedral Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals. Effects of electrodeposition time and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount on the degradation efficiency was discussed, giving the optimum conditions and the corresponding degradation mechanism. The catalyst showed high ability in degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, eosin B and their mixtures under identical conditions.

  4. Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

    1997-03-01

    A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

  5. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesis and Oxidation ofSpotlight Mekena McGrew

  6. Employee Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee Headcount bySpotlight

  7. Employee Spotlight: Dances of India

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jobs Career Stories Employee Spotlight Alina Deshpande Alina Deshpande-Dances of India Lab scientist Alina Deshpande teaches classical Indian dance and writes, produces,...

  8. Spotlight, March 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-01

    Danny "Numero Uno" Anderson. Page 3 KU Center for Sustainability Sustainability Spotlight March 2012 What do plush carpets, glossy lipsticks and artificial heart valves have in common? They are all made from crude oil. In fact, more than 10... help them optimize the entire life cycle of the product, from crop choice through production facilities and beyond. Clearly, a bio?based chemical industry has the potential to grow in fields across the Midwest. If we build clean technologies today, CEBC researchers...

  9. Spotlight: Jenna Casias

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines Candidates f orSpotlight:

  10. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne NationalScientists In the Spotlight

  11. Scientist in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment |Scientist in the Spotlight

  12. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S. (Windsor, CO)

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  13. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  14. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania: Developing the Skills and Tools for Workforce Success Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania:...

  15. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy Upgrade Conversions Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training Boosts Energy...

  16. Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a...

  17. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues April 23, 2014 - 10:38am Addthis...

  18. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    more successful and to read more from this Spotlight series, visit betterbuildings.energy.govneighborhoods. Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of...

  19. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time,...

  20. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to a Sustainable Level of Incentives More Documents & Publications Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on...

  1. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated...

  2. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Making the Program Work for Contractors Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings...

  3. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Revised July 2011 Version 2 Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend Program Reach Getting Started 1 Seattle Moves the Needle With the Help of Its...

  4. MULTIPHOTON DISSOCIATION PRODUCTS FROM HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudbo, Aa. S.

    2011-01-01

    FROM HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS RECE1VED Aa. S. Sudbo, P. A.FROM HALOGENATED HYDROCARBONS LBL-6966 Aa. S. Sudbo, t P. A.

  5. SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    SPOTLIGHT on: Lindsay Freeman Chemical Engineering (Nanotechnology) Undergraduate Hometown.D. in chemical engineering with an emphasis in nanotechnology. Lindsay stands out as a very well-balanced student

  6. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local...

  7. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be...

  8. SCHOLAR SPOTLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL STAFF IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    can student teachers and school social worker interns learn to support their students' social-service training in SEL for UIC students that focused on race and class. The group training occurred over sixMarch 2014 SCHOLAR SPOTLIGHT TRAINING SCHOOL STAFF IN SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL LEARNING Introduction How

  9. Children's School March 2012 Research Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Children's School March 2012 Research Spotlight The Fish Game Dr. Anna Fisher is investigating, attention, processing speed, executive function, and language ability. In this "fish game", graduate children are presented with a series of fish similar to the ones pictured below. Children are told

  10. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First Tribally Owned Hydroelectric Facility Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First...

  11. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light...

  12. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA) Building America Research Teams:...

  13. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) and Building America Research Alliance (BARA) Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential Building...

  14. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives Better...

  15. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awards Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2013 Sustainability Awards. 2013spotlight.pdf...

  16. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    betterbuildings.energy.govneighborhoods 1 Spotlight on Michigan: Experiment to Find the Right Mix of Incentives With support from the U.S. Energy Department's Better Buildings...

  17. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  18. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fans and Pumps Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Fans and Pumps Chilled water pumps at a central plant. Image by Warren Gretz, NREL06196 Chilled water pumps at a central plant....

  19. SPOTLIGHT on: Jennifer Dowling Industrial and Systems Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    SPOTLIGHT on: Jennifer Dowling Industrial and Systems Engineering Hometown: La Mirada, CA Involvement at USC: Society of Women Engineers- Corporate Affairs Committee member, Institute of Industrial Engineers- President, Viterbi Graduate Admissions Office- student staff member, Song Girl 2007 Favorite

  20. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    564 Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time This Better Buildings case study from April 2011 focuses on grantee...

  1. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big Rewards Workforce All About Contractors Austin Energy, a municipally owned utility, has a long history of...

  2. Photodissociation Dynamics of Halogen Oxide Species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, Kristin S.

    2010-07-14

    The focus of this dissertation is the study of the photodissociation dynamics of halogen oxide species (XO, X = Cl, Br, I). These radical species are known to be important in stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion ...

  3. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR May 14, 2015 - 12:36pm Addthis This...

  4. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J. (Yankton, SD); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Perry, W. Lee (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  5. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  6. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  7. Crystallographic studies on enzymatic halogenation of natural products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasiak, Leah Cameron

    2008-01-01

    Halogenated natural products are common and serve roles as hormones, pesticides, antibiotics, and anti-tumor agents. The incorporation of a halogen atom into an organic scaffold can tune the molecule's potency and selectivity, ...

  8. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William Kevin (Stillwater, MN); Janikowski, Stuart Kevin (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  9. Operation of thoriated tungsten cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, J.E. )

    1993-01-20

    The operating temperature of thoriated tungsten cathodes used in electric thrusters depends on the surface coverage of thorium, which is determined by a balance of rate processes which supply and deplete the surface layer. The fundamental processes and rates are first reviewed in detail, then a phenomenological model based on these rate processes is described. The model indicates that the thermionic emission capabilities of thoriated tungsten cathodes decay rapidly because of thorium depletion at temperatures encountered in electric thrusters.

  10. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Zevenhoven & Kilpinen Halogens, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-1 Chapter 7 Halogens, dioxins/furans 7 in Figure 7.1. The polychlorinated dibenzo -(p) dioxins and -furans (PCDD/Fs) that are found in PCBs and may, dioxins/furans 17.6.2001 7-2 2,3,7,8 tetrachloro dibenzo - p- dioxin PCB furan 2,3,7,8 tetrachlorodibenzo

  11. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO); Davis, John W. (Ballwin, MO)

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  12. TUNGSTEN--2000 81.1 By Kim B. Shedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TUNGSTEN--2000 81.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Jason of uses (see Tungsten in the 20th Century section of this report). During 2000, U.S. demand for tungsten.S. and world tungsten statistics for 2000 and the previous 4 years are listed in table 1. Most data

  13. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

    1987-08-21

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  14. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  15. #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dawson, an award-winning theoretical physicist seeking to better understand the Higgs boson particle and our latest LabSpotlight. Through the Looking Glass: The Art and...

  16. Webinar: Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar, Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis—Spotlight on Giner and Proton, originally presented on May 23, 2011.

  17. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO)

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  18. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  19. Better Buildings- Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings - Spotlight on Portland, Oregon; Financing and Incentives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings.

  20. TUNGSTEN--2001 80.1 By Kim B. Shedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TUNGSTEN--2001 80.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared- temperature lubricants. U.S. apparent consumption of all tungsten materials in 2001 remained approximately as compared with that of 2000. No tungsten was mined in the United States in 2001. U.S. supply of tungsten raw

  1. TUNGSTEN--1999 80.1 By Kim B. Shedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TUNGSTEN--1999 80.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Eric. U.S. tungsten mines remained closed in 1999. China continued to be the largest supplier of tungsten imports to the United States. Russia was also a significant supplier. In 1999, 66% of all tungsten imports

  2. Diffusion of tungsten clusters on tungsten (110) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian; Gao, Fei

    2009-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation and modified analytic embedded-atom method, we have investigated the self-diffusion of clusters on a tungsten (110) surface. As compared to the linear-chain configuration, the close-packed islands for tungsten clusters containing more than nine adatoms have been predicted to be more stable with the relatively lower binding energies. The migration energies show an interesting and oscillating behavior with increasing cluster size. The tetramer, hexamer and octamer have obviously higher migration energies than the others. The different atomic configurations and diffusion mechanisms have been determined during the diffusion processes. It is clear that the dimer-shearing mechanism occurs inside the hexamer, while it occurs at the periphery of heptamer. The successive hopping mechanism of individual atom is of critical importance in the migration of the clusters containing five or fewer adatoms. In addition, the diffusion of a cluster with nine adatoms is achieved through the changes of the cluster shape.

  3. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers' Spotlight

  4. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers' Spotlight3

  5. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 4 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers' Spotlight34

  6. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 5 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers' Spotlight345

  7. Photochemical reductive elimination of halogen from transition metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Timothy R. (Timothy Raymond), 1982-

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the synthesis and study of transition metal complexes that undergo halogen elimination when irradiated with UV and visible light. This chemistry is relevant for solar energy storage schemes in ...

  8. Enhanced metabolism of halogenated hydrocarbons in transgenic plants containing mammalian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Enhanced metabolism of halogenated hydrocarbons in transgenic plants containing mammalian efficient remediation of many sites contaminated with haloge- nated hydrocarbons. Trichloroethylene (TCE hydrocarbon, ethylene dibromide (EDB; dibromoeth- ane), was used as a soil fumigant to kill nematodes

  9. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  10. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beahm, Edward C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Parker, George W. (Concord, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  11. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  12. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K. (Birmingham, MI)

    1983-06-21

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  13. EECBG Success Story: The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    World" -- now has its spotlight on energy efficiency. The city of Los Angeles held a press event to wrap up the Department of Energy's Energy Efficiency Community Block Grant...

  14. IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    IUFRO Spotlight #19/ April 2014 / IUFRO World Congress `Citizen science': A way to fight invasive of a tree can mean to different social groups. The organizers see this "citizen science" (one definition

  15. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  16. Optimization of Target Parameters for a Tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    and tungsten to sol. axis 50cm long of tungsten in sol. axis #12;Meson Productions at 8GeV 28819 (pos: 13613 neg: 15206) 27220 (pos: 13202 neg: 14018) Meson Hg (13.54 g/cm3) with optimization 50% W (9.65 g/cm3 · Fit: peak at 43.5 cm #12;Meson Productions at 8GeV 28819 (pos: 13613 neg: 15206) 29069 (pos: 14099 neg

  17. Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) in the Norwestern Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pangallo, Kristin C

    2009-01-01

    Halogenated 1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrroles (MBPs) are a distinctive class of marine organic compounds. They are naturally produced, they have a unique carbon structure, they are highly halogenated, and they bioaccumulate in ...

  18. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Halogen Incandescent MR16 Lamps and LED Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses the halogen MR16 lamp and its commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  19. Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

    2013-05-21

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  20. Growth of tungsten oxide on carbon nanowalls templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hua; Su, Yan; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Tungsten oxide deposited on carbon nanowalls by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. ? This composite has two-dimensional uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. ? Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. - Abstract: In the present work we present a simple approach for coupling tungsten oxide with carbon nanowalls. The two-dimensional carbon nanowalls with open boundaries were grown using plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, and the subsequent tungsten oxide growth was performed in the same equipment by direct heating of a tungsten filament. The tungsten oxide coating is found to have uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. The method of synthesis described here provides an operable route to the production of two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanocomposites.

  1. Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Petrosius, Steven C. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

  2. Alkali and Halogen Chemistry in Volcanic Gases on Io

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Schaefer; Bruce Fegley Jr

    2004-09-20

    We use chemical equilibrium calculations to model the speciation of alkalis and halogens in volcanic gases emitted on Io. The calculations cover wide temperature (500-2000 K) and pressure (10^-6 to 10^+1 bars) ranges, which overlap the nominal conditions at Pele (T = 1760 K, P = 0.01 bars). About 230 compounds of 11 elements (O, S, Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, F, Cl, Br, I) are considered. We predict the major alkali and halogen species in a Pele-like volcanic gas and the major alklai and halogen condensates. We also model disequilibrium chemistry of the alkalis and halogens in the volcanic plume. Based on this work and our prior modeling for Na, K, and Cl in a volcanic plume, we predict the major loss processes for the alkali halide gases are photolysis and/or condensation onto grains. On the basis of elemental abundances and photochemical lifetimes, we recommend searching for gaseous KCl, NaF, LiF, LiCl, RbF, RbCl, CsF, and CsCl around volcanic vents during eruptions. Based on abundance considerations and observations of brown dwarfs, we also recommend a search of Io's extended atmosphere and the Io plasma torus for neutral and ionized Li, Cs, Rb, and F.

  3. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  4. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  5. RE@21 Spotlight: Most Influential Papers from the Requirements Engineering Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieringa, Roel

    RE@21 Spotlight: Most Influential Papers from the Requirements Engineering Conference Martin Glinz, an award has been presented annually at the IEEE International Requirements Engineering Conference for the Most Influential Paper presented at the conference 10 years previously. In 2013, we celebrate 21 years

  6. Catalytic ionic hydrogenation of ketones using tungsten or molybdenum organometallic species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Voges, Mark (Leverkusen, DE); Bullock, R. Morris (Wading River, NY)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the catalytic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes to alcohols at low temperatures and pressures using organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes. The functional group is selected from groups represented by the formulas R(C.dbd.O)R' and R(C.dbd.O)H, wherein R and R' are selected from hydrogen or any alkyl or aryl group. The active catalyst for the process has the form: [CpM(CO).sub.2 (PR*.sub.3) L].sup.+ A.sup.-, where Cp=.eta..sup.5 -R.sup..tangle-solidup..sub.m C.sub.5 H.sub.5-m and R.sup..tangle-solidup. represents an alkyl group or a halogen (F, Cl, Br, I) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =OR' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) or R.sup..tangle-solidup. =CO.sub.2 R' (where R'=H, an alkyl group or an aryl group) and m=0 to 5; M represents a molybdenum atom or a tungsten atom; R*.sub.3 represents three hydrocarbon groups selected from a cyclohexyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.11), a methyl group (CH.sub.3), and a phenyl group (C.sub.6 H.sub.5) and all three R* groups can be the same or different or two of the three groups can be the same; L represents a ligand; and A.sup.- represents an anion. In another embodiment, one, two or three of the R* groups can be an OR*.

  7. Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li Lithium-halogen exchange reactions are essentially inert. 2 t-BuLi t-BuI + RLi t-BuLi isobutene + isobutane + LiI Lithium-halogen exchange reactions, and lithium iodide. H OEtBr H H OEtLi H1.1 eq n-BuLi Et2O, !80 °C Lau, K. S.; Schlosser, M. J. Org. Chem. 1978

  8. Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulloch, Daryl Neil

    2013-01-01

    for Halogenated Analogs of Bisphenol A. Environ. Healthof aqueous chlorination of bisphenol A and their estrogenicJ. L. ; Olea, N. , Bisphenol-A and chlorinated derivatives

  9. Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    larger when it bursts, creating more surface debris. The colors indicate helium atoms (blue) and tungsten atoms (red). The Science When simulated helium (He) bubbles grow quickly,...

  10. Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on...

  11. Design of bulk nanocrystalline tungsten alloys via nano-phase separation sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Mansoo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    An accelerated sintering method called 'nano-phase separation sintering' is developed, with specific applicability to nanostructured tungsten alloys. Nanocrystalline tungsten alloys containing minority additions of chromium ...

  12. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henriksen, Gary L. (Troy, MI)

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  13. Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29Hai Ah Nam Hai Ah Nam-TheHalogen

  14. Thermal compression wafer bonding of tungsten applied to fabrication of small-period tungsten woodpile structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klotzkin, David

    properties Multilayer structure Nanomaterials Optical materials and properties In this paper, we report of a 3D tungsten woodpile structure using this method. The structure is fabricated by holographic region of the electromagnetic spectrum and then to bond these 2D- structures to form a 3D

  15. Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power Co Jump to:TudelTungsten

  16. Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

  17. Polaron absorption in amorphous tungsten oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Lars; Azens, Andris; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2001-08-15

    Amorphous thin films of tungsten oxide were deposited by sputtering onto glass substrates covered by conductive indium--tin oxide. The density and stoichiometry were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Lithium ions were intercalated electrochemically into the films. The optical reflectance and transmittance were measured in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 2.5 {mu}m, at a number of intercalation levels. The polaron absorption peak becomes more symmetric and shifts to higher energies until an intercalation level of 0.25 to 0.3 Li{sup +}/W, where a saturation occurs. The shape of the polaron peak is in very good agreement with the theory of Bryksin [Fiz. Tverd. Tela 24, 1110 (1982)]. Within this model, the shift of the absorption peak is interpreted as an increase in the Fermi level of the material as more Li ions are inserted. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  18. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  19. Catalytic, Asymmetric r-Halogenation Harald Wack, Andrew E. Taggi, Ahmed M. Hafez,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lectka, Thomas

    reported "relay" deprotonation strategy,5 in which protons are shuttled from the chiral amine catalyst Phenylacetyl chloride 1a was used as a test substrate to screen the various halogenating agents using 10 mol

  20. Atomistic computer simulation analysis of nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engwall, Alison Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys are harder, stronger, more resistant to degradation, and safer to electrodeposit than chromium. Atomistic computer simulations have previously met with success in replicating the ...

  1. Tungsten carbide-cobalt by Three Dimensional Printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Andrew, III

    1998-01-01

    Three Dimensional Printing is an additive manufacturing process for rapid prototyping ceramic and metallic parts [Sachs, et al, 1990]. Green (not sintered) tungsten carbide-cobalt parts must have a density greater than 50% ...

  2. Microstructured tungsten thermophotovoltaic selective emitters c by Natalija (Zorana) Jovanovi?.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Natalija Zorana

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates the fabrication, modeling, characterization, and application of tungsten two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structures as selective emitters and means of achieving higher efficiencies ...

  3. C3E Spotlights Women Leaders in Clean Energy Careers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6 Shares of U.S.6Low-CostC3E Spotlights

  4. Spotlight: Two Los Alamos scientists honored with E.O. Lawrence Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines Candidates f orSpotlight:Two

  5. Tungsten dust impact on ITER-like plasma edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, R. D. Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2015-01-15

    The impact of tungsten dust originating from divertor plates on the performance of edge plasma in ITER-like discharge is evaluated using computer modeling with the coupled dust-plasma transport code DUSTT-UEDGE. Different dust injection parameters, including dust size and mass injection rates, are surveyed. It is found that tungsten dust injection with rates as low as a few mg/s can lead to dangerously high tungsten impurity concentrations in the plasma core. Dust injections with rates of a few tens of mg/s are shown to have a significant effect on edge plasma parameters and dynamics in ITER scale tokamaks. The large impact of certain phenomena, such as dust shielding by an ablation cloud and the thermal force on tungsten ions, on dust/impurity transport in edge plasma and consequently on core tungsten contamination level is demonstrated. It is also found that high-Z impurities provided by dust can induce macroscopic self-sustained plasma oscillations in plasma edge leading to large temporal variations of edge plasma parameters and heat load to divertor target plates.

  6. Tungsten-dependent formaldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase: Reaction mechanism from quantum chemical calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Tungsten-dependent formaldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase: Reaction mechanism from quantum chemical April 2011 Keywords: Tungstoenzyme Formaldehyde oxidoreductase Reaction mechanism Density functional theory Enzyme catalysis Formaldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Pyrococcus furiosus is a tungsten

  7. Room-Temperature Z-Selective Homocoupling of alpha-Olefins by Tungsten Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinescu, Smaranda C.

    3,5-Dimethylphenylimido complexes of tungsten can be prepared using procedures analogous to those employed for other tungsten catalysts, as can bispyrrolide species and MonoAryloxide-Pyrrolide (MAP) species. Homocouplings ...

  8. Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

    2010-01-01

    Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation was observed at SO{sub 2} concentrations of 400 ppmv and higher. In contrast, SO{sub 2} concentrations as low as 50 ppmv significantly reduced mercury oxidation by bromine, this reduction could be due to both gas and liquid phase interactions between SO{sub 2} and oxidized mercury species. The simultaneous presence of chlorine and bromine in the flue gas resulted in a slight increase in mercury oxidation above that obtained with bromine alone, the extent of the observed increase is proportional to the chlorine concentration. The results of this study can be used to understand the relative importance of gas-phase mercury oxidation by bromine and chlorine in combustion systems. Two temperature profiles were tested: a low quench (210 K/s) and a high quench (440 K/s). For chlorine the effects of quench rate were slight and hard to characterize with confidence. Oxidation with bromine proved sensitive to quench rate with significantly more oxidation at the lower rate. The data generated in this program are the first homogeneous laboratory-scale data on bromine-induced oxidation of mercury in a combustion system. Five Hg-Cl and three Hg-Br mechanisms, some published and others under development, were evaluated and compared to the new data. The Hg-halogen mechanisms were combined with submechanisms from Reaction Engineering International for NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and hydrocarbons. The homogeneous kinetics under-predicted the levels of mercury oxidation observed in full-scale systems. This shortcoming can be corrected by including heterogeneous kinetics in the model calculations.

  9. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  10. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  11. FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard University of Wisconsin proposing an all-tungsten divertor for their tokamak designs. In designing such a component, fracture a series of fracture mechanics-based analyses to demonstrate the feasibility of using an all- tungsten

  12. IDS120h GEOMETRY SHIELDING VESSELS: STAINLESS STEEL vs. TUNGSTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY SHIELDING VESSELS: STAINLESS STEEL vs. TUNGSTEN SHIELDING MATERIAL: 60%WC+40%H2 O shielding vessels (STST OR W) Different cases of shielding material. >mars1510/MCNP >10-11 MeV NEUTRON ENERGY CUTOFF >SHIELDING:60%WC+40%H2 O (STST or W VESSELS), 80%WC+20%He, 80%W+20%He (W VESSELS) >4 MW

  13. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothman, Albert J. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  14. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  15. Fabrication of Gas-Filled Tungsten-Coated Glass Shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Baugh, W.; Steinman, D.A.

    2004-03-15

    Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx}0.15 {mu}m/hr coatings with {approx}2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {mu}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx}100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 deg. C.

  16. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of NIF: Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) Project: Created a Single-shot, Second Harmonic Generation Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (SHG FROG) system for damage testing...

  17. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Name: Image Analysis Classification algorithm to automatically classify NIF optics damage sites Project Description: Develop a classification system of potential damage...

  18. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructure ofStructures of

  19. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructure ofStructures ofCzapla Nick Czapla

  20. Student Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructure ofStructures ofCzapla Nick

  1. Spotlights Archive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 Special Report:405-01ToolsProgram,

  2. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  3. Studies on nickel-tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usha, K. S. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India); Sivakumar, R., E-mail: krsivakumar1979@yahoo.com [Directorate of Distance Education, Alagappa University, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Department of Physics, Alagappa Chettiar College of Engineering and Technology, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Nickel-Tungsten oxide (95:5) thin films were prepared by rf sputtering at 200W rf power with various substrate temperatures. X-ray diffraction study reveals the amorphous nature of films. The substrate temperature induced decrease in energy band gap with a maximum transmittance of 71%1 was observed. The Micro-Raman study shows broad peaks at 560 cm{sup ?1} and 1100 cm{sup ?1} correspond to Ni-O vibration and the peak at 860 cm{sup ?1} can be assigned to the vibration of W-O-W bond. Photoluminescence spectra show two peaks centered on 420 nm and 485 nm corresponding to the band edge emission and vacancies created due to the addition of tungsten, respectively.

  4. The OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeter front end electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.E.; Charalambous, A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, K. )

    1994-08-01

    A pair of small angle silicon-tungsten (Si-W) calorimeters has been built to measure the luminosity to a precision better than 0.1% in the OPAL experiment at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN near Geneva. Each calorimeter contains 19 layers of tungsten (W) plates and silicon (Si) detectors, corresponding to a total of 22 radiation lengths, sampled by about 1 m[sup 2] of detectors divided into 304 x64 independently read out channels. A complete electronics system has been developed, from the preamplifier up to the VME read out and control interface. It includes a fast trigger based on analogue sums. This paper describes how a large number of channels have been implemented in a dense environment, thanks to the use of ASIC's directly bonded on the detector.

  5. Deflection of light by using tungsten bronze crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jelsma, L.F.; McWright, G.M.; Schumacher, F.A.; Neurgaonkar, R.R.

    1988-07-05

    This paper reports our preliminary results on an electrooptical light deflector for streak camera applications that uses tungsten bronze SBN:60% crystals. We found the performance of these ferroelectric crystals to be an order of magnitude better than the best LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals currently available. We discuss the theory and performance of this crystal as well as other bronze crystals for application to the streak camera. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Halogens in the coastal snow pack near Barrow, Alaska: Evidence for active bromine air-snow chemistry during springtime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domine, Florent

    . Frost flowers have been proposed as an important intermediate step in halogen activation [Rankin et al with organic compounds, such as aldehydes, leading to HBr and HCl. These acids are then scavenged by snow

  7. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DUCTILE-PHASE TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Odette, George R.; Cunningham, Kevin; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-03-03

    The objective of this study is to develop the materials science of fiber-reinforced tungsten composites as candidates for plasma-facing components in future fusion reactors.

  8. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald; Tu, Chia-Hao; Chang Chi; Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Hsin-Li; Tzeng, Yonhua; Auciello, Orlando

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  9. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  10. Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

  11. The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

  12. Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei

    Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D W. Zhou*, T. Z. Long and C. K of the plates were produced using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method. The TIG arc was also used to deposit welding beads on some of the thin plates. No cracking was found in the butt joints. However, hot cracking

  13. Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram deposited as a coating, it can protect the substrate surface from high heat flux. In this study, tungsten (W) sprayed coatings were formed on stainless steel substrates by gas tunnel type plasma spraying at a short

  14. Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J. Keinonen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J-principles calculations were used in determining the binding and trapping properties of hydrogen to point defects in tungsten. Hydrogen zero-point vibrations were taken into account. It was concluded that the monovacancy can

  15. Structures and defects of WO3x nanorods grown by in-situ heating tungsten filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Structures and defects of WO3Ŕx nanorods grown by in-situ heating tungsten filament Huairuo Zhang a nanorods were grown on the tips of electrochemical etched W filaments by in-situ heating under different work, we prepare tungsten oxide nanorods by heating the electrochemical etched W filaments under

  16. Nanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga and C. Y/air polymer electrolyte fuel cell using nanoscale tungsten carbide as the anode catalyst and carbon supported as to whether the carbides perform the catalysis in the H2/CO fuel streams. Furthermore, the mechanism based

  17. Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    \\ Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten· Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld Image. EAGAR ABSTRACT. An experimental study was carried out to map the light emissions from a gas tungsten arc. The emissions were found to be dramat- ically different with different shielding gases, welding current and base

  18. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique R Krishnan1 , Y Liu2 , C Gaire2 , L (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial

  19. 3/30/10 10:43 AMElectrospinning self-healing polymer coating systems Page 1 of 2http://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=15547.php

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    machining to 3D nanotechnology fabrication Posted: Mar 26th, 2010 Nanoscale investigation advances://www.nanowerk.com/spotlight/spotid=15547.php Article Tools Printer-friendly E-mail this article Daily News Email Digest Subscribe into medical and industrial applications Posted: Mar 17th, 2010 Future bio-nanotechnology will use computer

  20. March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE March 8-9, 2001 #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber on analysis ­ Remaining issues #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry

  1. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  2. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shih-Jye [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Ju, Shin-Pon, E-mail: jushin-pon@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-07

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  3. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  4. Characterization of tungsten films and their hydrogen permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemani?, Vincenc Kova?, Janez; Lungu, Cristian; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Zajec, Bojan

    2014-11-01

    Prediction of tritium migration and its retention within fusion reactors is uncertain due to a significant role of the structural disorder that is formed on the surface layer after plasma exposure. Tungsten films deposited by any of the suitable methods are always disordered and contain a high density of hydrogen traps. Experiments on such films with hydrogen isotopes present a suitable complementary method, which improves the picture of the hydrogen interaction with fusion relevant materials. The authors report on the morphology, composition, and structure of tungsten films deposited by the thermionic vacuum arc method on highly permeable Eurofer substrates. Subsequently, hydrogen permeation studies through these films were carried out in a wide pressure range from 20 to 1000 mbars at 400?°C. The final value of the permeation coefficient for four samples after 24?h at 400?°C was between P?=?3.2?×?10{sup ?14}?mol?H{sub 2}/(m?s?Pa{sup 0.5}) and P?=?1.1?×?10{sup ?15}?mol H{sub 2}/(m s Pa{sup 0.5}). From the time evolution of the permeation flux, it was shown that diffusivity was responsible for the difference in the steady fluxes, as solubility was roughly the same. This is confirmed by XRD data taken on these samples.

  5. Sensitivity of Tropospheric Chemical Composition to Halogen-Radical Chemistry Using a Fully Coupled Size-Resolved Multiphase Chemistry-Global Climate System: Halogen Distributions, Aerosol Composition, and Sensitivity of Climate-Relevant Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, M.; Keene, W. C.; Easter, Richard C.; Sander, Rolf; Liu, Xiaohong; Kerkweg, A.; Erickson, D.

    2014-04-07

    Observations and model studies suggest a significant but highly non-linear role for halogens, primarily Cl and Br, in multiphase atmospheric processes relevant to tropospheric chemistry and composition, aerosol evolution, radiative transfer, weather, and climate. The sensitivity of global atmospheric chemistry to the production of marine aerosol and the associated activation and cycling of inorganic Cl and Br was tested using a size-resolved multiphase coupled chemistry/global climate model (National Center for Atmospheric Research’s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM); v3.6.33). Simulation results showed strong meridional and vertical gradients in Cl and Br species. The simulation reproduced most available observations with reasonable confidence permitting the formulation of potential mechanisms for several previously unexplained halogen phenomena including the enrichment of Br- in submicron aerosol, and the presence of a BrO maximum in the polar free troposphere. However, simulated total volatile Br mixing ratios were generally high in the troposphere. Br in the stratosphere was lower than observed due to the lack of long-lived organobromine species in the simulation. Comparing simulations using chemical mechanisms with and without reactive Cl and Br species demonstrated a significant temporal and spatial sensitivity of primary atmospheric oxidants (O3, HOx, NOx), CH4, and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC’s) to halogen cycling. Simulated O3 and NOx were globally lower (65% and 35%, respectively, less in the planetary boundary layer based on median values) in simulations that included halogens. Globally, little impact was seen in SO2 and non-sea-salt SO42- processing due to halogens. Significant regional differences were evident: The lifetime of nss-SO42- was extended downwind of large sources of SO2. The burden and lifetime of DMS (and its oxidation products) were lower by a factor of 5 in simulations that included halogens, versus those without, leading to a 20% reduction in nss-SO42- in the southern hemisphere planetary boundary layer based on median values.

  6. Quantum spin coherence in halogen-modified Cr$_7$Ni molecular nanomagnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danielle Kaminski; Amy L. Webber; Christopher J. Wedge; Junjie Liu; Grigore A. Timco; Inigo J. Vitorica-Yrezabal; Eric J. L. McInnes; Richard E. P. Winpenny; Arzhang Ardavan

    2014-10-30

    Among the factors determining the quantum coherence of the spin in molecular magnets is the presence and the nature of nuclear spins in the molecule. We have explored modifying the nuclear spin environment in Cr$_7$Ni-based molecular nanomagnets by replacing hydrogen atoms with deuterium or the halogen atoms, fluorine or chlorine. We find that the spin coherence, studied at low temperatures by pulsed electron spin resonance, is modified by a range of factors, including nuclear spin and magnetic moment, changes in dynamics owing to nuclear mass, and molecular morphology changes.

  7. Roles of Oxygen and Water Vapor in the Oxidation of Halogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianette, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-12-18

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Cl and Br terminated Ge(111) surfaces is studied using photoelectron spectroscopy. The authors perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different factors in oxidation, and find that water vapor and oxygen play different roles. Water vapor effectively replaces the halogen termination layers with the hydroxyl group, but does not oxidize the surfaces further. In contrast, little oxidation is observed for Cl and Br terminated surfaces with dry oxygen alone. However, with the help of water vapor, oxygen oxidizes the surface by breaking the Ge-Ge back bonds instead of changing the termination layer.

  8. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  9. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

    2000-01-01

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  10. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  11. Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun; Yan, Qingzhi Lang, Shaoting

    2014-05-14

    A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

  12. Gamma Spectrum from Neutron Capture on Tungsten Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, Aaron; Summers, Neil; Sleaford, Brad; Firestone, Richard B; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.S.

    2010-04-29

    An evaluation of thermal neutron capture on the stable tungsten isotopes is presented, with preliminary results for the compound systems 183;184;185;187W. The evaluation procedure compares the g-ray cross-section data collected at the Budapest reactor, with Monte Carlo simulations of g-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process. The statistical-decay code DICEBOX was used for the Monte Carlo simulations. The evaluation yields new gamma rays in 185W and the confirmation of spins in 187W, raising the number of levels below which the level schemes are considered complete, thus increasing the number of levels that can be used in neutron data libraries.

  13. Performance of a Clad Tungsten Rod Spallation Neutron Source Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, Walter F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Louthan, McIntyre R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Willcutt, Gordon J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Ferguson, Phillip D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-09-15

    Tungsten rods, slip-clad with Type 304L stainless steel, performed successfully as a spallation neutron source target operating to a peak fluence of {approx}4 x 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2}. The target was used as a neutron source during the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) materials irradiation program at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Tungsten rods of 2.642-mm diameter were slip-fit in Type 304L stainless steel tubes that had an inner diameter of 2.667 mm. The radial gap was filled with helium at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) calculations suggest a time-averaged peak power deposition in the W of 2.25 kW/cm{sup 3}. Thermal-hydraulic calculations indicate that the peak centerline W temperature reached 271 deg. C. The LAHET calculations were also used to predict neutron and proton fluxes and spectra for the complex geometry used in the irradiation program. Activation foil sets distributed throughout the experiment were used to determine target neutronics performance as a comparison to the LAHET calculations. Examination of the irradiated target assemblies revealed no significant surface degradation or corrosion on either the Type 304L or the W surfaces. However, it was clear that the irradiation changed material properties because post-proton-irradiation measurements on Type 304L test samples from the APT program demonstrated increases in the yield strength and decreases in the ductility and fracture toughness with increasing dose, and the wrought W rod samples became brittle. Fortunately, the slip-clad target design subjects the materials to very low stress.

  14. Multiphysics Design and Simulation of a Tungsten-Cermet Nuclear Thermal Rocket 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appel, Bradley

    2012-10-19

    fuel safety have sparked interest in an NTR core based on tungsten-cermet fuel. This work investigates the capability of modern CFD and neutronics codes to design a cermet NTR, and makes specific recommendations for the configuration of channels...

  15. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

    1990-12-11

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

  16. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

  17. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  18. Sintering and joining of low temperature co-fired tungsten and aluminum oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant

    2006-01-01

    Conventional methods used to fabricate co-fired tungsten/alumina composites usually rely on high temperature processing (>1500C). As it would be beneficial or even necessary for some applications to produce such composites ...

  19. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  20. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  1. Tungsten coating for improved wear resistance and reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Mani, Seethambal S. (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A process is disclosed whereby a 5-50-nanometer-thick conformal tungsten coating can be formed over exposed semiconductor surfaces (e.g. silicon, germanium or silicon carbide) within a microelectromechanical (MEM) device for improved wear resistance and reliability. The tungsten coating is formed after cleaning the semiconductor surfaces to remove any organic material and oxide film from the surface. A final in situ cleaning step is performed by heating a substrate containing the MEM device to a temperature in the range of 200-600 .degree. C. in the presence of gaseous nitrogen trifluoride (NF.sub.3). The tungsten coating can then be formed by a chemical reaction between the semiconductor surfaces and tungsten hexafluoride (WF.sub.6) at an elevated temperature, preferably about 450.degree. C. The tungsten deposition process is self-limiting and covers all exposed semiconductor surfaces including surfaces in close contact. The present invention can be applied to many different types of MEM devices including microrelays, micromirrors and microengines. Additionally, the tungsten wear-resistant coating of the present invention can be used to enhance the hardness, wear resistance, electrical conductivity, optical reflectivity and chemical inertness of one or more semiconductor surfaces within a MEM device.

  2. High energy halogen atom reactions activated by nuclear transformations. Progress report, February 15, 1980-February 14, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The stereochemistry of high energy /sup 18/F, /sup 34m/Cl, and /sup 76/Br substitution reactions involving enantiomeric molecules in the gas and condensed phase is studied. The gas to condensed state transition in halogen high energy chemistry, involving chlorine, bromine, and iodine activated by the (n,..gamma..) and (I.T.) processes in halomethanes, saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons is being investigated in more detail. Special attention is given to defining the nature of the enhancement yields in the condensed phase. High energy halogen reactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of organic and biomolecular solutes are studied in an attempt to learn more about these reactions. The applications of high energy chemistry techniques and theory to neutron activation analysis of biological systems are being continued. Special attention is given to developing procedures for trace molecular determinations in biological systems. The applications of hot halogen atoms as indicators of solute-solute interactions in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions of halogenated bases and nucleosides are being developed. Experiments are designed to explain the mechanisms of the radioprotection offered biomolecular solutes trapped within the frozen ice lattice. Reactions of bromine and iodine activated by isomeric transition with halogenated biomolecular solutes in liquid and frozen aqueous solutions are studied. The high energy reactions of iodine with the isomers of pentene have been studied in low pressure gaseous systems employing additives and rare gas moderators and liquid systems. Reactivity of excited complex formation and structural effects of electrophilic iodine attack on the pi-bond systems are studied.

  3. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  4. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Duba, Alfred G. (Livermore, CA); Chen, Ching-I (Danville, CA)

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  5. Mechanism of the Initial Oxidation of Hydrogen andHalogen Terminated Ge(111) Surfaces in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shiyu; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Sun, Yun; Liu, Zhi; Lee, Dong-Ick; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-08-23

    The initial stage of the oxidation of Ge(111) surfaces etched by HF, HCl and HBr solutions is systematically studied using synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). We perform controlled experiments to differentiate the effects of different oxidation factors. SR-PES results show that both moisture and oxygen contribute to the oxidation of the surfaces; however, they play different roles in the oxidation process. Moisture effectively replaces the hydrogen and halogen termination layers with hydroxyl (OH), but hardly oxidizes the surfaces further. On the other hand, dry oxygen does not replace the termination layers, but breaks the Ge-Ge back bonds and oxidizes the substrates with the aid of moisture. In addition, room light enhances the oxidation rate significantly.

  6. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; et al

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates throughmore »a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using ?pump 1, which implies that the electron that remains from the dissociation of exciton XA is involved in the creation of this trion with a binding energy ~ 10 meV with respect to XA. The absorption peak that corresponds to trion T2 appears when ?pump > 2.4 eV, which is just sufficient to excite exciton XB. The dynamics of trion T2 formation are found to correlate with the disappearance of the bleach of XB exciton, which indicates the involvement of holes participating in the bleach dynamics of exciton XB. Static electrical-doping photoabsorption measurements confirm the presence of an induced absorption peak similar to that of T2. Since the proposed trion formation process here involves exciton dissociation through hole-trapping by defects in the 2D crystal or substrate, this discovery highlights the strong role that defects have in defining the optical and electrical properties of 2D metal chalcogenides, which is relevant to a broad spectrum of basic science and technology applications.« less

  7. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  8. Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

    1985-07-18

    The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  9. DISPLACEMENT CASCADE SIMULATION IN TUNGSTEN AT 1025 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30

    Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to investigate the irradiation damage properties of bulk tungsten at 1025 K (0.25 melting temperature). A comprehensive data set of primary cascade damage was generated up to primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies 100 keV. The dependence of the number of surviving Frenkel pairs (NFP) on the PKA energy (E) exhibits three different characteristic domains presumably related to the different cascade morphologies that form. The low-energy regime < 0.2 keV is characterized by a hit-or-miss type of Frenkel pair (FP) production near the displacement threshold energy of 128 eV. The middle regime 0.3 – 30 keV exhibits a sublinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) associated with compact cascade morphology with a slope of 0.73. Above 30 keV, the cascade morphology consists of complex branches or interconnected damage regions. In this extended morphology, large interstitial clusters form from superposition of interstitials from nearby damage regions. Strong clustering above 30 keV results in a superlinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) with a slope of 1.365. At 100 keV, an interstitial cluster of size 92 and a vacancy cluster of size 114 were observed.

  10. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  11. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagannadham, K., E-mail: jag-kasichainula@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900?°C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900?°C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650?°C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900?°C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  12. Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Department of Chemical Engineering, Urmia University of Technology, Urmia 57155-419 ; Ghiaci, M.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (7–12 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ? An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ? WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 7–12 nm. ? Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ? WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ? Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UV–visible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 7–12 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 6–24 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

  13. Growth and field-emission property of tungsten oxide nanotip arrays Jun Zhou, Li Gong, Shao Zhi Deng,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Growth and field-emission property of tungsten oxide nanotip arrays Jun Zhou, Li Gong, Shao Zhi of 010 . The tungsten oxide nanotips exhibit excellent field-emission properties with a low threshold field for an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2 4.37 MV/m and uniform emission from the entire arrays

  14. High temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten James S.K.-L. Gibson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (essentially helium ions) from the plasma as well as 14 MeV neutrons. While the rate of helium production dueHigh temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten James S.K.-L. Gibson a,n , Steve G Hardening a b s t r a c t Nanoindentation has been performed on tungsten, unimplanted and helium

  15. FAILURE STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF VPS TUNGSTEN COATINGS FOR HAPL FIRST WALL ARMOR Hyoungil Kim, Jaafar El-Awady, Jennifer Quan, Shahram Sharafat, Vijay Gupta and Nasr Ghoniem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    FAILURE STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF VPS TUNGSTEN COATINGS FOR HAPL FIRST WALL ARMOR Hyoungil Kim a compression/tension stress wave through the composite layered structure. The tensile strength in the coating is then related to the displacement velocity of the free surface of the tungsten coating. VPS tungsten coated

  16. Effect of silver incorporation in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly Bose, R.; Kumar, R. Vinod; Sudheer, S. K.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P. [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India); Reddy, V. R.; Ganesan, V. [UGC - DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017, Madhyapradesh (India)

    2012-12-01

    Silver incorporated tungsten oxide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of silver incorporation in micro structure evolution, phase enhancement, band gap tuning and other optical properties are investigated using techniques such as x-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Effect of silver addition in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films are investigated. It is found that the texturing and phase formation improves with enhancement in silver content. It is also found that as the silver incorporation enhances the thickness of the films increases at the same time the strain in the film decreases. Even without annealing the desired phase can be achieved by doping with silver. A broad band centered at the wavelength 437 nm is observed in the absorption spectra of tungsten oxide films of higher silver incorporation and this can be attributed to surface plasmon resonance of silver atoms present in the tungsten oxide matrix. The transmittance of the films is decreased with increase in silver content which can be due to increase in film thickness, enhancement of scattering, and absorption of light caused by the increase of grain size, surface roughness and porosity of films and enhanced absorption due to surface plasmon resonance of silver. It is found that silver can act as the seed for the growth of tungsten oxide grains and found that the grain size increases with silver content which in turn decreases the band gap of tungsten oxide from 3.14 eV to 2.70 eV.

  17. Review on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science M. Rieth a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    material optimization, and irradiation performance testing, which are complemented by a funda- mentalReview on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science M. Rieth a, , J Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe, Germany b EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching, Germany

  18. Transient Thermal and Stress Response of A Helium-Cooled Tungsten Plate-Type Divertor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Transient Thermal and Stress Response of A Helium- Cooled Tungsten Plate-Type Divertor X.R. Wang, A and shutdown operations have been analyzed with a coupled transient thermo-fluid and thermal-stress approach and investigated for power plant applications with a goal of accommodating a heat flux of 10 MW/m2 . The concepts

  19. Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

  20. Tungsten as first wall material in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The carbon tiles were shaped to reduce edge erosion and coated with 0 6 ˇ 1 5 µm tungsten by Plasma Arc experiments are using carbon as plasma facing material. Due to the codepo- sition of tritium with carbon a future fusion reactor has to minimise the graphite plasma facing components [1]. A promising alternative

  1. Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Micro-engineered first wall tungsten armor for high average power laser fusion energy systems is developing an inertial fusion energy demonstration power reactor with a solid first wall chamber. The first is a coordinated effort to develop laser inertial fusion energy [1]. The first stage of the HAPL program

  2. MODELING SPACE-TIME DEPENDENT HELIUM BUBBLE EVOLUTION IN TUNGSTEN ARMOR UNDER IFE CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    dependent Helium transport in finite geometries, including the simultaneous transient production of defects of Helium bubbles. I. INTRODUCTION Helium production and helium bubble evolution in neutronMODELING SPACE-TIME DEPENDENT HELIUM BUBBLE EVOLUTION IN TUNGSTEN ARMOR UNDER IFE CONDITIONS Qiyang

  3. Biomass-derived high-performance tungsten-based electrocatalysts on graphene for hydrogen evolution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Fanke; Hu, Enyuan; Zhang, Lihua; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2015-08-05

    We report a new class of highly active and stable tungsten-based catalysts to replace noble metal materials for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in an acidic electrolyte. The catalyst is produced by heating an earth-abundant and low-cost mixture of ammonium tungstate, soybean powder and graphene nanoplatelets (WSoyGnP). The catalyst compound consists of tungsten carbide (W?C and WC) and tungsten nitride (WN) nanoparticles decorated on graphene nanoplatelets. The catalyst demonstrates an overpotential (???, the potential at a current density of 10 mA cm?˛) of 0.105 V, which is the smallest among tungsten-based HER catalysts in acidic media. The coupling with graphenemore »significantly reduces the charge transfer resistance and increases the active surface area of the product, which are favorable for enhancing the HER activity. Therefore, the approach of employing biomass and other less expensive materials as precursors for the production of catalysts with high HER activity provides a new path for the design and development of efficient catalysts for the hydrogen production industry.« less

  4. Stress reduction in tungsten films using nanostructured compliant layers Tansel Karabacak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Stress reduction in tungsten films using nanostructured compliant layers Tansel Karabacak-3590 (Received 14 January 2004; accepted 11 August 2004) The residual stress in thin films is a major limiting factor for obtaining high quality films. We present a strategy for stress reduction in sputter deposited

  5. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing for the sample exposed to TPE at 500 °C. Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) analysis reveals that the detrapping energy decreases from 1.8 eV to 1.4 eV, indicating the changes in trapping mechanisms. This paper also summarizes deuterium behavior studies in HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten under US-Japan TITAN program.

  6. New novel cleaning technique for extending mean time between mechanical cleans in a Genus tungsten CVD reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lujan, R.D.; Fleming, J.G.; Baird, J.L.; Gentry, M.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Center for Microelectronics Technologies

    1994-12-31

    During the chemical vapor deposition of blanket tungsten from the reduction of tungsten hexafluoride (WF{sub 6}), metallic parts within the reaction chamber accumulate metallic tungsten, tungsten oxyfluorides, and other related tungsten species. The usual method for removal of the chamber deposits is to open the chamber and perform a labor intensive mechanical clean, which involves the use of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and deionized (DI) water, or an in-situ fluorine-base plasma clean. The authors have investigated the use of repetitive in-situ nitrogen trifluoride (NF{sub 3}) plasma cleans during the course of operating a Genuse 8721 tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor. The Genuse reactor has been retrofitted with self-ratchetting linear slides, which allow the wafer clamps to be extended into the NF{sub 3} plasma. They have extended the mean time between failures (MTBF) due to the use of 10 minute plasma clean every 75--100 wafers. Deposition for this process is 8,000 angstroms per wafer, using 6 deposition sites. The total tungsten deposition for a 0.5 micron tungsten plug is 4 microns, per a 25 wafer lot. Instead of a total removal of the accumulated tungsten from the chamber hardware, a partial etchback of the deposition from the wafer clamps and wafer chucks was performed. With this, sources for particles and backside deposition were eliminated. They see an increase in wafer-to-wafer uniformity, lot-to-lot repeatability, and particle reduction due to the use of frequent plasma clean. Recovery time after a plasma clean is excellent and no detrimental effects from hydrogen fluoride ``poisoning`` were seen.

  7. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  8. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Anderson, Brian L. (Lodi, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  9. Z-Selective Metathesis Homocoupling of 1,3-Dienes by Molybdenum and Tungsten Monoaryloxide Pyrrolide (MAP) Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoveyda, Amir H.

    Molybdenum or tungsten monoaryloxide pyrrolide (MAP) complexes that contain OHIPT as the aryloxide (hexaisopropylterphenoxide) are effective catalysts for homocoupling of simple (E)-1,3-dienes to give (E,Z,E)-trienes in ...

  10. GENERATION, TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF TUNGSTEN-OXIDE AEROSOLS AT 1000 C IN FLOWING AIR-STEAM MIXTURES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

    2001-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the rates of oxidation and vaporization of pure tungsten rods in flowing air, steam and air-steam mixtures in laminar flow. Also measured were the downstream transport of tungsten-oxide condensation aerosols and their region of deposition, including plateout in the superheated flow tube, rainout in the condenser and ambient discharge which was collected on an array of sub-micron aerosol filters. The nominal conditions of the tests, with the exception of the first two tests, were tungsten temperatures of 1000 C, gas mixture temperatures of 200 C and wall temperatures of 150 C to 200 C. It was observed that the tungsten oxidation rates were greatest in all air and least in all steam, generally decreasing non-linearly with increasing steam mole fraction. The tungsten oxidation rates in all air were more than five times greater than the tungsten oxidation rates in all steam. The tungsten vaporization rate was zero in all air and increased with increasing steam mole fraction. The vaporization rate became maximum at a steam mole fraction of 0.85 and decreased thereafter as the steam mole fraction was increased to unity. The tungsten-oxide was transported downstream as condensation aerosols, initially flowing upwards from the tungsten rod through an 18-inch long, one-inch diameter quartz tube, around a 3.5-inch radius, 90{sup o} bend and laterally through a 24-inch horizontal run. The entire length of the quartz glass flow path was heated by electrical resistance clamshell heaters whose temperatures were individually controlled and measured. The tungsten-oxide plateout in the quartz tube was collected, nearly all of which was deposited at the end of the heated zone near the entrance to the condenser which was cold. The tungsten-oxide which rained out in the condenser as the steam condensed was collected with the condensate and weighed after being dried. The aerosol smoke which escaped the condenser was collected on the sub-micron filter assemblies. There was no aerosol generation for the case of all air, so the plateout, condensate and smoke were all zero. For the case of all steam, there was very little plateout in the superheated regions (several percent) and the rest of the aerosol was collected in the condensate from the condenser. There was no smoke discharge into the filters. For the experiments with intermediate air-steam fractions, there was some aerosol plateout, considerable aerosol in the condensate and aerosol smoke discharged from the condenser with the escaping air.

  11. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10˛? m?˛ to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10˛? m?˛ in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Finalmore »thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (« less

  12. High Strain and Strain-Rate Behaviour of PTFE/Aluminium/Tungsten Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Addiss; Jing Cai; Stephen Walley; William Proud; Vitali F. Nesterenko

    2007-11-08

    Conventional drop-weight techniques were modified to accommodate low-amplitude force transducer signals from low-strength, cold isostatically pressed 'heavy' composites of polytetrafluoroethylene, aluminum and tungsten. The failure strength, strain and the post-critical behavior of failed samples were measured for samples of different porosity and tungsten grain size. Unusual phenomenon of significantly higher strength (55 MPa) of porous composites (density 5.9 g/cc) with small W particles (less than 1 micron) in comparison with strength (32 MPa) of dense composites (7.1 g/cc) with larger W particles (44 microns) at the same volume content of components was observed. This is attributed to force chains created by a network of small W particles. Interrupted tests at different levels of strain revealed the mechanisms of fracture under dynamic compression.

  13. Mechanical characterization and modelling of the heavy tungsten allow IT180

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scapin, M

    2015-01-01

    Pure tungsten or its alloys(WHA) find applications in several fields, especially due to the fact that these materials show a good combination of mechanical and thermal properties and they are commonly used in aerospace, automotive, metal working processes, military and nuclear technologies. Looking at the scientific literature, a lack in the mechanical characterization over wide ranges in temperature and strain-rates was found, especially forW–Ni–Cu alloys.

  14. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  15. Dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack velocity in tungsten: Pt. II. Bicrystals and polycrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liv, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1986-06-01

    The experimental techniques for crack velocity measurements have been applied to bicrystals of tungsten with twist orientations about (100) and polycrystals. The hesitation of the propagating cleavage crack in the vicinity of the grain boundary is examined. The contributions to energy dissipation from deformation and fracture processes in the grain boundary region as well as the in direct effects of crack deceleration are discussed. These findings have been applied to explain th dynamic fracture resistance and crack arrest in polycrystals.

  16. Dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack velocity in tungsten: Pt. 1. Single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liv, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The dependence of dynamic fracture resistance on crack propagation velocity on (100) in tungsten has been examined. A correlation is obtained between the measured local crack velocity with the surfac and subsurface deformations. Based on the experimental results on one pass, two passes, and prestrained, electron beam zone refined single crystals, a discussion is given on the slip modes activated at the crack tip, the contributions to the dynamic fracture resistance from dislocations and surface features and from the preexisting deformed microstructure.

  17. TUNGSTEN SHIELDS FOR CS-137 INLINE MONITORS IN THE CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V; Mark Hogue, M; Javier Reyes-Jimenez, J; Paul Filpus-Luyckx, P; Timothy Riley, T; Fred Ogden, F; Donald Pak, D

    2007-05-10

    The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The CSSX process is a continuous process that uses a novel solvent to extract cesium from highly radioactive waste and concentrate it in dilute nitric acid. In-line analyses are performed with gamma-ray monitors to measure the C-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and in the strip effluent (SE). Sodium iodide (NaI) monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration before the DSS Hold Tank, while Geiger-Mueller (GM) monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the SE hold tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to provide the needed reduction of the process background radiation at the detector positions. A one-inch tungsten cylindrical shield reduced the background radiation by a factor of fifty that was adequate for the GM detectors, while a three-and-one-half-inch tungsten cylindrical shield was required for the NaI detectors. Testing of the NaI shield was performed at the SRS Instrument Calibration Facility. Based on this testing, the as-built shield is predicted to be able to detect the MCU DSS stream at concentrations above 0.003 Ci/gal under the ''worst case'' field conditions with a MCU feed solution of 1.1 Ci/gal and all of the process tanks completely full. This paper discusses the design, fabrication, testing and implementation of the tungsten shields in the MCU facility.

  18. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

  19. Fracture and Creep in an All-Tungsten Divertor for ARIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fracture and Creep in an All- Tungsten Divertor for ARIES Jake Blanchard University of Wisconsin by these designs Fracture Thermal creep #12;The Design #12;Major Input Parameters Parameter Value Units Surface c/a=10 Fracture Results 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 StressIntensity(MPa-m1/2) Crack Depth (mm) c

  20. Equation of state for tungsten over a wide range of densities and internal energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khishchenko, Konstantin V

    2015-01-01

    A caloric model, which describes the pressure--density--internal-energy relationship in a broad region of condensed-phase states, is applied for tungsten. As distinct from previously known caloric equations of state for this material, a new form of the cold-compression curve at $T = 0$~K is used. Thermodynamic characteristics along the cold curve and shock Hugoniots are calculated for the metal and compared with some theoretical results and experimental data available at high energy densities.

  1. Enhanced photoelectrochemical properties of TiO{sub 2} by codoping with tungsten and silver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Matiullah, E-mail: matiullahustb@gmail.com [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics, Kohat University of Science and Technology (KUST), Kohat 26000 (Pakistan); Jiang, Peng; Cao, Wenbin, E-mail: wbcao@ustb.edu.cn [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-04-21

    The Tungsten (W) and Silver (Ag) codoped TiO{sub 2} samples were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method without any post calcination. To understand the correlation between electronic structure and photocatalytic properties, the synthesized samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller specific surface area, transmission electron microscopy, ultra-violet–visible absorption spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the photocatalytic properties were evaluated under visible light irradiations. Codoping could not induce any changes in the phase and all the synthesized samples displayed pure anatase phase with spherical morphology. Visible light absorptions of the codoped samples were dramatically improved compared to the corresponding mono-doped samples. XPS analysis indicated that the dopant atoms successfully entered the TiO{sub 2} network. Results from the visible light photodegradation experiments showed that tungsten-silver codoped TiO{sub 2} possessed strong ability in photo-degrading methylene blue compared to tungsten doped TiO{sub 2} and silver doped TiO{sub 2}, which was attributed to the smaller particle size, higher specific surface area, enhanced visible light absorption, and improved separation of photogenerated carriers.

  2. Collisional-radiative modeling of tungsten at temperatures of 1200–2400 eV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Colgan, James; Fontes, Christopher; Zhang, Honglin; Abdallah, Jr., Joseph

    2015-04-30

    We discuss new collisional-radiative modeling calculations of tungsten at moderate temperatures of 1200 to 2400 eV. Such plasma conditions are relevant to ongoing experimental work at ASDEX Upgrade and are expected to be relevant for ITER. Our calculations are made using the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) collisional-radiative modeling ATOMIC code. These calculations formed part of a submission to the recent NLTE-8 workshop that was held in November 2013. This series of workshops provides a forum for detailed comparison of plasma and spectral quantities from NLTE collisional-radiative modeling codes. We focus on the LANL ATOMIC calculations for tungsten that weremore »submitted to the NLTE-8 workshop and discuss different models that were constructed to predict the tungsten emission. In particular, we discuss comparisons between semi-relativistic configuration-average and fully relativistic configuration-average calculations. We also present semi-relativistic calculations that include fine-structure detail, and discuss the difficult problem of ensuring completeness with respect to the number of configurations included in a CR calculation.« less

  3. The effects of tungsten's pre-irradiation surface condition on helium-irradiated morphology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garrison, Lauren M.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2015-07-17

    Erosion is a concern associated with the use of tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. To compare the damage progression, polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) and (110) single crystal tungsten (SCW) samples were prepared with (1) a mechanical polish (MP) with roughness values in the range of 0.018–0.020 ?m and (2) an MP and electropolish (MPEP) resulting in roughness values of 0.010–0.020 ?m for PCW and 0.003–0.005 ?m for SCW samples. Samples were irradiated with 30 keV He+ at 1173 K to fluences between 3 × 1021 and 6 × 1022 He/m2. The morphologies that developed after low-fluence bombardment weremore »different for each type of sample—MP SCW, MPEP SCW, MP PCW, and MPEP PCW. At the highest fluence, the SCW MPEP sample lost significantly more mass and developed a different morphology than the MP SCW sample. The PCW samples developed a similar morphology and had similar mass loss at the highest fluence. Surface preparation can have a significant effect on post-irradiation morphology that should be considered for the design of future fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO.« less

  4. A study of tungsten spectra using large helical device and compact electron beam ion trap in NIFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Murakami, I. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, C. F.; Kato, D.; Sakaue, H. A.; Oishi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Hasuo, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Koike, F. [Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara 252-0374 (Japan); Nakamura, N. [Institute of Laser Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo 182-8585 (Japan); Sasaki, A. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Research Agency, Kizugawa 619-0215, Kyoto (Japan); Wang, E. H. [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2013-07-11

    Tungsten spectra have been observed from Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact electron Beam Ion Trap (CoBIT) in wavelength ranges of visible to EUV. The EUV spectra with unresolved transition array (UTA), e.g., 6g-4f, 5g-4f, 5f-4d and 5p-4d transitions for W{sup +24-+33}, measured from LHD plasmas are compared with those measured from CoBIT with monoenergetic electron beam ({<=}2keV). The tungsten spectra from LHD are well analyzed based on the knowledge from CoBIT tungsten spectra. The C-R model code has been developed to explain the UTA spectra in details. Radial profiles of EUV spectra from highly ionized tungsten ions have been measured and analyzed by impurity transport simulation code with ADPAK atomic database code to examine the ionization balance determined by ionization and recombination rate coefficients. As the first trial, analysis of the tungsten density in LHD plasmas is attempted from radial profile of Zn-like WXLV (W{sup 44+}) 4p-4s transition at 60.9A based on the emission rate coefficient calculated with HULLAC code. As a result, a total tungsten ion density of 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} at the plasma center is reasonably obtained. In order to observe the spectra from tungsten ions in lower-ionized charge stages, which can give useful information on the tungsten influx in fusion plasmas, the ablation cloud of the impurity pellet is directly measured with visible spectroscopy. A lot of spectra from neutral and singly ionized tungsten are observed and some of them are identified. A magnetic forbidden line from highly ionized tungsten ions has been examined and Cd-like WXXVII (W{sup 26+}) at 3893.7A is identified as the ground-term fine-structure transition of 4f{sup 23}H{sub 5}-{sup 3}H{sub 4}. The possibility of {alpha} particle diagnostic in D-T burning plasmas using the magnetic forbidden line is discussed.

  5. Influence of Atomic Physics on EDGE2D-EIRENE Simulations of JET Divertor Detachment with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Atomic Physics on EDGE2D-EIRENE Simulations of JET Divertor Detachment with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Plasma-Facing Components

  6. Target Particle and Heat Loads in Low-Triangularity L-mode Plasmas in JET with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Target Particle and Heat Loads in Low-Triangularity L-mode Plasmas in JET with Carbon and Beryllium/Tungsten Walls

  7. Integrated Core-SOL-Divertor Modelling for ITER Including Impurity: Effect of Tungsten on Fusion Performance in H-mode and Hybrid Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Core-SOL-Divertor Modelling for ITER Including Impurity: Effect of Tungsten on Fusion Performance in H-mode and Hybrid Scenario

  8. Spotlight -Language and Literacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    To be recognized as a major national source of research and personnel development in early intervention/ education community, and 5. Develop and maintain model programs for research and and professional development. 2014 graduate program, these four scholars are participating in a specialized seminar on prevention

  9. Spotlight, October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-10-01

    . downtown, at the Arts Center, and in the Community Health Building. We’ve installed solar panels at the County Fairgrounds, and our retrofit of the Library’s heating and cooling system is using 21% less energy than before. Economic Development: A... economically efficient, is slow and susceptible to the addition of impurities from environmental exposure. For this project, it may be possible to use the environment effectively, including wind and solar sustainable energies, to accelerate drying...

  10. Spotlight, November 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-11-01

    -free, sustainable, technologically advanced architecture, walkable communities, and landscapes incorporating nature. Domer explained how emphasis on the nuclear family in an age- segregated society disconnects the young and old and how a proposed...-free, sustainable, technologically advanced architecture, walkable communities, and landscapes incorporating nature. Domer explained how emphasis on the nuclear family in an age- segregated society disconnects the young and old and how a proposed...

  11. Spotlight, April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-04-01

    AUDITORIUM Sponsored by: KU Environs, KU Environmental Studies Program, KU Student Senate, KU School of Architecture and Urban Planning, KU Climate Change IGERT Program, & the KU Center for Sustainability KU & Lawre nce Earth Day 2013 ANNUAL SPEAKER DAVID... AUDITORIUM Sponsored by: KU Environs, KU Environmental Studies Program, KU Student Senate, KU School of Architecture and Urban Planning, KU Climate Change IGERT Program, & the KU Center for Sustainability KU & Lawre nce Earth Day 2013 ANNUAL SPEAKER DAVID...

  12. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ann Schlenker

    2013-06-10

    Ann Schlenker, Director for the Center for Transportation Research, discusses mentoring and working at Argonne.

  13. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter highlights the recipients of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sustainability Performance Office (SPO) 2014 Sustainability Awards.

  14. Robot learning [TC Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russell Louis

    Creating autonomous robots that can learn to act in unpredictable environments has been a long-standing goal of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. In contrast, current commercially available ...

  15. Spotlight, March 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-01

    -wide initiative.” 5 Page 5 KU Center for Sustainability 3/26 Empowering & Sustaining Malawi: Africa Windmill Project with John Drake, 7:30 PM Dole Institute of Politics 3/28 3rd Annual Spring Symposium on the Scholarship of Diversity, 8:30 AM to 1...-wide initiative.” 5 Page 5 KU Center for Sustainability 3/26 Empowering & Sustaining Malawi: Africa Windmill Project with John Drake, 7:30 PM Dole Institute of Politics 3/28 3rd Annual Spring Symposium on the Scholarship of Diversity, 8:30 AM to 1...

  16. Spotlight, May 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-05-01

    emissions responsible for climate change. To gauge our food’s climate impact, we can ask questions like: How much energy and water were used to produce it? What was the scale of production? And, how low is it on the food chain? As long as the food... emissions responsible for climate change. To gauge our food’s climate impact, we can ask questions like: How much energy and water were used to produce it? What was the scale of production? And, how low is it on the food chain? As long as the food...

  17. Spotlight, June 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-06-01

    hard fought weeks have yielded a winner in the Lights Out! energy conservation competition held at the University of Kansas. The faculty and staff in Bailey Hall nudged out the victory by just 1.6%, fending off Green and Summerfield Halls... their buildings and encouraged their fellow students, faculty, and staff to do their part. They helped create a great model we can use moving forward with energy conservation at KU.” Greening the Crimson and Blue Bailey Hall Wins Lights Out! Competition...

  18. Spotlight, August 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-08-01

    on the road means lower CO2 emissions, and all the Hertz on Demand vehicles are EPA SmartWay certified, ensuring fewer air pollutants and greenhouse gases are emitted into the air. Using Hertz on Demand is also more energy efficient than owning a car..., or ride a bus to campus a new choice. KU Parking & Transit has partnered with Hertz on Demand to bring rental cars by the hour to the KU Lawrence Campus. After signing up for a free membership, you only pay for a car when and where you need it...

  19. Employee Spotlight: Alessandro Cattaneo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee Headcount

  20. Employee Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryant Roybal Bryant

  1. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryant RoybalDave

  2. Employee Spotlight: James Hunter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryant

  3. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryantCareers, Jobs

  4. Employee Spotlight: Jason Halladay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryantCareers,

  5. Employee Spotlight: Jeff Martin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryantCareers,Jeff

  6. Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon Engle Jonathan

  7. Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon Engle JonathanJosé

  8. Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon Engle JonathanJoséMichael

  9. Employee Spotlight: Michelle Ferran

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon Engle

  10. Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon EngleMonika Bittman Monika

  11. Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon EngleMonika

  12. Employee Spotlight: Sim Balkey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon EngleMonikaCareer Jobs»

  13. Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines Candidates f or t

  14. Spotlight: Christopher Lee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines Candidates f or tChristopher

  15. Spotlight: Claudia Mora

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 SpecialSponsor Guidelines Candidates f or

  16. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National Laboratory gain

  17. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National Laboratory gainScientists

  18. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National Laboratory

  19. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National LaboratoryScientists In

  20. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National LaboratoryScientists

  1. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National

  2. Employee Spotlight: Alessandro Cattaneo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio SegrèDepartment

  3. Employee Spotlight: Bryant Roybal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio

  4. Employee Spotlight: Dave Keller

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2, 2014 It's 2

  5. Employee Spotlight: Janice Lovato

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2, 2014 It's

  6. Employee Spotlight: Jonathan Engle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2,Jonathan Engle

  7. Employee Spotlight: Kristen Honig

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June

  8. Employee Spotlight: Michael Torrez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller JuneMichael Torrez

  9. Employee Spotlight: Monika Bittman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller JuneMichael

  10. Employee Spotlight: Ron Barber

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller JuneMichaelRon Barber

  11. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment |Scientist inScientists

  12. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment |Scientist

  13. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment |ScientistScientists In the

  14. Scientists in the Spotlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice ofTorus Experiment |ScientistScientists In

  15. Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes Ameerah Jabr-Hamdan, Dr. Eric Montgomery, Dr. Patrick O' Shea, Blake Riddick, and Peter Zhigang Pan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Cesium Evaporation Rate on Tungsten Photocathodes Ameerah Jabr-Hamdan, Dr. Eric Montgomery, Dr into a vacuum chamber. Experimentally found the evaporation rate of Cesium on a Tungsten Photocathode. Motivation A High Power Free Electron Laser. High QE and decent lifetime Photocathode. (Cesium Dispenser

  16. Interface strength measurement of tungsten coatings on F82H substrates Hyoungil Kim *, Jaafar El-Awady, Vijay Gupta, Nasr Ghoniem, Shahram Sharafat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Interface strength measurement of tungsten coatings on F82H substrates Hyoungil Kim *, Jaafar El isostatic pressing is adopted to deposit tungsten coatings on F82H substrates. The interface strength to determine the strength of the coating. Finally, the failure mechanisms of the hot isostatic pressing versus

  17. The Effect of 800 MeV Proton Irradiation on the Mechanical Properties of Tungsten at Room Temperature and at 475 Degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maloy, S A.; James, M R.; Sommer, Walter F.; Willcutt, Gordon; Lopez, M; Romero, T J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2005-08-01

    For the accelerator production of tritium (APT), the accelerator driven transmutation facility (ADTF), and the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI), tungsten is being proposed as a target material to produce neutrons. In this study, tungsten rods were irradiated at the 800MeV Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) proton accelerator for six months.

  18. Testing Hadronic Interaction Models using a Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration; B. Bilki; J. Repond; J. Schlereth; L. Xia; Z. Deng; Y. Li; Y. Wang; Q. Yue; Z. Yang; G. Eigen; Y. Mikami; T. Price; N. K. Watson; M. A. Thomson; D. R. Ward; D. Benchekroun; A. Hoummada; Y. Khoulaki; C. Cârloganu; S. Chang; A. Khan; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kong; Y. D. Oh; G. C. Blazey; A. Dyshkant; K. Francis; J. G. R. Lima; P. Salcido; V. Zutshi; V. Boisvert; B. Green; A. Misiejuk; F. Salvatore; K. Kawagoe; Y. Miyazaki; Y. Sudo; T. Suehara; T. Tomita; H. Ueno; T. Yoshioka; J. Apostolakis; G. Folger; G. Folger; V. Ivantchenko; A. Ribon; V. Uzhinskiy; S. Cauwenbergh; M. Tytgat; N. Zaganidis; J. -Y. Hostachy; L. Morin; K. Gadow; P. Göttlicher; C. Günter; K. Krüger; B. Lutz; M. Reinecke; F. Sefkow; N. Feege; E. Garutti; S. Laurien; S. Lu; I. Marchesini; M. Matysek; M. Ramilli; A. Kaplan; E. Norbeck; D. Northacker; Y. Onel; E. J. Kim; B. van Doren; G. W. Wilson; M. Wing; B. Bobchenko; M. Chadeeva; R. Chistov; M. Danilov; A. Drutskoy; A. Epifantsev; O. Markin; R. Mizuk; E. Novikov; V. Popov; V. Rusinov; E. Tarkovsky; D. Besson; E. Popova; M. Gabriel; C. Kiesling; F. Simon; C. Soldner; M. Szalay; M. Tesar; L. Weuste; M. S. Amjad; J. Bonis; S. Callier; S. Conforti di Lorenzo; P. Cornebise; Ph. Doublet; F. Dulucq; M. Faucci-Giannelli; J. Fleury; T. Frisson; B. Kégl; N. van der Kolk; H. Li; G. Martin-Chassard; F. Richard; Ch. de la Taille; R. Pöschl; L. Raux; J. Rouëné; N. Seguin-Moreau; M. Anduze; V. Balagura; E. Becheva; V. Boudry; J-C. Brient; R. Cornat; M. Frotin; F. Gastaldi; F. Magniette; A. Matthieu; P. Mora de Freitas; H. Videau; J-E. Augustin; J. David; P. Ghislain; D. Lacour; L. Lavergne; J. Zacek; J. Cvach; P. Gallus; M. Havranek; M. Janata; J. Kvasnicka; D. Lednicky; M. Marcisovsky; I. Polak; J. Popule; L. Tomasek; M. Tomasek; P. Ruzicka; P. Sicho; J. Smolik; V. Vrba; J. Zalesak; D. Jeans; M. Götze

    2015-05-08

    A detailed study of hadronic interactions is presented using data recorded with the highly granular CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter. Approximately 350,000 selected negatively charged pion events at energies between 2 and 10 GeV have been studied. The predictions of several physics models available within the Geant4 simulation tool kit are compared to this data. A reasonable overall description of the data is observed; the Monte Carlo predictions are within 20% of the data, and for many observables much closer. The largest quantitative discrepancies are found in the longitudinal and transverse distributions of reconstructed energy.

  19. Detrapping of tungsten nanoparticles in a direct-current argon glow discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couëdel, L. Kumar, K. Kishor; Arnas, C.

    2014-12-15

    Nanoparticles are grown from the sputtering of a tungsten cathode in a direct current argon glow discharge. Laser light scattering of a vertical laser sheet going through the plasma reveals that the dust particle cloud is compressed and pushed towards the anode during the discharge. Scanning electron microscopy images of substrates exposed to the plasma for given durations show that dust particles are continuously falling down on the anode during the discharge. These observations are explained by the fact that the electrostatic force at the negative glow-anode sheath boundary cannot balance the ion drag, gravity, and thermophoresis forces for particles of more than a few tens of nanometres in diameter.

  20. Measurement of quasiparticle transport in aluminum films using tungsten transition-edge sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yen, J. J. Shank, B.; Cabrera, B.; Moffatt, R.; Redl, P.; Young, B. A.; Tortorici, E. C.; Brink, P. L.; Cherry, M.; Tomada, A.; Kreikebaum, J. M.

    2014-10-20

    We report on experimental studies of phonon sensors which utilize quasiparticle diffusion in thin aluminum films connected to tungsten transition-edge-sensors (TESs) operated at 35 mK. We show that basic TES physics and a simple physical model of the overlap region between the W and Al films in our devices enables us to accurately reproduce the experimentally observed pulse shapes from x-rays absorbed in the Al films. We further estimate quasiparticle loss in Al films using a simple diffusion equation approach. These studies allow the design of phonon sensors with improved performance.

  1. Adhesion of diamond coatings synthesized by oxygen-acetylene flame CVD on tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, S.; Stankovic, S.; Dekanski, A.

    1995-12-31

    The results of a study concerned with chemical vapor deposition of diamond on tungsten carbide cutting tools using an oxygen-acetylene flame in a normal ambient environment are presented. Effects of preparation conditions on the adhesion of the coating have been investigated, including different surface treatment, different position of the flame with respect to the coated surface, effect of an intermediate poorly crystalline diamond layer, etc. In particular, effect of polishing and ultrasonic lapping with diamond powder was compared with that of a corresponding treatment with SiC powder.

  2. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10˛? m?˛ to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10˛? m?˛ in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10˛? m?˛.

  3. A Conceptual Multi-Megawatt System Based on a Tungsten CERMET Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan A. Webb; Brian Gross

    2011-02-01

    Abstract. A conceptual reactor system to support Multi-Megawatt Nuclear Electric Propulsion is investigated within this paper. The reactor system consists of a helium cooled Tungsten-UN fission core, surrounded by a beryllium neutron reflector and 13 B4C control drums coupled to a high temperature Brayton power conversion system. Excess heat is rejected via carbon reinforced heat pipe radiators and the gamma and neutron flux is attenuated via segmented shielding consisting of lithium hydride and tungsten layers. Turbine inlet temperatures ranging from 1300 K to 1500 K are investigated for their effects on specific powers and net electrical outputs ranging from 1 MW to 100 MW. The reactor system is estimated to have a mass, which ranges from 15 Mt at 1 MWe and a turbine inlet temperature of 1500 K to 1200 Mt at 100 MWe and a turbine temperature of 1300 K. The reactor systems specific mass ranges from 32 kg/kWe at a turbine inlet temperature of 1300 K and a power of 1 MWe to 9.5 kg/kW at a turbine temperature of 1500 K and a power of 100 MWe.

  4. A structural evaluation of the tungsten isotopes via thermal neutron capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurst, A M; Sleaford, B W; Summers, N C; Revay, Zs; Szentmiklosi, L; Basunia, M S; Belgya, T; Escher, J E; Krticka, M

    2014-01-01

    Total radiative thermal neutron-capture $\\gamma$-ray cross sections for the $^{182,183,184,186}$W isotopes were measured using guided neutron beams from the Budapest Research Reactor to induce prompt and delayed $\\gamma$ rays from elemental and isotopically-enriched tungsten targets. These cross sections were determined from the sum of measured $\\gamma$-ray cross sections feeding the ground state from low-lying levels below a cutoff energy, E$_{\\rm crit}$, where the level scheme is completely known, and continuum $\\gamma$ rays from levels above E$_{\\rm crit}$, calculated using the Monte Carlo statistical-decay code DICEBOX. The new cross sections determined in this work for the tungsten nuclides are: $\\sigma_{0}(^{182}{\\rm W}) = 20.5(14)$ b and $\\sigma_{11/2^{+}}(^{183}{\\rm W}^{m}, 5.2 {\\rm s}) = 0.177(18)$ b; $\\sigma_{0}(^{183}{\\rm W}) = 9.37(38)$ b and $\\sigma_{5^{-}}(^{184}{\\rm W}^{m}, 8.33 \\mu{\\rm s}) = 0.0247(55)$ b; $\\sigma_{0}(^{184}{\\rm W}) = 1.43(10)$ b and $\\sigma_{11/2^{+}}(^{185}{\\rm W}^{m}, 1.67 ...

  5. Dynamics of tungsten hexacarbonyl, dicobalt octacarbonyl, and their fragments adsorbed on silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthukumar, Kaliappan; Valentí, Roser; Jeschke, Harald O.

    2014-05-14

    Tungsten and cobalt carbonyls adsorbed on a substrate are typical starting points for the electron beam induced deposition of tungsten or cobalt based metallic nanostructures. We employ first principles molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the dynamics and vibrational spectra of W(CO){sub 6} and W(CO){sub 5} as well as Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} and Co(CO){sub 4} precursor molecules on fully and partially hydroxylated silica surfaces. Such surfaces resemble the initial conditions of electron beam induced growth processes. We find that both W(CO){sub 6} and Co{sub 2}(CO){sub 8} are stable at room temperature and mobile on a silica surface saturated with hydroxyl groups (OH), moving up to half an Angström per picosecond. In contrast, chemisorbed W(CO){sub 5} or Co(CO){sub 4} ions at room temperature do not change their binding site. These results contribute to gaining fundamental insight into how the molecules behave in the simulated time window of 20 ps and our determined vibrational spectra of all species provide signatures for experimentally distinguishing the form in which precursors cover a substrate.

  6. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50–70 ?C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. After cooling down, the HFIR neutronirradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 ?C twice at the ion fluence of 5×1025 m-2 to reach the total ion fluence of 1×1026 m-2 in order to investigate maximum near-surface (more »in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the nearsurface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was trapped in bulk (at least 50µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35µm depth for 0.3 dpa) at 500 ?C cases even in the relatively low ion fluence of 1026 m-2.« less

  7. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, Masashi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States).Fusion Safety Program; Cao, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Otsuka, T. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science; Hara, M. [Univ. of Toyama (Japan). Hydrogen Isotope Center; Kobayashi, M. [Shizuoka Univ. (Japan). Radioscience Research Lab.; Oya, Y. [Shizuoka Univ. (Japan). Radioscience Research Lab.; Hatano, Y. [Shizuoka Univ. (Japan). Radioscience Research Lab.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50–70 ?C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa. After cooling down, the HFIR neutronirradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 ?C twice at the ion fluence of 5×1025 m-2 to reach the total ion fluence of 1×1026 m-2 in order to investigate maximum near-surface (<5µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at% D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at% D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the nearsurface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was trapped in bulk (at least 50µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35µm depth for 0.3 dpa) at 500 ?C cases even in the relatively low ion fluence of 1026 m-2.

  8. Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten ions at low ionization stages in large helical device based on vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy in wavelength range of 500–2200 Ĺ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oishi, T. Morita, S.; Goto, M.; Huang, X. L.; Zhang, H. M.

    2014-11-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet spectra of emissions released from tungsten ions at lower ionization stages were measured in the Large Helical Device (LHD) in the wavelength range of 500–2200 Ĺ using a 3 m normal incidence spectrometer. Tungsten ions were distributed in the LHD plasma by injecting a pellet consisting of a small piece of tungsten metal and polyethylene tube. Many lines having different wavelengths from intrinsic impurity ions were observed just after the tungsten pellet injection. Doppler broadening of a tungsten candidate line was successfully measured and the ion temperature was obtained.

  9. Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Comparison of QM-Only and QM/MM Models for the Mechanism of Tungsten-Dependent Acetylene Hydratase-only and QM/MM approaches for the modeling of enzymatic reactions. For this purpose, we present a QM/MM case of the previously suggested one-water attack mechanism. The QM/MM calculations with the minimal QM region M1 (32

  10. Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten carbide coatings using an axially fed DC-plasmatron S. Sharafata,U , A. Kobayashib , S. Chena , N of high-density Ni WC coatings were produces with uniform distribution of WC particles. The small powder

  11. Conceptual Designs for a Spallation Neutron Target Constructed of a Helium-Cooled, Packed Bed of Tungsten Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    foundation a target and blanket system that is driven by a proton accelerator. The subcritical blanket-cooled, packed bed of tungsten particles. Two packed bed target designs for accelerator transmutation of waste/p and improved axial distribution of neutrons. * E-mail: ammerman@lanl.gov I. INTRODUCTION The Accelerator

  12. Transforming dielectric coated tungsten and platinum wires to gaseous state using negative nanosecond-pulsed-current in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jian; Li, Xingwen Wang, Kun; Yang, Zefeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici; Li, Zhenghong

    2014-11-15

    With the help of thin dielectric coatings, corona free explosions were achieved in the region of about half a wire length (2?cm) for tungsten wires and nearly the whole wire length for platinum wires under a fast rising (46–170?A/ns) negative polarity current in vacuum. Expansion velocity of the tungsten gas was over 10?km/s. Current waveforms from exploding coated wires were similar to those from bare wires in the air including a current pause stage. Coated wires with different coating parameters had a similar joule energy deposition before voltage collapsed, but a quite different scenario in the region near the electrodes. The axial field under negative current was the main reason for the axial inhomogeneity of coated tungsten wires. Tungsten or platinum gases in the vaporized region were tightly encompassed by the dielectric coating, while gaps or probably low density gases, were observed between the coating and the edge of the dense wire core in the core-corona structure region.

  13. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  14. Growth of tungsten bronze family crystals. Final technical report, 6 May 1985-30 November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neurgaonkar, R.R.; Cross, L.E.

    1988-03-01

    A systematic investigation of tungsten bronze crystals for electro-optic and photorefractive applications was carried out successfully. The Sr{sub 1-X}BaXNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (SBN) and Ba{sub 2-X}SrXK{sub 1-y}NaYNb{sub 5}O{sub 15} (BSKNN) system crystals were grown in optical quality with and without specific impurities whose purpose is to enhance photorefractive coupling and speed. Both SBN and BSKNN crystals appear to be excellent hosts for electro-optic applications, e.g., modulators, waveguides, and spatial light modulators (SLM) and photorefractive applications, e.g., phase conjugation, image processing, optical computing and laser hardening. For photorefractive applications, cerium and chromium doping show the largest effects on photorefractive coupling and speed.

  15. R&D for a highly granular silicon tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pöschl, R

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on first experience with the technological prototype of a highly- granular silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter as envisaged for the detectors at a future lepton collider. In the focus of the analysis is the performance of a highly integrated Application Specific Integrated Circuit designed to meet the requirements in terms of dynamic range, compactness and power consumption. The beam test results show that the circuit will allow a future detector with a signal over noise ratio of at least 10:1. To minimise the power dissipation the ASIC will be operated in a power pulsed mode. So far no conceptual problem was revealed but the studies show the way for further work. The prototype is read out by a DAQ system conceived to meet the needs of a trigger less system with a huge number of readout cells.

  16. On vapor shielding of dust grains of iron, molybdenum, and tungsten in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, B. T.; Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla, California 92093-0411 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The shielding effects of ablation cloud around a small dust grain composed of iron, molybdenum, or tungsten in fusion plasmas are considered. These include collisional dissipation of momentum flux of impinging plasma ions, heat transfer by secondary plasma created due to electron impact ionization of the ablated atoms, and radiative plasma power losses in the ablation cloud. The maximum radius, which limits applicability of existing dust-plasma interaction models neglecting the cloud shielding effects, for dust grains of the considered high-Z metals is calculated as function of plasma parameters. The thermal bifurcation triggered by thermionic electron emission from dust grains, observed for some of the considered materials, is analyzed. The results are compared with previous calculations for dust composed of low-Z fusion related materials, i.e., lithium, beryllium, and carbon.

  17. Simultaneous impact of neutron irradiation and sputtering on the surface structure of self–damaged ITER–grade tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyaeva, A. I. Savchenko, A. A.; Galuza, A. A.; Kolenov, I. V.

    2014-07-15

    Simultaneous effects of neutron irradiation and long–term sputtering on the surface relief of ITER–grade tungsten were studied. The effects of neutron–induced displacement damage have been simulated by irradiation of tungsten target with W{sup 6+} ions of 20?MeV energy. Ar{sup +} ions with energy 600?eV were used as imitation of charge exchange atoms in ITER. The surface relief was studied after each sputtering act. The singularity in the WJ–IG surface relief was ascertained experimentally at the first time, which determines the law of roughness extension under sputtering. As follows from the experimental data, the neutron irradiation has not to make a decisive additional contribution in the processes developing under impact of charge exchange atoms only.

  18. Direct measurement of the work of fracture for grain boundaries of twist misorientation about (100) in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The authors report results on the direct measurement of the work of fracture in twist boundaries in electron beam zone refined bicrystals of tungsten. The work of fracture is referred to as the energy required for crack extension. This approach may be used to advantage when the effects of impurities are present, for example, in problems related to grain boundary embrittlement in steels, copper and nickel.

  19. Beta (?) tungsten thin films: Structure, electron transport, and giant spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Qiang; Chen, Wenzhe; Xiao, Gang

    2015-05-04

    We use a simple magnetron sputtering process to fabricate beta (?) tungsten thin films, which are capable of generating giant spin Hall effect. As-deposited thin films are always in the metastable ?-W phase from 3.0 to 26.7?nm. The ?-W phase remains intact below a critical thickness of 22.1?nm even after magnetic thermal annealing at 280?°C, which is required to induce perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a layered structure of ?-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO. Intensive annealing transforms the thicker films (>22.1?nm) into the stable ?-W phase. We analyze the structure and grain size of both ?- and ?-W thin films. Electron transport in terms of resistivity and normal Hall effect is studied over a broad temperature range of 10?K to at least 300?K on all samples. Very low switching current densities are achieved in ?-W/Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20}/MgO with PMA. These basic properties reveal useful behaviors in ?-W thin films, making them technologically promising for spintronic magnetic random access memories and spin-logic devices.

  20. FINAL FOCUS ION BEAM INTENSITY FROM TUNGSTEN FOIL CALORIMETER AND SCINTILLATOR IN NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lidia, S.M.; Bieniosek, F.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.; Seidl, P.

    2010-04-30

    Laboratory high energy density experiments using ion beam drivers rely upon the delivery of high-current, high-brightness ion beams with high peak intensity onto targets. Solid-state scintillators are typically used to measure the ion beam spatial profile but they display dose-dependent degradation and aging effects. These effects produce uncertainties and limit the accuracy of measuring peak beam intensities delivered to the target. For beam tuning and characterizing the incident beam intensity, we have developed a cross-calibrating diagnostic suite that extends the upper limit of measurable peak intensity dynamic range. Absolute intensity calibration is obtained with a 3 {micro}m thick tungsten foil calorimeter and streak spectrometer. We present experimental evidence for peak intensity measures in excess of 400 kW/cm{sup 2} using a 0.3 MV, 25 mA, 5-20 {micro}sec K{sup +1} beam. Radiative models and thermal diffusion effects are discussed because they affect temporal and spatial resolution of beam intensity profiles.

  1. Decomposition pathways of C2 oxygenates on Rh-modified tungsten carbide surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kelly, Thomas G.; Ren, Hui; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-03-27

    Ethanol decomposition on tungsten monocarbide (WC) and Rh-modified WC was investigated using ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface science experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DFT calculations indicated that the binding energies of ethanol and its decomposition intermediates on WC(0001) were modified by Rh, with Rh/WC(0001) showing similar values to those on Rh(111). Through temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments on polycrystalline WC and Rh-modified WC, it was shown that the selectivity for ethanol decomposition was different on these surfaces. On WC, the C-O bond of ethanol was preferentially broken to produce ethylene; on Rh-modified WC, the C-C bond was broken to producemore »carbon monoxide and methane. In addition, high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to determine likely surface intermediates. On Rh-modified WC, ethanol first formed ethoxy through O-H scission, then reacted through an aldehyde intermediate to form the C1 products.« less

  2. Tungsten Cluster Migration on Nanoparticles: Minimum Energy Pathway and Migration Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Gao, Fei; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian

    2011-03-02

    Transition state searches have been employed to investigate the migration mechanisms of W clusters on W nanoparticles, and to determine the corresponding migration energies for the possible migration paths of these clusters. The tungsten clusters containing up to four adatoms are found to prefer 2D-compact structures with relatively low binding energies. The effect of interface and vertex regions on the migration behavior of the clusters is significantly strong, as compared to that of nanoparticle size. The migration mechanisms are quite different when the clusters are located at the center of the nanoparticle and near the interface or vertex areas. Near the interfaces and vertex areas, the substrate atoms tend to participate in the migration processes of the clusters, and can join the adatoms to form a larger cluster or lead to the dissociation of a cluster via the exchange mechanism, which results in the adatom crossing the facets. The lowest energy paths are used to be determined the energy barriers for W cluster migrations (from 1- to 4-atoms) on the facets, edges and vertex regions. The calculated energy barriers for the trimers suggest that the concerted migration is more probable than the successive jumping of a single adatom in the clusters. In addition, it of interest to note that the dimer shearing is a dominant migration mechanism for the tetramer, but needs to overcome a relatively higher migration energy than other clusters.

  3. Radiative recombination data for tungsten ions: II. W{sup 47+}–W{sup 71+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzhaskovskaya, M.B., E-mail: Trzhask@MT5605.spb.edu [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Nikulin, V.K. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15

    New radiative recombination and photoionization cross sections, radiative recombination rate coefficients, and radiated power loss rate coefficients are presented for 23 tungsten impurity ions in plasmas. We consider ions from W{sup 47+} to W{sup 71+} that are of importance to fusion studies for ITER and for experiments using electron beam ion traps. The calculations are fully relativistic and all significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The Dirac–Fock method is used to compute the electron wavefunctions. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are found using the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution of the continuum electron velocity. The total radiative recombination cross sections are given in the electron energy range from 1 eV to ?80keV. Partial cross sections for ground and excited states are approximated by an analytical expression involving five fit parameters. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are calculated in the temperature range from 10{sup 4}K to 10{sup 9}K. The total radiative recombination rates are approximated by another analytical expression with four fit parameters.

  4. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  5. A Review of Tungsten Heavy Alloy Utilization in Isotope Transport Containers - 13380

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, Steven G. [ATI Firth Sterling, Madison, AL (United States)] [ATI Firth Sterling, Madison, AL (United States)

    2013-07-01

    A common requirement for radioisotope transport containers is that they provide both durable and efficient shielding of penetrating gamma radiation. This is the case for transport of both spent nuclear fuel as well as intentionally created radioisotopes for medical or other uses. Tungsten heavy alloy (WHA) provides a unique engineering property set for such shielding - easily surpassing more commonly used lead alloys in both strength and attenuation. This family of alloys contains typically 90-98 wt.% W in combination with transition metals such as Ni and Fe. WHA is manufactured in near net shape blanks by liquid phase sintering of compacted powder shapes to full metallurgical density parts. This powder metallurgy approach is described in its ability to provide excellent material utilization and affords efficient manufacturing of various shapes required for gamma shields or collimators. WHAs offer very high density (approaching 19 g/cc) in combination with relatively high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, ambient corrosion resistance, and can be provided with mechanical properties comparable to many medium carbon steels. As such, they can be machined to complex, damage resistant geometries using common metal cutting tools and methods. WHA additionally provides a lower toxicity alternative to Pb- or U-based gamma shielding. Given the specialty nature of WHA, specific metallurgical characteristics are reviewed to assist shielding designers who may otherwise encounter difficulties locating important alloy selection and fabrication details. Contained within this materials and applications overview are guidelines for WHA component design, alloy selection, and practical machining, finishing, and assembly considerations. The microstructure of WHA is that of a metal matrix composite. This factor has specific implications in the design of components for stress service as well as their protection in the presence of electrolytes. WHA is also discussed in the broader context of materials compatibility, as it is rarely used in isolated monolithic shapes. Alloy selection for new applications is often made primarily on the basis of density. An alternative strategy to this selection approach is presented which proposes that mechanical requirements for a given shielding use be the primary selection criterion over density. Standard commercial grades of WHA for radiation shielding are defined by specifications such as AMS-T-21014 and ASTM B777. These specifications define 4 density classes of as-sintered WHA. Compositional options, as well as post-sinter processing of WHA, are discussed for shielding components that must exhibit higher levels of ductility or very low magnetic permeability. In addition to the mechanical advantages over Pb-based shielding, the higher linear attenuation of energetic photons for various grades of WHA (as calculated by the NIST XCOM routine) are presented for selected photon energies of interest to illustrate the shield volume reduction generally possible through the use of tungsten-based shielding. While W provides inefficient attenuation of neutrons in a mixed radiation environment, its secondary role in shielding gamma radiation produced as a result of neutron capture is also described. (authors)

  6. Crystal orientation effects on helium ion depth distributions and adatom formation processes in plasma-facing tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Karl D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996–2300 (United States); Wirth, Brian D., E-mail: bdwirth@utk.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996–2300 (United States); P.O. Box 2008, MS-6003, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831–6003 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    We present atomistic simulations that show the effect of surface orientation on helium depth distributions and surface feature formation as a result of low-energy helium plasma exposure. We find a pronounced effect of surface orientation on the initial depth of implanted helium ions, as well as a difference in reflection and helium retention across different surface orientations. Our results indicate that single helium interstitials are sufficient to induce the formation of adatom/substitutional helium pairs under certain highly corrugated tungsten surfaces, such as (1 1 1)-orientations, leading to the formation of a relatively concentrated layer of immobile helium immediately below the surface. The energies involved for helium-induced adatom formation on (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) surfaces are exoergic for even a single adatom very close to the surface, while (0 0 1) and (0 1 1) surfaces require two or even three helium atoms in a cluster before a substitutional helium cluster and adatom will form with reasonable probability. This phenomenon results in much higher initial helium retention during helium plasma exposure to (1 1 1) and (2 1 1) tungsten surfaces than is observed for (0 0 1) or (0 1 1) surfaces and is much higher than can be attributed to differences in the initial depth distributions alone. The layer thus formed may serve as nucleation sites for further bubble formation and growth or as a source of material embrittlement or fatigue, which may have implications for the formation of tungsten “fuzz” in plasma-facing divertors for magnetic-confinement nuclear fusion reactors and/or the lifetime of such divertors.

  7. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  8. Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Cladding materials via Spark Plasma Sintering for Ultra High Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charit, Indrajit; Butt, Darryl; Frary, Megan; Carroll, Mark

    2012-11-05

    This research will develop an optimized, cost-effective method for producing high-purity tungsten-rhenium alloyed fuel clad forms that are crucial for the development of a very high-temperature nuclear reactor. The study will provide critical insight into the fundamental behavior (processing-microstructure- property correlations) of W-Re alloys made using this new fabrication process comprising high-energy ball milling (HEBM) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A broader goal is to re-establish the U.S. lead in the research field of refractory alloys, such as W-Re systems, with potential applications in very high-temperature nuclear reactors. An essential long-term goal for nuclear power is to develop the capability of operating nuclear reactors at temperatures in excess of 1,000K. This capability has applications in space exploration and some special terrestrial uses where high temperatures are needed in certain chemical or reforming processes. Refractory alloys have been identified as being capable of withstanding temperatures in excess of 1,000K and are considered critical for the development of ultra hightemperature reactors. Tungsten alloys are known to possess extraordinary properties, such as excellent high-temperature capability, including the ability to resist leakage of fissile materials when used as a fuel clad. However, there are difficulties with the development of refractory alloys: 1) lack of basic experimental data on thermodynamics and mechanical and physical properties, and 2) challenges associated with processing these alloys.

  9. Measurement of Leakage Neutron Spectra for Tungsten with D-T Neutrons and Validation of Evaluated Nuclear Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zhanga; Z. Chen; Y. Nie; R. Wada; X. Ruan; R. Han; X. Liu; W. Lin; J. Liu; F. Shi; P. Ren; G. Tian; F. Luo; J. Ren; J. Bao

    2014-11-20

    Integral neutronics experiments have been investigated at Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP, CAS) in order to validate evaluated nuclear data related to the design of Chinese Initiative Accelerator Driven Systems (CIADS). In present paper, the accuracy of evaluated nuclear data for Tungsten has been examined by comparing measured leakage neutron spectra with calculated ones. Leakage neutron spectra from the irradiation of D-T neutrons on Tungsten slab sample were experimentally measured at 60$^{\\circ}$ and 120$^{\\circ}$ by using a time-of-flight method. Theoretical calculations are carried out by Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C with evaluated nuclear data of the ADS-2.0, ENDF/B-VII.0, ENDF/B-VII.1, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries. From the comparisons, it is found that the calculations with ADS-2.0 and ENDF/B-VII.1 give good agreements with the experiments in the whole energy regions at 60$^{\\circ}$, while a large discrepancy is observed at 120$^{\\circ}$ in the elastic scattering peak, caused by a slight difference in the oscillation pattern of the elastic angular distribution at angles larger than 20$^{\\circ}$. However, the calculated spectra using data from ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0 and CENDL-3.1 libraries showed larger discrepancies with the measured ones, especially around 8.5-13.5 MeV. Further studies are presented for these disagreements.

  10. Influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of magnetron sputtered tungsten thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, J. C.; Cavaleiro, A.

    2006-11-15

    The influence of substrate properties and annealing temperature on the stress state of tungsten thin films deposited by dc reactive magnetron sputtering was studied using 310 steel (AISI), Fecralloy registered and Invar registered substrates. Besides elemental tungsten, only residual amounts of contamination elements (O, C, Ar, etc.) were detected by electron probe microanalysis. Only the {alpha}-W crystalline structure, with a preferential <110> orientation, was detected in all the films by x-ray diffraction. The highest lattice parameters were measured for the films deposited on 310 steel substrates, while the smallest values were obtained for the films deposited on Invar registered substrates. These results are closely related to the thermal expansion coefficients of the substrates. All the as-deposited films were in a compressive stress state independent of the substrate type (-3 GPa for 310 steel and Fecralloy registered substrates and -2 GPa for Invar registered substrates). The residual compressive stresses of the films deposited on Fecralloy registered substrates strongly decrease with annealing temperatures up to {approx_equal}-8 GPa at 1175 K. This result shows that the measured compressive stresses are not real, and they are a direct consequence of plastic deformation of the substrate. On the contrary, the compressive stresses measured in the films deposited on Invar registered and 310 steel substrates are real as plastic deformation of the substrates is not observed.

  11. Mechanochemical synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles by using WO{sub 3}/Zn/C powder mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoseinpur, Arman; Vahdati Khaki, Jalil; Marashi, Maryam Sadat

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Nano particles of WC are synthesized by mechanochemical process. ? Zn was used to reduce WO{sub 3}. ? By removing ZnO from the milling products with an acid leaching, WC will be the final products. ? XRD results showed that the reduction reactions were completed after 36 h. ? TEM and SEM images showed that the morphology of produced powder is nearly spherical like. -- Abstract: In this research we introduce a new, facile, and economical system for fabrication of tungsten carbide (WC) nano particle powder. In this system WO{sub 3}, Zn, and C have been ball-milled for several hours, which led to the synthesis of tungsten carbide nano particles. The synthesized WC can successfully be separated from the ball-milled product by subjecting the product powder to diluted HCl for removing ZnO and obtaining WC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicates that the reduction of WO{sub 3} will be completed gradually by increasing milling time up to 36 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM) images show that after 36 h of milling the particle size of the fabricated powder is nano metric (about 20 nm). Results have shown that this system can surmount some main problems occurred in previous similar WC synthesizing systems. For example carbothermic reduction reactions, which lead to the synthesis of W{sub 2}C instead of WC, would not be activated because in this system reactions take place gradually.

  12. Protonation Studies of a Tungsten Dinitrogen Complex Supported by a Diphosphine Ligand Containing a Pendant Amine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Charles J.; Egbert, Jonathan D.; Chen, Shentan; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Mock, Michael T.

    2014-05-12

    Treatment of trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)] (dppe = Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2; PEtNMePEt = Et2PCH2N(Me)CH2PEt2) with three equivalents of tetrafluoroboric acid (HBF4?Et2O) at -78 °C generated the seven-coordinate tungsten hydride trans-[W(N2)2(H)(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)][BF4]. Depending on the temperature of the reaction, protonation of a pendant amine is also observed, affording trans-[W(N2)2(H)(dppe)(PEtNMe(H)PEt)][BF4]2, with formation of the hydrazido complex, [W(NNH2)(dppe)(PEtNMe(H)PEt)][BF4]2, as a minor product. Similar product mixtures were obtained using triflic acid (HOTf). Upon acid addition to the carbonyl analogue, cis-[W(CO)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)], the seven-coordinate carbonyl-hydride complex, trans-[W(CO)2(H)(dppe)(PEtN(H)MePEt)][OTf]2 was generated. The mixed diphosphine complex without the pendant amine in the ligand backbone, trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(depp)] (depp = Et2P(CH2)3PEt2), was synthesized and treated with HBF4?Et2O, selectively generating a hydrazido complex, [W(NNH2)(F)(dppe)(depp)][BF4]. Computational analysis was used to probe proton affinity of three sites of protonation, the metal, pendant amine, and N2 ligand in these complexes. Room temperature reactions with 100 equivalents of HOTf produced NH4+ from reduction of the N2 ligand (electrons come from W). The addition of 100 equivalents HOTf to trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(PEtNMePEt)] afforded 0.88 ± 0.02 equivalents NH4+, while 0.36 ± 0.02 equivalents of NH4+was formed upon treatment of trans-[W(N2)2(dppe)(depp)], the complex without the pendant amine. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Computational resources were provided by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  13. Manufacturing Spotlight: Boosting American Competitiveness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how the Energy Department is helping bring new clean energy technologies to the marketplace and make manufacturing processes more energy efficient.

  14. Employee Spotlight: Dances of India

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee HeadcountBryant Roybal

  15. Employee Spotlights | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon EngleMonikaCareer Jobs»

  16. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 Special Report:405-01ToolsProgram,July

  17. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 Special

  18. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 SpecialOctober 14, 2014

  19. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 SpecialOctober 14, 2014April 9, 2014

  20. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 SpecialOctober 14, 2014April 9,

  1. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 SpecialOctober 14, 2014April 9,April 17,

  2. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 SpecialOctober 14, 2014April 9,April

  3. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 SpecialOctober 14, 2014April 9,AprilJuly

  4. Spotlights Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesAVideoSolarSpace-Based Solar Power1Agreements

  5. UV light from the ground term of Ti-like ytterbium, tungsten, and bismuth J. V. Porto, I. Kink, and J. D. Gillaspy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chantler, Christopher T.

    -8421 Received 24 September 1999; published 7 April 2000 We have used an electron-beam ion trap to measure tungsten and bismuth 9 provide strong motivation for measuring them. Electron-beam ion traps EBIT because their unexpected weak dependence on Z makes them potentially important for plasma diagnostics 1

  6. High-Heat Flux Testing of Irradiated Tungsten based Materials for Fusion Applications using Infrared Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans Jr, James O; Schaich, Charles Ross; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Byun, Thak Sang

    2014-01-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research has proved challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat flux testing facility based on water-wall Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) is now being used for materials and small component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12,000 C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, are currently in use. The first PAL system provides a maximum incident heat flux of 4.2 MW/m2 over an area of 9x12 cm2. The second PAL available at ORNL provides a maximum incident heat flux of 27 MW/m2 over an area of 1x10 cm2. The absorbed heat fluxes into a tungsten target for the two PALs are approximately 1.97 and 12.7 MW/m2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design of the new PAL facilities as well as the design and implementation of the Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interested, such as those for plasma facing components. Moreover, IMTS designs are underway to extend the testing of small mock-ups for assessing the combined heating and thermomechanical effects of cooled, irradiated components. For the testing of material coupons , the specimens are placed in a shallow recess within the molybdenum holder that is attached to a water-cooled copper alloy rod. As the measurement of the specimen temperature for PAL is historically challenging since traditional approaches of temperature measurement cannot be employed due to the infrared heating and proximity of the PAL reflector to the specimen that does not allow a direct line of site, experiments for temperature calibration are presented. Finally, results for the high-heat flux testing of tungsten-based materials using the PAL are presented. As a demonstration of the system, results will be shown of thermal fatigue and high-heat flux testing of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in the HFIR reactor to neutron dose consistent to ITER lifetime.

  7. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Liming; Fu, Honggang; Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup ?1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup ?1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Grain Boundary Segregation and Embrittlement in Tungsten for Mechanistic Design of Alloys for Coal Fired Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Jian; Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Naixie; Lee, Hongsuk

    2013-06-30

    Based on a recent discovery of premelting-like grain boundary segregation in refractory metals occurring at high temperatures and/or high alloying levels, this project investigated grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in tungsten (W) based alloys. Specifically, new interfacial thermodynamic models have been developed and quantified to predict high-temperature grain boundary segregation in the W-Ni binary alloy and W-Ni-Fe, W-Ni-Ti, W-Ni-Co, W-Ni-Cr, W-Ni-Zr and W-Ni-Nb ternary alloys. The thermodynamic modeling results have been experimentally validated for selected systems. Furthermore, multiscale modeling has been conducted at continuum, atomistic and quantum-mechanical levels to link grain boundary segregation with embrittlement. In summary, this 3-year project has successfully developed a theoretical framework in combination with a multiscale modeling strategy for predicting grain boundary segregation and embrittlement in W based alloys.

  9. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Deeney, Christopher E. [National Nuclear Security Administration, Washington, D.C. 20585 (United States); Douglas, Melissa R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chittenden, Jerry [Imperial College, London, SW and 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  10. A Highly Granular Silicon-Tungsten Electromagnetic Calorimeter and Top Quark Production at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouëné, J

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with two aspects of the International Linear Collider (ILC) which is a project of a linear electron-positron collider of up to at least 500 GeV center of mass energy. The first aspect is the development of a silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter (SiW-ECAL) for one of the detectors of the ILC. The concept of this detector is driven by the ILC beam specifications and by the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). This requires highly granular calorimeter and very compact one with integrated electronics. To prove the capability of the SiW- ECAL a technological prototype has been built and tested in test beam at DESY. The results are presented here, and show, after the calibration procedure a signal over noise ratio of 10, even in the power pulsing mode. The second aspect is the study of one of the important physics channels of the ILC, the top anti-top quark pairs production. The main goal of this study is to determine the precision that we can expect at the ILC on the top coupling with the W bos...

  11. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-11-07

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO{sub 3} thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W{sup 5+} ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (?) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO{sub 3} could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, ? increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO{sub 3} after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, ?{sub photo}) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO{sub 3} thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, ?{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W{sup 5+} state) to the conduction band of WO{sub 3}. Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO{sub 3} thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  12. Relaxor nature in lead-free Sr{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} tetragonal tungsten bronze ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhu, Xiao; Department of Materials and Ceramic Engineering, Centre for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro ; Li, Kun; Qiang Liu, Xiao; Ming Chen, Xiang; Asif Rafiq, Muhammad

    2013-09-28

    Lead-free tetragonal tungsten bronze Sr{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} ceramics were prepared and the correlation of the relaxor nature and crystal structure was studied using dielectric spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. Three dielectric relaxations were observed below the deviation temperature T{sub D}? 330 K. Relaxation I and II followed the Vogel-Fulcher law with the freezing temperatures of 189 K and ?90 K. Low temperature relaxation III, which was first observed in filled tungsten bronze, followed well the Arrhenius law. Dielectric response becomes static below 50 K. Polarization-field (P-E) hysteresis loops were evaluated from 183 K to 298 K. P{sub r} value of 0.41?C/cm{sup 2} was observed at 183 K. Deviation of lattice parameter c from the linear contraction and increasing of tetragonality (c/a ratio) were observed below T{sub D}, reflecting the structure change during the formation of polar nanoregions and the following freezing process. Opposite tendency was observed below 100 K for all the lattice parameters, corresponding to relaxation III. Generally, the main dielectric relaxation I and II were attributed to flipping and breathing of polar nanoregions along c axis, while the concerted rotations of the oxygen octahedra in the ab plane were suggested as the origin of relaxation III.

  13. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba{sub 6?x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolodiazhnyi, T. Sakurai, H.; Vasylkiv, O.; Borodianska, H.; Mozharivskyj, Y.

    2014-03-17

    Ba{sub 6?x}Sr{sub x}Nb{sub 10}O{sub 30} solid solution with 0???x???6 crystallizes in centrosymmetric tetragonal “tungsten bronze” structure (space group P4/mbm). We report on the x dependence of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline samples measured in the 2–400?K temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature (T???10–30?K) “plateau” region reminiscent of a glass-like compounds. We explain this behaviour based on a size-driven site occupancy and atomic displacement parameters associated with an alkaline earth atomic positions in the title compounds.

  14. Doe Sustainability SPOtlight - 2014 Sustainability Awards

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The joint collaboration between LLNL's Weapons and Complex Integration's High Performance Computing data center and the laboratory's Operations & Business' enterprise data center...

  15. In this issue. . . Linguistics Alum Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    their language. Funded by a Volkswagen Foundation Grant and an NSF Grant, Khvtisiashvili and her colleagues

  16. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about large medical imaging equipment energy results.

  17. Sambamurti Memorial Lecture: Spotlight on the Gluon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Michael Begelas

    2010-09-01

    Begel uses results from the Fermilab D0 and E706 experiments to explain how the production rate and energy spectrum of photons produced during proton collisions helped to clarify how the energy inside the proton is shared between quarks and gluons.

  18. Children's School January 2013 Undergraduate Spotlight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York City, earned a Master of Arts in Early Childhood General Education and Early Childhood Special' perception and assessment of early childhood inclusive special education; early childhood learning at the Children's School for the rest of her undergraduate career and then continuing her education in psychology

  19. Employee Spotlight: Beth Drewniak | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contest --Science Careers in Search of Women -Site environmental protection --Site waste management -Site sustainability Operations -Business diversity -Technology transfer...

  20. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Best Practices Series...

  1. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Chiller Plants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project for two sites. Read details about the chiller plant energy results.

  2. SPRING 2015 10 Spotlight on Dimitris Chorafas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    read about a major area of new emphasis, nuclear magnetic resonance research. This area is enabling of politics and leading to new achievements for the benefit of humankind--and, remarkably, so soon after World of the International Board Science Feature 40 Major league magnets: Nuclear magnetic resonance in the service

  3. griculture is in the spotlight as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    . These "crite- ria pollutants" are ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2 to a particle of water. Equivalent spherical diameter (ESD) -- A term that categorizes the properties

  4. Shining a spotlight on intact proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Masselon, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Cells react to cues from their environment using various mechanisms that include changes in metabolites, gene expression, protein binding partners, protein localization, and protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs), all of which contribute to altered cellular signatures that enable appropriate cellular responses. Given the seemingly infinite number of mechanisms available to affect protein function and modulate biological processes, the question arises as to how cells manage to interpret protein readouts to accomplish the appropriate cell-type specific response to a particular stimulus.

  5. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  6. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Baldwin Homes Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Baldwin Homes of Arnold, Maryland, built a HERS 55 Builders Challenge-certified house as an “Eco-Model” home to showcase 69 green and energy-efficient features.

  7. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Clifton View Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Clifton View Homes’s remodel of a 1962 rambler, on Whidbey Island in Washington State, cut energy costs by two-thirds.

  8. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Imagine Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Imagine Homes, working with the DOE's Building America research team member IBACOS, has developed a system that can be replicated by other contractors to build affordable, high-performance homes. Imagine Homes has used the system to produce more than 70 Builders Challenge-certified homes per year in San Antonio over the past five years.

  9. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Treasure Homes Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Treasure Homes, Inc., achieved a HERS rating of 46 without PV on its prototype “Gem” home, located on the shores of Lake Michigan in northern Indiana, thanks in part to training received from a Building America partner, the National Association of Home Builders Research Center.

  10. spotlight1115 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopmentatabout Who Works for NIFYuccaPagesSRSCROto Perform

  11. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon Engle JonathanJosé Valdez

  12. Employee Spotlight: Muge Acik | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon EngleMonika Bittman

  13. Employee Spotlight: Peter Friedman | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployeeJon EngleMonika Bittman(Click

  14. Spotlighting Howard University | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime |ofProgram Reach

  15. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField | DepartmentAirSavesofDOE

  16. Intern Spotlight: Elise Burton | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLANIsProcess Relevant toIntergovernmentalAs(Click image to

  17. Intern Spotlight: Gabrielle Kane | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLANIsProcess Relevant toIntergovernmentalAs(Click image

  18. Intern Spotlight: Kevin Banks | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLANIsProcess Relevant toIntergovernmentalAs(Click

  19. Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMayBuilding K-25 cleanup atDepartmentCompetition on

  20. In The Spotlight | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy,Impact AssessmentsImprovingIn Case ofIn SituIn The News

  1. Workers' Spotlight Newsletters | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize »EvePlant | Department ofJuly 27,

  2. Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio SegrèDepartmentEmployee

  3. Employee Spotlight: Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio SegrèDepartmentEmployeeAli

  4. Employee Spotlight: Ann Schlenker | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.Emilio SegrèDepartmentEmployeeAliAnn

  5. Employee Spotlight: Jennifer Hogan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2, 2014

  6. Employee Spotlight: Jennifer Hogan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2, 2014Jennifer

  7. Employee Spotlight: José Valdez

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2,Jonathan

  8. Employee Spotlight: Sarah Soltau | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller JuneMichaelRon

  9. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated Al–MgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the Mg–Al dissimilar joint. - Highlights: • Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. • The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. • The formation of Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  10. Tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines: Unfiltered x-ray spectra from 20 kV to 640 kV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, Andrew M. [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Boone, John M., E-mail: john.boone@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Group, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods were used to generate lightly filtered high resolution x-ray spectra spanning from 20 kV to 640 kV. Methods: X-ray spectra were simulated for a conventional tungsten anode. The Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended radiation transport code (MCNPX 2.6.0) was used to produce 35 spectra over the tube potential range from 20 kV to 640 kV, and cubic spline interpolation procedures were used to create piecewise polynomials characterizing the photon fluence per energy bin as a function of x-ray tube potential. Using these basis spectra and the cubic spline interpolation, 621 spectra were generated at 1 kV intervals from 20 to 640 kV. The tungsten anode spectral model using interpolating cubic splines (TASMICS) produces minimally filtered (0.8 mm Be) x-ray spectra with 1 keV energy resolution. The TASMICS spectra were compared mathematically with other, previously reported spectra. Results: Using pairedt-test analyses, no statistically significant difference (i.e., p > 0.05) was observed between compared spectra over energy bins above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence. For all energy bins, the correlation of determination (R{sup 2}) demonstrated good correlation for all spectral comparisons. The mean overall difference (MOD) and mean absolute difference (MAD) were computed over energy bins (above 1% of peak bremsstrahlung fluence) and over all the kV permutations compared. MOD and MAD comparisons with previously reported spectra were 2.7% and 9.7%, respectively (TASMIP), 0.1% and 12.0%, respectively [R. Birch and M. Marshall, “Computation of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra and comparison with spectra measured with a Ge(Li) detector,” Phys. Med. Biol. 24, 505–517 (1979)], 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (Poludniowski), and 0.4% and 8.1%, respectively (AAPM TG 195). The effective energy of TASMICS spectra with 2.5 mm of added Al filtration ranged from 17 keV (at 20 kV) to 138 keV (at 640 kV); with 0.2 mm of added Cu filtration the effective energy was 9 keV at 20 kV and 169 keV at 640 kV. Conclusions: Ranging from 20 kV to 640 kV, 621 x-ray spectra were produced and are available at 1 kV tube potential intervals. The spectra are tabulated at 1 keV intervals. TASMICS spectra were shown to be largely equivalent to published spectral models and are available in spreadsheet format for interested users by emailing the corresponding author (JMB)

  11. THE PUZZLE OF TWO DIFFERENT SUB-MICROMETER TUNGSTEN-RICH DEPOSITS IN BULK YBCO: ONE ACTS AS PINNING CENTERS AND THE OTHER DOES NOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Gandini, Alberto [Beam Particle Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Physics, and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, 77204 (United States)

    2010-04-08

    Two types of large grain YBCO samples doped with tungsten oxide, one with platinum and the other without, were produced using a slow cooling process. Observations of the trapped magnetic flux density showed that the flux density of the W-doped, Pt-free samples did not change with W doping levels of up to 2.1 mol%. In contrast, the (W+Pt)-doped samples resulted in a monotonic improvement in trapped magnetic flux density as a function of W doping. Microstructure studies indicate that both types of samples contain profuse sub-micrometer deposits of a W-rich compound. The Pt-free samples contain (W{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} deposits while the (W+Pt)-doped samples contain deposits of a (W{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6} compound. Both types of deposits are of essentially the same size and have comparable number density. The results are strikingly similar to an earlier experiment in which uranium doped, Pt-free, large grain YBCO also did not show any improvement in trapped magnetic flux density. The U-doped, Pt-free samples contain profuse sub-micrometer deposits of a (U{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} compound, which have been shown to be ferromagnetic. The inability of both the (W{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} and (U{sub 0.4}Y{sub 0.6})BaO{sub 3} sub-micrometer deposits to act as pinning centers in self-field, suggest that this behavior is systematic.

  12. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J.R.; Dominguez, F.; Johnson, A.W.; Omstead, T.R.

    1997-09-02

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten. 2 figs.

  13. The elastic and piezoelectric properties of tungsten bronze ferroelectric crystals ,,Sr0.7Ba0.3...2NaNb5O15 and ,,Sr0.3Ba0.7...2NaNb5O15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    in the applications of the dielectric, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric devices. In general, most of the functional properties will be enhanced near the MPB. For the piezoelectric applications, such as making ultra- sonicThe elastic and piezoelectric properties of tungsten bronze ferroelectric crystals ,,Sr0.7Ba0

  14. Accepted Manuscript Making Tungsten Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Organization, Cadarache, FRANCE 3 Plasma Science and Fusion Center at MIT International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor Organization, Cadarache, FRANCE 3 Plasma Science and Fusion, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL

  15. Tungsten Wire & VISAR Goran Skoro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    wire tests ­ Alternative approach While waiting for `refurbishment' of our power supply, there is Roger

  16. Tungsten Status Chris Densham (RAL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of ~700°C was observed after 1 dpa at 300°C. Fracture toughness No information on the effect Comments on data reviewed Hardening, loss of ductility For p and n, up to 20 dpa, 50300°C. Tensile ductility falls rapidly to zero after ductility up to 900°C. Very

  17. Use of the ORNL Tungsten-188/Rhenium-188 Generator for Preparation of the Rhenium-188 HDD/Lipiodol Complex for Transarterial Liver Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp Jr, Russ F [ORNL; Jeong, J M [Seoul National University

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the installation, use, and quality control (QC) of the alumina-based tungsten-188 ({sup 188}W)/rhenium-188 ({sup 188}Re) generators provided by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, methods used for concentration of the {sup 188}Re-perrhenate bolus and preparation of {sup 188}Re-labeled HDD (4-hexadecyl-2,2,9,9-tetramethyl-4,7-diaza-1,10-decanethiol) for trans-arterial administration for therapy of nonresectable liver cancer also are described. The {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator has a long useful shelf-life of several months and is a convenient on-site {sup 188}Re production system. {sup 188}Re has excellent therapeutic and imaging properties (T{sub 1/2} 16.9 hours; E{beta}{sub max} 2.12 MeV; 155-keV gamma ray, 15%) and is cost effectively obtained on demand by saline elution of the generator. The clinical efficacy of a variety of {sup 188}Re-labeled agents has been demonstrated for several therapeutic applications. Because of the favorable physical properties of {sup 188}Re, several {sup 188}Re-labeled agents are being developed and evaluated for the treatment of nonresectable/refractory liver cancer. {sup 188}Re-labeled HDD has been the most widely studied of these agents for this application and has been introduced into clinical trials at a number of institutions. The trans-arterial administration of {sup 188}Re-labeled agents for treatment of inoperable liver cancer requires use of high-level (1-2 Ci) {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators. The handling of such high levels of {sup 188}Re imposes radiological precautions normally not encountered in a radiopharmacy and adequate care and ALARA (ie, 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable') principles must be followed. The ORNL generator provides consistently high {sup 188}Re yields (>75%) and low {sup 188}W parent breakthrough (<10{sup -3}%) over an extended shelf-life of several months. However, the high elution volumes (20-40 mL for 1-2 Ci generators) can require concentration of the {sup 188}Re bolus by postelution passage through silver cation chloride trapping columns used in the cost-effective tandem cation/anion column system. The silver column removes the high levels of chloride anion as insoluble AgCl, thus allowing subsequent specific trapping of the perrhenate anion on the small (QMA SeaPak) anion column. This method permits subsequent elution of {sup 188}Re-perrhenate with a small volume of saline, providing a very high activity-concentration solution. Because the {sup 188}Re-specific volume-activity concentration continually decreases with time, the tandem system is especially effective method for extending the useful generator shelf-life. Low elution flow rates (<1 mL/min) minimize any high back pressure which may be encountered during generator/tandem column elution when using tightly packed, small-particle-size commercial columns. In-house preparation of silver cation columns is recommended since the chloride trapping capacity is essentially unlimited, it is inexpensive and not limited in availability to any one supplier, and back pressure can be eliminated by the use of larger particles. Methods for the preparation of {sup 188}Re-HDD have been optimized and this agent can be obtained in high yield (80%).

  18. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Halogens, dioxins/Halogens, dioxins/furansfurans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    -500 / 50-2000/0.5 -90 Light fuel oil - Peat ~ 500 Heavy fuel oil - / oil shale ~2000 & electronic equip- ment (E&E) waste plastics * ~ 3.5 / ~ 0.9 Sewage sludge 0.03 - 1 Mixed medical waste 1 - 4

  19. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  20. Incommensurate and commensurate modulations of Ba{sub 5}RTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} (R?=?La, Nd) tungsten bronzes and the ferroelectric domain structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Min Min; Li, Kun; Zhu, Xiao Li; Chen, Xiang Ming

    2015-04-07

    Incommensurate and commensurate structural modulations of Ba{sub 5}RTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} (R?=?La, Nd) tungsten bronze ceramics were investigated by using a cooling holder equipped transmission electron microscopy in the temperature range from 100?K to 363?K. The incommensurate modulation was observed in both Ba{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} and Ba{sub 5}NdTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} at room temperature, while there was a transition from incommensurate tilted structure to commensurate superstructure for Ba{sub 5}NdTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30} with decreasing temperature. The incommensurate and commensurate modulations were determined by the A-site occupancy of Ba and R cations. The A-site disorder resulted in larger incommensurability parameter ? and the diffusion of the satellite reflection spots. The effect of A-site disorder on the coupling between long-range dipolar order and the commensurate modulation was also discussed. The obvious ferroelectric 180° domains with spike-like shape parallel to c axis were observed for Ba{sub 5}NdTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30}, while no macro ferroelectric domain was determined for Ba{sub 5}LaTi{sub 3}Nb{sub 7}O{sub 30}.

  1. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oregon; Financing and Incetntives: Use Incentives to Get Attention and Encourage Deep Savings Portland Summary of Reported Data Voluntary Initiative: Designing Incentives...

  2. Celebrity Power: Spotlighting and Persuasion in the Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Mark A.

    2014-05-31

    John Lennon’s organizing with Jerry Rubin and Abby Hoffman amounted to any real changes? Does it make a difference when politicians vi play music at their rallies? How did Ronald Reagan co-opt Bruce Springsteen’s critical and subversive “Born...

  3. High Performance Builder Spotlight: GreenCraft, Lewisville, TX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    In October and November 2009, the TimberCreek Zero Energy House in Lewisville, Texas, opened as a Building America Demonstration House. The 2,538-foot,three-bedroom, 2˝-bath custom-built home showed a home energy rating score (HERS) of 56 without the solar photovoltaics and a HERS score of 1 with PV.

  4. EM Update Newsletter Spotlights River Corridor Cleanup at Hanford...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    preventing contamination from reaching it, and cocooning or demolishing hundreds of structures no longer in use, including former reactors along the river that helped create...

  5. Learning in a Studio Mode, Spotlighting Teamwork and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xi

    students supported by one instructor, 2 TF's, and 2 LA's" Focus on teamwork & active engagement" Learning student-centered active learning. 3/7/14Learning in a Studio Mode Why do Studio? Better learning overall Students like it better #12;3 Class design: Lecture 3/7/14Learning in a Studio Mode Lecture

  6. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Programmatic evolution is underway to understand the effectiveness of the various sweep design elements and to further increase the number of upgrades completed. One realiza-...

  7. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    andor ventilation 8) Identify any potential hazards to life safety such as carbon monoxide or inadequate combustion, electrical, or fuel issues NO END Processing enters bid,...

  8. ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Atomics Scientists at General Atomics are working to develop a "flow battery" that will be able to store large amounts of energy using chemicals that are stored...

  9. McGuffey Art Center Spotlight Series SCIENCE & ART PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    the psychological effects of social and political trauma, natural disaster or illness on individuals, families, China, Israel, Malaysia, South #12;Korea, New Zealand, Japan, Canada and Taiwan. To learn more, visit as a like-minded community using psychodrama, shamanic energy medicine, and art therapy. #12;

  10. The blinking spotlight of attention Rufin VanRullen*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanRullen, Rufin

    on continuous allocation of attention to the different targets (a ``parallel'' strategy) or whether attention to distinguish between these two alternatives. The human psychometric function for detection of a single target as a function of its duration can be used to predict the correspond- ing function for two or more attended

  11. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  12. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    codes across the United States. The team won another Top Innovation award for its cost-effective advanced framing techniques that improve the thermal performance of an...

  13. ORNL, Industry Collaboration Puts Spotlight on Solar T DOING...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for thin-film copper indium gallium di- selenide, a direct-bandgap material for solar cells. Ferro Corpora- tion (Independence, Ohio) is creating inks and pastes to be used for...

  14. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes of Fresno, CA, has worked with Building America team member IBACOS to apply building science to production homes. Even without solar panels, the company’s Jordan model exceeds California’s building efficiency standard by 36%.

  15. Earth & Space Science News Eos.org // 27 RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    . In a new study, Barnes and Houze catalog different types of "hydrometeors"--parti- cles of water and ice inflows travel laterally and gradually descend. This study shows how the formation of the liquid and ice

  16. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    low-income weatherization program to households with incomes greater than 200% above poverty level. The expanded program requires a BPI certified technician to perform a home...

  17. High Performance Builder Spotlight: G.W. Robinson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    G.W. Robinson of Gainesville, Florida, worked with Building America partners Florida Solar Energy Center and Florida HERO to achieve a true net zero energy home in 2010.

  18. High Performance Builder Spotlight: LifeStyle Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    LifeStyle Homes of Melbourne, Florida, is aiming for affordable net zero energy homes with help from Building America research partner Florida Solar Energy Center.

  19. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight – Tommy Williams Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-02-05

    Builders Challenge fact sheet highlighting performance and energy-efficiency features of Tommy Williams Homes, Longleaf case study, Gainesville, FL

  20. Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Here are past webinars and materials from Home Energy Score. March 4, 2015: Home Energy Score Update: New Simulation Training & Requirements for Assessors In an effort to...

  1. Thermal reclamation of used blast grit. Technology spotlight report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    Naval shipyards and other domestic port facilities generate thousands of tons of used blast grit annually. There are also thousands of steel bridges in the United States on a repaint schedule that requires grit blasting for surface preparation. All the used grit, along with the paint residue it contains, is currently disposed of in landfills. Cleaning and recycling used blast grit is an attractive alternative. Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed a fluidized-bed sand calciner that is well suited for cleaning and recycling used blast grit. Essentially, IGT researchers applied a transfer/adaptation of fluidized-bed calcination originally developed for the reclamation of foundry sand. The calciner has a patented sloped-grid design that enhances the combustion of paint residues and promotes the isolation of reusable material.

  2. FE SPOTLIGHT Breathing, bugs, and brains: conceptual unification?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). At some point, the level of oxygen declines, or car- bon dioxide rises, enough to cause the spiracles a recent mechanistic model for the control of spiracles, from Fo¨ rster & Hetz (2010), and a new hypothesis energy. Although the actual metabolic costs of running an insect brain are poorly known, they could

  3. Employee Spotlight: John T. Murphy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES ScienceInformation CompanyEmployee

  4. Spotlight on Maine: Transition to a Sustainable Level of Incentives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime |

  5. Spotlight on Michigan: Sweeping the State for Ultimate Success | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime |of Energy

  6. Spotlight on Seattle, Washington: Community Partnerships Work to Extend

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime |ofProgram Reach |

  7. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Maine: Transition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy| Departmentof EnergyStateandto a

  8. Better Buildings: Financing and Incentives: Spotlight on Michigan:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy| Departmentof EnergyStateandto aExperiment

  9. Better Buildings: Workforce, Spotlight on Maine: Contractor Sales Training

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy| Departmentof EnergyStateandto

  10. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Fayette County, Pennsylvania:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy| Departmentof EnergyStateandtoDeveloping

  11. Better Buildings: Workforce: Spotlight on Portland, Oregon: Making the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy| Departmentof

  12. Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretaryDepartment7 Annual2 Special Report:405-01ToolsProgram, Final

  13. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Alliance for Residential

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergymeeting, The Best ApproachprojectsBuilding

  14. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on Home Innovation and PARR |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergymeeting, The Best ApproachprojectsBuildingDepartment

  15. Hydrogen Production by PEM Electrolysis: Spotlight on Giner and Proton

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTION BY PEM ELECTROLYSIS:

  16. DOE Sustainability SPOtlight: Special Edition 2013 DOE Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes onandField |

  17. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing ProgramsDepartment of¡

  18. SSL in America: Spotlight on SAES Pure Gas

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIXAllegations RelatedSTUDENTApril 15, 2015

  19. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 1 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork Plan|Department

  20. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 10 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork Plan|Department0

  1. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 11 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork Plan|Department011

  2. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 12 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork Plan|Department0112

  3. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 13 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork

  4. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers'

  5. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers'7 Workers'

  6. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 8 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers'7

  7. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 9 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.Energy Wind PowerRegina RameikaWork2 Workers'7Workers'

  8. White House Spotlights Solar Innovation as Summit Registration Continues |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department of EnergyData compiledEnergy In honorDepartment of

  9. Washington Auto Show Spotlight: How Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles Work |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel EfficiencyWashington , DC 20585 April 15, 2013

  10. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 14 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize »EvePlant | Department ofJuly 27, 20114

  11. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 15 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize »EvePlant | Department ofJuly 27, 201145

  12. Employee Spotlight: John T. Murphy | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDave Keller June 2,

  13. ARPA-E Technology Showcase: Project Spotlight | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar: DemonstrationProgram |

  14. Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrailTrosky,EnergyTullahassee,

  15. Tungsten Powder Jet Update Ottone Caretta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    alternative tecnologies (solid & flowing powder targets) Must achieve cost estimate of target system so

  16. Residual stress in nanocrystalline nickel tungsten electrodeposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D. (Tiffany Dawn)

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We employ a three-dimensional ...

  17. Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown(LECBP) | Open EnergyTrueWindTulsa

  18. Use of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator for preparation of the rhenium-188 HDD/lipiodol complex for trans-arterial liver cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J M [Seoul National University; Knapp Jr, Russ F [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    This work describes the installation, use, and quality control (QC) of the alumina-based tungsten-188 ({sup 188}W)/rhenium-188 ({sup 188}Re) generators provided by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In addition, methods used for concentration of the {sup 188}Re-perrhenate bolus and preparation of {sup 188}Re-labeled HDD (4-hexadecyl-2,2,9,9-tetramethyl-4,7-diaza-1,10-decanethiol) for trans-arterial administration for therapy of nonresectable liver cancer also are described. The {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator has a long useful shelf-life of several months and is a convenient on-site {sup 188}Re production system. {sup 188}Re has excellent therapeutic and imaging properties (T{sub 1/2} 16.9 hours; E{sub {beta}max} 2.12 MeV; 155-keV gamma ray, 15%) and is cost effectively obtained on demand by saline elution of the generator. The clinical efficacy of a variety of {sup 188}Re-labeled agents has been demonstrated for several therapeutic applications. Because of the favorable physical properties of {sup 188}Re, several {sup 188}Re-labeled agents are being developed and evaluated for the treatment of nonresectable/refractory liver cancer. {sup 188}Re-labeled HDD has been the most widely studied of these agents for this application and has been introduced into clinical trials at a number of institutions. The trans-arterial administration of {sup 188}Re-labeled agents for treatment of inoperable liver cancer requires use of high-level (1-2 Ci) {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators. The handling of such high levels of {sup 188}Re imposes radiological precautions normally not encountered in a radiopharmacy and adequate care and ALARA (i.e., 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable') principles must be followed. The ORNL generator provides consistently high {sup 188}Re yields (>75%) and low {sup 188}W parent breakthrough (<10{sup -3}%) over an extended shelf-life of several months. However, the high elution volumes (20-40 mL for 1-2 Ci generators) can require concentration of the {sup 188}Re bolus by postelution passage through silver cation chloride trapping columns used in the cost-effective tandem cation/anion column system. The silver column removes the high levels of chloride anion as insoluble AgCl, thus allowing subsequent specific trapping of the perrhenate anion on the small (QMA SeaPak) anion column. This method permits subsequent elution of {sup 188}Re-perrhenate with a small volume of saline, providing a very high activity-concentration solution. Because the {sup 188}Re-specific volume-activity concentration continually decreases with time, the tandem system is especially effective method for extending the useful generator shelf-life. Low elution flow rates (<1 mL/min) minimize any high back pressure which may be encountered during generator/tandem column elution when using tightly packed, small-particle-size commercial columns. In-house preparation of silver cation columns is recommended since the chloride trapping capacity is essentially unlimited, it is inexpensive and not limited in availability to any one supplier, and back pressure can be eliminated by the use of larger particles. Methods for the preparation of {sup 188}Re-HDD have been optimized and this agent can be obtained in high yield (80%).

  19. Accumulation and Metabolism of Halogenated Compounds in Sea Turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Kristine Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry 34(1): 19- Lakesparverius). Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 20(11):hepatocytes. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 25(2):

  20. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Michael J. (Sterling Heights, MI); Arendell, Mark W. (Warren, MI)

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  1. Nature's Inventory of Halogenation Catalysts: Oxidative Strategies Predominate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biosynthetic gene clusters, enabling coordinate regulation to activate these secondary metabolite pathways the abundance of chloride and bromide ions in microenvironments of terrestrial and marine producer organisms

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Halogen-Free Antiflammable Polyphosphonates Containing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    flammability. Polyethylene and polypropylene, for example, possess heat of combustion properties on par a diffusion barrier of gaseous products to the flame, shields the polymer surface from heat and oxygen

  3. Accumulation and Metabolism of Halogenated Compounds in Sea Turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Kristine Lynn

    2010-01-01

    rat liver cytosol with styrene oxide and 35 S-GSH, and B)PB-treated rat cytosol with styrene oxide and 35 S-GSH (seeglutathione conjugate of styrene as a standard. However, GS-

  4. Manganese Porphyrins Catalyze Selective C-H Bond Halogenations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2010-01-01

    We report a manganese porphyrin mediated aliphatic C?H bond chlorination using sodium hypochlorite as the chlorine source. In the presence of catalytic amounts of phase transfer catalyst and manganese porphyrin Mn(TPP)Cl 1, reaction of sodium hypochlorite with different unactivated alkanes afforded alkyl chlorides as the major products with only trace amounts of oxygenation products. Substrates with strong C?H bonds, such as neopentane (BDE =?100 kcal/mol) can be also chlorinated with moderate yield. Chlorination of a diagnostic substrate, norcarane, afforded rearranged products indicating a long-lived carbon radical intermediate. Moreover, regioselective chlorination was achieved by using a hindered catalyst, Mn(TMP)Cl, 2. Chlorination of trans-decalin with 2 provided 95% selectivity for methylene-chlorinated products as well as a preference for the C2 position. This novel chlorination system was also applied to complex substrates. With 5?-cholestane as the substrate, we observed chlorination only at the C2 and C3 positions in a net 55% yield, corresponding to the least sterically hindered methylene positions in the A-ring. Similarly, chlorination of sclareolide afforded the equatorial C2 chloride in a 42% isolated yield. Regarding the mechanism, reaction of sodium hypochlorite with the Mn{sup III} porphyrin is expected to afford a reactive Mn{sup V}?O complex that abstracts a hydrogen atom from the substrate, resulting in a free alkyl radical and a Mn{sup IV}—OH complex. We suggest that this carbon radical then reacts with a Mn{sup IV}—OCl species, providing the alkyl chloride and regenerating the reactive Mn{sup V}?O complex. The regioselectivity and the preference for CH{sub 2} groups can be attributed to nonbonded interactions between the alkyl groups on the substrates and the aryl groups of the manganese porphyrin. The results are indicative of a bent [Mn{sup v}?O---H---C] geometry due to the C—H approach to the Mn{sup v}?O (d??p?)* frontier orbital.

  5. Accumulation and Metabolism of Halogenated Compounds in Sea Turtles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Kristine Lynn

    2010-01-01

    tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Poland et al. 1976;from PCBs seem to stem from dioxin- like congeners, but thetetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin- induced toxicity. Toxicology

  6. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  11. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko (Hampton Bays, NY); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Southold, NY)

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solid interactionCrystalDesigning(JournalProblemsofofthe rapid

  13. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals: On enabling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnectlaser-solid interactionCrystalDesigning(JournalProblemsofofthe

  14. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01

    Polytetraflouroethylene…………………………………………………… PTFE Scanningthe Polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) matrix fractured due toformed by the particles. The PTFE would not allow the course

  15. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01

    matrix composites include radiation absorption, ductile magnets, and thermal expansion. Ceramicsmatrix composites [ 2]. Stir casting involves uniform mixing of a molten metal and a ceramic

  16. Placing a tool in the spotlight: spatial attention modulates visuomotor responses in cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gazzaniga, Michael

    perception. Here, we report that spatial attention can also modulate implicit visuomotor processing in dorsal­the supplementary motor area (SMA) and the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL)­showed an interaction betweenPMd), the supplementary motor area (SMA), the region just anterior to SMA (preSMA), and the inferior parietal lobule (IPL

  17. Spotlights on Recent JACS Publications HYBRID METAL-ORGANIC CRYSTALS PROVIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and their applications include gas storage and separation, drug delivery, and catalysis. M. Angeles Monge and colleagues electrons on the nanosheets, activate and reduce adsorbed nitrogen into reactive ammonia. Though the authors

  18. Shifting the spotlight of attention: evidence for discrete computations in cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschman, Tim

    Our thoughts have a limited bandwidth; we can only fully process a few items in mind simultaneously. To compensate, the brain developed attention, the ability to select information relevant to the current task, while ...

  19. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight: Yavapai College, Chino Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-22

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on Yavapai College of Chino Valley, Arizona. These college students built a Building America Builders Challenge house that achieved the remarkably low HERS score of -3 and achieved a tight building envelope.

  20. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Martha Rose Construction, Inc., Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Martha Rose Construction, an energy-efficient home builder in marine climate using the German Passiv Haus design, improved insulation, and solar photovoltaics.

  1. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - NextGen Home, Las Vegas, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-01

    Building America Builders Challenge fact sheet on the NextGen demo home built in Las Vegas. The home has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index score of 44 with R-40 spray foam attic insulation, R-40 insulated concrete walls, and a 4kW DC solar laminate

  2. 220 March 2013 / Vol. 63 No. 3 www.biosciencemag.org Spring Spotlight on Books

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    a Styrofoam coffee cup to a Big Gulp. Our expectation of the weight of an object influences the forces that we

  3. In the glare of the media spotlight, the European refugee crisis has sparked a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    of poverty, receiving humanitarian assistance to `integrate' as refugees, and dealing with the consequences and poverty (MOOP) in East, West and Southern Africa as well as South and Southeast Asia show that all

  4. SpecieS in the Spotlight: Survive to thrive Recovering threatened and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for taking the time to review this annual report to Congress. The report is important because it documents with renewed commitment and intensified efforts. Starting on May 15, 2015--Endangered Species Day) ·Central California Coast Coho Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) ·Cook Inlet Beluga Whale DPS ·Hawaiian

  5. Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainabil...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    McCord, Ralph Wrons, Sean Naegle, Debra Clifford, Ben St. Clair, Lynda Innis, Charles Snider, Chadwick Johnson, Matthew Smith, Jason Loyd, and Gabe Arrillaga. Jun 15, 2015 at 10...

  6. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the central hydronic heating system in a three-building, 42-unit housing development. The heating control systems were upgraded, which reduced energy use by nearly 20% with a...

  7. oday the spotlight in the United States is on the increasing world demand for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    , The Texas A&M University System. Manure to Energy: Understanding Processes, Principles and Jargon -- Saqib sources, such as bio fuels, forests, wind, solar and animal manure. While demand for hydrocarbon energy. Energy losses during the digestion process include the energy lost in manure (feces and urine), in gases

  8. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with the local receiver, secured computer network servers, and satellite- or cellular-based communication channels. The EM RFID technology was developed to cut costs of...

  9. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of Packaging and Transportation, discusses the radiofrequency identification technology he developed. At left is RFID Team Leader Yung Liu, with Argonne National...

  10. Builders Challenge High Performance Builder Spotlight - Rural Development Inc., Turner Falls, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    Building America/Builders Challenge fact sheet on Rural Development Inc, an energy-efficient home builder in cold climate using radiant floor heat, solar hot water, and PV. Examines cost impacts.

  11. Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Cleanup Project Steps into Spotlight at International Meeting in Vienna

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    VIENNA – The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project has kept the United States at the forefront of characterization, remediation, and end-state reuse of uranium millsites around the world.

  12. Report to the New Jersey State Board of Agriculture Spotlight on Rutgers NJAES EcoComplex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    researchers are working on microturbine co-generation of heat and electricity and on biogas production from

  13. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime | Department of

  14. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Let Your Contractor Be Your Guide for Big

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime | Department

  15. Spotlight on Rutland County, Vermont: How Local Ties Lead to Local Wins |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo.Hydrogen4EnergySolidof2 SpecialSpent FuelTime |of

  16. The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy Efficiency | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternational Affairs, BeforeActivitiesEnergy Tell(EAP)BNLBusinessesof Energy

  17. EECBG Success Story: The City of Los Angeles Has Its Spotlight on Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i FramingBecker andfindingEnergy roof of the justice center

  18. Building America Research Teams: Spotlight on ARIES and NorthernSTAR |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergymeeting, The Best Approachprojects

  19. Spotlight on Key Program Strategies from the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartmentSpecial Report:Department of EnergyFinal

  20. Oct. 29 Webinar to Spotlight DOE Energy Programs for Tribes and First

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSiteWeatherization FundingFundingOct

  1. Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight Issue 14 October, November, December 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice of IndianEnergy Office ofIssue 15

  2. Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Workers' Spotlight, July, August, September 2014

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice of IndianEnergy Office ofIssue

  3. Award Spotlight Could Return to EM-Developed Technology for Tracking

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLC | Department4 The26Shipments | Department of Energy

  4. Home Energy Score Past Webinars and Video Spotlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting OversightEMSHome Energy ChecklistResidential

  5. Lab Spotlight: Sandia National Lab Team Wins Best in Class Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResource andfirstDevice UWRecord-Setting

  6. #LabSpotlight - People of the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar: Demonstration of

  7. LED Surgical Task Lighting Scoping Study: A Hospital Energy Alliance Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuenge, Jason R.

    2011-01-17

    Tungsten-halogen (halogen) lamps have traditionally been used to light surgical tasks in hospitals, even though they are in many respects ill-suited to the application due to the large percentage of radiant energy outside the visible spectrum and issues with color rendering/quality. Light-emitting diode (LED) technology offers potential for adjustable color and improved color rendition/quality, while simultaneously reducing side-effects from non-visible radiant energy. It also has the potential for significant energy savings, although this is a fairly narrow application in the larger commercial building energy use sector. Based on analysis of available products and Hospital Energy Alliance member interest, it is recommended that a product specification and field measurement procedure be developed for implementation in demonstration projects.

  8. Abnormal thermal conductivity in tetragonal tungsten bronze Ba...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature interval. Substitution of Sr for Ba brings about a significant decrease in thermal conductivity at x???3 accompanied by development of a low-temperature...

  9. Microsoft Word - Lamellae tungsten tile design thermal and electromagn...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stress Profile: von Mises; Screw Assy View 1 Temp Profile (281 C) (275 C) (207 C) (440 C) (440 C) (456 C) (484 C) 31 Fig. 3.2.7 - Thermal Stress Profile: von Mises, Screw...

  10. RADBALLTECHNOLOGY TESTING AND MCNP MODELING OF THE TUNGSTEN COLLIMATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.

    2010-07-08

    The United Kingdom's National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed a remote, non-electrical, radiation-mapping device known as RadBall{trademark}, which can locate and quantify radioactive hazards within contaminated areas of the nuclear industry. RadBall{trademark} consists of a colander-like outer shell that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer sphere. The outer shell works to collimate radiation sources and those areas of the polymer sphere that are exposed react, becoming increasingly more opaque, in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer sphere is imaged in an optical-CT scanner, which produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. Subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation matrix provides information on the spatial distribution of sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} has no power requirements and can be positioned in tight or hard-to reach locations. The RadBall{trademark} technology has been deployed in a number of technology trials in nuclear waste reprocessing plants at Sellafield in the United Kingdom and facilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This study focuses on the RadBall{trademark} testing and modeling accomplished at SRNL.

  11. Proceedings of the Tungsten Workshop for Hard Target Weapons Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Hayden, H.W.; Davis, R.M.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to review and exchange information and provide technical input for improving technologies relevant to the Hard Target Weapons Program. This workshop was attended by representatives from 17 organizations, including 4 Department of Defense (DoD) agencies, 8 industrial companies, and 5 laboratories within DOE. Hard targets are defined as reinforced underground structures that house enemy forces, weapon systems, and support equipment. DOE-ORO and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) have been involved in advanced materials research and development (R&D) for several DOE and DoD programs. These programs are conducted in close collaboration with Eglin AFB, Department of the Army`s Picatinny Arsenal, and other DoD agencies. As part of this ongoing collaboration, Eglin AFB and Oak Ridge National Laboratory planned and conducted this workshop to support the Hard Target Weapons Program. The objectives of this workshop were to (1) review and identify the technology base that exists (primarily due to anti-armor applications) and assess the applicability of this technology to the Hard Target Weapons Program requirements; (2) determine future directions to establish the W materials, processing, and manufacturing technologies suitable for use in fixed, hard target penetrators; and (3) identify and prioritize the potential areas for technical collaboration among the participants.

  12. Residual stress in electrodeposited nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziebell, Tiffany D.

    Characterizing the residual stress of thick nanocrystalline electrodeposits poses several unique challenges due to their fine grain structure, thickness distribution, and matte surface. We use a three-dimensional ...

  13. Deuterium Retention in Tungsten-Coated Reduced Activation Ferritic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Morphologies of Thin W Film 9 RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS 3 Film cracks due to tensile stress Columnar pattern Division of Quantum Science and Engineering Faculty of...

  14. Fundamental Studies of Molybdenum and Tungsten Methylidene and Metallacyclobutane Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard Royce

    Addition of ethylene to Mo(NAr)(CHCMe2Ph)(OHIPT)(Pyr) (NAr = N-2,6-i-Pr2C6H3, OHIPT = O-2,6-(2,4,6-i-Pr3C6H2)2C6H3, Pyr = NC4H4) led to the trigonal-bipyramidal metallacyclobutane complex Mo(NAr)(C3H6)(OHIPT)(Pyr), in which ...

  15. The evolution of molybdenum and tungsten olefin metathesis catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Annie Jinying Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Chapter 1: Reaction of Mo(NR)(CHR')(OTf)2(dme) (R = 2,6-i-Pr2C6H3 (Ar), 2,6-Me2C6H3 (Ar'), 2,6-Cl2C6H3 (ArCl), 1-adamantyl (Ad); R' = CMe2Ph, CMe3; dme = dimethoxyethane) with the lithium salt of ArCl-nacnac ([2,6-Cl2C6H ...

  16. Topical Report Tantalum – 2.5% Tungsten Machinability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. J. Lazarus

    2009-09-02

    Protection Association (NFPA). NFPA 484, Standard for Combustible Metals, Chapter 9 Tantalum and Annex E, supplemental Information on Tantalum require cutting oil be used when machining tantalum because it burns at such a high temperature that it breaks down the water in a water-based metalworking fluid (MWF). The NFPA guide devotes approximately 20 pages to this material. The Kansas City Plant (KCP) uses Fuchs Lubricants Ecocut Base 44 LVC as a MWF. This is a highly chlorinated oil with a high flash point (above 200° F). The chlorine is very helpful in preventing BUE (Built Up Edge) that occurs frequently with this very gummy material. The Ecocut is really a MWF additive that Fuchs uses to add chlorinated fats to other non-chlorinated MWF.

  17. Line spectrum and ion temperature measurements from tungsten...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; DOPPLER...

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Callite Tungsten Co - NJ 36

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth Dakota Edgemont, SouthLaboratory - CT 06YorkBurroCallite

  19. Scientists gain insight into origin of tungsten ditelluride's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistance | Argonne National Laboratory gain insight

  20. Covalent Attachment of Diamondoid Phosphonic Acid Dichlorides to Tungsten

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collider TestspolycarbonateArticle) | SciTechcollectiveCovalency

  1. Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect AssessingBasinLecture)

  2. Exploring hardness enhancement in superhard tungsten tetraboride-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent)pressure|theIntegratedsolid solutions using

  3. NUCLEOSYNTHETIC TUNGSTEN ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN ACID LEACHATES OF THE MURCHISON CHONDRITE: IMPLICATIONS FOR HAFNIUM-TUNGSTEN CHRONOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer; Kleine, Thorsten; Dauphas, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Progressive dissolution of the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite with acids of increasing strengths reveals large internal W isotope variations that reflect a heterogeneous distribution of s- and r-process W isotopes among the components of primitive chondrites. At least two distinct carriers of nucleosynthetic W isotope anomalies must be present, which were produced in different nucleosynthetic environments. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates follows a linear trend that is consistent with a mixing line between terrestrial W and a presumed s-process-enriched component. The composition of the s-enriched component agrees reasonably well with that predicted by the stellar model of s-process nucleosynthesis. The co-variation of {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W in the leachates provides a means for correcting the measured {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W of Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI) for nucleosynthetic anomalies using the isotopic variations in {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W. This new correction procedure is different from that used previously, and results in a downward shift of the initial {epsilon}{sup 182}W of CAI to -3.51 {+-} 0.10 (where {epsilon}{sup 182}W is the variation in 0.01% of the {sup 182}W/{sup 183}W ratio relative to Earth's mantle). This revision leads to Hf-W model ages of core formation in iron meteorite parent bodies that are {approx}2 Myr younger than previously calculated. The revised Hf-W model ages are consistent with CAI being the oldest solids formed in the solar system, and indicate that core formation in some planetesimals occurred within {approx}2 Myr of the beginning of the solar system.

  4. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)Electrolysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on...

  5. Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)Electrolysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton Hydrogen Production by Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Electrolysis-Spotlight on Giner and Proton...

  6. Investigating the Biosynthesis of Halogenated Meroterpenoid Natural Products from Marine Actinomycetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jaclyn Marie

    2010-01-01

    0.25 M lithium sulfate 0.2 M calcium acetate 0.2 M calciumlithium nitrate none none none none none none 0.3 M ammonium acetate

  7. Investigating the biosynthesis of halogenated meroterpenoid natural products from marine actinomycetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Jaclyn Marie

    2010-01-01

    0.25 M lithium sulfate 0.2 M calcium acetate 0.2 M calciumlithium nitrate none none none none none none 0.3 M ammonium acetate

  8. Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulloch, Daryl Neil

    2013-01-01

    L) in advanced primary wastewater treatment effluent treatedat an advanced primary wastewater treatment plant as finalat an advanced primary wastewater treatment plant as final

  9. Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Novel Field-Effect Transistor Gate Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiehlbaugh, Kasi Michelle

    2009-01-01

    access to the pumps inside for maintenance and repair. Afterand easy maintenance. The inlet to each mechanical pump was

  10. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  11. Supramolecular self-assembled network formation containing NBr halogen bonds in physisorbed overlayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Adam Y.; Sacchi, Marco; Parker, Julia E.; Truscott, Chris L.; Jenkins, Steve; Clarke, Stuart M.

    2014-08-05

    the physicochemical properties of molecular solids4 via complementary interactions between the constituent mole- cules. Similar principles have been utilised in the design of two-dimensional (2D) physisorbed co-layers. Typically, hydro- gen bonding is the interaction... of the surface unit cell, relative to the much stronger adsorbate–adsorbate interactions.32,41 Therefore in the first set of calculations we have optimized the structure of the commensurate and non-commensurate co- layer without including the substrate...

  12. Halogen-Based Plasma Etching of Novel Field-Effect Transistor Gate Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiehlbaugh, Kasi Michelle

    2009-01-01

    for the main etch step: Adding fluorine-bearing species tothe main etch. It was included as an alternative F-bearing

  13. Separating the Influence of Halogen and Climate Changes on Ozone Recovery in the Upper Stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    causes ozone destruction by enhancing production of water vapor via methane oxidation. Additionally. Including potential climate-induced stratospheric water vapor increases, the ozone change relative to 1980 depletion chemistry, and therefore indirectly leading to more ozone. Increases in methane directly affect

  14. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song (Fort Collins, CO); Fallgren, Paul H. (Laramie, WY); Morris, Jeffrey M. (Laramie, WY)

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  15. Reactive Halogens in the Marine Boundary Layer (RHaMBLe): the tropical North Atlantic experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    close to or East of the Canary Islands, before arriving atpassing near to the Canary Islands on its way to Cape Verde.passing close to the Canary islands before approaching Cape

  16. THERMAL RATE CONSTANTS, ENERGY DEPENDENCE AND ISOTOPE EFFECT FOR LASER INITIATED HALOGEN-HYGRO-GENHALIDE REACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mei, C.-C.

    2011-01-01

    vs 10 IT ..•..••. Velocity dependence of the reaction crossIII-II. Velocity dependence of the reaction cross section crthermal reaction, the ratio of the rotational velocity of

  17. Halogen-elimination photochemistry and oxygen-activation chemistry of late transition-metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teets, Thomas S. (Thomas Sebastian)

    2012-01-01

    Multi-electron reaction chemistry, from both ground- and excited-state species, is at the heart of many topics in renewable energy and catalysis. In this thesis, two classes of reactions central to the themes of energy ...

  18. The Halogenation of Oils with Special Attention to the Method of Wijs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Edmund Oliver

    1913-05-15

    of experiments in which varying time was used, 44 Eh c CO o a •H Eh «.H O +> O O , 3 C IH EH o o o a a $ S to o CO as will be noted from time to time in this paper while explaining the various tables. Following the completion of Table Ho. I, a series of experiments represented by Tables II, III, IV and V...

  19. Remedial extraction and catalytic hydrodehalogenation for treatment of soils contaminated by halogenated hydrophobic organic compounds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wee, Hun Young

    2009-05-15

    for the extraction of 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzne (TeCB) or pentachlorophenol (PCP) from contaminated soil. Palladium-catalyzed hydrodehalogenation (HDH) was applied for destroying TeCB or PCP in mixtures of water and ethanol in a batch mode. The experimental results...

  20. Analysis and Characterization of Halogenated Transformation Products of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products in Wastewater Effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulloch, Daryl Neil

    2013-01-01

    emerging contaminants in sewage sludge. Trac-Trends Anal.mass spectrometry in sewage sludge from the Spanish area of