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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\ Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten· Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld Image. EAGAR ABSTRACT. An experimental study was carried out to map the light emissions from a gas tungsten arc. The emissions were found to be dramat- ically different with different shielding gases, welding current and base

Eagar, Thomas W.

2

A Glove Box Enclosed Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding System  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an inert atmosphere enclosed gas-tungsten arc welding system which has been assembled in support of the MC2730, MC2730A and MC 3500 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Enhanced Surveillance Program. One goal of this program is to fabricate welds with microstructures and impurity levels which are similar to production heat source welds previously produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mound Facility. These welds will subsequently be used for high temperature creep testing as part of the overall component lifetime assessment. In order to maximize the utility of the welding system, means for local control of the arc atmosphere have been incorporated and a wide range of welding environments can easily be evaluated. The gas-tungsten arc welding system used in the assembly is computer controlled, includes two-axis and rotary motion, and can be operated in either continuous or pulsed modes. The system can therefore be used for detailed research studies of welding impurity effects, development of prototype weld schedules, or to mimic a significant range of production-like welding conditions. Fixturing for fabrication of high temperature creep test samples have been designed and constructed, and weld schedules for grip-tab and test welds have been developed. The microstructure of these welds have been evaluated and are consistent with those used during RTG production.

Reevr, E, M; Robino, C.V.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electrochemical Testing of Gas Tungsten ARC Welded and Reduced Pressure Electron Beam Welded Alloy 22  

SciTech Connect

Alloy 22 (N06022) is the material selected for the fabrication of the outer shell of the nuclear waste containers for the Yucca Mountain high-level nuclear waste repository site. A key technical issue in the waste package program has been the integrity of the container weld joints. The currently selected welding process for fabricating and sealing the containers is the traditional gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIC method. An appealing faster alternative technique is reduced pressure electron beam (RPEB) welding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion properties of specimens prepared using both types of welding techniques. Standard electrochemical tests were carried on GTAW and RPEB welds as well as on base metal (non-welded) to determine their relative corrosion behavior in simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C (alkaline), 1 M HCI at 60 C (acidic) and 1 M NaCl at 90 C (neutral) solutions. Results show that for all practical purposes, the three tested materials had the same electrochemical behavior in the three tested electrolytes.

S. Daniel Day; Frank M.G. Wong; Steven R. Gordon; Lana L. Wong; Raul B. Rebak

2006-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

5

Surface preparation effects on GTA (gas tungsten arc) weld penetration in JBK-75 stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of GTA welds on JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface (weld groove) preparation produced substantial changes in the penetration characteristics and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent weld penetration (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander result from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any improvement in penetration. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, and increase the surface oxide thickness. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Similar results were observed with changes in filler wire surface oxide thickness, caused by changes in wire production conditions. 15 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

Campbell, R.D.; Heiple, C.R.; Sturgill, P.L.; Robertson, A.M.; Jamsay, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Gas tungsten arc welder with electrode grinder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Analysis of effect of temperature gradients on surface-tension phenomena in gas-tungsten-arc welds  

SciTech Connect

Fluid motion directed by surface tension is considered as a contributor to heat penetration in a weld pool. The potential phenomena at the gas-liquid interface were analyzed, and the dependence of surface motion on temperature in the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welding process was examined. An existing heat-transfer model was used and was able to predict weld size to +- 50% of the actual value. A momentum-transfer equation was derived by considering the contribution of Lorentz force. The momentum boundary condition was developed and was able to predict the Marangoni effect. The magnitude of surface-tension-driven force is comparable to the gravitational force on one gram. An empirical approach was proposed to couple heat-transfer and momentum-transfer phenomena. A dimensional analysis identified the pertinent dimensionless groups as Reynolds, Weber, Froude, Peclet, and Power numbers and a dimensionless velocity. A simplified form of the correction was developed by combining dimensionless groups to yield a correlation with the Bond, Prandtl, and modified power numbers. Future experimental work was proposed to test the functionality of the dimensionless groups.

Lee, H.A.; Chien, P.S.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Welding arc initiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

Correy, T.B.

1989-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

9

Welding arc initiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome.

Correy, Thomas B. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ) : ,- Oxygen and Nitrogen Contamination During Arc Welding T. W. Eagar Department of }faterials, mechanisms, and expected levels of oxygen and nitrogen contamination during gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc indicating the importance of dec9mposition of SiOz into silicon monoxide and oxygen are presented, indicating

Eagar, Thomas W.

11

Sensing the gas metal arc welding process  

SciTech Connect

Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Waddoups, M.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Sensing the gas metal arc welding process  

SciTech Connect

Control of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) requires real-time sensing of the process. Three sensing techniques for GMAW are being developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These are (1) noncontacting ultrasonic sensing using a laser/EMAT (electromagnetic acoustic transducer) to detect defects in the solidified weld on a pass-bypass basis, (2) integrated optical sensing using a CCD camera and a laser stripe to obtain cooling rate and weld bead geometry information, and (3) monitoring fluctuations in digitized welding voltage data to detect the mode of metal droplet transfer and assure that the desired mass input is achieved.

Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.; Watkins, A.D.; Larsen, E.D.; Taylor, P.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Waddoups, M.A. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arc welding GTAW Gas tungsten arc welding HAZ Heat affected zone HF High frequency MMC Metal matrix composite MMCs Metal matrix composites NDE Non-destructive examination SAW Submerged arc welding SMAW Shielded metal arc... limited their applications. Further, the use of composite materials requires us to stay from the established processes and areas of practice that were relevant to more conventional engineering materials. Except for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW...

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measurement and finite element analysis of temperature distribution in arc welding process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This presentation describes both the experimental measurement and finite element analysis used to study the temperature distribution during a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process, including the cooling down period. Welding was carried out on ... Keywords: FEA, MIG welding, arc welding, cracking, finite element analysis, metal inert gas welding, residual stress, simulation, temperature distribution, weldment temperature

C. K. Lee; J. Candy; C. P. H. Tan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D W. Zhou*, T. Z. Long and C. K ductility, and the HAZ was found to be the `weakest link'. Keywords: Magnesium alloy, AZ91D, TIG welding, Hot cracking, Liquation, Fracture Introduction Magnesium alloys have high strength/weight ratio

Zhou, Wei

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding dynamic Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a system IO board; arc sensor interface board for weld seam tracking... inverter power source renders possible ... Source: Ang Jr.,, Marcelo H. - Department of Mechanical...

17

WELDING RESEARCH -S249WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thick that the reduction in the number of passes is dramatic, the time needed for additional positioning agent on the work- piece surface during gas tungsten arc welding to modify the flow in the weld pool mixtures of inorganic powders suspended in a volatile medium, for different materials. This method, re

Zhang, YuMing

18

Optimization of Weld Bead Penetration in Pulsed Gas Metal Arc Welding using Genetic Algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — The weld quality is highly influenced by various process parameters involved in the process. This can be achieved by meeting quality requirements of bead geometry. Inadequate depth of penetration will contribute to failure of the welded structure. This paper presents the development of genetic algorithm model for the optimization of depth of penetration of weld bead geometry in pulsed gas metal arc welding process. The model is based on experimental data. The thickness of the plate, pulse frequency, wire feed rate, wire feed rate/travel speed ratio, and peak current have been considered as the process parameters to maximize the bead penetration depth. Optimization of process parameters was done using GA. The developed model is then compared with experimental results and it is found that the results obtained from genetic algorithm model are accurate. The optimal process parameters gave a value of 5.314 for depth of penetration which demonstrates an accuracy of 1.33 % and thus the effectiveness of the model presented. The obtained results help in selecting quickly the process parameters to achieve the desired quality. Keywords—Genetic algorithm, Pulsed GMA welding, Welding parameters, Depth of penetration, Regression mode I.

K. Manikya Kanti; P. Srinivasa Rao; G. Ranga Janardhana

19

Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness  

SciTech Connect

This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welding robot Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

robot Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arc welding robot Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Development of a mobile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Convection in Arc Weld Pools Electromagnetic and surface tension forces are shown to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convection in Arc Weld Pools Electromagnetic and surface tension forces are shown to dominate flow tension forces. It is shown that the electromag- netic and surface tension forces domi- nate the flow by experimental measurements of segrega- tion in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven

Eagar, Thomas W.

22

Effect of Microstructure on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using for example gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). However as strength levels increase it becomes more difficult to fulfil impact toughness requirements with flexible and productive welding methods such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored... . Little effects are seen on the cross sectional area of each weld bead deposited with increase in interpass temperature but the proportion of recrystallised area increases [12]. By eliminating the columnar microstructure, hardness becomes more uniform...

Keehan, Enda

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Plutonium metal and oxide container weld development and qualification  

SciTech Connect

Welds were qualified for a container system to be used for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxide. Inner and outer containers are formed of standard tubing with stamped end pieces gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welded onto both ends. The weld qualification identified GTA parameters to produce a robust weld that meets the requirements of the Department of Energy standard DOE-STD-3013-94, ``Criteria for the Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides.``

Fernandez, R.; Horrell, D.R.; Hoth, C.W.; Pierce, S.W.; Rink, N.A.; Rivera, Y.M.; Sandoval, V.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Laser-ultrasonic inspection of hybrid laser-arc welded HSLA-65 steel  

SciTech Connect

The hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) process is a relatively low heat input joining technology that combines the synergistic qualities of both the high energy density laser beam for deep penetration and the arc for wide fit-up gap tolerance. This process is especially suitable for the shipbuilding industry where thick-gauge section, long steel plates have been widely used in a butt joint configuration. In this study, preliminary exploration was carried out to detect and visualize the welding defects using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Results obtained on 9.3 mm thick butt-welded HSLA-65 steel plates indicated that the laser-ultrasonic SAFT inspection technique can successfully detect and visualize the presence of porosity, lack of fusion and internal crack defects. This was further confirmed by X-ray digital radiography and metallography. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the laser-ultrasonic technology for the automated inspection of hybrid laser-arc welds.

Lévesque, D.; Rousseau, G.; Monchalin, J.-P. [National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, QC (Canada); Wanjara, P.; Cao, X. [National Research Council Canada, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

In-situ repairs of pipelines using metal arc welding under oil (MAW-UO) aided by eddy current crack detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal arc welding under oil (MAW-UO) is a new process developed to make in-situ internal repairs of in-service oil industry pipelines tanks and vessels without the need to evacuate the service from the containing fluid. High nickel alloy welding wires were used to produce a tough relatively soft austenitic weld metal; with reduced weld metal hardness porosity residual strain and cracking susceptibility. Eddy current sensors were able to detect cracks under oil which then can be repaired in-situ using MAW-UO. The in-situ under oil crack detection and arc weld repair process will be described.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Set up an Arc Welding Code with Enthalpy Method in Upwind Scheme  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a numerical code with enthalpy method in upwind scheme is proposed to estimate the distribution of thermal stress in the molten pool, which is primarily determined by the type of the input power and travel speed of heating source. To predict the cracker deficit inside the workpiece, a simulated program satisfying the diagonal domination and Scarborough criterion provides a stable iteration. Meantime, an experimental performance, operated by robot arm 'DR-400' to provide a steady and continuous arc welding, was also conducted to verify the simulated result. By surveying the consistence of molten pool bounded by contrast shade and simulated melting contour on the surface of workpiece, the validity of model proposed to predict the thermal cracker has been successfully identified.

Ho, J.-E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Ilan University, Ilan, Taiwan (China)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Method for enhanced control of welding processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

Sheaffer, Donald A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA); Tung, David M. (Livermore, CA); Schroder, Kevin (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Gas metal arc welding of duplex stainless steel using flux cored wire  

SciTech Connect

The effect of chemical compositions and welding parameters on pitting corrosion resistance and notch toughness of duplex stainless steel weld metals by FCAW was investigated. And the effect of welding parameters on hot cracking susceptibility of the FCAW weld metals was also studied. Pitting corrosion resistance was improved with the increase of Cr, Mo and N content in the weld metal, and it was also proved that the corrosion resistance was greatly affected by welding heat input. Hot cracking susceptibility of the weld metal was increased with the increase of welding current and welding speed.

Maruyama, T.; Ogawa, T.; Nishiyama, S.; Ushijima, A.; Yamashita, K. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Fujisawa (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy welded joints Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

arc welding is a unique arc welding process for deep Summary: welding (GTAW) in terms of penetration depth, joint preparation and thermal distortion (Ref. 2). Although... welding...

32

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lamp filaments, the electrodes of an electric arc, and molten metals of high melting point. The emission of an incandescent object is due to its temperature and depends little upon the chemical nature of the radiator. The Stefan- 13 Boltzmann law... is automatically fed by the welding machine into the weld puddle. Metal is transferred through the arc plasma to the base material being welded. The wire is of the same metallic composition as the base metal, and generally the same diameter is used for most...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc weld-surfacing process Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky Collection: Engineering 3 GIS by ESRITM What is ArcGIS Summary: PlotTM, ArcEditTM, and so on). Geo- processing Map...

34

Welding of HSLA-100 steel using ultra low carbon bainitic weld metal to eliminate preheating  

SciTech Connect

Advanced high strength steels such as the Navy`s HSLA-100 and HSLA-80 contain sufficiently low carbon levels to be weldable without preheating. Unfortunately, commercial filler metals specifically designed to weld these steels without costly preheating have not yet been developed. The objective of this paper is to show that the Navy`s advanced steels can be welded by gas metal-arc (GMAW) and gas tungsten-arc welding (GTAW) without preheating by using filler metal compositions that produce weld metal with an ultra-low carbon bainitic (ULCB) microstructure. Filler metals were fabricated from vacuum induction melted (VIM) ingots containing ultra-low levels of C, O and N. HSLA-100 plate and plate from the VIM ingots were welded by both GMAW and GTAW with Ar-5% CO{sub 2} shielding gas using welding conditions to achieve cooling times from 800 to 500 C (t{sub 8-5}) from 35 to 14 sec. Weld metal tensile, hardness and CVN impact toughness testing as well as microstructural studies using transmission electron microscopy were conducted. The ULCB weld metal was relatively insensitive to cooling rate, resulting in good strength and toughness values over a wide range of t{sub 8-5} cooling times. Filler metal compositions which met the mechanical property requirements for HSLA-100, HSLA-80 and HSLA-65 weld metal were developed.

Devletian, J.H.; Singh, D.; Wood, W.E. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Surface preparation effects on GTA weld shape in JBK-75 stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study are reported here on the effects of surface preparation on the shape of autogenous gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds in JBK-75, an austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel similar to A286. Minor changes in surface preparation produced substantial changes in the fusion zone shape and welding behavior of this alloy. Increased and more consistent depth of fusion (higher d/w ratios) along with improved arc stability and less arc wander resulted from wire brushing and other abrasive surface preparations, although chemical and machining methods did not produce any increase in depth of fusion. Abrasive treatments roughen the surface, increase the surface area, increase the surface oxide thickness, and entrap oxide. The increased weld d/w ratio is attributed to oxygen added to the weld pool from the surface oxide on the base metal. The added oxygen alters the surface-tension-driven fluid flow pattern in the weld pool. Increased depth of fusion in wire-fed U-groove weld joints also resulted when welding wire with a greater surface oxide thickness was used. Increasing the amount of wire brushing produced even deeper welds. However, a maximum in depth of fusion was observed with further wire brushing, beyond which weld fusion depth decreased.

Campbell, R.D.; Robertson, A.M. (AWS Precision Joining Center, Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)); Heiple, C.R. (EG and G Rocky Flats Plant, Golden (Colombia)); Sturgill, P.L.; Jamsay, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Increasing Productivity of Welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trend toward the continuous electrode wire pro e s cesses and away from shielded metal-arc welding dr stick welding as it is commonly called. The con tinuous electrode wire process include gas metal arc welding "GMAW", f lux-cored arc welding... versus the s shielded becomes more complex. However, for hi er strength materials, the gas shielded version is preferred, primarily because it can be used to the low alloy, high strength steels and will pr deposited weld metal closely approaching...

Uhrig, J. J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

WELDING RESEARCH -s77WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the changing microstructure from base metal to the weld zone, there are corresponding changes in hardness been performed on similar and dissimilar welds of aluminum alloys of the 1xxx, 2xxx, 5xxx, 6xxx, and 7- genic gas generated in arc welding by evaporation from the liquid pool and molten metal droplets (in

DuPont, John N.

40

Roughening and removal of surface contamination from beryllium using negative transferred-arc cleaning  

SciTech Connect

Negative transferred-arc (TA) cleaning has been used extensively in the aerospace industry to clean and prepare surfaces prior to plasma spraying of thermal barrier coatings. This non-line of sight process can improve the bond strength of plasma sprayed coatings to the substrate material by cleaning and macroscopically roughening the surface. A variation of this cleaning methodology is also used in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding to cathodically clean the surfaces of aluminum and magnesium prior to welding. Investigations are currently being performed to quantify the degree in which the negative transferred-arc process can clean and roughen metal surfaces. Preliminary information will be reported on the influence of processing conditions on roughening and the removal of carbon and other contaminates from the surface of beryllium. Optical, spectral and electrical methods to quantify cleaning of the surface will also be discussed. Applications for this technology include chemical-free precision cleaning of beryllium components.

Castro, R.G.; Hollis, K.J.; Elliott, K.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys  

SciTech Connect

Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. ??-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and ??-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of ??-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type, morphology and distribution of the phases are thoroughly investigated. • Dissimilar welding is successfully performed without occurrence of any hot cracks.

Naffakh Moosavy, Homam, E-mail: homam_naffakh@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mapelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Massa 34, Milan 20156 (Italy)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Weldability and weld performance of a special grade Hastelloy-X modified for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of weld defects in the electron beam (EB) welding and the tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding for Hastelloy-XR, a modified version of Hastelloy-X, are clarified through the bead-on-plate test and the Trans-Varestraint test. Based on the results, weldabilities on EB and TIG weldings for Hastelloy-XR are discussed and found to be almost the same as Hastelloy-X. The creep rupture behaviors of the welded joints are evaluated by employing data on creep properties of the base and the weld metals. According to the evaluation, the creep rupture strength of the EB-welded joint may be superior to that of the TIG-welded joint. The corrosion test in helium containing certain impurities is conducted for the weld metals. There is no significant difference of such corrosion characteristics as weight gain, internal oxidation, depleted zone, and so on between the base and the weld metals. Those are superior to Hastelloy-X.

Shimizu, S.; Mutoh, Y.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

New findings in welding of structural steels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas shielded arc welding is the most widely applied welding process in industry. H2 (1.0425) structural steel chosen can be welded very cost-effectively with VAC 60 welding wires in CO2 shielding gas. With only the replacement of a highly oxidising gas, i.e. CO2, with a less oxidising gas mixture, i.e. Ar+18% CO2, a nicer appearance of the weld face and a higher weld quality may be obtained. Still higher quality of welds may be accomplished by employing pulsed arc welding of structural steels. In the study and development of the existing welding process, special attention was paid to the metal transfer. In pulsed arc welding with VAC 60 wire in the protective gas mixture of Ar+18% CO2, the metal transfer is very smooth and uniform in a very wide range of welding parameters. Because of the low oxidising capability of the Ar+18% CO2 gas mixture and the very short time of droplet formation, however, in pulsed arc welding major chemical processes in the droplet will occur only in welding with a higher average welding current (281 A). Less alloyed surfacing welds with silicon and manganese will provide higher quality only because of the surfacing weld dilution resulting from the parent-metal fusion, i.e. penetration. In pulsed arc welding, a pulse shape and energy and base current may efficiently affect the degree of penetration.

Uros Kejzar; Rajko Kejzar; Janez Grum; Damjan Klobcar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CHARACTERIZATION OF DEFECTS IN ALLOY 152, 52 AND 52M WELDS  

SciTech Connect

Defect distributions have been documented by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction in alloy 152 and 52 mockups welds, alloy 52 and 52M overlay mockups and an alloy 52M inlay. Primary defects were small cracks at grain boundaries except for more extensive cracking in the dilution zone of an alloy 52 overlay on 304SS. Detailed characterizations of the dilution zone cracks were performed by analytical transmission electron microscopy identifying grain boundary titanium-nitride precipitation associated with the intergranular separations. I. INTRODUCTION Weldments continue to be a primary location of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor systems. While problems related to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) sensitization and intergranular (IG) SCC of austenitic stainless alloys in boiling-water reactors (BWRs) have been significantly reduced, SCC has now been observed in HAZs of non-sensitized materials and in dissimilar metal welds where Ni-base alloy weld metals are used. IGSCC in weld metals has been observed in both BWRs and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) with recent examples for PWR pressure vessel penetrations producing the most concern. This has led to the replacement of alloy 600/182/82 welds with higher Cr, more corrosion-resistant replacement materials (alloy 690/152/52/52M). Complicating this issue has been a known susceptibility to cracking during welding [1-7] of these weld metals. There is a critical need for an improved understanding of the weld metal metallurgy and defect formation in Ni-base alloy welds to effectively assess long-term performance. A series of macroscopic to microscopic examinations were performed on available mockup welds made with alloy 52 or alloy 152 plus selected overlay and inlay mockups. The intent was to expand our understanding of weld metal structures in simulated LWR service components with a focus on as-welded defects. Microstructural features, defect distributions, defect characteristics and weld residual strains were examined by optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Industry-supplied mock-up welds were characterized including alloy 52 and 152 weldments, alloy 52M overlay and inlay welds, and an alloy 52 overlay. II. WELDMENTS II.A. Alloy 52 and 152 Weld Mockups The alloy 52 and 152 weld mockups were fabricated by MHI for the Kewaunee reactor and were obtained from the EPRI NDE Center. The mockups were U-groove welds joining two plates of 304SS as shown in Figure 1. Alloy 152 butter (heat 307380) was placed on the U-groove surface for both mockups by shielded metal arc welding (SMAW). For the alloy 152 weld mockup, the alloy 152 fill (heat 307380) was also applied using SMAW while for the alloy 52 weld mockup, the alloy 52 fill (heat NX2686JK) was applied using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Welding parameters for the fill materials were substantially different with the alloy 152 SMAW having a deposition speed of 4-25 cm/min with a current of 95-145 A and the alloy 52 GTAW having a deposition speed of 4-10 cm/min with a current of 150-300 A. One prominent feature in these mockup welds is the presence of a crack starting at the 304SS butt joint at the bottom of the U-groove and extending up into the weld. It appears that the 304SS plate on either side of the butt joint acted as an anchor for the weld resulting in a stress rise across the slit that drove crack formation and extension up into the fill weld. As will be shown in the next section, the extent of the cracking around this stress riser was much greater in the MHI 52 weld mockup.

Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Seffens, Rob J.; Efsing, Pal G.

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

WELDING RESEARCH OCTOBER 2005-s156  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the welding fume reveals that gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fume consists pre- dominately of particle of the chemicals present in the in- haled particles. Particles or agglomerates between 0.1 and 1 µm can be exhaled with different size range capabilities to measure the particle size of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fume

Eagar, Thomas W.

47

Method for welding beryllium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Frank M. (Espanola, NM); O'Leary, Richard F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A comparison of LBW and GTAW processes in miniature closure welds  

SciTech Connect

When small electronic components with glass-to-metal seals are closure welded, residual stresses developed in the glass are of concern. If these stresses exceed allowable tensile levels` the resulting weld-induced seal failure may cause the entire component to be scrapped or reworked at substantial cost. Conventional wisdom says the best welding process for these applications is that which provides the least heat input, and that Laser Beam Welding (LBW) provides less heat input than Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. (GTAW); however, other concerns such as weld fit-up, part variability, and material weldability can modify the final choice of a welding process. In this paper we compare the characteristic levels of heat input and the residual stresses generated in the glass seals for the two processes (as calculated by 3D Finite Element Analysis) as a function of heat input and travel speed, and contrast some of the other manufacturing decisions that must be made to choose a production process. The geometry chosen is a standing edge corner weld in a cylindrical container about 20 mm diameter by 35 mm tall. Four metal pins are glassed into the part lid. The stresses calculated to result from continuous wave C0{sub 2} LBW are compared with those that result from GTAW. The total energy required by the laser weld is significantly less than for the equivalent size GTA weld. The energy input required for a given size weld is inversely proportional to the travel speed, but approaches a saturation level as the travel speed increases. LBW travel speeds ranging from 10 mm/sec to 50 mm/sec were examined.

Knorovsky, G.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Gianoulakis, S.E.; Burchett, S.N.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Microstructure/property relationships in dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steels and carbon steels  

SciTech Connect

The metallurgical characteristics, toughness and corrosion resistance of dissimilar welds between duplex stainless steel Alloy 2205 and carbon steel A36 have been evaluated. Both duplex stainless steel ER2209 and Ni-based Alloy 625 filler metals were used to join this combination using a multipass, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. Defect-free welds were made with each filler metal. The toughness of both the 625 and 2209 deposits were acceptable, regardless of heat input. A narrow martensitic region with high hardness was observed along the A36/2209 fusion boundary. A similar region was not observed in welds made with the 625 filler metal. The corrosion resistance of the welds made with 2209 filler metal improved with increasing heat input, probably due to higher levels of austenite and reduced chromium nitride precipitation. Welds made with 625 exhibited severe attack in the root pass, while the bulk of the weld was resistant. This investigation has shown that both filler metals can be used to joint carbon steel to duplex stainless steels, but that special precautions may be necessary in corrosive environments.

Barnhouse, E.J. [Weirton Steel Corp., WV (United States); Lippold, J.C. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effects of alloying elements on the strength and cooling rate sensitivity of ultra-low carbon alloy steel weld metals. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of weld cooling rate on the strength of autogenous GTAW deposited weld metal. The basic weld metal composition was based on a low carbon bainite metallurgical system. The weld metal yield strength goal was 130 ksi, needed to surpass the current HY-13O weld metal requirements. Vacuum Induction Melted (VIM) heats of steel were produced and processed into 3/4` thickness plates. The autogenous gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) on the parent steel plates were produced under two different heat input conditions. Tensile specimens were produced from the weldments; specimens from certain heats were subjected to gleeble thermal simulations of multi-pass welding conditions using the Gleeble 1500. All specimens were then evaluated for yield and ultimate tensile strength. From the data presented, it was found that the experimental compositions studied were less sensitive to cooling rate than current HY-130 welding consumables. The compositions tested approached the target yield strength of 130 ksi, but further work is necessary in this area.

Vassilaros, M.G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment  

SciTech Connect

It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater environment was carried out in the different welding position, horizontal, vertical upward and downward. The soundness of cladding layers (about 3 mm) is confirmed in visual and penetration test, and cross section observation. In the application to the actual plants, it is preferable to reduce the start and end point numbers of beads with which a defect is easy to cause. Therefore a special welding equipment for a YAG laser CRC that could weld continuously was developed. (authors)

Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakaharacho, Isogoku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Characterization of microstructures and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 stainless steel dissimilar welds  

SciTech Connect

The microstructure and mechanical properties of Inconel 617/310 austenitic stainless steel dissimilar welds were investigated in this work. Three types of filler materials, Inconel 617, Inconel 82 and 310 austenitic stainless steels were used to obtain dissimilar joint using the gas tungsten arc welding process. Microstructural observations showed that there was no evidence of any possible cracking in the weldments achieved by the nickel-base filler materials. The welds produced by 617 and 310 filler materials displayed the highest and the lowest ultimate tensile strength and total elongation, respectively. The impact test results indicated that all specimens exhibited ductile fracture. Among the fillers, Inconel 617 exhibited superlative fracture toughness (205 J). The mechanical properties of the Inconel 617 filler material were much better than those of other fillers. - Research Highlights: {yields} A fine dendritic structure was seen for the Inconel 617 weld metal. {yields} A number of cracks were initiated when the 310 SS filler metal was used. {yields} All welded samples showed ductile fracture. {yields} The Inconel 617 filler material presents the optimum mechanical properties.

Shah Hosseini, H., E-mail: h.shahhosseini@ma.iut.ac.ir; Shamanian, M.; Kermanpur, A.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

EFFECT OF UNBROKEN LIGAMENTS ON STRESS CORROSION CRACKING BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 82H WELDS  

SciTech Connect

Previously reported stress corrosion cracking (SCC) rates for Alloy 82H gas-tungsten-arc welds tested in 360 C water showed tremendous variability. The excessive data scatter was attributed to the variations in microstructure, mechanical properties and residual stresses that are common in welds. In the current study, however, re-evaluation of the SCC data revealed that the large data scatter was an anomaly due to erroneous crack growth rates inferred from crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) measurements. Apparently, CMOD measurements provided reasonably accurate SCC rates for some specimens, but grossly overestimated rates in others. The overprediction was associated with large unbroken ligaments that often form in welds in the wake of advancing crack fronts. When ligaments were particularly large, they prevented crack mouth deflection, so apparent crack incubation times (i.e. period of time before crack advance commences) based on CMOD measurements were unrealistically long. During the final states of testing, ligaments began to separate allowing the crack mouth to open rather quickly. This behavior was interpreted as a rapid crack advance, but it actually reflects the ligament separation rate, not the SCC rate. Revised crack growth rates obtained in this study exhibit substantially less scatter than that previously reported. The effects of crack orientation and fatigue flutter loading on SCC rates in 82H welds are also discussed.

Mills, W.J. and Brown, C.M.

2003-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW  

SciTech Connect

Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dissimilar-alloy laser welding of titanium: Ti6Al-4V to Beta-C{trademark}  

SciTech Connect

Beta-C{sup TM} is a metastable-beta titanium alloy (nominal composition: Ti-3wt%Al-8wt%V-6wtTCr-4wt%Mo-4wt%Zr) which can be thermomechanically processed and heat treated to provide excellent combinations of strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. Recently, the increased application of metastable-beta titanium alloys in aerospace and commercial applications has resulted in the necessity to join these alloys to conventional alpha-beta titanium alloys. Based on this previous work, two approaches were considered for improving the ductility of dissimilar-alloy welds between Ti-6Al-4V and Beta-C{sup TM} in the present study: (1) application of a low heat input welding process to minimize the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ) beta grain size and (2) modification of the fusion zone chemical composition to allow greater microstructural optimization through postweld aging. CO{sub 2} laser welds were produced between Ti-6Al-4V and Beta-C{sup TM} sheet. Three different nominal fusion zone chemical compositions were obtained by varying the laser beam locations relative to the joint centerline and thereby melting different quantities of each base metal. For comparable postweld aging conditions, the laser welds exhibited ductilities superior to those of coarse-grained gas tungsten arc welds. Fracture analysis of the weld zone revealed a transition from a predominantly transgranular fracture in the low-temperature aged conditions to increasingly intergranular fracture following aging at higher temperature. This transition was promoted by an increase in the thickness and continuity of alpha phase at beta grain boundaries.

Liu, P.S.; Baeslack, W.A. III; Hurley, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fatique Resistant, Energy Efficient Welding Program, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The program scope was to affect the heat input and the resultant weld bead geometry by synchronizing robotic weave cycles with desired pulsed waveform shapes to develop process parameters relationships and optimized pulsed gas metal arc welding processes for welding fatique-critical structures of steel, high strength steel, and aluminum. Quality would be addressed by developing intelligent methods of weld measurement that accurately predict weld bead geometry from process information. This program was severely underfunded, and eventually terminated. The scope was redirected to investigate tandem narrow groove welding of steel butt joints during the one year of partial funding. A torch was designed and configured to perform a design of experiments of steel butt weld joints that validated the feasability of the process. An initial cost model estimated a 60% cost savings over conventional groove welding by eliminating the joint preparation and reducing the weld volume needed.

Egland, Keith; Ludewig, Howard

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

57

3612--VOLUME 27A, NOVEMBER 1996 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A Solidification of an Alloy 625 Weld Overlay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steel by gas metal arc welding was investigated by light and electron optical microscopy, electron to that produced in dissimilar welds between Alloy 625 and Cr- Mo steels in weld overlay applications of an Alloy 625 Weld Overlay J.N. DuPONT The solidification behavior (microsegregation, secondary phase

DuPont, John N.

58

Int. J. Modelling, Identification and Control, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2006 133 Copyright 2006 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: An adaptive control based on fuzzy logic has been implemented for Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW logic control and adaptive fuzzy logic control of gas tungsten arc welding. Keywords: Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) adaptive control; fuzzy logic. Reference to this paper should be made as follows: Crawford

Zhang, YuMing

59

A 2D finite element with through the thickness parabolic temperature distribution for heat transfer simulations including welding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The arc welding process involves thermal cycles that cause the appearance of undesirable residual stresses. The determination of this thermal cycle is the first step to a thermomechanical analysis that allows the numerical calculation of residual stresses. This study describes the formulation of a 2D finite element with through the thickness parabolic temperature distribution, including an element estabilization procedure. The 2D element described in this paper can be used to perform thermal analysis more economically than 3D elements, especially in plates, because the number of degrees of freedom through the thickness will always be three. A numerical model of a tungsten arc welding (GTAW) setup was made based on published experimental results. Size and distribution of the heat source input, thermal properties dependent on temperature, surface heat losses by convection and latent heat during phase change were considered. In parallel the same setup was modeled using ANSYS software with 3D elements (SOLID70) to compare against 2D numerical results. The results obtained by 2D model, 3D model and experimental data showed good agreement.

Darlesson Alves do Carmo; Alfredo Rocha de Faria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

F i W ldiFusion Welding ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-fuel) cutting · Thermit Electric arc· Electric arc · Resistance L b· Laser beam · Electron beam ME 4210 Welding ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 11 #12;Electric ArcElectric solid rocket booster (SRB) · In skin of Hindenburg dirigible ­ electrostatic discharge caused fire ME

Colton, Jonathan S.

62

Welding and Weldability of Thorium-Doped Iridium Alloys  

SciTech Connect

Ir-0.3%W alloys doped with thorium are currently used as post-impact containment material for radioactive fuel in thermoelectric generators that provide stable electrical power for a variety of outer planetary space exploration missions. Welding and weldability of a series of alloys was investigated using arc and laser welding processes. Some of these alloys are prone to severe hot-cracking during welding. Weldability of these alloys was characterized using Sigmajig weldability test. Hot-cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and composition. Thorium content and welding atmosphere were found to be very critical. The weld cracking behavior in these alloys can be controlled by modifying the fusion zone microstructure. Fusion zone microstructure was found to be controlled by welding process, process parameters, and the weld pool shape.

David, S.A.; Ohriner, E.K.; King, J.F.

2000-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) failures between carbon corrosion conditions that require the use of austenitic stainless steels. A dissimi- lar metal weld (DMW to understand the mechanism of DMW failures in such applications. In the as-welded condition, a compo- sition

DuPont, John N.

64

Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks  

SciTech Connect

Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyedkashi, S. M. H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

65

KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment  

SciTech Connect

Results of the KISMET tungsten dispersal experiment indicate a relatively small degree of wall-rock contamination caused by this underground explosive experiment. Designed as an add-on to the KISMET test, which was performed in the U-1a.02 drift of the LYNER facility at Nevada Test Site on 1 March 1995, this experiment involved recovery and analysis of wall-rock samples affected by the high- explosive test. The chemical, high-explosive blast drove tungsten powder, placed around the test package as a plutonium analog, into the surrounding wall- rock alluvium. Sample analyses by an analytical digital electron microscope (ADEM) show tungsten dispersed in the rock as tiny (<10 {mu}m) particles, agglomerates, and coatings on alluvial clasts. Tungsten concentrations, measured by energy dispersive spectral analysis on the ADEM, indicate penetration depths less than 0.1 m and maximum concentrations of 1.5 wt % in the alluvium.

Wohletz, K.; Kunkle, T.; Hawkins, W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The effect of iron dilution on strength of nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds  

SciTech Connect

The weld strength, as a function of iron content, for nickel/steel and Monel/steel welds was determined. Samples were prepared using a Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) automatic process to weld steel plate together with nickel or Monel to produce a range of iron contents typical of weld compositions. Tensile specimens of each iron content were tested to obtain strength and ductility measurements for that weld composition. Data indicate that at iron contents of less than 20% iron in a nickel/steel weld, the weld fails at the weld interface, due to a lack of fusion. Between 20% and 35% iron, the highest iron dilution that could be achieved in a nickel weld, the welds were stronger than the steel base metal. This indicates that a minimum amount of iron dilution (20%) is necessary for good fusion and optimum strength. On the other hand for Monel/steel welds, test results showed that the welds had good strength and integrity between 10% and 27% iron in the weld. Above 35% iron, the welds have less strength and are more brittle. The 35% iron content also corresponds to the iron dilution in Monel welds that has been shown to produce an increase in corrosion rate. This indicates that the iron dilution in Monel welds should be kept below 35% iron to maximize both the strength and corrosion resistance. 2 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Fout, S.L.; Wamsley, S.D.

1983-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Anode and Cathode Arcs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... we call an anode arc, produces a circular pit on the anode and a general roughening of the opposed cathode. Photomicrographs of single anode-type arcs were published1 before the ... arcs\tCathode arcs

L. H. GERMER; W. S. BOYLE

1955-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

WELDING RESEARCH -s51WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixed zone (PMZ) of dissimilar welds. Introduction Ferritic-to-austenitic dissimilar metal welds). Nickel-based filler metals are often used to prolong the life of austenitic-to- ferritic dissimilar welds to examine the gradient of alloying elements across the weld inter- face of austenitic/ferritic dissimilar

DuPont, John N.

69

WELDING RESEARCH -S125WELDING JOURNAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cracking susceptibility of dissimilar metal welds between AL- 6XN super austenitic stainless steel and two and independent of weld metal dilution level, while the cracking suscepti- bility of welds produced with IN625 resistance of the weld metal. Previous research has shown that the depleted dendrite cores are susceptible

DuPont, John N.

70

Tungsten Cathode Catalyst for PEMFC  

SciTech Connect

Final report for project to evaluate tungsten-based catalyst as a cathode catalyst for PEM cell applications.

Joel B. Christian; Sean P. E. Smith

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

71

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

72

Narrow gap laser welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Rare Earth Tungsten Bronzes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rare Earth Tungsten Bronzes ... Trivalent Rare Earth Ion Conduction in the Rare Earth Tungstates with the Sc2(WO4)3-Type Structure ... Trivalent Rare Earth Ion Conduction in the Rare Earth Tungstates with the Sc2(WO4)3-Type Structure ...

Werner Ostertag

1966-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Oxygen and Nitroaen Contamination During Submerged Arc Wel ding of Titanium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ) ) ··- -~ Oxygen and Nitroaen Contamination During Submerged Arc Wel ding of Titanium T· \\v· Eagar* The oxygen content of ti tanium submerged arc wel ~ metal is primaril y derendent uron the purity of the fluo1~ ide fluxes, but it is shown here that the oxygen content of the weld metal may be affected

Eagar, Thomas W.

75

Intelligent Control of Modular Robotic Welding Cell  

SciTech Connect

Although robotic machines are routinely used for welding, such machines do not normally incorporate intelligent capabilities. We are studying the general problem of formulating usable levels of intelligence into welding machines. From our perspective, an intelligent machine should: incorporate knowledge of the welding process, know if the process is operating correctly, know if the weld it is making is good or bad, have the ability to learn from its experience to perform welds, and be able to optimize its own performance. To this end, we are researching machine architecture, methods of knowledge representation, decision making and conflict resolution algorithms, methods of learning and optimization, human/machine interfaces, and various sensors. This paper presents work on the machine architecture and the human/machine interface specifically for a robotic, gas metal arc welding cell. Although the machine control problem is normally approached from the perspective of having a central body of control in the machine, we present a design using distributed agents. A prime goal of this work is to develop an architecture for an intelligent machine that will support a modular, plug and play standard. A secondary goal of this work is to formulate a human/machine interface that treats the human as an active agent in the modular structure.

Smartt, Herschel Bernard; Kenney, Kevin Louis; Tolle, Charles Robert

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEDURES FOR ARC PROJECTS Revised - May 2013 Agricultural Research Center Washington State University #12;Table of Contents THE PROJECT SYSTEM, AN INTRODUCTION................................................................................. 5 DEVELOPING AN ARC PROJECT

Collins, Gary S.

77

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppZ&nent au n07, Tome 40, Juillet 1979, page C7-451 AN INVESTIGATIONOF ARC STARTING ON COLDCATHODES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-voltage arc spot mode, with brief(40 micro-sec) re-ignition and de-ignition spikes near current zero electrodes. This arc spot can move about a tungsten surface w i t h scattered oxide surface layers AN INVESTIGATIONOF ARC STARTING ON COLDCATHODES Harald L.Witting. Genera2 Electric Company, Corporate Research

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

78

Unipolar arc simulation device  

SciTech Connect

We describe a simple laboratory device for establishing a vacuum arc plasma discharge that can serve to simulate a unipolar arc. The technique makes use of a triggered vacuum arc plasma gun to generate a plasma plume that in turn causes breakdown of a secondary discharge. The device is in fact a secondary vacuum arc discharge that is triggered by a primary vacuum arc discharge, with some of the features of the secondary plasma discharge having similarities with a unipolar arc configuration. Here we describe the experimental setup and outline how the device can be used for some areas of unipolar arc materials research. [copyright] [ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.

Wang, S.G.; Brown, I.G. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Oxidation and Volatilization from Tungsten Brush High Heat Flux Armor During High Temperature Steam Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten brush accommodates thermal stresses and high heat flux in fusion reactor components such as plasma facing surfaces or armor. However, inherently higher surface areas are introduced with the brush design. We have tested a specific design of tungsten brush in steam between 500 and 1100°C. Hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization rates were determined to address fusion safety issues. The brush prepared from 3.2-mm diameter welding rods had a packing density of 85 percent. We found that both hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush, fixtured to represent a unit within a larger component, were less than projections based upon the total integrated surface area (TSA). Steam access and the escape of hydrogen and volatile oxide from void spaces within the brush are restricted compared to specimens with more direct diffusion pathways to the test environment. Hydrogen generation rates from restrained specimens based on normal surface area (NSA) remain about five times higher than rates based on total surface areas from specimens with direct steam access. Volatilization rates from restrained specimens based upon normal surface area (NSA) were only 50 percent higher than our historic cumulative maximum flux plot (CMFP) for tungsten. This study has shown that hydrogen generation and tungsten volatilization from brush do not scale according to predictions with previously determined rates, but in fact, with higher packing density could approach those from flat surfaces.

Smolik, Galen Richard; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Petti, David Andrew

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fusion welding process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO); Davis, John W. (Ballwin, MO)

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Taupo's atypical arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... many other continental arcs around the world, with andesite-dacite cone volcaaoes and relatively low geothermal heat fluxes. In sharp contrast, in the middle

Colin J. N. Wilson

1996-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

advisory committee in the order of importance (high to low) - Weld with no or minimal fusion - Cold or stuck weld - Weld nugget size - Weld expulsion and indentation - Weld...

84

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition André Anders Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 53, Berkeley, California 94720 aanders@lbl.gov Abstract Cathodic arc plasma deposition is one of oldest coatings technologies. Over the last two decades it has become the technology of choice for hard, wear resistant coatings on cutting and forming tools, corrosion resistant and decorative coatings on door knobs, shower heads, jewelry, and many other substrates. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions are reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. The

85

Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO)

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Effect of multiple repairs in girth welds of pipelines on the mechanical properties  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the results of multiple weld repairs in the same area in seamless API X-52 microalloyed steel pipe. Four conditions of shielded metal arc welding repairs and one as-welded specimen of the girth weld were characterized to determine changes in the microstructure, grain size in the heat affected zone, and to evaluate their effect on the mechanical properties of the weld joints. The mechanical properties by means of tension tests, Charpy-V impact resistance and Vickers hardness of the welds were analyzed. The results indicate that significant changes are not generated in the microstructural constituents of the heat affected zone. Grain growth in the heat affected zone at the specimen mid-thickness with the number of repairs was observed. Tensile strength of the weld joints meets the requirement of the API 1104 standard even after the fourth weld repair. Significant reduction in Charpy-V impact resistance with the number of weld repairs was found when the notch location was in the intersection of the fusion line with the specimen mid-thickness. A significant increase in the Vickers hardness of the heat affected zone occurred after the first repair and a gradual decrease in the Vickers hardness occurred as the number of repairs increases.

Vega, O.E.; Hallen, J.M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, Laboratorios Pesados de Metalurgia, UPALM, Zacatenco, C.P. 07738, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Villagomez, A. [Construcciones Maritimas Mexicanas, CMM-PROTEXA, Av. Periferica s/n, Fracc. Lomas de Holche, C.P. 24120, Cd. del Carmen, Campeche (Mexico); Contreras, A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Investigacion en Ductos, Corrosion y Materiales, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas Norte 152 Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, C.P. 07730, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: acontrer@imp.mx

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Marangoni effects in welding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...problem of it variable weld penetration or cast-to-cast variation...etration in HS casts and reduced penetration in LS casts. Although this...travel speed (Sw) affects the rate of heat input to the weld...energy resulted in increased penetration for HS and MS casts but have...

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electric arc saw apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Synthesis of tungsten nano composites  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten-copper composites are currently used as thermal management substrates on a commercial basis. Properties such as high corrosion/erosion resistance, good thermal and electrical conductivity and sufficient mechanical strength and thermal shock resistance make tungsten-copper based composites attractive as electrode materials in automobile sparkplugs. These composites are mostly manufactured through infiltration and mechanical alloying. The products, however, generally lack compositional homogeneity. In this study, chemical approaches were used to synthesize W-Cu and W-Cu-TiB{sub 2} composites. The powders obtained had an average agglomerate size of 1.2 {mu}m and consisted of 50--200 mn sized primary particles. The W and Cu distribution was uniform on at least the submicron level. Consolidation studies on a W-Cu-TiB{sub 2} sample showed no substantial grain growth at 1,350 C under 500 MPa pressure for 2 minutes. The morphology of the grains, however, underwent noticeable changes.

Yu, C.C.; Kumar, R.; Sudarshan, T.S. [Materials Modification, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Friction stir welding tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barnes, Timothy A. (Ammon, ID)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

1987-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Vacuum arc deposition devices  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum arc is a high-current, low-voltage electrical discharge which produces a plasma consisting of vaporized and ionized electrode material. In the most common cathodic arc deposition systems, the arc concentrates at minute cathode spots on the cathode surface and the plasma is emitted as a hypersonic jet, with some degree of contamination by molten droplets [known as macroparticles (MPs)] of the cathode material. In vacuum arc deposition systems, the location and motion of the cathode spots are confined to desired surfaces by an applied magnetic field and shields around undesired surfaces. Substrates are mounted on a holder so that they intercept some portion of the plasma jet. The substrate often provides for negative bias to control the energy of depositing ions and heating or cooling to control the substrate temperature. In some systems, a magnetic field is used to guide the plasma around an obstacle which blocks the MPs. These elements are integrated with a deposition chamber, cooling, vacuum gauges and pumps, and power supplies to produce a vacuum arc deposition system.

Boxman, R.L.; Zhitomirsky, V.N. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

K Series Spectrum of Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The source of x-rays is a General Electric Pyrex tube operated at a constant potential...and the tube adjusted until the counter discharge rate was a maximum. The crystal used...served to oscillate the crystal through an arc of five minutes. Thus both a lines are...

J. C. Hudson; H. G. Vogt

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

College of Design ARC Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Design ARC Architecture KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped,landscape,andarchitecturalspaceswithattentiontotheirapplicationtothearchitecturalexperience.Studio:4hoursperweek. Prereq: Admission to the School of Architecture. ARC 102 DRAWING II: OBSERVATIONAL OF ARCHITECTURE. (3

MacAdam, Keith

96

Robotic Welding and Inspection System  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hall-effect arc protector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored.

Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID); Kotter, Dale K. (Shelley, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hall-effect arc protector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Hall-Effect Arc Protector is used to protect sensitive electronics from high energy arcs. The apparatus detects arcs by monitoring an electrical conductor, of the instrument, for changes in the electromagnetic field surrounding the conductor which would be indicative of a possible arcing condition. When the magnitude of the monitored electromagnetic field exceeds a predetermined threshold, the potential for an instrument damaging are exists and the control system logic activates a high speed circuit breaker. The activation of the breaker shunts the energy imparted to the input signal through a dummy load to the ground. After the arc condition is terminated, the normal signal path is restored. 2 figs.

Rankin, R.A.; Kotter, D.K.

1997-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

100

Weldability and keyhole behavior of Zn-coated steel in remote welding using disk laser with scanner head  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zinc-coated steels are widely used in automobile bodies. Laser welding which offers a lot of advantages over the conventional welding with metal active gas welding CO2 arc etc. in terms of improved weld quality high-speed and easy automation has been developed for cars. However in laser lap welding of zinc-coated steel sheets without gaps defects such as underfilled beads or porosity were easily formed due to higher pressure of zinc vapor trapped in the molten pool because of the lower boiling point of zinc (1180?K) with respect to the melting point of steel (Fe 1803?K). Laser lap welding results of two Zn-coated steel sheets have been reported. However there are not enough data for welding of three Zn-coated steel sheets. Therefore to understand laser lap weldability of three Zn-coated steel sheets lap welding of two or three sheets with and without gaps was performed using 16?kW disk laser apparatus with a scanner head and molten pool motions spattering and keyhole behavior during welding were observed by high-speed video cameras and x-ray transmission real-time imaging apparatus. Lap welding of three steel sheets was difficult but acceptably good welds were produced in sheets with upper and lower gaps of 0.1 and 0.1?mm 0.1 and 0.2?mm or 0.2 and 0.1?mm respectively. Bubble generation leading to porosity formation was observed and it was confirmed that welding phenomena were different depending upon the gap levels.

Jong-Do Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electrical conductivity of warm dense tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The electrical conductivity of warm dense tungsten plasma has been investigated successfully by a linear mixture rule considering various interactions of electrons with electrons, atoms, and ions. The plasma composition is calculated by the nonideal Saha equation. The interesting regime for tungsten plasma spans from weakly coupled and nondegenerate regime to strongly coupled and partial degenerate state. The electrical conductivity calculated is in reasonable agreement with the exploding wire experiments and other theoretical models. The present result demonstrates that the theoretical model is valid for the electrical conductivity of tungsten plasma in the warm dense matter regime.

Zhijian Fu; Lijun Jia; Xiaowei Sun; Qifeng Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A comparative evaluation of low-cycle fatigue behavior of type 316LN base metal, 316 weld metal, and 316LN/316 weld joint  

SciTech Connect

A comparative evaluation of the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of type 316LN base metal, carried out at 773 and 873 K. Total strain-controlled LCF tests were conducted at a constant strain rate of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} with strain amplitudes in the range {+-}0.20 to {+-}1.0 pct. Weld pads with single V and double V configuration were prepared by the shielded metal-arc welding (SMAW) process using 316 electrodes for weld-metal and weld-joint specimens. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the untested and tested samples were carried out to elucidate the deformation and the fracture behavior. The cyclic stress response of the base metal shows a very rapid hardening to a maximum stress followed by a saturated stress response. Weld metal undergoes a relatively short initial hardening followed by a gradual softening regime. Weld joints exhibit an initial hardening and a subsequent softening regime at all strain amplitudes, except at low strain amplitudes where a saturation regime is noticed. The initial hardening observed in base metal has been attributed to interaction between dislocations and solute atoms/complexes and cyclic saturation to saturation in the number density of slip bands. The 18-8 group of austenitic stainless steels, such as AISI type 316, 304, and their modified grades, finds applications as structural material for various components of the liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor (LMFBR).

Valsan, M.; Sundararaman, D.; Sankara Rao, K.B.; Mannan, S.L. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamil Nadu (India)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Tungsten wire for incandescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten wire for incandescent lamp filaments must operate at high temperatures and for long times. To meet these requirements, the grain morphology of the wire must be controlled to reduce the propensity for grain boundary sliding. The morphology is a function of the distribution of very small pockets of potassium in the wire and the mechanical processing from ingot to wire. The behavior of the filament is directly related to the grain morphology. This paper describes the mechanism by which the potassium is incorporated into and distributed in the ingot. The elongation and spheroidization of the bubbles during hot rolling and swaging is also examined and related to the grain morphology of wire. Some indications of the relationship between grain morphology and filament behavior are also given.

Walter, J.L.; Briant, C.L. (General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume  

SciTech Connect

Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

Mueller, R.E. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Tullahoma, TN (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

MAIN APPLICATIONS Spot welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IRB 6400 MAIN APPLICATIONS Spot welding Press tending Material handling Machine tending Palletizing with high material strength. The arms are mechanically balanced and equipped with double bearings. Advanced DATA, IRB 6400 INDUSTRIAL ROBOT WORKING RANGE AND LOAD DIAGRAM IRB 6400PE IRB 6400R IRB 6400S PR10036EN

De Luca, Alessandro

106

Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Tungsten...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract: The structure and catalytic activity of tungsten oxide clusters formed via sublimation of monodispersed cyclic (WO3)3 onto FeO(111)Pt(111) surface has been studied...

107

GIS Fundamentals: Supplementary Lessons with ArcGIS Introduction to ArcGIS Lesson 1: Introduction to ArcGIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS Fundamentals: Supplementary Lessons with ArcGIS Introduction to ArcGIS 1 Lesson 1: Introduction to ArcGIS What You'll Learn: -Start ArcMap -Create a new map -Add data layers -Pan and zoom -Change data errors. Background: This is the first in a series of introductory exercises for ArcGIS

Harbor, David

108

Evaluation on defect in the weld of stainless steel materials using nondestructive technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this study is to evaluate the elastic wave's characteristic on the crack in the weld of stainless steel materials using guided wave and acoustic emission, nondestructive tests. The stainless steel is expected as candidate of structural piping material under high temperature condition in nuclear fusion instrument, and a tungsten inert gas (TIG) weld technique was applied for making its jointing. The defect size of 20 mm was induced in the weld material. The guided wave, one of elastic waves, can propagate through very long pipe, and easily change to lots of modes by the defects in the structure. By analyzing the relationship between the mode conversion and the defects we can evaluate existing of the defects in weld material. In present study Nd-YAG laser was used to excite the guided wave by non-contact method, and AE technique was also used to clarify the mode conversion of guided wave by defect because lots of AE parameters of energy, count and amplitude can give more chances for analysis of mode conversion. The optimal AE parameters for the evaluation of the defects in weld zone using laser guided wave were derived.

Jin Kyung Lee; Dong Su Bae; Sang Pill Lee; Joon Hyun Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High-temperature stress measurement on chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten silicide and tungsten films  

SciTech Connect

Stresses in chemical-vapor-deposited tungsten silicide and tungsten films at high temperatures were measured. Tungsten silicide films were formed from WF/sub 6/ and SiH/sub 4/ or Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/. Tungsten films were formed from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/. The stress in tungsten silicide films is tensile and in the order of 10/sup 9/--10/sup 10/ dynes/cm/sup 2/. For a composition ratio of Si/Wless than or equal to2.6, the stress of a film of more than 1000 A has a maximum at about 500 /sup 0/C. On the other hand, for a composition Si/W>2.9, the stress has no maximum. The maximum of the stress is caused by crystallization of the film. The stress has two components. One component is related to the difference of the thermal expansion coefficients between the film and the Si substrate. Another is related to the film crystallization. It was found that the stress concentrates in the portion of the film nearest the substrate. The stress in tungsten films also reaches a maximum at 550 /sup 0/C, similar to the tungsten silicide films. However, the cause of this behavior is not clear.

Shioya, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Maeda, M.; Yanagida, K.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation S. A. GEDEON and T. W. EAGAR Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance

Eagar, Thomas W.

111

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy  

SciTech Connect

Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

Holden,N.E.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Plasma focus assisted damage studies on tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tungsten is being considered as a front runner choice for the plasma facing component material of next generation fusion reactor because of its superior thermophysical and mechanical properties. Therefore, it is essential to study the ion material interaction of this material for its response to severe conditions of fusion reactor. In this work, we have used an ingenious ion source a namely plasma focus to study the effect of proton irradiation on tungsten under various experimental conditions. Exposed and reference tungsten samples were analyzed using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscope, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and Vickers hardness tester. Surface analyses confirm the formation of microcracks, bubbles, blisters, holes, etc. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the development of compressive stress on the sample due to thermal load and formation of other phases or some expanded phases. A slight reduction in hardness values is observed in case of the exposed sample than the reference sample.

M. Bhuyan; S.R. Mohanty; C.V.S. Rao; P.A. Rayjada; P.M. Raole

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.. ) Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys Welds made with sharp bevel-groove weld aluminum and by aluminum alloy 5456 have been studied. The results indicate that initial absorption varies of the most dramatic illustrations of the differences in beam characteristics occurs when welding aluminum

Eagar, Thomas W.

115

Arc fault detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weld cracks - Weld porosity Most critical Excessive indentation Stuck weld (insufficient fusion) Less critical Cracks Porosity 10 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of...

117

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE CoZZoque C7, suppZ6ment au n07, Tome 40, JuiZZet 1979, page C7-243 THE ARC DIAMETER AND RATE OF ROTATIONff A MAGNETICALLY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It has been shown (1)that cathode erosion is negligible and that anode lifetime is depend- ent upon, velocity, anode root Fig. 3 Pholographs of arc, DOA, 160V. 20 I/min. hydrog:.,~. velocity and the drag terminated in a water cooled nozzle (anode). A water cooled rod, tipped with thoriated tungsten served

Boyer, Edmond

118

Assisting manual welding with robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a first attempt to assist manual welding with a physically interactive robot. An interactive control scheme is developed to suppress the vibrations of torch during the welding of novice welders. The torch is attached to the end-effector of a haptic-robot. Human and robot act together on the welding torch: the human controls the direction and speed; the robot suppresses the sudden and abrupt motions. The control scheme is developed by experimenting with an air-paint-brush. The painting process emulates the actual welding. Such an emulating environment is useful to surmount the difficulties of experimentation with actual welding. The impedance parameters of the control scheme are investigated. A damping value is determined for an effective vibration suppression and minimum human effort. A variable impedance control scheme is applied to ease the manipulation of the torch while not welding. The results of real welding of novice welders with and without robot assistance are presented. There is a considerable improvement in the performance of the welders when they are assisted with the robot.

Mustafa Suphi Erden; Bobby Mari?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Process for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for coating tungsten carbide with cobalt metal, the process comprising: (a) forming an aqueous slurry of tungsten carbide having a particle size of no greater than - 100 mesh, and zinc metal powder; (b) adding ammonia to the slurry with the amount of the ammonia being sufficient so that the slurry is basic after the subsequent addition of cobalt chloride in step c; (c) adding to the resulting ammoniated slurry, a solution of cobalt chloride with agitation, to form a coating of partially reduced cobalt on the tungsten carbide; (d) removing the resulting cobalt coated tungsten carbide from the resulting liquor; and (e) heating the cobalt coated tungsten carbide in a reducing atmosphere to effect the essentially complete reduction of the cobalt and to produce a cobalt metal coating on the tungsten carbide, the coating making up no greater than about 15% of weight of the tungsten carbide.

Ritsko, J.E.; Lee, J.S.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Tungsten Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.6751,"lon":-117.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients  

SciTech Connect

The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

John Scott O'Dell

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.  

SciTech Connect

Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew J. (R.J. Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA); Faraone, Kevin M. (BWX Technologies, Inc., Lynchburg, VA); Norris, Jerome T.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fracture Toughness and Strength in a New Class of Bainitic Chromium-Tungsten Steels  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with developing an understanding of the toughening and stengthening mechanisms for a new class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with Nooter Corporation and other industrial partners. The new steele had 50% higher tensile strength up to 650 degrees Celsius than currently used steels and the potential for not requiring any postweld heat treatment (PWHT) and for reducing equipment weight by 25%. This project was closely related to the Nooter project described in the report Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic steels for Industrial Process Applications (ORNL/TM-2005/82). The project was carried out jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and ORNL. The University of Pittsburgh carried out fracture toughness measurements and microstructural analysis on base metal and welded plates prepared at ORNL. The project focused on three areas. The first dealt with detailed microstructural analysis of base compositions of 3Cr-3WV and 3Cr-3WBV(Ta) in both normalized (N) and normalized and tempered (NT) conditions. The second aspect of the prject dealt with determining tensile properties and fracture toughness values of K{subIC} at room temperature for both 3Cr-3Wv and 3Cr-3WV(Ta) compositions. The third focus of the project was to measure the fracture toughness values of the base metal and the heat-affectged zone (HAZ) of a plate of Fe-3Cr-W(Mo)V steel plate welded by the gas tungsten are (GTA) process. The HAZ toughness was measured in both the as-welded and the PWHT condition.

Mao, S. X.; Sikka, V. K.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

125

Thiophene Hydrogenation to Tetrahydrothiophene over Tungsten Sulfide Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Independent reactions of thiophene reduction to tetrahydrothiophene and thiophene hydrogenolysis to form hydrogen sulfide...4...hydrocarbons are shown to occur over supported tungsten sulfide catalysts and unsupp...

A. V. Mashkina

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Confined plasma gliding arc discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A confined plasma gliding arc is produced in a reactor with two-electrodes contained within a very narrow channel and water spray injected into the discharge. The evolution of pH and conductivity and the formation of hydrogen peroxide in pure water with different carrier gases and the decolourisation and mineralisation of an organic dye were compared with results for a non-confined three-electrode gliding arc reactor. The energy efficiency for the decolourisation of an organic blue dye in the confined reactor is twice that of the non-confined reactor. Significant levels of total organic carbon are removed in the confined plasma reactor.

Radu Burlica; Bruce R. Locke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Contamination and solid state welds.  

SciTech Connect

Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

Mills, Bernice E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A visible light-sensitive tungsten carbide/tungsten trioxde composite photocatalyst  

SciTech Connect

A photocatalyst composed of tungsten carbide (WC) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) has been prepared by the mechanical mixing of each powder. Its photocatalytic activity was evaluated by the gaseous isopropyl alcohol decomposition process. The photocatalyst showed high visible light photocatalytic activity with a quantum efficiency of 3.2% for 400-530 nm light. The photocatalytic mechanism was explained by means of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction due to WC, which may serve as a multielectron reduction catalyst, as well as the photogeneration of holes in the valence band of WO{sub 3}.

Kim, Young-ho [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Irie, Hiroshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Department of Applied Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

MagLab - Arc Lamp Tutorial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with 2,000 cells to create an arc across a 4-inch (100 millimeter) gap. When suitable electric generators became available in the late 1870s, the practical use of arc lamps began....

130

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel [Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding of Metals > Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding and Post Weld Treatment of Modified 9Cr-1MoVNb Steel Zhiyue Xu Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory

133

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Refractory Alloy Welding [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Refractory Alloy Welding Refractory Alloy Welding Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Refractory Alloy Welding Project description: Welding of refractory metals such as vanadium alloys. Category: internal R&D project Bookmark and Share Butt weld of two 4 mm thick V-4Cr-4Ti plates made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser

135

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Identification of the selective corrosion existing at the seam weld of electric resistance-welded pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The selective corrosion existing at the seam weld of high frequency electric resistance welded pipes of carbon steel with low sulfur content in electrolyte solutions is revealed by localized electrochemical measurements. The seam weld, mainly consisted of ferrite, has more negative open circuit potential and higher anodic dissolution current density than the base metal consisting ferrite and pearlite. Between the seam weld and the base metal, there is a galvanic coupling effect accelerating the dissolution kinetics of the seam weld such that V-shaped corrosion groove preferentially occurs at the seam weld.

S.J. Luo; R. Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Characterization of arcs in frequency domain  

SciTech Connect

Arc detection systems are developed for ICRH on ITER to prevent arcs from damaging the RF components. One of the detectors, the Sub-Harmonic Arc Detector (SHAD) is based on the detection of the frequencies emitted in the MHz range by arcs [R1]. To ensure the high level of reliability required for this safety system, it is necessary to demonstrate that these frequencies present a signal with a Signal to Noise Ratio high enough to be detected under the wide range of operational conditions (frequency, power, configuration) and for the different types of arcs that can appear in the feeding lines and on the antennas (vacuum arc, glow discharge, multipactor-induced discharge). For each type of arc, we analyze the evolution of the frequency spectrum relative to the evolution of other electrical parameters (reflected power, voltage)

D'Inca, R.; Siegl, G.; Faugel, H.; Braun, F.; Eckert, B.; Bobkov, V. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany, EURATOM Association (Germany); El Khaldi, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching, Germany, EURATOM Association (Germany); Gent University, EESA Department (Belgium)

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Corrosion and wear resistance of tungsten carbide-cobalt and tungsten carbide-cobalt-chromium thermal spray coatings  

SciTech Connect

Tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings provide wear surfaces to new and overhauled components for various industries. Their wear resistance is obtained by incorporating small tungsten carbide particles into a metal matrix. This presentation will show what parameters influence their corrosion resistance in the ASTM B-117 Salt Spray Corrosion Test,

Quets, J.; Alford, J.R.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Filters for cathodic arc plasmas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

In-service repair of main pipelines by welding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new approach to the repair of main pipelines by welding without removing them from service ... failure risk; safety of welding works on pipeline under pressure; use of different variants of repair by welding; s...

V. I. Makhnenko; V. S. But; O. I. Oleinik

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, H.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: The electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical components of the nanocomposite, and is also affected by the property of electrolyte. A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. Highlights: {yields} Electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite with core-shell structure. {yields} Activity is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical component of the nanocomposite. {yields} The property of electrolyte affects the electrocatalytic activity. {yields} A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. -- Abstract: Tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite was prepared by combining a reduced-carbonized approach with a mechanochemical approach. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope under scanning mode and X-ray energy dispersion spectrum. The results show that the crystal phases of the samples are composed of anatase, rutile, nonstoichiometry titanium oxide, monotungsten carbide, bitungsten carbide and nonstoichiometry tungsten carbide, and they can be controlled by adjusting the parameters of the reduced-carbonized approach; tungsten carbide particles decorate on the surface of titania support, the diameter of tungsten carbide particle is smaller than 20 nm and that of titania is around 100 nm; the chemical components of the samples are Ti, O, W and C. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples was measured by a cyclic voltammetry with three electrodes. The results indicate that the electrocatalytic activities of the samples are related to their crystal phases and the property of electrolyte in aqueous solution. A synergistic effect between titania and tungsten carbide is reported for the first time.

Hu, Sujuan; Shi, Binbin; Yao, Guoxing [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Li, Guohua, E-mail: nanozjut@zjut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Ma, Chunan [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)] [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Green Chemistry Synthesis Technology, School of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Processing and properties of extruded tungsten-hafnium and tungsten-steel composites  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the processing behavior and properties of tungsten-hafnium (W-Hf) and W-steel composites produced by hot extrusion of canned powders. The W-Hf composite was consolidated by extrusion of blended powders with preheat temperatures over the temperature range of 1100 to 1400{degrees}C. All extrusions produced fully dense material which exhibits elongation of the tungsten phase within the hafnium matrix. The flow stress, as characterized by the extrusion constant, decreases with increasing temperature up to 1300{degrees}C and increases substantially at 1400{degrees}C as significant quantities of intermetallic phase are formed during preheating. The room-temperature (RT) hardness and compressive yield stress increase modestly with increased extrusion ratio and are not affected by extrusion temperature in the range 1100 to 1300{degrees}C. The microstructures are essentially fully recrystallized at the 1300{degrees}C preheat temperature and partially recrystallized at lower temperatures. Additionally, a mixture of tungsten and steel powder was consolidated to full density by hot extrusion at a 1000{degrees}C preheat temperature and a reduction ratio of 4.2. Increased reduction of the W-steel composite results in increased RT hardness.

Ohriner, E.K.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kapoor, D. [Army Armament Research and Development Engineering Center, Dover, NJ (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nd:YAG laser welding aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

Autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding wrought 4047, 1100, 3003, 2219, 5052, 5086, 5456, and 6061 and cast A356 aluminum alloys to cast A356 aluminum alloy in restrained annular weld joints was investigated. The welds were 12.7 mm (0.375 in.) and 9.5 mm (0.375 in.) diameter with approximately 0.30 mm (0.012 in.) penetration. This investigation determined 4047 aluminum alloy to be the optimum alloy for autogenous Nd:YAG laser welding to cast A356 aluminum alloy. This report describes the investigation and its results.

Jimenez, E. Jr.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A multi-bead overlapping model for robotic wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wire and arc additive manufacturing (WAAM) is a promising alternative to traditional subtractive manufacturing for fabricating large aerospace components that feature high buy-to-fly ratio. Since the WAAM process builds up a part with complex geometry through the deposition of weld beads on a layer-by-layer basis, it is important to model the geometry of a single weld bead as well as the multi-bead overlapping process in order to achieve high surface quality and dimensional accuracy of the fabricated parts. This study firstly builds models for a single weld bead through various curve fitting methods. The experimental results show that both parabola and cosine functions accurately represent the bead profile. The overlapping principle is then detailed to model the geometry of multiple beads overlapping together. The tangent overlapping model (TOM) is established and the concept of the critical centre distance for stable multi-bead overlapping processes is presented. The proposed TOM is shown to provide a much better approximation to the experimental measurements when compared with the traditional flat-top overlapping model (FOM). This is critical in process planning to achieve better geometry accuracy and material efficiency in additive manufacturing.

Donghong Ding; Zengxi Pan; Dominic Cuiuri; Huijun Li

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Welding shield for coupling heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

148

Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mtn Geothermal Project Mtn Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Tungsten Mtn Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.723055555556°, -118.08027777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.723055555556,"lon":-118.08027777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

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Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

151

Rhenium alloying of tungsten heavy alloys  

SciTech Connect

Alloying experiments were performed using rhenium additions to a classic 90 mass % tungsten heavy alloy. The mixed-powder system was liquid phase sintered to full density at 1500 C in 60 min The rhenium-modified alloys exhibited a smaller grain size, higher hardness, higher strength, and lower ductility than the unalloyed system. For an alloy with a composition of 84W-6Re-8Ni-2Fe, the sintered density was 17, 4 Mg/m{sup 3} with a yield strength of 815 MPa, tensile strength of 1180 MPa, and elongation to failure of 13%. This property combination results from the aggregate effects of grain size reduction and solid solution hardening due to rhenium. In the unalloyed system these properties require post-sintering swaging and aging; thus, alloying with rhenium is most attractive for applications where net shaping is desired, such as by powder injection molding.

German, R.M.; Bose, A.; Jerman, G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Growth of Ordered Ultrathin Tungsten Oxide Films on Pt(111)....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

tungsten oxide ultra-thin films were prepared on a Pt(111) substrate at 700 K via direct sublimation of monodispersed cyclic (WO3)3 trimers. The surface composition, structure and...

155

Electrochemistry of (Dihapto-Buckminster-Fullerene) Pentacarbonyl Tungsten(0)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cyclic voltammetry experiments on [60]fullerene, (C60), and (dihapto-[60]fullerene) pentacarbonyl tungsten(0), (?2-C60)W(CO)5, constitute an educational experiment for the inorganic chemistry laboratory with a primary objective to teach the chemical ...

Elvin Igartúa-Nieves; Yessenia Ocasio-Delgado; José Rivera-Pagán; José E. Cortés-Figueroa

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microstructured tungsten thermophotovoltaic selective emitters c by Natalija (Zorana) Jovanovi?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research investigates the fabrication, modeling, characterization, and application of tungsten two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structures as selective emitters and means of achieving higher efficiencies ...

Jovanovic, Natalija Zorana

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel  

SciTech Connect

Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

A New Type of Submerged-Arc Flux-Cored Wire Used for Hardfacing Continuous Casting Rolls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is expected that the welding hardfacing of continuous casting rolls has better welding performance and higher wear resistance. A new type of submerged-arc hardfacing flux-cored wire has been developed through nitrogen replacing part of carbon and addition of the nitrogen-fixing elements of niobium and titanium. And microstructure, degree of hardness and high-temperature wear resistance of its deposited metal samples were also investigated. It is found that the microstructure is martensite, residual austenite and carbonitride precipitates. As a result, the hardfacing metal with homogeneous distribution of very fine carbonitride particles had high hardness and excellent wear-resisting property during high-temperature wear, which could significantly extend the service life of continuous casting rolls.

Ke YANG; Zhi-xi ZHANG; Wang-qin HU; Ye-feng BAO; Yong-feng JIANG

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Plasma of Electric Arc Discharge between Melted Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma of electric arc discharge between melted electrodes was experimentally investigated. Diagnostics of electric arc plasma was carried out. Optical emission and ... in plasma tends to be located at the arc ax...

A.N. Veklich; I.L. Babich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Surface Coating of Tungsten Carbide by Electric Exploding of Contact  

SciTech Connect

Electric exploding of a tungsten carbide--cobalt material near-by high-speed steel surface forms on it a hardening coating. The essential structure properties of the formed coatings are determined by parameters of contact exploding electrode at the pulse current amplitude from above 106 A/cm2 and duration less than 10-4 s. The metallographic investigations of coating structures were done by microscope 'Neophot-24'. They have shown that the contact electric exploding caused the transfer of tungsten carbide and cobalt on the surface of high-speed steel. The breakdown of tungsten carbide--cobalt material took place during electrical exploding. The hardening layers of tungsten carbide and pure nanocrystalline tungsten have been formed upon the surface of high-speed steel as a result of electric exploding. Crystalline grains of tungsten have an almost spherical form and their characteristic size less than 400 nanometers. Micro hardness of the coating layers and high-speed steel structures was measured.

Grigoryev, Evgeny G. [General Physics Department, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Temperature of the Copper Arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Laboratory, General Electric Company. | Journal Article...TEMPERATURE OF THE COPPER ARC By C. G. SUITS RESEARCH LABORATORY, GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY Read before the...figure 1, where Fis an arc burning between the electrodes...experiment is a condensed discharge between the electrode...

C. G. Suits

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Local arc discharge mechanism and requirements of power supply in micro-arc oxidation of magnesium alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To study the requirements of the power supply in micro-arc oxidation (MAO) of magnesium alloy, many experiments ... . Based on the experimental results and electric arc theory, the separate local arc discharge me...

Ming Chen; Yuezhou Ma; Yuan Hao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, R.S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

Hawke, R.S.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

166

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines...

168

Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron coatings - Part I: Coating deposition process and basic coating Tribological performance of hybrid filtered arc-magnetron...

169

The robustness of dynamic vehicle performance to spot weld failures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spot welds are the dominant joining method in the vehicle assembly process. As the automated assembly process is not perfect, some spot welds may be absent when the vehicle leaves the assembly line. Furthermore, spot welds are highly susceptible to fatigue, ... Keywords: Failure, Fatigue, Finite element analysis, Robustness, Spot welds, Structural dynamics

S. Donders; M. Brughmans; L. Hermans; C. Liefooghe; H. Van der Auweraer; W. Desmet

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dilution and microsegregation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilution and microsegregation in dissimilar metal welds between super austenitic stainless steel the weld will also signi® cantly affect the corrosion resistance. Dissimilar metal welds between a super dissimilar weld. The dilution level was found to decrease as the ratio of volumetric ® ller metal feedrate

DuPont, John N.

171

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 97 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 115 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Welding Hot Cracking of Side Shell of Drilling-Well Oil Storage Ship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Cracks were found in the weld metal (WM) of weld-section of side shell of drilling-well oil storage ship when performing post weld radiographic...

Zhi-wei Yu; Xiao-lei Xu

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Influence of welding passes on grain orientation -the example of a multi-pass V-weld.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation (CANDE), derived from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) with buttering. Comparisons are made using

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction  

SciTech Connect

The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Neutron and x-ray scattering studies of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in Weldalite welds  

SciTech Connect

Weldalite is a lithium-containing aluminum alloy which is being considered for aerospace applications because its favorable strength-to-weight ratio. Successful welding of this alloy depends on the control of the metallurgical condition and residual stresses in the heat affected zone. Neutron and x-ray scattering methods of residual stress measurement were applied to plasma arc welds made in aluminum-lithium alloy test panels as part of an evaluation of materials for use in welded structures. In the course of these studies discrepancies between x-ray and neutron results from the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld were found. Texture changes and recovery from the cold work, indicated in peak widths, were found in the HAZ as well. The consideration of x-ray and neutron results leads to the conclusion that there is a change in solute composition which modifies the d-spacings in the HAZ which affects the neutron diffraction determination of residual stresses. The composition changes give the appearance of significant compressive strains in the HAZ. This effect and sharp gradients in the texture give severe anomalies in the neutron measurement of residual stress. The use of combined x-ray and neutron techniques and the solution to the minimizing of the neutron diffraction anomalies are discussed.

Spooner, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pardue, E.B.S. [Technology for Energy Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Robotic equipment for pipeline repair  

SciTech Connect

Hyperbaric welding provides the most reliable method for connection or repair of subsea oil and gas pipelines. Research on hyperbaric arc welding processes indicates that it should be possible to achieve stable welding conditions with Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) to approximately 600m, and with Gas Metal Arc (GMA) and Plasma Arc to at least 1,000m. These depths are well beyond the limits of manned saturation diving. At the present time the limitation on the maximum depth to which these processes can be applied, in practice, is the requirement for completely diverless operation deeper than approximately 350m. Fully diverless hyperbaric welding is not presently available to the industry but several diverless pipeline repair systems which utilize mechanical connectors have been developed. This paper reviews the present status of mechanized hyperbaric welding systems currently being used in the North Sea and discusses some of the work being done to achieve fully diverless robotic pipeline repair with both welding and connectors.

Gibson, D.E.; Barratt, K.; Paterson, J. [National Hyperbaric Centre, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

An Application of Augmented Reality (AR) in the Teaching of an Arc Welding Robot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology that utilizes computer vision methods to overlay virtual objects onto the real world scene so as to make them appear to co-exist with the real objects. Its main objective ...

Chong, J. W. S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Heat and Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Argon and Helium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Massachusetts Institute of Tc:chnology, is Head of Secondary Metallurgy Group with MEFOS. Lulea, Sweden. T

Eagar, Thomas W.

182

Double-Sided Arc Welding of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheet.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Magnesium alloys are of interest to the automotive industry because of their high specific strength and potential to reduce vehicle weight and fuel consumption. In… (more)

Shuck, Gerald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

Wei, Yanni [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Li, Jinglong, E-mail: lijinglg@nwpu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Xiong, Jiangtao [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel  

SciTech Connect

Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Characteristics of the weld interface in dissimilar austenitic-pearlitic steel welds  

SciTech Connect

The weld interface in dissimilar alloy welds between austenitic and pearlitic steels was observed directly by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry. Two types of weld interface were found in the joints. One was the austenite/martensite-like interface that formed the boundary between the mixed weld metal zone and the partially mixed transitional zone. The other is the martensite-like/ferrite interface that is the true liquid-solid boundary of the joint. These interfaces can exist independently in different joints and can also coexist in one joint, depending on the Cr and Ni contents of the filler metals and alloy in the base metals. The formation mechanism of the weld interface and its effect on the mechanical properties of the welded joint are discussed.

Pan, C.; Zhang, Z. (Wuhan Transportation Univ. (China). Dept. of Marine Mechanical Engineering)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

VAPORIZATION OF TUNGSTEN-METAL IN STEAM AT HIGH TEMPERATURES.  

SciTech Connect

The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate system. The aerosol formed a fine white smoke of tungsten-oxide which was visible to the eye as it condensed in the laminar boundary layer of steam which flowed along the surface of the rod. The aerosol continued to flow as a smoke tube downstream of the rod, flowing coaxially along the centerline axis of the quartz glass tube and depositing by impaction along the outside of a bend and at sudden area contractions in the piping. The vaporization rate data from the 17 experiments which exceeded the vaporization threshold temperature are shown in Figure 5 in the form of vaporization rates (g/cm{sup 2} s) vs. inverse temperature (K{sup {minus}1}). Two correlations to the present data are presented and compared to a published correlation by Kilpatrick and Lott. The differences are discussed.

GREENE,G.A.; FINFROCK,C.C.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Automated generation of weld path trajectories.  

SciTech Connect

AUTOmated GENeration of Control Programs for Robotic Welding of Ship Structure (AUTOGEN) is software that automates the planning and compiling of control programs for robotic welding of ship structure. The software works by evaluating computer representations of the ship design and the manufacturing plan. Based on this evaluation, AUTOGEN internally identifies and appropriately characterizes each weld. Then it constructs the robot motions necessary to accomplish the welds and determines for each the correct assignment of process control values. AUTOGEN generates these robot control programs completely without manual intervention or edits except to correct wrong or missing input data. Most ship structure assemblies are unique or at best manufactured only a few times. Accordingly, the high cost inherent in all previous methods of preparing complex control programs has made robot welding of ship structures economically unattractive to the U.S. shipbuilding industry. AUTOGEN eliminates the cost of creating robot control programs. With programming costs eliminated, capitalization of robots to weld ship structures becomes economically viable. Robot welding of ship structures will result in reduced ship costs, uniform product quality, and enhanced worker safety. Sandia National Laboratories and Northrop Grumman Ship Systems worked with the National Shipbuilding Research Program to develop a means of automated path and process generation for robotic welding. This effort resulted in the AUTOGEN program, which has successfully demonstrated automated path generation and robot control. Although the current implementation of AUTOGEN is optimized for welding applications, the path and process planning capability has applicability to a number of industrial applications, including painting, riveting, and adhesive delivery.

Sizemore, John M. (Northrop Grumman Ship Systems); Hinman-Sweeney, Elaine Marie; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission. 3 figs.

Falabella, S.

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Magnetoresistive conductive polymer-tungsten trioxide nanocomposites with ultrahigh sensitivity at low magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanoparticles. These nanocomposites have demonstrated ultrahigh MRMagnetoresistive conductive polymer-tungsten trioxide nanocomposites with ultrahigh sensitivity polymers and their nanocomposite systems has attracted intense interests due to their easy synthesis, low

Guo, John Zhanhu

190

Compressibility and strength of nanocrystalline tungsten boride under compression to 60GPa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest in transition metal borides (TMs) as potential new avenues for synthesizing hard materials.1­4 Tungsten borides, WBx, which include WB, WB2, and WB4 and are analogous to tungsten carbides, have been

Duffy, Thomas S.

191

Welding of uranium and uranium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The major reported work on joining uranium comes from the USA, Great Britain, France and the USSR. The driving force for producing this technology base stems from the uses of uranium as a nuclear fuel for energy production, compact structures requiring high density, projectiles, radiation shielding, and nuclear weapons. This review examines the state-of-the-art of this technology and presents current welding process and parameter information. The welding metallurgy of uranium and the influence of microstructure on mechanical properties is developed for a number of the more commonly used welding processes.

Mara, G.L.; Murphy, J.L.

1982-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Development of steel plate and welding material with superior preferential corrosion resistance in welded joint  

SciTech Connect

The effects of chemical composition and microstructure on preferential corrosion of YP 420MPa steel were investigated. The test results indicated that the Ni addition prevented preferential corrosion in weld metal and heat affected zone (HAZ). The high contents of C and Cy accelerated preferential corrosion in HAZ. Inhibition of the creation of M-A constituents was effective in preventing the localized corrosion in HAZ. The localized corrosion in the welded joint was prevented by increasing the rest potential of weld metal by adding of Cr or Ni to the weld metal.

Kimura, Mitsuo; Miyata, Yukio; Saito, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Yoshifumi [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Chiba (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc. For more information on how of the ARCS Foundation, Inc. funds seven scholarships for exceptional University of Georgia doctoral students. Available to attend the ARCS Foundation Awards Luncheon in Atlanta on November 21, 2013. ARCS Foundation

Arnold, Jonathan

194

Continuous nanoparticle generation and assembly by atmospheric pressure arc discharge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continuous nanoparticle generation and assembly by atmospheric pressure arc discharge Jesse J. Cole a dc arc discharge plasma. The particles are positively charged by the arc and form a room temperature precursor materials.5,6 High temperature plasmas in the form of dc arc discharges led to the discovery

Jacobs, Heiko O.

195

AdaptiveARC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AdaptiveARC AdaptiveARC Jump to: navigation, search Name AdaptiveARC Address 7683 Sitio Manana Place Carlsbad, California Zip 92009 Sector Biomass Product Waste-to-clean-energy startup is developing an arc-plasma reactor Website http://www.adaptivearc.com/ Coordinates 33.07959°, -117.22539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.07959,"lon":-117.22539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

196

Arc Statistics in Clusters: Galaxy Contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The frequency with which background galaxies appear as long arcs as a result of gravitational lensing by foreground clusters of galaxies has recently been found to be a very sensitive probe of cosmological models by Bartelmann et al. (1998). They have found that such arcs would be expected far less frequently than observed (by an order of magnitude) in the currently favored model for the universe, with a large cosmological constant $\\Omega_\\Lambda \\sim 0.7$. Here we analyze whether including the effect of cluster galaxies on the likelihood of clusters to generate long-arc images of background galaxies can change the statistics. Taking into account a variety of constraints on the properties of cluster galaxies, we find that there are not enough sufficiently massive galaxies in a cluster for them to significantly enhance the cross section of clusters to generate long arcs. We find that cluster galaxies typically enhance the cross section by only $\\lesssim 15%$.

R. A. Flores; A. H. Maller; J. R. Primack

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Detection of arcs in automotive electrical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the present time, there is no established method for the detection of DC electric arcing. This is a concern for forthcoming advanced automotive electrical systems which consist of higher DC electric power bus voltages, ...

Mishrikey, Matthew David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten  

SciTech Connect

We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

Liu, Yi-Nan [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China) [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland); Ahlgren, T.; Bukonte, L.; Nordlund, K. [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland)] [Association EURATOM-TEKES, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, PO Box 64, 00560 (Finland); Shu, Xiaolin; Yu, Yi; Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China)] [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing, 100191 (China); Li, Xiao-Chun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)] [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

A history of tungsten- and molybdenum-base alloys  

SciTech Connect

The development of tungsten and molybdenum alloys was initiated in the early 1900s in search of a better electric lamp filament with tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, and osmium being the prime candidates. The efforts required for accomplishment of the task led to refining oxides to high purity, reduction of the oxides to metal powders, forming green product forms by extrusion or pressing, and finally sintering by electric furnace and self-heating by direct current almost to the melting point. The technology required for producing lamp filaments led to the development of the powder metallurgy field and early research on high-melting-temperature metals. During the period 1909 through 1959, most of the tungsten-molybdenum, high-melting-temperature element alloys were developed and produced in almost any product form required.

Heestand, R.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

A history of tungsten- and molybdenum-base alloys  

SciTech Connect

The development of tungsten and molybdenum alloys was initiated in the early 1900s in search of a better electric lamp filament with tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, and osmium being the prime candidates. The efforts required for accomplishment of the task led to refining oxides to high purity, reduction of the oxides to metal powders, forming green product forms by extrusion or pressing, and finally sintering by electric furnace and self-heating by direct current almost to the melting point. The technology required for producing lamp filaments led to the development of the powder metallurgy field and early research on high-melting-temperature metals. During the period 1909 through 1959, most of the tungsten-molybdenum, high-melting-temperature element alloys were developed and produced in almost any product form required.

Heestand, R.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard University of Wisconsin proposing an all-tungsten divertor for their tokamak designs. In designing such a component, fracture a series of fracture mechanics-based analyses to demonstrate the feasibility of using an all- tungsten

202

Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel  

SciTech Connect

To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-matallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved, 1) To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug. 2) investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys. 3) Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

Method and apparatus for real time weld monitoring  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus are provided for real time weld monitoring. An infrared signature emitted by a hot weld surface during welding is detected and this signature is compared with an infrared signature emitted by the weld surface during steady state conditions. The result is correlated with weld penetration. The signal processing is simpler than for either UV or acoustic techniques. Changes in the weld process, such as changes in the transmitted laser beam power, quality or positioning of the laser beam, change the resulting weld surface features and temperature of the weld surface, thereby resulting in a change in the direction and amount of infrared emissions. This change in emissions is monitored by an IR sensitive detecting apparatus that is sensitive to the appropriate wavelength region for the hot weld surface.

Leong, Keng H. (Lemont, IL); Hunter, Boyd V. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

WeldingFabr&MetalForm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welding, Welding, Fabrication, and Metal Forming Manufacturing Technologies The department consists of three trades: weld- ing; fabrication and assembly; and precision metal forming. These interrelated groups use similar equipment and rely on each other's skills. One stop will get you the service of three reliable trades. The team manufactures and assembles proto- type hardware and has the in-house capability of producing hardware with sizes ranging from thumbnail to rail-car. Expertise includes aircraft quality sheet metal construction, certified weld- ing, and assembly. The staff has experience managing a variety of activities: design modifi- cation assistance; in-house fabrication; and project management and can work with your engineers to transform sketches and ideas into working prototypes.

205

Current Issues and Problems in Welding Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and properties. Rapid heating, cooling...thermomechanical simulation, and welding of...recent advances in rapid so-lidification...prevalent during rapid solidification...microstruc-tural modeling within the HAZ and...progressively replaced by automated systems to achieve...

S. A. David; T. DebRoy

1992-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Vibration welding system with thin film sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Wet welding qualification trials at 35 MSW  

SciTech Connect

Wet welding is gaining increased attention and attraction for application on marine buildings and offshore structures all over the world because of its versatility, flexibility and mobility in combination with low investment costs. In a common research and development project between PETROBRAS/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany wet welding qualification trials have been performed in different water depths up to 35 msw. The tests have been performed with newly developed electrodes in two different wet welding procedures. The experiments have been carried out on SS- as well as on 5F-specimens acc. ANSI/AWS D 3.6-89. Results will be presented in respect to the performance of the two welding procedures especially with regard to the avoidance of hydrogen induced cold cracking and high hardness values.

Dos Santos, V.R.; Teixeira, C.J. [Petrobras/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Szelagowski, P.J.F. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

The 'world's largest' Inconel waterwall weld overlay  

SciTech Connect

An 11,000 square foot Inconel 655 weld repaired severe wastage caused by low NOx firing with coal/petcoke at the Belledune generating station in New Brunswick, Canada. 1 ref., 1 fig., 3 photos.

MacLean, K.; Fournier, E.; Gomez-Grande, J.; Scandroli, T. [New Brunswick Power Generation (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment wiht the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Method for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites are disclosed. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspension of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite. 1 fig.

Buhrmaster, C.L.; Clark, D.E.; Smartt, H.B.

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for gas-metal arc deposition of metal, metal alloys, and metal matrix composites. The apparatus contains an arc chamber for confining a D.C. electrical arc discharge, the arc chamber containing an outlet orifice in fluid communication with a deposition chamber having a deposition opening in alignment with the orifice for depositing metal droplets on a coatable substrate. Metal wire is passed continuously into the arc chamber in alignment with the orifice. Electric arcing between the metal wire anode and the orifice cathode produces droplets of molten metal from the wire which pass through the orifice and into the deposition chamber for coating a substrate exposed at the deposition opening. When producing metal matrix composites, a suspenion of particulates in an inert gas enters the deposition chamber via a plurality of feed openings below and around the orifice so that reinforcing particulates join the metal droplets to produce a uniform mixture which then coats the exposed substrate with a uniform metal matrix composite.

Buhrmaster, Carol L. (Corning, NY); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Laser welding dissimilar reflective alloys  

SciTech Connect

This project, jointly sponsored by Rocketdyne and CSTAR, involves the development of laser joining of materials which have heretofore been impractical to bond. Of particular interest are joints between stainless steel and copper and also aluminum 6061 to aluminum 2219. CSTAR has a unique opportunity in this area since both the process and development and diagnostics are of interest to industry. Initial results using the pulse tailored laser welding technique developed in CLA for joining crack sensitive materials have proven promising for the aluminum joints based upon metallurgical and electronic microprobe analysis. A declaration of success requires additional mechanical testing. A CW technique has been applied to the stainless-copper joining with some preliminary success. These joints are of significant interest for aeronautics and rocket propulsion applications and the project is expected to continue.

Mccay, M.H.; Gopinathan, S.; Kahlen, F.; Speigel, L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Effects of sequential tungsten and helium ion implantation on nano-indentation hardness of tungsten  

SciTech Connect

To simulate neutron and helium damage in a fusion reactor first wall sequential self-ion implantation up to 13 dpa followed by helium-ion implantation up to 3000 appm was performed to produce damaged layers of {approx}2 {mu}m depth in pure tungsten. The hardness of these layers was measured using nanoindentation and was studied using transmission electron microscopy. Substantial hardness increases were seen in helium implanted regions, with smaller hardness increases in regions which had already been self-ion implanted, thus, containing pre-existing dislocation loops. This suggests that, for the same helium content, helium trapped in distributed vacancies gives stronger hardening than helium trapped in vacancies condensed into dislocation loops.

Armstrong, D. E. J.; Edmondson, P. D.; Roberts, S. G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Design consideration for wet welded joints  

SciTech Connect

Wet welding has become a joining technique that under certain circumstances can provide results which cannot be distinguished between wet or dry production and the achievable mechanical quality is comparable to dry atmospheric welds. Wet welding is not a process which can be applied easily and which can be properly handled by untrained diver welders. Wet welding is more than any other kind of welding process or procedure a joining technique that requires the full job-concentration and -knowledge of an excellent trained and skilled diver welder throughout the whole production time, who is 100% identifying himself with his task. Furthermore he must be fully aware of the production requirements and possible metallurgical/environmental reactions and outcomes. He must be able to be fully concentrated on the process performance throughout his total work shift. In short: he must be an outstanding expert in his field. The following paper will highlight these subjects and show the necessity of their exact observation to achieve excellent quality in wet welding.

Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffbau; Lafaye, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway S.A., Marseille (France)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advanced tests of wet welded joints  

SciTech Connect

Wet Welding has in former times only been applied to secondary structural components. Nowadays wet welding has become an upcoming repair process due to high process flexibility, its low investment costs and its high versatility. Even the quality of the wet welded joints has been improved remarkably due to intensive and concentrated development activities. However, especially in the North Sea regions owners of offshore structures and classifying authorities still hesitate to recognize the process as a reliable alternative to dry hyperbaric welding repair methods. It therefore requires further activities especially in the field of data development for life prediction of such repaired components. Advanced testing methods are necessary, additional design criteria are to be developed and achievable weldment quality data are to be included in acknowledged and approved standards and recommendations to improve the credibility of the process and to solve the problem of quality assurance for wet welded joints. A comprehensive project, sponsored by the European Community under the Thermie Programme, is in progress to develop new testing procedures to generate the required data and design criteria for the future application of the wet welding process to main components of offshore structures. It is the aim of the project to establish additional fitness for purpose data for this process.

Pachniuk, I. [Stolt Comex Seaway S.A., Marseille (France); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany); Szelagowski, P.; Drews, O. [GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Laser Welding of Metals [Laser Applications Laboratory] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Welding of Metals Laser Welding of Metals Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Experimentation Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Overview Laser Oil & Gas Well Drilling Laser Heat Treatment Laser Welding of Metals On-line Monitoring Laser Beam Delivery Laser Glazing of Railroad Rails High Power Laser Beam Delivery Decontamination and Decommissioning Refractory Alloy Welding Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Laser Applications Laboratory Laser Welding of Metals Project description: High-speed laser welding of metals. Category: Project with industrial partner (Delphi Energy and Engine Management Systems) Bookmark and Share

218

Effects of xenon cover gas in CO/sub 2/ laser welding  

SciTech Connect

Weld spatter in CO/sub 2/ laser welding is detrimental to miniature components. The effects of using xenon gas as an inert laser welding atmosphere to reduce weld spatter are discussed. The laser plume characteristics, weld penetration, and weld spatter are evaluated.

Hendrix, T.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. I. Variation with Current and Arc-Length. II. Influence upon the Luminous Radiation from the Arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 December 1915 research-article The Consumption of Carbon in the Electric Arc. I. Variation with Current and Arc-Length. II. Influence upon the Luminous Radiation from the...

1915-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Tungsten and tungsten alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications excluding lamps. (Latest citations from the US Patent bibliographic file with exemplary claims). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys, including applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. (Contains a minimum of 109 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Atomistic modeling of diffusion coefficient in fusion reactor first wall material tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tungsten is remarkable for its robustness, especially it has the highest melting point of all the non–alloyed metals. Metallic material tungsten and tungsten alloys have been widely used in aerospace, weapon, nuclear industries and fusion reactor. Tungsten is expected to be the fusion reactor first wall material for this reason. In this paper, self-diffusion coefficients of metallic material tungsten have been investigated via molecular dynamics simulation method using the modified embedded atom potential model. Diffusion activation energy of tungsten can be gotten according to Arrhenius relation between the self-diffusion coefficients simulation results and temperatures. The dipole interaction model is introduced to analyze metallic material tungsten self-diffusion process in a uniform magnetic field. The strong magnetic field increases diffusion activation energy by 34.52% and limits self-diffusion coefficient by 1.15% in 2 T uniform magnetic field.

Zenghui Wang; Kaixuan Zhao; Weiming Chen; Xiaodi Chen; Longyan Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Synthesis and characterization of reduced tungsten sulfide cluster complexes  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of tungsten(IV) chloride with metals was studied in order to find a high-yield and convenient preparation of {alpha}-tungsten (II) chloride. The reduction of tungsten(IV) chloride with iron metal proved to be the most convenient and reliable synthesis, with a good yield of 60%. The reactions between {alpha}-tungsten(II) chloride and sodium hydrosulfide were investigated. Complete substitution of sulfide for chloride in W{sub 6}Cl{sub 8}{sup 4+} was achieved in the presence of sodium n-butoxide in pyridine solution. Single crystals were grown at elevated temperature (200{degrees}C) in pyridine, and the structure of W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(py){sub 6} was determined by single crystal x-ray techniques. The triethylphosphine (PEt{sub 3}) and tetrahydrothiophene (THT) complexes of W{sub 6}S{sub 8} were established by ligand displacement of pyridine in W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(py){sub 6}. Structures for both W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(PEt{sub 3}){sub 6}. 1.44CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and W{sub 6}S{sub 8}(THT){sub 6} were determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction. These molecular complexes of the W{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster were also characterized by infrared spectroscopy. 86 refs., 19 figs., 22 tabs.

Zhang, Xiang.

1991-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons  

SciTech Connect

This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

225

Author's personal copy Tungsten in Hawaiian picrites: A compositional model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form 15 April 2009; available online 3 May 2009 Abstract Concentrations of tungsten (W) and uranium (U is three-times as enriched as the Depleted MORB Mantle (DMM; 3.0 � 2.3 ng/g). The relatively high of the recycling of W-rich oceanic crust and sediment into a depleted mantle source, such as the depleted MORB

Mcdonough, William F.

226

Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

Rothman, Albert J. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Glass Based on the oxides of Molybdenum, Tungsten and Uranium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN previous publications from this Laboratory, attention has been directed to glasses of unusual composition based on the oxides of tellurium and vanadium1-4. This article ... the oxides of tellurium and vanadium1-4. This article describes the development of further unusual glasses based on the oxides of molybdenum, tungsten and uranium.

P. L. BAYNTON; H. RAWSON; J. E. STANWORTH

1956-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Simple test for dissimilar-metal welds  

SciTech Connect

A simplified accelerated test procedure has been developed for testing dissimilar-metal welds between austenitic stainless steels and low-alloy ferritic steels. The failure of these welded joints in operating steam generators of fossil-fired power plants has become an increasing problem for the utility industry. The proposed test is a three-point loading, bent-beam test that uses sheet specimens taken from a dissimilar-metal weldment. Tests were conducted in a simple test fixture where the specimens are loaded with a set-screw. To determine whether the test produces the same type of failure as those produced in a power plant, tests were conducted on specimens taken from a weld between Type 316 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel plates using Type 309 stainless steel filler metal. The specimens were loaded in the test fixture at room temperature and then thermally cycled between room temperature and 593/sup 0/C (1099/sup 0/F) by placing the test apparatus in a box furnace (thermal cycling during power plant operation plays a major role in the weld failure during service). The specimens were kept in the furnace for 20 to 70 hours (h), cooled to room temperature, and then the cycle was repeated. Metallographic examination of specimens cycled as few as 64 times with a total of 2300 h at 593/sup 0/C revealed that the specimens contained cracks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after long-time elevated-temperature service racks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after longtime elevated-temperature service in a fossil-fired steam generator. All indications are that this simple accelerated test could be used as a screening procedure to compare the relative behavior of ''improved'' welds in future research and development programs.

Klueh, R.L.; King, J.F.; Griffith, J.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Training Program EHS ~ 244: Resistance Spot Welding Safety Training  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: Resistance Spot Welding Safety Training 4: Resistance Spot Welding Safety Training Course Syllabus Subject Category: Resistance Spot Welding Course Prerequisite: None Course Length: 25 minutes Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Web-Based Course Goal: Participants will be introduced to resistance spot welding processes, hazards, and safe work practices. Course Objectives: By the end of this course, you will be able to: * Identify resistance spot welding processes * Identify hazards, safe work practices, and personal protective equipment associated with resistance spot welding * Recognize the purpose of resistance spot welding schedules * Locate resistance spot welding schedule Subject Matter Expert: Joe Dionne x 7586 Training Compliance: 29 CFR 1910 Subparts O & Z, 29 CFR 1926 Subparts J & Z

230

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over the critical weld. In order...

Petri, Brad

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with gaps 17 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy no weld Destructive measurement Post-weld signature Accomplishment: Actual Auto Body Parts 2T auto body structures...

232

Vertical Arc for ILC Low Emittance Transport  

SciTech Connect

The design and parameters of a vertical arc for the ILC Low Emittance Transport (LET) are reviewed. A 1 TeV CM ILC which relies upon 30 MV/m accelerating cavities with a packing fraction of 65% will require almost 48 km of main linac, which suggests that the total site length including BDS and bunch compressors will be on the order of 53 km. If built in a laser-straight tunnel with the low-energy ends near the surface, and assuming a perfectly spherical ''cue ball'' planetary surface with radius 6370 km, the collider halls will necessarily be 55 meters below grade, as shown in the top plot of Figure 1. Such depths would demand extensive use of deep tunneling, which would potentially drive up the cost and difficulty of ILC construction. An alternate solution is to use discrete vertical arcs at a few locations to allow a ''piecewise straight'' construction in which the depth of the tunnel below grade does not vary by more than a few meters. This approach is shown schematically in the bottom plot of Figure 1. In this Note we consider the issues for a design with one such vertical arc at the 250 GeV/c point (ie, midway down the linac for 1 TeV CM), and a second arc at the entrance to the BDS (ie, the entire BDS lies in one plane, with vertical arcs at each end).

Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1983-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds  

SciTech Connect

This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

Leijun Li

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

235

Apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds is described in which is utilized in combination with a moveable welder for forming a partially completed weld, and an ultrasonic generator mounted on a moveable welder in which is reciprocally moveable along a path of travel which is laterally disposed relative to the partially completed weld.

Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bitsoi, Rodney J. (Ririe, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pace, David P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ion source based on the cathodic arc  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

CONTROL OF AN ARC DISCHARGE BY MEANS OF A GRID  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CONTROL OF AN ARC DISCHARGE BY MEANS OF A GRID Albert...Research Laboratory, General Electric Co., Schenectady , N. Y. CONTROL OF AN ARC DISCHARGE BY MEANS OF A GRID. | Research Laboratory, General Electric Co., Schenectady , N...

Albert W. Hull; Irving Langmuir

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fluorination of Arc-Produced Carbon Material Containing Multiwall Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we studied the fluorination process of MWNTs produced in an electric arc. ... Carbon material was synthesized by using a setup for arc-discharge graphite evaporation described elsewhere. ...

Nicolai F. Yudanov; Alexander V. Okotrub; Yuri V. Shubin; Lyudmila I. Yudanova; Lyubov G. Bulusheva; Andrew L. Chuvilin; Jean-Marc Bonard

2002-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on September 23, 2009, in the D Area Powerhouse Type B Accident Investigation of the Savannah River Site Arc Flash Burn Injury on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effective dose in the manufacturing process of rutile covered welding electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shielded metal arc welding using covered electrodes is the most common welding process. Sometimes the covering contains naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs). In Spain the most used electrodes are those covered with rutile mixed with other materials. Rutile contains some detectable natural radionuclides, so it can be considered a NORM. This paper mainly focuses on the use of MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) as a predictive tool to obtain doses in a factory which produces this type of electrode and assess the radiological impact in a specific facility after estimating the internal dose.To do this, in the facility, areas of highest radiation and positions of workers were identified, radioactive content of rutile and rutile covered electrodes was measured, and, considering a worst possible scenario, external dose at working points has been calculated using MCNP. This procedure has been validated comparing the results obtained with those from a pressurised ionisation chamber and TLD dosimeters. The internal dose has been calculated using DCAL (dose and risk calculation). The doses range between 8.8 and 394 ?Sv yr?1, always lower than the effective dose limit for the public, 1 mSv yr?1. The highest dose corresponds to the mixing area.

M Herranz; S Rozas; C Pérez; R Idoeta; R Núñez-Lagos; F Legarda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Measurement of the temperature of a pulsating electric arc discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple method for determining the temperature on the axis of an oscillating arc column is proposed.

A. Marotta

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Examination of dissimilar metal welds in BWR and PWR piping  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses dissimilar metal weld examinations at PWRS. Surveys were conducted to document the dissimilar metal weld configurations at PWR plants and to update the information known about dissimilar metal weld configurations at BWR plants. The experiences which BWR utilities have had with dissimilar metal weld examinations are documented and include: correct identification of IGSCC, indications thought to be IGSCC but were actually fabrication flaws, and difficulties encountered with the examination of dissimilar metal welds after stress improvement. An experimental program was conducted which verified that the longitudinal wave procedures developed for BWRs are also applicable to PWR designs.

MacDonald, D.E. [Electric Power Research Inst., Charlotte, NC (United States). NDE Center

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Achievement Rewards for College Scientists ARCS Foundation, Inc. Biomedical and Health Sciences the Atlanta chapter of the ARCS Foundation, Inc. funds eight scholarships for exceptional University.S. citizenship. · GPA of 3.5 or above. · Available to attend the ARCS Foundation Awards Luncheon in Atlanta

Arnold, Jonathan

247

Decomposition of Naphthalene by dc Gliding Arc Gas Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Decomposition of Naphthalene by dc Gliding Arc Gas Discharge ... In the air and oxygen gliding arc discharges, the naphthalene degradation is mainly governed by reactions with oxygen-derived radicals. ... Therefore, the local electric field strength is relatively low in argon gliding arc plasma. ...

Liang Yu; Xiaodong Li; Xin Tu; Yu Wang; Shengyong Lu; Jianhua Yan

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

248

Way to reduce arc voltage losses in hybrid thermionic converters  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results are reported concerning the output and emission characteristics of the arc and hybrid regimes in a plane-parallel thermionic converter with Pt--Zr--O electrode pair. It is shown that arc voltage losses can be reduced to values below those obtainable in ordinary arc thermionic converters.

Tskhakaya, V.K.; Yarygin, V.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effect of soft root weld layer on fracture toughness of under-matched weld joints on Q+T steel  

SciTech Connect

Welding of quenched and tempered (Q+T) high strength low alloyed steels can cause weld strength undermatching to satisfy the toughness requirements for the weld deposit. Cost of pre-heating of these steels can be saved if one can prove that use of soft electrodes for root passes do not endanger the overall quality of the joint. By welding of 40 mm thick Q+T structural steel (grade HT 80), over-matched condition had appeared in the root area of the X-groove weld despite of welding consumable which would give entire weld under-matched properties. This is the effect of weld metal alloying by elements from base material. So, the weld joint is not protected against cold cracking especially in the root region, therefore, a high preheating should be used to reduce the possibility of this phenomenon. In this work soft (lower strength) filler metal was used for first two and four root passes of X-joint. In this case root area was also alloyed by elements from base material and obtained mis-matching factor M was higher than it was expected. So, one homogeneous and two non homogeneous weld joints (with two and four soft passes) were considered. Mechanical properties of weld joints were measured by round tensile bars taken from different parts of the weld. The under-matching factor of weld joint with two and four soft root passes was around 0.80--0.90 in the soft root layer. It was expected that uneven strength distribution along the fatigue crack tip line would affect fracture initiation behavior of all three different weld joints. The metallographical post-test sectioning has revealed the initiation points mainly at the lowest weld metal strength.

Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Praunseis, Z. [Univ. of Maribor (Slovenia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Material Research

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Calculating the parameters of electric-arc heaters with gas-stabilized arcs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We used a turbulent model of a longitudinally streamlined electric arc to derive an analytical solution for the ... of the distribution of the primary flow and discharge parameters in a cylindrical discharge chan...

N. A. Zyrichev

1969-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fluor Hanford Nuclear Material Stabilization Project Welding Manual  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this section of the welding manual is to: (1) Provide a general description of the major responsibilities of the organizations involved with welding. (2) Provide general guidance concerning the application of codes related to welding. This manual contains requirements for welding for all Fluor Hanford (FH) welding operators working on the W460 Project, in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford facilities. These procedures and any additional requirements for these joining processes can be used by all FH welding operators that are qualified. The Welding Procedure Specifications (WPS) found in this document were established from Procedure Qualification Records (PQR) qualified by FH specifically for the W460 Project. PQRs are permanent records of the initial testing and qualification program and are used to backup, and support, the WPS. The identification numbers of the supporting PQR(s) are recorded on each WPS. All PQRs are permanently stored under the supervision of the Fluor Hanford Welding Engineer (FHWE). New PQRs and WPSs will continue to be developed as necessary. The qualification of welders, welding operators and welding procedures will be performed for FH under supervision and concurrent of the FHWE. All new welding procedures to be entered in this manual or welder personnel to be added to the welder qualification database, shall be approved by the FHWE.

BERKEY, J.R.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

Method for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds is disclosed and which includes providing a pair of transducers which are individually positioned on the opposite sides of a partially completed weld to be inspected; moving the transducers along the length of and laterally inwardly and outwardly relative to the partially completed weld; pulsing the respective transducers to produce an ultrasonic signal which passes through or is reflected from the partially completed weld; receiving from the respective transducers ultrasonic signals which pass through or are reflected from the partially completed welds; and analyzing the ultrasonic signal which has passed through or is reflected from the partially completed weld to determine the presence of any weld defects.

Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer ({mu}M) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 {mu}m W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 {mu}m W powder blends; 10{mu}m W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W.

Gurwell, W.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Creep and tensile properties of alloy 800H-Hastelloy X weldments. [HTGR  

SciTech Connect

Hastelloy X and alloy 800H were joined satisfactorily by the gas tungsten arc welding process with ERNiCr-3 filler and the shielded metal arc welding process with Inco Weld A filler. Test specimens were of two types: (1) made entirely of deposited Inco Weld A and (2) machined transverse across the weldments to include Hastelloy X, filler metal (ERNiCr-3 or Inco Weld A), and alloy 800H. They were aged 2000 and 10,000 h and subjected to short-term tensile and creep tests. Inco Weld A and ERNiCr-3 are both suitable filler metals and result in welds that are stronger than the alloy 800H base metal.

McCoy, H. E.; King, J. F.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Concentration-Dependent Kohn Effect in Cubic Tungsten Bronzes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on single crystals of cubic NaxWO3 reveal a large concentration-dependent Kohn anomaly in the [100] longitudinal acoustic-phonon dispersion curve. The results demonstrate the two-dimensional character of the Fermi surface, support the rigid-band model for 0.56tungsten bronzes.

W. A. Kamitakahara, B. N. Harmon, J. G. Taylor, L. Kopp, H. R. Shanks, and J. Rath

1976-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Synthesis, characterization, and structure of reduced tungsten chalcogenide cluster complexes  

SciTech Connect

Over the previous twenty years, ternary molybdenum chalcogenides of the general formula M{sub x}Mo{sub 6}Y{sub 8} (M = ternary metal cation; Y = chalcogenide), known as Chevrel phases, have been extensively studied. Many of these compounds have been found to have superconductivity, catalytic activity and ionic conductivity. The rich chemistry of the Chevrel phases raises considerable interest in finding the tungsten analogues of these phases. However, no such analogue has ever been synthesized, although the Chevrel phases are usually prepared directly from elements at high temperatures above 1000{degrees}C. The absence of the tungsten analogues may be caused by their thermodynamic instability at such high temperatures. Thus it might be necessary to avoid high-temperature synthetic procedures in order to establish the ternary and binary tungsten chalcogenides. A major focus of the McCarley research group has been on the preparation of M{sub 6}Y{sub 8}L{sub 6} (M = Mo, W; Y = S, Se, Te) cluster complexes as low temperature pathways to the Chevrel phases.

Xiaobing, Xie

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Page 1 of 2 -ARC Cost Transfer Guide v. 06/14/13 ARC SPONSORED PROJECT COST TRANSFER GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 of 2 - ARC Cost Transfer Guide v. 06/14/13 ARC SPONSORED PROJECT COST TRANSFER GUIDE There are three ways to move expenditures onto, off of, or between Sponsored Projects in ARC: AP Journal Voucher in which the voucher accounting date falls, and they are being moved to or between Sponsored Projects GL

Hone, James

258

Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.  

SciTech Connect

Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbide Precipitation in Steel Weld Metals www.msm.cam.ac.uk/phase-trans #12 diffusion into austenite Carbon diffusion into austenite and carbide precipitation in ferrite Carbide precipitation from austenite CASE 2: elimination of carbides #12;#12;#12;0.110.090.070.050.03 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

Cambridge, University of

260

CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Localized weld metal corrosion in stainless steel water tanks  

SciTech Connect

The rapidly developed leaks within the TFC and TFD tanks (LLNL groundwater treatment facilities) were caused by localized corrosion within the resolidified weld metal. The corrosion was initiated by the severe oxidation of the backsides of the welds which left the exposed surfaces in a condition highly susceptible to aqueous corrosion. The propagation of surface corrosion through the thickness of the welds occurred by localized corrosive attack. This localized attack was promoted by the presence of shielded aqueous environments provided by crevices at the root of the partial penetration welds. In addition to rapid corrosion of oxidized surfaces, calcium carbonate precipitation provided an additional source of physical shielding from the bulk tank environment. Qualification testing of alternate weld procedures showed that corrosion damage can be prevented in 304L stainless steel GTA welds by welding from both sides while preventing oxidation of the tank interior through the use of an inert backing gas such as argon. Corrosion resistance was also satisfactory in GMA welds in which oxidized surfaces were postweld cleaned by wire brushing and chemically passivated in nitric acid. Further improvements in corrosion resistance are expected from a Mo-containing grade of stainless steel such as type 316L, although test results were similar for type 304L sheet welded with type 308L filler metal and type 316L sheet welded with type 316L filler metal.

Strum, M.J.

1995-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hybrid Arc Cell Studies: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

I report on the status, at the end of FY12, of the studies of an arc cell for a hybrid synchrotron accelerating from 375 GeV/c to 750 GeV/c in momentum. Garren produced a complete lattice that gives a good outline of the structure of a hybrid synchrotron lattice. It is, however, lacking in some details: it does not maintain a constant time of flight, it lacks chromaticity correction, its cell structure is not ideal for removing aberrations from chromaticity correction, and it probably needs more space between magnets. I have begun studying cell structures for the arc cells to optimize the lattice performance and cost. I present some preliminary results for two magnets per half cell. I then discuss difficulties encountered, some preliminary attempts at resolving them, and the future plans for this work.

Berg J. S.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium  

SciTech Connect

Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ionsource. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials inthe Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-likebehavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arctriggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsecand 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150microsec, respectively. Both ion charge states and ion velocities decayfurther towards steady state values, which are not reached within the 300microsec pulses used here. It is argued that the exceptionally high vaporpressure and charge exchange reactions are associated with theestablishment of steady state ion values.

Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections  

SciTech Connect

Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

R. Camp

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloys laser welded Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

laser welded Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alloys laser welded Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The influence of laser welding...

266

Development of New Ultrasonic Inspection Technique for Spot Welds with Matrix Arrayed Probe and SAFT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A portable type of 3D ultrasonic inspection system, named “Matrixeye”, was applied to the spot welds, in which a matrix-arrayed probe was used as a sensing unit, and the welding zone in the spot welds was visuali...

T. Ikeda; H. Karasawa; S. Matsumoto; S. Satonaka; C. Iwamoto

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Delivery quality assurance with ArcCHECK  

SciTech Connect

Radiation therapy requires delivery quality assurance (DQA) to ensure that treatment is accurate and closely follows the plan. We report our experience with the ArcCHECK phantom and investigate its potential optimization for the DQA process. One-hundred seventy DQA plans from 84 patients were studied. Plans were classified into 2 groups: those with the target situated on the diodes of the ArcCHECK (D plans) and those with the target situated at the center (C plans). Gamma pass rates for 8 target sites were examined. The parameters used to analyze the data included 3%/3 mm with the Van Dyk percent difference criteria (VD) on, 3%/3 mm with the VD off, 2%/2 mm with the VD on, and x/3 mm with the VD on and the percentage dosimetric agreement “x” for diode plans adjusted. D plans typically displayed maximum planned dose (MPD) on the cylindrical surface containing ArcCHECK diodes than center plans, resulting in inflated gamma pass rates. When this was taken into account by adjusting the percentage dosimetric agreement, C plans outperformed D plans by an average of 3.5%. ArcCHECK can streamline the DQA process, consuming less time and resources than radiographic films. It is unnecessary to generate 2 DQA plans for each patient; a single center plan will suffice. Six of 8 target sites consistently displayed pass rates well within our acceptance criteria; the lesser performance of head and neck and spinal sites can be attributed to marginally lower doses and increased high gradient of plans.

Neilson, Christopher; Klein, Michael; Barnett, Rob [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada); Yartsev, Slav, E-mail: slav.yartsev@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair Develop baseline computational model for proactive welding stress management to suppress helium induced cracking during weld repair There are over 100 nuclear power plants operating in the U.S., which generate approximately 20% of the nation's electricity. These plants range from 15 to 40 years old. Extending the service lives of the current fleet of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years is imperative to allow for the environmentally-sustainable energy infrastructure being developed and matured. Welding repair of irradiated nuclear reactor materials (such as austenitic stainless steels) is especially challenging because of the

269

Process-control in laser welding utilising optical signal oscillations  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe an optical sensor for process monitoring of Nd:YAG laser welding. This sensor detects the broadband radiation produced by the welding process, dividing it into broad spectral bands (designated as UV/visible and IR). Fourier analysis is used to investigate an oscillatory intensity modulation of the optical signals, believed to arise from a combination of keyhole and weld pool oscillations. The spectral content of the oscillations may be used to detect a fully open welding keyhole, and determine work-piece thickness in this welding regime. These oscillations have also been utilized in the construction of a seam tracking system which allows the authors to follow the seam of a lap-weld. Additional signal processing also allows optimum positioning of the laser spot.

Haran, F.M.; Hand, D.P.; Jones, J.D.C. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Influence of wet underwater welding on fracture values  

SciTech Connect

The fracture behavior of welds is influenced by residual stresses. The influence of residual stresses on fracture parameters is investigated through the comparison of wet underwater welds, dry welds and welds without residual stresses. The fracture parameters for a sharp, stationary crack on the surface of a bead on plate weld under bending are determined by the finite element method. The geometric influence of weld on fracture parameters is investigated. The stress intensity factor for linear elastic fracture mechanics, the J-integral and the crack tip opening displacement for plastic fracture mechanics are calculated. The material behavior is assumed as linear elastic or linear elastic/ideal plastic or elastic plastic with multilinear isotropic hardening. The numerical data are compared with the experiments.

Lindhorst, L.; Hamann, R.; Mahrenholtz, O. [Technical Univ. of Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany). Offshore Engineering Section 2; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Material Research

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer  

SciTech Connect

A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Conductive Polypyrrole/Tungsten Oxide Metacomposites with Negative Permittivity Jiahua Zhu,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) nanocomposites reinforced with tungsten oxide (WO3) nanoparticles (NPs) and nanorods (NRs) are fabricatedConductive Polypyrrole/Tungsten Oxide Metacomposites with Negative Permittivity Jiahua Zhu, Suying techniques to form PNCs. Therefore, synthesis techniques have been developed and optimized to incorporate

Guo, John Zhanhu

273

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes S. S. Harilal,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes S. S. Harilal,1 N. Farid,1,2 A tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features for a cost effective way for various applica- tions. Typical synthesis methods for nanoparticles are liquid

Harilal, S. S.

274

The Activation Energy of the para-Hydrogen Conversion on Tungsten  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article The Activation Energy of the para-Hydrogen Conversion on Tungsten A. Couper D. D. Eley...has been made of the activation energy, E, and frequency factor, B , for the conversion of para-hydrogen on tungsten...

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J. Keinonen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J-principles calculations were used in determining the binding and trapping properties of hydrogen to point defects in tungsten. Hydrogen zero-point vibrations were taken into account. It was concluded that the monovacancy can

Nordlund, Kai

276

Nanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a possibility of replacing precious metal anode catalysts with transition metal compounds for hydrogen oxidation density of states of tungsten carbides resembles that of noble metal platinum.4,5 FundamentalNanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga and C. Y

277

Industry standards catch up with in-service welding  

SciTech Connect

Welding onto a pipeline after it has been put into service, a practice commonly referred to as hot tap welding, is frequently required for several reasons. Repair sleeves are installed to reinforce areas of corrosion or mechanical damage, and branch connections are made for system modifications. There are often significant economic incentives to perform this welding without removing the system from service. Operations are maintained during welding and the pipe's contents are not vented into the atmosphere. Due to technological advances in in-service welding, industry needed an update to standards and recommended practices. This year, the American Petroleum Institute (API) hopes to meet that need. The 19th edition of API Standard 1104--Welding of Pipelines and Related Facilities, includes a new appendix that pertains to in-service welding. Appendix B, In-Service Welding, is intended to eventually replace API Recommended Practice 1107--Pipeline Maintenance Welding Practices. API 1107, which was introduced in 1966 and updated in 1987 and 1991, is intended to provide recommended practices for pipeline maintenance welding. The current third edition approached its mandatory five-year review in 1996 by the API-AGA Joint Committee on Oil and Gas Pipeline Field Welding Practices, which also maintains API 1104. The committee saw 11078 needed to reflect the updates that had been made to 1104 as well as the technological advances for in-service welding. To alleviate redundancy between the two documents, and to alleviate lag time between updates, the committee approved a proposal to update and incorporate requirements of API 1107 into an appendix of API 1104. In the meantime, the third edition of API 1107 was reapproved for another five-year review cycle.

Bruce, W.A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Heat of combustion of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composites  

SciTech Connect

The heat of combustion of two distinctly synthesized stoichiometric tantalum-tungsten oxide energetic composites was investigated by bomb calorimetry. One composite was synthesized using a sol-gel (SG) derived method in which micrometric-scale tantalum is immobilized in a tungsten oxide three-dimensional nanostructured network structure. The second energetic composite was made from the mixing of micrometric-scale tantalum and commercially available (CA) nanometric tungsten oxide powders. The energetic composites were consolidated using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique under a 300 MPa pressure and at temperatures of 25, 400, and 500 C. For samples consolidated at 25 C, the density of the CA composite is 61.65 {+-} 1.07% in comparison to 56.41 {+-} 1.19% for the SG derived composite. In contrast, the resulting densities of the SG composite are higher than the CA composite for samples consolidated at 400 and 500 C. The theoretical maximum density for the SG composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 81.30 {+-} 0.58% and 84.42 {+-} 0.62%, respectively. The theoretical maximum density of the CA composite consolidated to 400 and 500 C are 74.54 {+-} 0.80% and 77.90 {+-} 0.79%, respectively. X-ray diffraction analyses showed an increase of pre-reaction of the constituents with an increase in the consolidation temperature. The increase in pre-reaction results in lower stored energy content for samples consolidated to 400 and 500 C in comparison to samples consolidated at 25 C. (author)

Cervantes, Octavio G. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Munir, Zuhair A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the metalworking, mining, oil- and gas-drilling, and construction industries. The remaining tungsten was consumed inventory inventory for disposal FY 2007 FY 2007 Ferrotungsten 6 136 Metal powder 268 268 136 34 Ores

280

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic welding Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 34 Automated system for welding-based rapid prototyping Summary: Automated system for welding-based rapid prototyping Yu Ming...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

284

SF 2001-WLD;CONTRACTOR WELDING, CUTTING AND BRAZING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

closet, manhole sewer, confined space and activity. Example: Bldg 890 mechanical room steam line piping that runs thru ceiling space requires overhead welding: SF 2001-WLD...

285

Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Farid, N. [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States) [Center for Materials Under Extreme Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Kozhevin, V. M. [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)] [Ioffe Physics Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation  

SciTech Connect

The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

Sun, Shih-Jye [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Ju, Shin-Pon, E-mail: jushin-pon@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrochemistry of chemical vapor deposited tungsten films with relevance to chemical mechanical polishing  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical behavior of chemically vapor deposited tungsten films in solutions of interest to tungsten chemical mechanical polishing has been investigated using dc potentiodynamic polarization, linear polarization, and Tafel methods. It was found that in the absence of an oxidizer, the tungsten surface was passivated most effectively at acidic pH values. At pH 2 or 4, a WO{sub 2}/WO{sub 3} duplex oxide layer of less than 50 A thickness was detected over the tungsten layer by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The oxide layer formed at pH 2 was much thicker, and had better passivity compared to the oxide formed at pH 4. Addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at pH 2 or 4 resulted in a dramatic increase in tungsten dissolution.

Kneer, E.A.; Raghunath, C.; Raghavan, S. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Jeon, J.S. [Advanced Micro Devices Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Arc Flash Boundary Calculations Using Computer Software Tools  

SciTech Connect

Arc Flash Protection boundary calculations have become easier to perform with the availability of personal computer software. These programs incorporate arc flash protection boundary formulas for different voltage and current levels, calculate the bolted fault current at each bus, and use built in time-current coordination curves to determine the clearing time of protective devices in the system. Results of the arc flash protection boundary calculations can be presented in several different forms--as an annotation to the one-line diagram, as a table of arc flash protection boundary distances, and as printed placards to be attached to the appropriate equipment. Basic arc flash protection boundary principles are presented in this paper along with several helpful suggestions for performing arc flash protection boundary calculations.

Gibbs, M.D.

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition  

SciTech Connect

Arcing is a well-known, unwanted discharge regime observed on the surface of sputtering targets. The discharge voltage breaks down to less than 50 V while the current jumps to elevated levels. Arcing is unwanted because it prevents uniform deposition and creates particulates. The issue of arcing has been dealt with by target surface conditioning and by using modern power supplies that have arc suppression incorporated. With increasing quality requirements in terms of uniformity of coatings, and absence of particulates, especially for electrochromic and other advanced coatings applications, the issue of arcing warrants a closer examination with the goal to find other, physics-based, and hopefully better approaches of arcing prevention. From a physics point of view, the onset of arcing is nothing else than the transition of the discharge to a cathodic arc mode, which is characterized by the ignition of non-stationary arc spots. Arc spots operate by a sequence of microexplosions, enabling explosive electron emission, as opposed to secondary electron emission. Arc spots and their fragments have a size distribution in the micrometer and sub-micrometer range, and a characteristic time distribution that has components shorter than microseconds. Understanding the ignition conditions of arc spots are of central physical interest. Spot ignition is associated with electric field enhancement, which can be of geometric nature (roughness,particles), or chemical nature (e.g. oxide formation) and related local accumulation of surface charge. Therefore, it is clear that these issues are of particular concern when operating with high-density plasmas, such as in high-power pulsed sputtering, and when using reactive sputter gases.

Anders, Andre

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Tungsten and tungsten-alloy powder metallurgy: Powder production and applications-excluding lamps. November 1971-July 1989 (Citations from the US Patent data base). Report for November 1971-July 1989  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the preparation of metallic and ceramic powders of tungsten and tungsten alloys including various applications of these materials. The hydrogen reduction of tungsten compounds together with alloying-element compounds produce forms with characteristics of high density, hardness, wear resistance, high melting points, and abrasiveness. Topics include production of various cathodes, heaters, filament wires, electrical contacts, acoustic absorbers, high-density sheets and coatings, hard penetrators, and tungsten carbide and metallized ceramics. Tungsten halogen lamps are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 60 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Carbon Diffusion Across Dissimilar Steel Welds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of recrystallised ferrite. The major consequence of carbon diffusion is a loss of strength in the carbon depleted region and an increase in hardness in the carburised region. These zones are immediately adjacent to one another and provide a significant change... , tungsten and niobium, a sequence of alloy carbides may be formed, giving rise to the more complex M23C6 and M6C carbides at higher tempering temperatures. In this notation "M" indicates a mixture of metal atoms. Nutting (1969) summarises the sequence...

Race, Julia Margaret

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

292

Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs Johanna Roséndistributions (IEDs) in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmasfor vacuum arc plasmas. Aluminum plasma, for example,

Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

294

Spot welding of steel and aluminum using insert sheet  

SciTech Connect

Automobile industries have been increasingly interested in the use of aluminum and thus joining of steel and aluminum becomes of importance. The joining of the two types of metal raises a problem of brittle welds caused by the formation of intermetallic compounds. The authors solved the problem by using an insert sheet. This paper deals with the resistance spot welding of steel and aluminum sheets using insert sheets. The insert sheet used in the present development was a steel/aluminum clad sheet of the 0.8 mm thickness with 50% steel and 50% aluminum. The clad sheet was produced by warm rolling of steel and aluminum with a direct resistance heating process. Steel to be warm rolled was of EDDQ of the 0.4 mm thickness and aluminum was of JIS A1050 of 0.6 mm thickness. The mechanical properties of the insert clad sheets were in between those of the steel sheets and the aluminum sheets, while the clad sheets showed much better formability than the aluminum sheets. Resistance spot welding was conducted for 0.8 mm thick EDDQ steel sheets and 1.0 mm thick aluminum alloy (AL-5.5%Mg) sheets under the welding force of 1.96 kN, welding current ranging between 4.2 and 20.1 kA, and welding time from 0.5 to 10 cycles. The steel was spot welded to the steel side of the insert sheet while the aluminum was welded to the aluminum side. What the authors investigated were the applicable welding current range, nugget diameter, tensile shear strength, U-tension strength, and macro- and microstructures. In conclusion, steel sheets can be spot welded to aluminum sheets without difficulty by using clad sheets as insert materials while the strength level of the dissimilar metal spot welds is close to that of aluminum joints.

Oikawa, H.; Saito, T.; Yoshimura, T. [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

A New Survey for Giant Arcs  

SciTech Connect

We report on the first results of an imaging survey to detect strong gravitational lensing targeting the richest clusters selected from the photometric data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with follow-up deep imaging observations from the Wisconsin Indiana Yale NOAO (WIYN) 3.5m telescope and the University of Hawaii 88-inch telescope (UH88). The clusters are selected from an area of 8000 deg{sup 2} using the Red Cluster Sequence technique and span the redshift range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.6, corresponding to a comoving cosmological volume of {approx} 2Gpc{sup 3}. Our imaging survey thus targets a volume more than an order of magnitude larger than any previous search. A total of 240 clusters were imaged of which 141 had sub-arcsecond image quality. Our survey has uncovered 16 new lensing clusters with definite giant arcs, an additional 12 systems for which the lensing interpretation is very likely, and 9 possible lenses which contain shorter arclets or candidate arcs which are less certain and will require further observations to confirm their lensing origin. The number of new cluster lenses detected in this survey is likely > 30. Among these new systems are several of the most dramatic examples of strong gravitational lensing ever discovered with multiple bright arcs at large angular separation. These will likely become 'poster-child' gravitational lenses similar to Abell 1689 and CL0024+1654. The new lenses discovered in this survey will enable future systematic studies of the statistics of strong lensing and its implications for cosmology and our structure formation paradigm.

Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Oguri, Masamune; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Strauss, Michael A.; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Lin,; Lampeitl, Hubert; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Schneider, Donald P.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Modeling of thermal plasma arc technology FY 1994 report  

SciTech Connect

The thermal plasma arc process is under consideration to thermally treat hazardous and radioactive waste. A computer model for the thermal plasma arc technology was designed as a tool to aid in the development and use of the plasma arc-Joule beating process. The value of this computer model is to: (a) aid in understanding the plasma arc-Joule beating process as applied to buried waste or exhumed buried waste, (b) help design melter geometry and electrode configuration, (c) calculate the process capability of vitrifying waste (i.e., tons/hour), (d) develop efficient plasma and melter operating conditions to optimize the process and/or reduce safety hazards, (e) calculate chemical reactions during treatment of waste to track chemical composition of off-gas products, and composition of final vitrified waste form and (f) help compare the designs of different plasma-arc facilities. A steady-state model of a two-dimensional axisymmetric transferred plasma arc has been developed and validated. A parametric analysis was performed that studied the effects of arc length, plasma gas composition, and input power on the temperatures and velocity profiles of the slag and plasma gas. A two-dimensional transient thermo-fluid model of the US Bureau of Mines plasma arc melter has been developed. This model includes the growth of a slag pool. The thermo-fluid model is used to predict the temperature and pressure fields within a plasma arc furnace. An analysis was performed to determine the effects of a molten metal pool on the temperature, velocity, and voltage fields within the slag. A robust and accurate model for the chemical equilibrium calculations has been selected to determine chemical composition of final waste form and off-gas based on the temperatures and pressures within the plasma-arc furnace. A chemical database has been selected. The database is based on the materials to be processed in the plasma arc furnaces.

Hawkes, G.L.; Nguyen, H.D.; Paik, S.; McKellar, M.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

WELDING RESEARCH JUNE 2007, VOL. 86-s170  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance, Fe-Al weld cladding is susceptible to cracking due to hydrogen embrittlement at elevated aluminum cracking of FeAl and Fe3Al intermetallics is due to hydrogen embrittlement. In that work, the room investigated the effect of chromium on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld cladding. The results

DuPont, John N.

298

The effect of phosphorus on the formation of tungsten dioxide: A novel morphology  

SciTech Connect

The industrial production of tungsten is based on the hydrogen reduction of tungsten oxides, ammonium paratungstate (APT) or ammonium tungsten oxide bronze (ATOB). Hydrogen reduction is applied when high purity tungsten is required and when the addition of other elements or compounds (dopants) is desired for modification of the properties of the metal powder. The first stage of the reduction is finished when WO{sub 2} is formed and it seems that the efficient incorporation of the additives starts mainly at this reduction step. The study reported here was undertaken to investigate the effect of phosphorus dope on the morphology of the intermediate tungsten dioxide and analyze its influence on the grain size of the final tungsten metal powder. The authors observed star shaped morphology of WO{sub 2}, a structure which has not been describe in the literature. Contrary to the well-known cauliflower shaped tungsten dioxide, these starlets are not pseudomorphic to the initial ATOB particles; they grow separately and have a great influence on the grain size of the final metal powder.

Hegedus, E.; Neugebauer, J. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Research Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science] [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Research Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science

1999-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

299

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc magmatism isotopic Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Nakamura (1993) Nature 370 e.g. Izu arc: Ishikawa & Nakamura (1993) Nature 370 Boron isotopes help... --Th isotopes in arc magmasTh isotopes in arc magmas For equilibrium:...

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc northwesternmost california Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

365 ARC JIW Engineering Design Requirements (4... 201 2. ARC 203 2. ARC 204 (studio) 3. PHY 103 3. PHY ... Source: Bou-Zeid, Elie - Department of Civil and Environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc detector system Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by hand later) Summary: . The spatial resolution is approximately 1 arc sec in the E-W direction and 2 arc sec along the slit (N... ,0) (3,0) (0,910) Slit n ? (arc sec 2 ) ...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted non-consumable arc Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: assisted non-consumable arc Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 GIS by ESRITM What is ArcGIS Summary: GIS by ESRITM What is ArcGIS TM ? 12;Copyright ...

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc dynamic behavior Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: arc dynamic behavior Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 GIS by ESRITM What is ArcGIS Summary: and events Dynamic segmentation Importing ArcView GIS...

304

CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan Performance Objective: This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks. Criteria: Establish designated area in which routine and repetitive welding, cutting, and other spark- or flame producing operations are conducted [1910.252(a)(2)(iv),1910.252(a)(2)(vi)(A), 1910.252(a)(2)(xv), General Requirements].

305

Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect

Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Residual Stress Determination for A Ferritic Steel Weld Plate  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this experiment is to demonstrate the capability of neutron diffraction technique to reproducibly map residual strains in a ferritic steel weld. The objective includes the identification of corrections for variations in metal composition due to the welding process which produces changes in lattice parameter that are not due to mechanical effects. The second objective is to develop and demonstrate a best practice for neutron diffraction strain mapping of steel welds. The appropriate coordinate system for the measurement of a weld, which is strongly distorted from planar geometry, has to be defined. The coordinate system is important in determining the procedures for mounting and positioning of the weld so that mapping details, especially in regions of high gradients, can be conveniently inter-compared between laboratories.

Wang, D.-Q.; Hubbard, C.R.; Spooner, S.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

F i W ldi PFusion Welding -Processes ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview · Types of fusion welding ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 3 #12Summary · Types of fusion welding ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 25 #12.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid

Colton, Jonathan S.

308

17 The Intelligent Welding Gun: Augmented Reality for Experimental Vehicle Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17 The Intelligent Welding Gun: Augmented Reality for Experimental Vehicle Construction Florian presents the prototypical design and implementation of an Intelligent Welding Gun to help welders is the Intelligent Welding Gun ­ a regular welding gun with a display attachment, a few buttons for user in

Bruegge, Bernd

309

Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

Carmignani, B

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition  

SciTech Connect

A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China); Institute of Powder Metallurgy and Advanced Ceramics, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111, 1st Section, Northern 2nd Ring Road, Chengdu (China); Yan, Qingzhi, E-mail: qzyan@ustb.edu.cn; Lang, Shaoting [Institute of Special Ceramics and Powder Metallurgy, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing (China)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Arc Geometry and Algebra: Foliations, Moduli Spaces, String ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exhaustive if wti(?) = 0 for all i. We set Arcs g(r ?1) ? As g,r and DArcs g(r ?1) ? Ds g,r to be the subsets of exhaustive elements. We furthermore set Arc(n) = ?g,

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Connecting ARC/INFO and SNACTor Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connecting ARC/INFO and SNACTor Project Report June 1991 Stuart C. Shapiro, Hans Chalupsky;Connecting ARC/INFO* and SNACTor --- Project Report1 Stuart C. Shapiro2 , Hans Chalupsky2 and Hsueh and reasoning system developed by Stuart C. Shapiro et al. at the State University of New York at Buffalo

California at Santa Barbara, University of

313

Mechanism of carbon nanostructure synthesis in arc plasma  

SciTech Connect

Plasma enhanced techniques are widely used for synthesis of carbon nanostructures. The primary focus of this paper is to summarize recent experimental and theoretical advances in understanding of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) synthesis mechanism in arcs, and to describe methods of controlling arc plasma parameters. Fundamental issues related to synthesis of SWNTs, which is a relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics are considered. It is shown that characteristics of synthesized SWNTs can be altered by varying plasma parameters. Effects of electrical and magnetic fields applied during SWNT synthesis in arc plasma are explored. Magnetic field has a profound effect on the diameter, chirality, and length of a SWNT synthesized in the arc plasma. An average length of SWNT increases by a factor of 2 in discharge with magnetic field and an amount of long nanotubes with the length above 5 {mu}m also increases in comparison with that observed in the discharge without a magnetic field. In addition, synthesis of a few-layer graphene in a magnetic field presence is discovered. A coupled model of plasma-electrode phenomena in atmospheric-pressure anodic arc in helium is described. Calculations indicate that substantial fraction of the current at the cathode is conducted by ions (0.7-0.9 of the total current). It is shown that nonmonotonic behavior of the arc current-voltage characteristic can be reproduced taking into account the experimentally observed dependence of the arc radius on arc current.

Keidar, M.; Shashurin, A.; Volotskova, O. [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Beilis, I. I. [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Quiz # 7, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, April 8, 2009 (Q2, Page 354) To decide whether the pipe welds in a nuclear power plant meet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

welds in a nuclear power plant meet specifications, a random sample of welds is to be selected : µ nuclear power plants is to determine if welds

Sanyal, Suman

315

Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding  

SciTech Connect

Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal  

SciTech Connect

The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

Babu, N. Kishore [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site Darwin: The Third DOE ARM TWP ARCS Site W. E. Clements and L. Jones Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico T. Baldwin Special Services Unit Australian Bureau of Meteorology Melbourne, Australia K. Nitschke South Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia, Samoa Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program began operations in its Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale in October 1996 when the first Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Station (ARCS) began collecting data on Manus Island in Papua New Guinea (PNG). Two years later, in November 1998 a second ARCS began operations on the island of Nauru in the Central Pacific. Now a third ARCS has begun collecting data in Darwin, Australia. See Figure 1 for

318

Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - area filtered arc Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Kentucky Collection: Engineering 3 GIS by ESRITM What is ArcGIS Summary: and terrainmodelingcapabilities. ArcGIS 3D Analyst...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - andean arc magmatism Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia... - genian magmatic arc. Zircon and titanite in four samples from Mashigin Fjord and Matochkin Strait yield U... ). The events at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

S&TR | March/April 2008: Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding. Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding. WELDED materials are an integral part of everyday life. Appliances, cars, and bridges are all made by welding materials together. But not all welds are created equal. Welding methods vary in complexity, time, and cost, depending on a product's requirements and purpose. In electron-beam (EBeam) welding, an electron beam generated in a vacuum creates a fusing heat source that can unite almost any metals. This method produces deep welds without adding excessive heat that can adversely affect the properties of the surrounding metal. In the nuclear energy and aerospace industries, electron-beam welding is preferred for manufacturing high-value welds-those in which defects cannot be tolerated. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) nuclear weapons

322

Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

Ren, Weiju

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

An algorithm to calculate a collapsed arc dose matrix in volumetric modulated arc therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The delivery of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is more complex than other conformal radiotherapy techniques. In this work, the authors present the feasibility of performing routine verification of VMAT delivery using a dose matrix measured by a gantry mounted 2D ion chamber array and corresponding dose matrix calculated by an inhouse developed algorithm.Methods: Pinnacle, v9.0, treatment planning system (TPS) was used in this study to generate VMAT plans for a 6 MV photon beam from an Elekta-Synergy linear accelerator. An algorithm was developed and implemented with inhouse computer code to calculate the dose matrix resulting from a VMAT arc in a plane perpendicular to the beam at isocenter. The algorithm was validated using measurement of standard patterns and clinical VMAT plans with a 2D ion chamber array. The clinical VMAT plans were also validated using ArcCHECK measurements. The measured and calculated dose matrices were compared using gamma ({gamma}) analysis with 3%/3 mm criteria and {gamma} tolerance of 1.Results: The dose matrix comparison of standard patterns has shown excellent agreement with the mean {gamma} pass rate 97.7 ({sigma}= 0.4)%. The validation of clinical VMAT plans using the dose matrix predicted by the algorithm and the corresponding measured dose matrices also showed good agreement with the mean {gamma} pass rate of 97.6 ({sigma}= 1.6)%. The validation of clinical VMAT plans using ArcCHECK measurements showed a mean pass rate of 95.6 ({sigma}= 1.8)%.Conclusions: The developed algorithm was shown to accurately predict the dose matrix, in a plane perpendicular to the beam, by considering all possible leaf trajectories in a VMAT delivery. This enables the verification of VMAT delivery using a 2D array detector mounted on a treatment head.

Arumugam, Sankar; Xing Aitang [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Jameson, Michael [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); South West Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Microsoft Word - Lamellae tungsten tile design thermal and electromagnetic stress analysis_Final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lamellae tungsten tile design transient Lamellae tungsten tile design transient thermal/ electromagnetic stress analysis Thomas Willard*, Rui Vieira, Samuel Pierson MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 8 June 2006 Abstract A transient thermal/ electromagnetic stress analysis of the lamellae tungsten tile design has been performed to determine if the design is adequate to meet the maximum design load conditions of 12 MW/ m 2 uniform heat flux for 5 seconds (single pulse, no Diverter Plate temperature ratcheting) , superimposed on the electromagnetic body load due to eddy currents generated by disruptions. The results show that the design is adequate, with the stresses in the tungsten lamellae and the TZM molybdenum hardware less than the ultimate strength of

325

Tungsten-Titanium as Advanced Material for RF-MEMS Switches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present first results on the development of high temperature stable tungsten-titanium (WTi) based MEMS cantilevers, using conventional sputter ... and wet chemical etching. By synthesizing two WTi

Stefan Klein; Helmut Seidel; Ulrich Schmidt…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Simulation Studies of Hydrogen Ion reflection from Tungsten for the Surface Production of Negative Hydrogen Ions  

SciTech Connect

The production efficiency of negative ions at tungsten surface by particle reflection has been investigated. Angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected hydrogen ions from tungsten surface are calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. The results obtained with ACAT have indicated that angular distributions of reflected hydrogen ions show narrow distributions for low-energy incidence such as 50 eV, and energy spectra of reflected ions show sharp peaks around 90% of incident energy. These narrow angular distributions and sharp peaks are favorable for the efficient extraction of negative ions from an ion source equipped with tungsten surface as negative ionization converter. The retained hydrogen atoms in tungsten lead to the reduction in extraction efficiency due to boarded angular distributions.

Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Wada, Motoi [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0394 (Japan)

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Multiphysics Design and Simulation of a Tungsten-Cermet Nuclear Thermal Rocket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel safety have sparked interest in an NTR core based on tungsten-cermet fuel. This work investigates the capability of modern CFD and neutronics codes to design a cermet NTR, and makes specific recommendations for the configuration of channels...

Appel, Bradley

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tantalum–tungsten oxide thermite composites prepared by sol–gel synthesis and spark plasma sintering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energetic composite powders consisting of sol–gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and the results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High-Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol–gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol–gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta–WO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g cm?3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

Joshua D. Kuntz; Octavio G. Cervantes; Alexander E. Gash; Zuhair A. Munir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Electropolymerized Polyaniline Stabilized Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposite Films: Electrochromic Behavior and Electrochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electropolymerized Polyaniline Stabilized Tungsten Oxide Nanocomposite Films: Electrochromic. The optical properties and electrochemical capacitive behaviors of the composite films for electrochromic (EC electrochromism at both positive and negative potentials arising from PANI and WO3, respectively. A coloration

Guo, John Zhanhu

330

Method of producing tungsten-titanium sputter targets and targets produced thereby  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for preparing a tungsten-titanium sputter target having substantially no [beta](Ti,W) phase present and exhibiting improvement in reduction of particulate emission upon sputtering, comprising: (a) providing powders of said tungsten and titanium wherein said titanium powder is present in an amount of about 1-20 wt. % based on the total weight of said tungsten and titanium powders provided; (b) compacting said powders at a pressure of from about 200 to 1,000 MPa; and (c) heating said powders at a temperature from about 600-882 C. A method for preparing a tungsten-titanium sputtering target having substantially no [beta](Ti,W) phase present and exhibiting improvement in reduction of particulate emission upon sputtering.

Wickersham, C.E. Jr.; Mueller, J.J.

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline tungsten matrix Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to be easily resolved (P. Piccoli and B. Stuller). WDS map of tungsten in a titanite (CaTiSiO5) grain from... the Cathedral Peak Granodiorite, Yosemite National Park. The...

332

Mechanical and metallurgical properties of MMC friction welds  

SciTech Connect

The mechanical and metallurgical properties of similar and dissimilar welds involving aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) base material were investigated using factorial experimentation. The test materials comprised aluminum-based alloy 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (W6A.10A-T6), aluminum Alloy 6061-T6 and AISI 304 stainless steel. Notch tensile strength increased when high friction pressures were employed during MMC/MMC, MMC/Alloy 6061, MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel and Alloy 6061/Alloy 6061 friction welding. In MMC/Alloy 6061 welds, notch tensile strength also increased when high forging pressures were employed. Applied oxide films on both the MMC and AISI stainless steel substrates had a markedly detrimental effect on dissimilar weld mechanical properties. The optimum notch tensile strength properties were produced when high friction pressure values were applied during dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel welding. High friction pressure had two beneficial effects, i.e., it decreased the thickness of the FeAl{sub 3} intermetallic film and it promoted disruption and dispersal of oxide films at the joint interface. In direct contrast, the presence of thick anodized oxide films on the MMC substrate surface prior to friction welding had no observable influence on MMC/MMC weld mechanical properties.

Li, Z.; Maldonado, C.; North, T.H. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science; Altshuller, B. [Alcan R and D Labs., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal and molecular investigation of laser tissue welding  

SciTech Connect

Despite the growing number of successful animal and human trials, the exact mechanisms of laser tissue welding remain unknown. Furthermore, the effects of laser heating on tissue on the molecular scale are not fully understood. To address these issues, a multi-front attack oil both extrinsic (solder/patch mediated) and intrinsic (laser only) tissue welding was launched using two-color infrared thermometry, computer modeling, weld strength assessment, biochemical assays, and vibrational spectroscopy. The coupling of experimentally measured surface temperatures with the predictive numerical simulations provided insight into the sub-surface dynamics of the laser tissue welding process. Quantification of the acute strength of the welds following the welding procedure enabled comparison among trials during an experiment, with previous experiments, and with other studies in the literature. The acute weld integrity also provided an indication of tile probability of long-term success. Molecular effects induced In the tissue by laser irradiation were investigated by measuring tile concentrations of specific collagen covalent crosslinks and characterizing the Fourier-Transform infrared (FTIR) spectra before and after the laser exposure.

Small, W., IV

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

New development activities in the field of wet welding  

SciTech Connect

The Wet Welding process has now become an interesting alternative repair process due to its high flexibility, its low investment costs and its high versatility. However, due to the prior bad reputation of the in former times achievable low weldment quality, due to extremely high hardness, high porosity, high hydrogen contamination and in combination with this high cracking susceptibility the wet welding process nowadays requires further activities to improve its reputation and credibility. New acceptance criteria, more detailed information on the achievable weldment quality and especially the development of life prediction data for wet welded components are now required. Advanced testing methods are necessary, additional design criteria are to be developed and achievable weldment quality data are to be included in acknowledged and approved standards and recommendations. Only by the provision of such data the credibility of the process and the problem of quality assurance for wet welded joints can be improved. In two comprehensive projects, sponsored by the European Community under the Thermie Programme, process development and new testing procedures have bene procured and are still under progress to generate the required data and new design criteria for the future application of the wet welding process to main components of offshore structures. The water depths in the range of 50 to 100 msw have been selected for the application of the wet welding process to structural components, as these depths include that range of application in which this process can become competitive to the hyperbaric dry welding process. The international trend to mechanize and automate the hyperbaric welding processes in dry environments can even be completed by the application of a semiautomatic wet welding process, which has already shown very promising results. This process is applicable to mechanized systems (e.g. to a wet robot system).

Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffbau; Lafaye, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway, S.A., Marseille (France)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Dissimilar friction welding of titanium alloys to alloy 718  

SciTech Connect

The design of advanced, high-performance gas-turbine engines will require the utilization of elevated-temperature titanium-based materials, including conventional alloys, titanium aluminides, and titanium metal-matrix composites. The most efficient utilization of these materials in the engine compressor section would be achieved by directly joining these materials to existing nickel-base superalloys, such as Alloy 718. To date, the dissimilar welding of titanium alloys to nickel-based alloys has not been common practice because intermetallic compounds form in the weld and cause embrittlement. Special welding techniques must be developed to inhibit this compound formation and to provide high strength welds. In this investigation, a friction welding process was developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718. An interlayer system comprised of copper and niobium sheet layers was employed as a diffusion barrier and weld deformation enhancer. A postweld heat treatment (PWHT, 700{degrees}C for 20 min in vacuum) under axial pressure (Ksi) was used to improve the joint strength consistency. The following conclusions can be drawn from this investigation: (1) A friction welding technique has been developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to Alloy 718 using an interlayer system of niobium and copper. Joint strengths averaging approximately 50 Ksi were achieved. (2) Deformation was concentrated in the interlayers, especially the copper interlayer, during friction welding. Increased reduction in length (RIL) during friction welding resulted in a decrease in the interlayer thicknesses. (3) The EDS results showed that the niobium and copper interlayers prevent interdiffusion between the two parent metals, producing formation of detrimental phases.

Kuo, M.; Albright, C.E.; Baeslack, W.A. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

R & D Welding and Brazing Sample Preparation and Activities in Bldg. 723-A R & D Welding and Brazing Sample Preparation and Activities in Bldg. 723-A Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The Materials Compatibility and Welding Technology group presently houses three electrical resistance welding stations, two self-contained low power laser welding stations, an electron beam welding vacuum chamber station, a semi-automatic gas tungsten arc welding station, induction power supply for brazing, and vacuum and conduction chamber furnaces for heat treatment and brazing, all within Building 723-A. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

337

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R & D Welding and Brazing Sample Preparation and Activities in Bldg. 723-A R & D Welding and Brazing Sample Preparation and Activities in Bldg. 723-A Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The Materials Compatibility and Welding Technology group presently houses three electrical resistance welding stations, two self-contained low power laser welding stations, an electron beam welding vacuum chamber station, a semi-automatic gas tungsten arc welding station, induction power supply for brazing, and vacuum and conduction chamber furnaces for heat treatment and brazing, all within Building 723-A. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

338

Experimental evidence of chaotic behavior in atmospheric pressure arc discharge  

SciTech Connect

Thermal plasma technology is already playing an important role in the production of new materials, in the destruction of toxic wastes, and in the development of safer and more efficient manufacturing and material processing applications. In free burning as well as in stabilized arc columns, the inherent movement of arc root results in fluctuation in arc voltage. A full knowledge and control over the arc root dynamics can effectively lengthen the life time, drastically improve performance and reliability in arc plasma devices. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigate the fluctuating voltage signals generated from an atmospheric pressure arc discharge produced in a hollow electrode plasma torch. For the first time, analysis of these signals reveal them to exhibit chaotic behavior. The present analysis is supported with real time behavior, phase portraits, power spectra and Lyapunov exponents. Dependence of system behavior on various control parameters is also investigated. This approach is interesting in the sense that it can lead to better understanding of physics for future researches on arc plasma jets and related devices.

Ghorui, S.; Sahasrabudhe, S.N.; Murthy, P.S.S.; Das, A.K.; Venkatramani, N.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A welding fixture for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Feld, Sam H. (West Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR FILL STEM MANUFACTURINGAND PINCH WELD PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

A statistically designed experiment was conducted as part of a six sigma project for Fill Stem Manufacturing and Pinch Weld Processing. This multi-year/multi-site project has successfully completed a screening study and used those results as inputs to this optimization study. Eleven welds were made using fairly tight current and cycle range. The welds demonstrate increased burst strength, longer closure length, more net displacement, and improved bond rating with increased current. However, excessive melting remains a concern from a processing viewpoint and may cause adverse metallurgical interactions. Therefore, the highest current levels specified cannot be utilized. A Validation Study is proposed for the Defense Programs Inert Facility.

Korinko, P; Karl Arnold, K

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect

Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

Weld-Windsor 115-kV Transmission Line Project, Weld County, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Western Area Power Administration is proposing to rebuild a 3.0 mile segment of the existing Flatiron-Weld 115-kV transmission line in Weld County. The line would be reconductored with new conductor on new wood pole double circuit structures. The new structures would support a double circuit transmission line configuration. The first circuit would be owned by Western and the second by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO). Alternatives considered included no action, constructing PSCO`s circuit on new right-of-way, and reconductoring Western`s existing line on the same structures. The proposed action was selected because it provided an opportunity to share structures with PSCO and, overall, would minimize costs and environmental impacts. The environmental assessment identifies minor effects on existing natural or human resources and minor benefits for agricultural operations.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Arc Energy Estimations: Applications in Lightning-Induced Concrete Spall  

SciTech Connect

After lightning contacts a building, the possibility of a physical break in its conductive path to ground may exist. Given such a break, an electric field may develop across the gap until it exceeds the breakdown strength of the non-conducting, or dielectric, material. Breakdown subsequently occurs and energy is dissipated during the development of an arc channel. If the dielectric is concrete, a concern exists that the energy available for arc formation may be capable of launching pieces of spall into sensitive equipment. This paper discusses the mechanisms of energy dissipation in arc formation and quantifies the energy available for concrete spall.

Tully, L K; Ong, M M

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

344

Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis  

SciTech Connect

Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc plasma gun Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gun Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arc plasma gun...

346

FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT.Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams.Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%-43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost-32.9%-55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT-the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%-18.5%, when compared to IMRT.Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom. This optimization method will allow patients to be simultaneously planned for dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency without switching between delivery techniques. Example phantom and clinical cases suggest that the conversion of only three VMAT segments to modulated beams may result in a good combination of quality and efficiency.

Matuszak, Martha M.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 and Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Long, Troy; Edwin Romeijn, H. [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm14grant.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High...

348

Microstructural study of high energy density dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect

Electron microscopy analysis of two different CO/sub 2/ laser welded dissimilar metal combinations revealed the presence of minor constituents which could be attributed to terminal solidification events. In the case of the 15-5 PH/HP 9-4-20 welds, a NbC/austenite eutectic-type constituent was identified, which accounted for the observed fusion-zone hot cracks in these welds. The identity of the interdendritic constituent first observed optically by Patterson and Milewski/sup 9/ in 304L/625 GTA welds has been confirmed as Laves phase. It was further determined that this phase is enriched in Mo and Nb relative to the austenite matrix.

Cieslak, M.J.; Hills, C.R.; Headley, T.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Steels (AHSS) Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February...

350

SAFT Imaging of Transverse Cracks in Austenitic and Dissimilar Welds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Up to now there is no sufficient technique to detect transverse cracks in austenitic and dissimilar welds which recently are of increasing interest in the integrity surveillance of nuclear power plants as well as...

Christian Höhne; Sanjeevareddy Kolkoori…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (L.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M.sub.6 S.sub.8).sup.0 cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na.sub.2x (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 by disproportionation at 800.degree. C. and well-crystallized NaMo.sub.6 S.sub.8 at .gtoreq. 900.degree. C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M.sup.2+ and M.sup.3+ salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n (Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8)S.sub.x .multidot.yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M.sup.n+.sub.2x/n Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8+x (MeOH).sub.y ›MMOS! (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as "Chevrel phase-like" in that both contain Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8 cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst showed to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts.

Hilsenbeck, Shane J. (Ames, IA); McCarley, Robert E. (Ames, IA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA); Xie, Xiaobing (College Station, TX)

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » SCI-Arc/Caltech  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SCI-Arc/Caltech SCI-Arc/Caltech Below you will find Solar Decathlon news from the SCI-Arc/Caltech archive, sorted by date. CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) Friday, May 13, 2011 By April Saylor Editor's Note: This entry has been cross-posted from DOE's Energy Blog. In honor of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon-which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive-we are profiling each of the 20 teams participating in the competition. The students from the Southern California Institute of Architecture and California Institute of Technology, otherwise known as the SCI-Arc/Caltech team, have teamed up to take an interesting approach to the design of their

353

Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument - ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument Capabilities of the ARCS Instrument ARCS Overview The wide angular-range chopper spectrometer ARCS at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample position with a large solid angle of detector coverage. The instrument incorporates modern neutron instrumentation, such as an elliptically focused neutron guide, high speed magnetic bearing choppers, and a massive array of 3He linear position sensitive detectors. Novel features of the spectrometer include the use of a large gate valve between the sample and detector vacuum chambers and the placement of the detectors within the vacuum, both of which provide a window-free final flight path to minimize background scattering while allowing rapid changing of the sample and

354

Arc Vault Significantly Reduces Electrical Hazards | GE Global...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The transfer of arc flash energy is accomplished by triggering an ablative plasma gun to generate a 3-phase fault within a safe containment. The plasma gun operates in few...

355

Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasmasources  

SciTech Connect

The total ion current generated by a vacuum arc plasma source was measured. The discharge system investigated allowed ion collection from the arc plasma streaming through a hemispherical mesh anode with geometric transparency of 72 percent. A range of different cathode materials was investigated, and the arc current was varied over the range 50-500 A. We find that the normalized ion current (Iion/Iarc) depends on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent and generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The application of a strong axial magnetic field in the cathode and arc region leads to increased normalized ion current, but only by virtue of enhanced ion charge states formed in a strong magnetic field.

Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Micro-arc oxidation coatings on Mg-Li alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) method was used for the...in-situ fabricated on the Mg-Li alloy. The morphology feature, phase composition, and corrosion-resistance of the formed ceramic coatings were studied by SEM, X...

Yongjun Xu; Kang Li; Zhongping Yao; Zhaohua Jiang; Milin Zhang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1092-1998 DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 DOE-HDBK-1092-2013...

358

Problems of physical modeling of electric-arc discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Special features of physical modeling of high-current arc discharges are considered. It is shown that the employment of dimensionless criterial expressions makes it possible to establish only approximate simil...

O. I. Yas'ko

359

Electric Parameters of the D.C. Carbon Arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic electric parameters of an arc discharge are the current strength (i) and the voltage drop across the gap (V). Both quantities can be measured without difficulty. In general, a relationship between V and...

P. W. J. M. Boumans

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Effect of electric arc discharge on hypersonic blunt body drag  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental results on the effect of energy deposition using an electric arc discharge, upstream of a 60°...half angle blunt cone configuration in a hypersonic flow is reported.Investigations involving drag meas...

K. Satheesh; G. Jagadeesh

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Velocity of the electric arc in a plasmatron discharge chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of the velocity of a high-current arc with air injection in the discharge chamber of a coaxial sectioned plasmatron is described. The experiments showed that the velocity of the c...

A. S. Shaboltas

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A forevacuum pulse arc-discharge-based plasma electron source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An arc-discharge-based electron source is described, which is designed for forming a pulsed wideaperture electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (4...2 in the submillisecond range of pulse durations. The c...

A. V. Kazakov; V. A. Burdovitsin; A. V. Medovnik…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of techniques for joining fuel rod simulators to test assemblies  

SciTech Connect

A unique tubular electrode carrier is described for gas tungsten-arc welding small-diameter nuclear fuel rod simulators to the tubesheet of a test assembly. Both the close-packed geometry of the array of simulators and the extension of coaxial electrical conductors from each simulator hindered access to the weld joint. Consequently, a conventional gas tungsten-arc torch could not be used. Two seven-rod assemblies that were mockups of the simulator-to-tubesheet joint area were welded and successfully tested. Modified versions of the electrode carrier for brazing electrical leads to the upper ends of the fuel pin simulators are also described. Satisfactory brazes have been made on both single-rod mockups and an array of 25 simulators by using the modified electrode carrier and a filler metal with a composition of 71.5 Ag-28 Cu-0.5 Ni.

Moorhead, A.J.; Reed, R.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Dissimilar-metal weld failures in boiler tubing  

SciTech Connect

Both ferritic heat-resisting steels and austenitic stainless steels are used for fossil-fired boilers for central power stations. The use of these two different types of materials within the system leads to the need for a dissimilar-metal weld transition joint. Increased cyclic operation of boilers has led to a rash of failures in welds between dissimilar metals; studies have identified the causes, and improved nondestructive testing techniques permit early identification of problem areas.

Klueh, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Similar- and Dissimilar-Alloy Friction Stir Welded Blanks  

SciTech Connect

Friction stir welding is a solid state joining process with relatively low welding temperatures. Nevertheless, the mechanical properties of friction stir welded blanks are degraded after welding. Indeed, both strength and ductility of the welds are decreased after welding. Often, the resulting friction stir welded blanks need to be formed to their final structural shape. Therefore, the formability of friction stir welded blanks is of primary importance in the manufacturing of structural parts. This paper studies how the mechanical properties and particularly formability of friction stir welded blanks can be improved by applying a post weld heat treatment. Two aluminum alloys from 2000 and 7000 series, namely 2024-T3 and 7075-T6, are selected for the study. The sheet thickness of both materials is 2,0 mm. The selected alloys are welded in three configurations: 2024-T3 and 2024-T3, 7075-T6 and 7075-T6, and 2024-T3 and 7075-T6. The resulting welds are naturally aged for a few months. Three sets of standard dog bone shape tensile test specimens are then machined from the welds. The first set of the specimens is tested without any heat treatment. The second set of the specimens is solution heat treated and quenched before testing. The third set of the specimens is solution heat treated, quenched, and naturally aged for a week before testing. The mechanical properties of the three different sets of specimens are compared with each other. It is shown that careful selection of post weld heat-treatment can greatly improve the formability of friction stir welded blanks.

Zadpoor, Amir Abbas [Materials Innovation Institute (M2i), Mekelweg 2, Delft 2628CD (Netherlands); Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, Delft 2629HS (Netherlands); Sinke, Jos [Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, Delft 2629HS (Netherlands)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Synthesis of silicon nanotubes by DC arc plasma method  

SciTech Connect

Plasma synthesis is a novel technique of synthesis of nanomaterials as they provide high rate of production and promote metastable reactions. Very thin walled silicon nanotubes were synthesized in a DC direct arc thermal plasma reactor. The effect of parameters of synthesis i.e. arc current and presence of hydrogen on the morphology of Si nanoparticles is reported. Silicon nanotubes were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Local Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

Tank, C. M.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune-7, Maharashtra (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

JOURNAL DE PPHYSIQUE THEORY OF =LOW CATHODEINATMOSPHERIC ARC INNOBLE GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. S. S. R. 1. The hollow arc discharge i n cylindrical hollow cathode (IiC) with s l i g h t l yJOURNAL DE PPHYSIQUE THEORY OF =LOW CATHODEINATMOSPHERIC ARC INNOBLE GAS F.G. Baksht, A.B. Rybakov. 4-22742~-j,2x$-.@+.j# .Ya4z(5) 4. he pre-electr*e ionization ~ w e r(L df 9 e L 4 - ~ = d ; ) must

Boyer, Edmond

368

Experimental Study on Gasoline Reforming Assisted by Nonthermal Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasoline conversion efficiency decreased when the electric discharge regime was changing from continuous to gliding arc and from gliding to streamer. ... Compared with catalytic reformers, plasma devices have so far lower performances, which is explained by the early stage of research on nonthermal plasma reforming and the need of an external energy input (electricity). ... and design of the plasma reactor, composed of two gliding arc discharges in series, were detailed. ...

Jean-Damien Rollier; José Gonzalez-Aguilar; Guillaume Petitpas; Adeline Darmon; Laurent Fulcheri; Rudolf Metkemeijer

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds  

SciTech Connect

The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a ‘steering’ of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J. [NDE Research, Support and Development, Rolls-Royce Marine, Derby, PO BOX 2000, DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Drinkwater, B. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University Walk, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

370

Lightning Induced Arcing an LDRD Report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to develop a science-based understanding of the early-time behavior of electric surface arcing in air at atmospheric pressure. As a first step towards accomplishing this, we used a kinetic approach to model an electron swarm as it evolved in a neutral gas under the influence of an applied electric field. A computer code was written in which pseudo-particles, each representing some number of electrons, were accelerated by an electric field. The electric field due to the charged particles was calculated efficiently using a tree algorithm. Collision of the electrons with the background gas led to the creation of new particles through the processes of ionization and photoionization. These processes were accounted for using measured cross-section data and Monte Carlo methods. A dielectric half-space was modeled by imaging the charges in its surface. Secondary electron emission from the surface, resulting in surface charging, was also calculated. Simulation results show the characteristics of a streamer in three dimensions. A numerical instability was encountered before the streamer matured to form branching.

JORGENSON,ROY E.; WARNE,LARRY K.; KUNHARDT,ERICH E.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Measurements of the total ion flux from vacuum arc cathodespots  

SciTech Connect

The ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured in two vacuum arc systems. The first was a vacuum arc ion source which was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The second discharge system essentially consisted of a cathode placed near the center of a spherically shaped mesh anode. In both systems, the ion current streaming through the mesh was measured by a biased collector. The mesh anodes had geometric transmittances of 60 percent and 72 percent, respectively, which were taken into account as correction factors. The ion current from different cathode materials was measured for 50-500 A of arc current. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent. The normalized ion current is generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The ion erosion rates were determined from values of ion current and ion charge states, which were previously measured in the same ion source. The absolute ion erosion rates range from 16-173 mu g/C.

Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu; Savkin,Konstantin P.; Brown, Ian G.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

372

High-speed EDM milling with moving electric arcs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel high-speed electrical discharge machining (EDM) milling method using moving electric arcs has been proposed in this study. We connected a copper electrode rotating rapidly around its axis and a work piece to a DC power supply to generate a moving electric arc. To ensure high relative speed of any point on the electrode with respect to the work piece, the electrode was shaped like a pipe. It was observed that the electric arcs move rapidly within the discharge gap due to the revolution of the tool electrode, removing the materials on the electrode along the track of the arc roots. To explore the characteristics of machining with moving electric arcs, an EDM milling apparatus was devised. Two planes with approximately the same roughness were machined separately by this equipment and a traditional EDM machine for comparison. It was found that a much higher material removal rate can be easily achieved by EDM milling with moving electric arcs. In the meanwhile, wear of the tool electrode in this new method is negligible, which is greatly favorable for machining accuracy. The microstructures of these surfaces were also investigated for further information.

Fuzhu Han; Yongxain Wang; Ming Zhou

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

1985-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Facility for high-heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new high-heat flux testing (HHFT) facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon plasma arc lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can accommodate irradiated plasma facing component materials and sub-size mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW m?2, which are prototypic of fusion steady state heat flux conditions, over a heated area of 9 ? 12 and 1 ? 10 cm2, respectively. The use of PAL permits the heat source to be environmentally separated from the components of the test chamber, simplifying the design to accommodate safe testing of low-level irradiated articles and materials under high-heat flux. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing of tungsten samples are presented and discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this photon-based HHFT facility are compared to existing e-beam and particle beam facilities used for similar purposes.

Adrian S Sabau; Evan K Ohriner; Jim Kiggans; David C Harper; Lance L Snead; Charles R Schaich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

SciTech Connect

A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL] [ORNL; Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL; Harper, David C [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL; Schaich, Charles Ross [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Microstructural issues in a friction-stir-welded aluminum alloy  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations of microstructures associated with friction-stir welding (FSW) in a number of aluminum alloys have consistently demonstrated the actual weld zone to consist of a (dynamically) recrystallized grain structure resulting from the extreme, solid-state, plastic deformation characterizing the process. Because of solubilities associated with the various precipitates in 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys, and the fact that the precipitates were either homogeneously distributed throughout both the original (unwelded) work-piece plates and the well zones (or formed varying densities of Widmanstaetten patterns within the original and recrystallized grains), it has been difficult to follow the stirring of stable, second-phase particles from the base metal (work-piece) into the weld zone. In the present investigation, a compositionally modified 1100 aluminum alloy (nominally 99.2% Al, 0.5% Fe, 0.15% Cu, 0.12% Si, 0.05 Mn, 0.04 Ti, balance in weight percent of Be and Mg), forming a stable microdendritic (second-phase), equiaxed, cell structure was friction-stir welded. These thermally stable, geometrically specific, precipitates in the base metal were compared with their disposition within the friction-stir-weld zone. In addition, as-cast plates of this alloy were cold-rolled 50% and friction-stir-welded in order to compare these two schedules (as-cast and 50% cold-rolled) in terms of residual hardness variations and related microstructural issues as well as the effect of prior deformation on the friction-stir welding process.

Flores, O.V.; Kennedy, C.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; Pappu, S.; Nowak, B.M.; McClure, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds with artificially produced stress corrosion cracks  

SciTech Connect

Austenitic stainless steel welds and nickel alloy welds, which are widely used in nuclear power plants, present major challenges for ultrasonic inspection due to the grain structure in the weld. Large grains in combination with the elastic anisotropy of the material lead to increased scattering and affect sound wave propagation in the weld. This results in a reduced signal-to-noise ratio, and complicates the interpretation of signals and the localization of defects. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection was applied to study austenitic stainless steel test blocks with different types of flaws, including inter-granular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCC). The results show that cracks located in the heat affected zone of the weld are easily detected when inspection from both sides of the weld is possible. In cases of limited accessibility, when ultrasonic inspection can be carried out only from one side of a weld, it may be difficult to distinguish between signals from scattering in the weld and signals from cracks.

Dugan, Sandra; Wagner, Sabine [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

378

Applications and case studies of laser hybrid welding in the automotive industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In joining technology, the high welding speed on the one and the good gap bridging ability on the other hand play a significant part. It is no doubt that the laser beam welding and the GMA welding have been established in the welding technology for very long, and that both processes allow a wide field of application in the joining technology. New possibilities and synergetic effects, however, are based on the combination of both processes. The laser radiation causes a very narrow thermally affected zone with a high ratio between welding depth and seam width. In the case of the laser welding process, the gap bridging ability is very low due to the small focus diameter, however very high welding speeds can be achieved. The GMA or Tandem welding process features a significantly lower energy density has a larger focused spot on the material surface and is characterised by its good gap bridging ability.

H. Staufer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive robotic welding Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

welding Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Development of a mobile welding robot for double-hull structures Summary: , the CPU board recalculates the path of the...

380

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: On-Line Weld NDE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: On-Line Weld NDE with IR Thermography Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Electron beam welding of ceramic to metal using fore-vacuum plasma electron source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of creating ceramic-metal joints by electron beam welding is considered. The welding of ... range (5–20 Pa) using a plasma electron source. The structure and composition of the ceramic ... breakin...

A. K. Goreev; V. A. Burdovitsin; A. S. Klimov…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Z .Surface and Coatings Technology 130 2000 164 172 Production of high-density Ni-bonded tungsten carbide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbide coatings using an axially fed DC-plasmatron S. Sharafata,U , A. Kobayashib , S. Chena , N spraying; Nickel; Tungsten carbide 1. Introduction 1.1. General Since the mid-1990s, the market share of cemented Z .carbides has surpassed that of high-speed steels HSS , Z .with tungsten carbide WC having 50

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

383

Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (7–12 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ? An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ? WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 7–12 nm. ? Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ? WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ? Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UV–visible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 7–12 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 6–24 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

Ghoreishi, S.M., E-mail: ghoreshi@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials Institute, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meshkat, S.S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering, Urmia University of Technology, Urmia 57155-419 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghiaci, M. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dadkhah, A.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen bombardment of tungsten carbide surfaces P. Trskelin,1 N. Juslin,1 P. Erhart,2 and K. Nordlund1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen bombardment of tungsten carbide surfaces P. Träskelin,1 and tungsten carbide WC is of interest both due to the use of hydrogen-containing plasmas in thin. INTRODUCTION Tungsten carbide WC exhibits extraordinary hardness and temperature resistance. It has long been

Nordlund, Kai

385

CX-010322: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Categorical Exclusion Determination 22: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010322: Categorical Exclusion Determination Research and Development Welding and Brazing Sample Preparation and Activities in Building 723-A CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/16/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The Materials Compatibility and Welding Technology group presently houses three electrical resistance welding stations, two self-contained low power laser welding stations, an electron beam welding vacuum chamber station, a semi-automatic gas tungsten arc welding station, induction power supply for brazing, and vacuum and conduction chamber furnaces for heat treatment and brazing, all within Building 723-A. CX-010322.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009045: Categorical Exclusion Determination

386

Deuterium Depth Profile in Neutron-Irradiated Tungsten Exposed to Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The effect of radiation damage has been mainly simulated using high-energy ion bombardment. The ions, however, are limited in range to only a few microns into the surface. Hence, some uncertainty remains about the increase of trapping at radiation damage produced by 14 MeV fusion neutrons, which penetrate much farther into the bulk material. With the Japan-US joint research project: Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), the tungsten samples (99.99 % pure from A.L.M.T., 6mm in diameter, 0.2mm in thickness) were irradiated to high flux neutrons at 50 C and to 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 1021-1022 m-2s-1, ion fluence: 1025-1026 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). First results of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed in TPE have been reported previously. This paper presents the latest results in our on-going work of deuterium depth profiling in neutron-irradiated tungsten via nuclear reaction analysis. The experimental data is compared with the result from non neutron-irradiated tungsten, and is analyzed with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) to elucidate the hydrogen isotope behavior such as retention and depth distribution in neutron-irradiated and non neutron-irradiated tungsten.

Masashi Shimada; G. Cao; Y. Hatano; T. Oda; Y. Oya; M. Hara; P. Calderoni

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Integrated thermal-microstructure model to predict the property gradients in resistance spot steel welds  

SciTech Connect

An integrated model approach was proposed for relating resistance welding parameters to weldment properties. An existing microstructure model was used to determine the microstructural and property gradients in resistance spot welds of plain carbon steel. The effect of these gradients on the weld integrity was evaluated with finite element analysis. Further modifications to this integrated thermal-microstructure model are discussed.

Babu, S.S.; Riemer, B.W.; Santella, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Feng, Z. [Edison Welding Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Dynamic voltage-current characteristics for a water jet plasma arc  

SciTech Connect

A virtual instrument technology is used to measure arc current, arc voltage, dynamic V-I characteristics, and nonlinear conductance for a cone-shaped water jet plasma arc under ac voltage. Experimental results show that ac arc discharge mainly happens in water vapor evaporated from water when heated. However, due to water's cooling effect and its conductance, arc conductance, reignition voltage, extinguish voltage, and current zero time are very different from those for ac arc discharge in gas work fluid. These can be valuable to further studies on mechanism and characteristics of plasma ac discharge in water, and even in gas work fluid.

Yang Jiaxiang; Lan Sheng; Xu Zuoming [College of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150040 (China)

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Advanced RenewableEnergy Company ARC Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advanced RenewableEnergy Company ARC Energy Advanced RenewableEnergy Company ARC Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced RenewableEnergy Company (ARC Energy) Place Nashua, New Hampshire Product New Hampshire-based stealth mode LED substrate manufacture equipment provider which aims to lower the cost of LEDs. Coordinates 42.758365°, -71.464209° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.758365,"lon":-71.464209,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ArcSafe® ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  2007 R&D 100 Award Entry Form ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge  Joint Submitters Submitting Organization Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800, MS 1181 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1181 USA Larry Schneider Phone: (505) 845-7135 Fax: (505) 845-7685 Email: lxschne@sandia.gov AFFIRMATION: I affirm that all information submitted as a part of, or supplemental to, this entry is a fair and accurate represen- tation of this product. (Signature)______________________________________ Astronics-Advanced Electronic Systems, Inc. 9845 Willows Rd NE City: Redmond State: WA Zip/Postal: 98052-2540 USA Contact Name: Michael Ballas, Program Manager Phone: (425) 895-4304 Fax: (425)702.4930 Email: michael.ballas@astronics.com

391

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Miocene volcanic complex of the Takashibiyama Formation consists largely of subalkali, subaqueous basalt to andesite lavas and andesite to dacite subaqueous volcaniclastic flow deposits. Most of subaqueous lavas are moderately to intensely brecciated with rugged rough surfaces and ramp structures similar to subaerial block lava. Volcaniclastic flow deposits commonly include basalt to andesite lava fragments and/or pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal

392

Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collections from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had ageometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as acorrection factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials wasmeasured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by thearc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesinthe range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current isgenerally greater for light elements than for heavy elements. The ionerosion rates were determined fromvalues of ion currentand ion chargestates, which were previously measured in the same experimental system.The ion erosion rates range from 12-94 mu g/C.

Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

393

Voltage flicker prediction for two simultaneously operated ac arc furnaces  

SciTech Connect

An EMTP-based arc furnace model was developed for evaluation of flicker concerns associated with supplying a large integrated steel mill as they go from one to two furnace operation and as system changes are implemented that will affect the short circuit capacity at the 230 kV power supply substation. The model includes a dynamic arc representation which is designed to be characteristic of the initial portions of the melt cycle when the arc characteristics are the most variable (worst flicker conditions). The flicker calculations are verified using previous measurements with one furnace operation. Flicker simulations were then performed to evaluate a variety of different possible system strengths with both one and two furnaces in operation. The primary flicker measure used for this study is the unweighted rms value of the fluctuation envelope, expressed as a percentage of the rms line-to-ground voltage magnitude.

Tang, L. [ABB Power T and D Co., Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [ABB Power T and D Co., Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Kolluri, S. [Entergy Services, New Orleans, LA (United States)] [Entergy Services, New Orleans, LA (United States); McGranaghan, M.F. [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

PNNL 331 Building Arc Flash Team Investigation Report  

SciTech Connect

On Friday, April 21, 2006, a PNNL electrician was performing repair of an electrical system for the 331 Building chilled water pump (CHWP) No.2, when an electrical arc flash occurred inside a 480V combination motor starter. The electrician was taken to the on-site medical provider for evaluation and was released for return to work without restriction. The electrician was not shocked, but did receive a minor, superficial (first degree) burn on the left wrist. This report, the result of a thorough review by the 331 Building Arc Flash Assessment Team, provides an in-depth look at the steps leading up to the arc-flash and recommendations and opportunities for improvement.

Deichman, Mark L.; Drewrey, John C.; Hodges, Hurtis; Madson, Vernon J.; Minton, Allen L.; Montgomery, Daniel M.; Olson, Marvin E.; Rojas, Pedro H.; Sanan, Sanjay K.; Sharp, Reed D.; Sparks, Bobby R.; Swearingen, Gary L.

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Multipass Arc Lattice Design for Recirculating Linac Muon Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Recirculating linear accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. A drawback of this scheme is that a separate return arc is required for each passage of the muons through the linac. In the work described here, a novel arc optics based on a Non-Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NSFFAG) lattice is developed, which would provide sufficient momentum acceptance to allow multiple passes (two or more consecutive energies) to be transported in one string of magnets. An RLA with significantly fewer arcs will reduce the cost. We will develop the optics and technical requirements to allow the maximum number of passes by using an adjustable path length to accurately control the returned beam to synchronize with the linac RF phase.

G.M. Wang, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, D. Trbojevic

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development program  

SciTech Connect

As a result of the work performed under RP 1874-1, the factors influencing the performance of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) in elevated temperature power plant boiler service have been defined. Details of the results are given in other volumes of this report series. In this volume, design and procedure guidelines for improving DMW performance are provided. DMW life can be extended by: locating DMWs such that service conditions are conducive to long life; such locations may be identified by the use of the computerized analytical program PODIS, developed under RP 1874; using preferred weld filler metals; and using specific weld configurations. Details of each of these approaches are described herein. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Roberts, D.I.; Ryder, R.H.; Grunloh, H.J.; Thurgood, B.E. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report  

SciTech Connect

The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of feed composition variations on process operating conditions and slag product performance; and collecting mass balance and operating data to support equipment and instrument design.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Use of Aria to simulate laser weld pool dynamics for neutron generator production.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results for the FY07 ASC Integrated Codes Level 2 Milestone number 2354. The description for this milestone is, 'Demonstrate level set free surface tracking capabilities in ARIA to simulate the dynamics of the formation and time evolution of a weld pool in laser welding applications for neutron generator production'. The specialized boundary conditions and material properties for the laser welding application were implemented and verified by comparison with existing, two-dimensional applications. Analyses of stationary spot welds and traveling line welds were performed and the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) level set algorithm is assessed by comparison with 3D moving mesh calculations.

Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Martinez, Mario J.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

3013 DE INNER CONTAINER CLOSURE WELD CORROSION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

Destructive evaluation (DE) of 3013 containers is one part of the U. S. Department of Energy Integrated Surveillance Program. During standard DE of 3013 containers, visual examinations for pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are performed on the accessible surfaces of the outer, inner, and convenience containers, which make up the 3013 container. As a result of 3013 DE additional analysis, the area near the inner container closure weld has been identified as being a region of increased corrosion susceptibility, which may provide a pathway for corrosive gases to the outer container. This area has a higher residual stress, an altered microstructure, and less corrosion resistant weld oxides as a result of the welding process as well as a lower temperature than other areas of the container, which may increase the absorption of moisture on the surface. The deposition of moisture in this stressed region could lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. During FY2013, the inner container closure weld area was more closely evaluated on several archived samples from DE containers. These containers included FY09 DE2, FY12 DE4, FY12 DE6 and FY12 DE7 and the Hanford High Moisture Container. The additional examinations included visual observations with a stereomicroscope, scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and serial metallography of the sidewall and lid that are part of the inner container closure weld region. Pitting was observed in all the samples taken from the closure weld regions of the examined inner containers. This pitting was generally less 20 μm with most less than 5m. These pits were similar in depth to those observed in the vapor exposed surfaces of teardrops in the shelf life corrosion testing. Cracking was not observed on either the vapor-exposed surfaces of the teardrop coupons or the inner container closure weld region. Further testing is necessary to determine if the conditions in the welded inner container could support SCC during the 50 year life time for the 3013 container.

Mickalonis, J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Closed-loop focus control system for laser welding  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the authors describe a focus control system for Nd:YAG laser welding based on an optical sensor incorporated into the fibre delivery system to detect light generated by the process. This broadband light is separated into two wavelength bands, and simple electronic processing gives a signal proportional to focal error, as a result of chromatic aberrations in the optical delivery system. Focus control is demonstrated for bead-on-plate welds in different thicknesses of titanium alloy, aluminum alloy, mild steel and stainless steel. The control system works for both pulsed and continuous laser radiation.

Haran, F.M.; Hand, D.P.; Jones, J.D.C. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Peters, C. [Lumonics Ltd., Rugby (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

An investigation of residual stress in welded joints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not extended beyond eight days time~ therefore the curve does not show com- plete relaxation of stress v!ith age of weld. However the figures "or the longitudinal stress compare favorably with that calculated by Houlton and iiartin (1) of 55, 000 psi... are bolted or doweled to a heavy cast iron or steel frame as shown which is of sufficient rigidity that all of the strain takes place in the specimen. The weld and the strain gage are separated sufficiently and the area between may be water cooled so II...

Moffat, William Hugh

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Vinyl chloride monomer and other contaminants in PVC welding fumes  

SciTech Connect

An investigation into the nature of fumes produced during thermal welding of plasticized PVC sheeting has been carried out with the objective of determining if the known carcinogen vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is formed and to assess the level of exposure to the operator. The results show that the atmospheric concentrations of VCM are well below accepted occupational exposure limits. This finding is consistent with reports in the technical literature which suggest that VCM is produced during thermal degradation of PVC only at temperatures considerably higher than those encountered during plastic welding.

Williamson, J.; Kavanagh, B.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Apparatus and process for ultrasonic seam welding stainless steel foils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic seam welding apparatus having a head which is rotated to form contact, preferably rolling contact, between a metallurgically inert coated surface of the head and an outside foil of a plurality of layered foils or work materials. The head is vibrated at an ultrasonic frequency, preferably along a longitudinal axis of the head. The head is constructed to transmit vibration through a contacting surface of the head into each of the layered foils. The contacting surface of the head is preferably coated with aluminum oxide to prevent the head from becoming welded to layered stainless steel foils.

Leigh, Richard W. (New York, NY)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc deposition system Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Asir terrane, which was active between... erosion and deposition in the back-arc basin environment (Camp, 1984). Regional metamorphism in the WBMD... volcanic arc system. J....

405

Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ARCS FOUNDATION GLOBAL IMPACT AWARD Global Health, Public Good and Graduate Education Case the ARCS Foundation Awards Luncheon in Atlanta on November 21, 2013. Application Materials: 1) A letter

Arnold, Jonathan

407

Evolution of residual stresses in micro-arc oxidation ceramic coatings on 6061 Al alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most researches on micro-arc oxidation mainly focus on the application rather than ... dimensional stability and corrosion resistance, etc. The micro-arc oxidation ceramic coatings are produced on the surfaces .....

Dejiu Shen; Jingrui Cai; Changhong Guo…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Comparative analysis of methods for ion-plasma sputter deposition and micro-arc oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the following advantages of micro-arc oxidation (MAO) over ion-plasma sputter deposition ... of operation by personnel. These advantages make micro-arc oxidation a promising technique for metallurgica...

M. V. Gerasimov

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Numerical modeling of the interaction between an electric arc and a gas flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction between an equilibrium arc discharge and a gas (air or argon) ... The dynamics and the special features of the electric arc formation are studied for both gases. In the air the electrically conduc...

E. N. Vasil’ev; D. A. Nesterov

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Optimization of NH3 Decomposition by Control of Discharge Mode in a Rotating Arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, the characteristic behavior of a rotating arc was investigated. Various modes, depending on the electric power supplied, can be observed in a rotating arc. Each mode produces different discharge ch...

Dae Hoon Lee; Kwan-Tae Kim; Hee Seok Kang…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Sliding electric arc discharge as a means of aircraft trajectory control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of sliding electric arc discharge and the formation of shock waves in the stages of leader motion and the electric arc development in a supersonic air flow behind ... (bar). The air flow in the discharge

V. S. Aksenov; V. V. Golub; S. A. Gubin; V. P. Efremov…

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Numerical computation of electric arc with annular attachment on the cathode butt end  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of computing a stationary arc with annular attachment on the butt end of a solid cylindrical cathode are presented. The influence of the discharge external parameters on the characteristics of arc ...

A. Zh. Zhainakov; R. M. Urusov; T. E. Urusova

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Growth Conditions of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growth Conditions of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge ... Preparation conditions for large-scale synthesis of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) by using electric arc discharge were examined. ...

Yahachi Saito; Takanori Nakahira; Sashiro Uemura

2003-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mechanism of current redistribution between jets in a double-jet electric arc  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of a double-jet electric arc have been determined by numerical simulation of ... plasma electrodes, along which the character of arc discharge changes from self-sustained to non-self-...

E. B. Kulumbaev; T. B. Nikulicheva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Parameters of free-burning arc discharge plasma in air with silver-based electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used optical spectroscopy to study the radial temperature profiles for an electric arc plasma between silver electrodes and electrodes made ... . We established that the parameters of the arc discharge pl...

I. L. Babich; A. N. Veklich; L. A. Kryachko…

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Dependence of thermal destabilization of electric-arc plasma in an air flow on discharge conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of the conditions of electric-arc burning in an air flow on the ... processes in the development of instability in an arc-discharge column is shown.

V. N. Borisyuk; S. V. Goncharik…

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc box test Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

box test Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: arc box test Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fat arcs for implicitly defined curves Szilvia...

418

A static voltage-current characteristic for the low current DC arc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems has failed to detect arcing faults numerous times with disastrous consequences. The fault leaves a charred furrow, known as the ''arc track'', through Kapton cable insulation. Tests by NASA and others have confirmed that the average circuit...

Moores, Gregory Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc protection class Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a GIS: A Bidirectional Link between ArcView 2.0TM and XGobi Summary: . The XGobi remote proce- dures callable from within ArcView 2.0 can be grouped into two classes. One...

420

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc routing problem Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: arc routing problem Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 GIS by ESRITM What is ArcGIS Summary: allocation) Solving complex routing problems Querying...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. • From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fracture behavior of surface cracked wide plates of high strength steel containing overmatched repair welds  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the experimental results of tests conducted using surface cracked wide plates containing overmatched repair weld joints. The deformation and fracture characteristics of the repair welded wideplates notched at the original weld deposit, repair weld and HAZ regions are discussed. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of strength mis-match and notch position on the fracture performance of such complex weldments. Furthermore, the predictions of crack driving force using the Engineering Treatment Model for mis-matched welds (ETM-MM) procedure was compared with the results of the wide plates containing semielliptical surface cracks. For this study, 1/2K weld joints were prepared on 30 nm thick pipeline steel X65 plates by using a SAW process, resulting in 50% overmatching. Repair was performed at the cap side of the original joint up to half depth of plate thickness with a GMA welding process under hyperbaric conditions, leading to 41% yield strength overmatching. In order to assess the fracture behavior of these welds, surface cracked (semielliptic defects) wide plates containing original and repair welds were tested in tension at {minus}10 C. The surface cracked wide plate tests results have confirmed that overmatched repair weld metal can exert a significant effect on the deformation and fracture behavior of the wide plates. Wide plates containing root cracks clearly showed a shielding effect of the overmatched repair weld since it prevented development of through thickness ligament yielding.

Junghans, E.; Kocak, M.; Schwalbe, K.H. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of a Plasma Arc Manufacturing Process and Machine to Create Metal Oxide Particles in Water From Wire Feedstock.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A plasma arc erosion process can be used to create metal and metal oxide particles in the ultra-fine size range (<70 um). An electric arc… (more)

George, Jonathan Alan 1983-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Submersion Criticality Safety Analysis of Tungsten-Based Fuel for Nuclear Power and Propulsion Applications  

SciTech Connect

The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is developing tungsten-encapsulated fuels for space nuclear applications. Aims to develop NTP fuels that are; Affordable Low impact on production and testing environment Producible on a large scale over suitable time period Higher-performance compared to previous graphite NTP fuel elements Space nuclear reactors remain subcritical before and during launch, and do not go critical until required by its mission. A properly designed reactor will remain subcritical in any launch abort scenario, where the reactor falls back to Earth and becomes submerged in terrestrial material. Submersion increases neutron reflection and thermalizes the neutrons, which typically increases the reactivity of the core. This effect is usually very significant for fast-spectrum reactors. This research provided a submersion criticality safety analysis for a representative tungsten/uranium oxide fueled reactor. Determine the submersion behavior of a reactor fueled by tungsten-based fuel. Considered fuel compositions with varying: Rhenium content (wt% rhenium in tungsten) Fuel loading fractions (UO2 vol%)

A.E. Craft; R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Difference in formation of hydrogen and helium clusters in tungsten K. O. E. Henriksson,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Difference in formation of hydrogen and helium clusters in tungsten K. O. E. Henriksson,a K online 12 October 2005 The experimentally observed large difference in the depths of hydrogen and helium and He embrittlement of materials. Yet many of the basic properties of such systems are not well

Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

426

Thermal shock and fatigue resistance of tungsten materials under transient heat loading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Transient heat loading tests were performed on rolled pure tungsten (PW) and lanthanum oxide doped tungsten (WL10) as well as swaged + rolled potassium doped tungsten (W-K) samples using an electron beam. In thermal shock tests, the cracking threshold was 0.44–0.66, 0.17–0.22 and 0.44–0.66 GW/m2 for PW, WL10 and W-K, respectively. The melting threshold was over 1.1 GW/m2 for PW and W-K while 0.66–0.88 GW/m2 for WL10. In thermal fatigue tests, the obvious roughening threshold was over 1000 cycles for PW and WL10 while 1–100 cycles for W-K. The cracking threshold was 100–1000 cycles for PW, 1–100 cycles for WL10 and over 1000 cycles for W-K alloy. WL10 displayed worse thermal and fatigue resistance while W-K exhibited better properties compared with PW, which was attributed to differences in thermal–mechanical properties of the three tungsten alloys, in addition to the size and number density of La2O3 particles and potassium bubbles.

Xiaoxin Zhang; Qingzhi Yan; Shaoting Lang; Min Xia; Xiang Liu; Changchun Ge

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tungsten carbide synthesized by low-temperature combustion as gas diffusion electrode catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

June 2014 Keywords: Low-temperature combustion syn- thesis Tungsten carbide Electrocatalyst Gas burning on the environment, and reduce dependence on fossil fuels, development of pure electric and fuel of highly efficient low-cost electrode catalysts for the oxygen reduction cathode, metaleair batteries have

Volinsky, Alex A.

428

Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)

Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Tungsten black absorber for solar light with wide angular operation range Eden Rephaeli1,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tungsten black absorber for solar light with wide angular operation range Eden Rephaeli1,a of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2936997 In solar-thermal applications, one aims to convert sun- light to heat that displays near-complete absorptivity throughout the entire solar spectrum over a wide angular range

Fan, Shanhui

430

SPS Fabrication of Tungsten-Rhenium Alloys in Support of NTR Fuels Development  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Tungsten metal slugs were fabricated via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) of powdered metals at temperatures ranging from 1575 K to 1975 K and hold times of 5 minutes to 30 minutes, using powders with an average diameter of 7.8 ?m. Sintered tungsten specimens were found to have relative densities ranging from 83 % to 94 % of the theoretical density for tungsten. Consolidated specimens were also tested for their Vickers Hardness Number (VHN), which was fitted as a function of relative density; the fully consolidated VHN was extrapolated to be 381.45 kg/mm2. Concurrently, tungsten and rhenium powders with average respective diameters of 0.5 ?m and 13.3 ?m were pre-processed either by High-Energy-Ball-Milling (HEBM) or by homogeneous mixing to yield W-25at.%Re mixtures. The powder batches were sintered at temperatures of 1975 K and 2175 K for hold times ranging from 0 minutes to 60 minutes yielding relative densities ranging from 94% to 97%. The combination of HEBM and sintering showed a significant decrease in the inter-metallic phases compared to that of the homogenous mixing and sintering.

Jonathan A. Webb; Indrajit Charit; Cory Sparks; Darryl P. Butt; Megan Frary; Mark Carroll

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tungsten nano-tendril growth in the Alcator C-Mod divertor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of tungsten nano-tendrils ('fuzz') has been observed for the first time in the divertor region of a high-power density tokamak experiment. After 14 consecutive helium L-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod, the tip of ...

Baldwin, M.J.

432

L3 Milestone Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L3 Milestone L3 Milestone Use Computational Model to Design and Optimize Welding Conditions to Suppress Helium Cracking during Welding June 2012 Wei Zhang and Zhili Feng, ORNL Eric Willis, EPRI Background and Objectives Today, welding is widely used for repair, maintenance and upgrade of nuclear reactor components. As a critical technology to extend the service life of nuclear power plants beyond 60 years, weld technology must be further developed to meet new challenges associated with the aging of the plants, such as control and mitigation of the detrimental effects of weld residual stresses and repair of highly irradiated materials. To meet this goal, fundamental understanding of the "welding" effect is necessary for development of new and improved welding technologies.

433

Gas and RRR distribution in high purity Niobium EB welded in Ultra-High Vacuum  

SciTech Connect

Electron beam (EB) welding in UHV (ultra-high vacuum, 10-5 divide 10-8 mbar) is applied in the standard fabrication of high gradient niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities of TESLA design. The quality of EB welding is critical for cavity performance. Experimental data of gas content (H2, O2, N2) and RRR (residual resistivity ratio) measurements in niobium (Nb) welding seams are presented. EB welding in UHV conditions allow to preserve low gas content (1 divide 3 wt. ppm hydrogen and 5 divide 7 ppm oxygen and nitrogen), essential for high values of RRR - 350 divide 400 units. Gas content redistribution in the electron beam welded and heat affected region take place in the welding process. Correlation between gas solubility parameters, RRR and thermal conductivity are presented. Mechanisms of gas solubility in EB welding process are discussed.

Anakhov, S.; Singer, X.; Singer, W.; Wen, H. [RSVPU, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); DESY, Hamburg (Germany); IEE CAS, Beijing (China)

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

434

Effect of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings on Corrosion Resistance of 6061-Al Alloy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, the corrosion behavior of micro arc oxidation (MAO) coatings deposited at two current...

Nitin P. Wasekar; A. Jyothirmayi…

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cyclic Strength of Titanium Alloys, Anodized under Micro-Arc Conditions, in Sea Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The durability of titanium alloys having undergone micro-arc oxidation and then exposed to sea water is...

G. A. Lavrushin; S. V. Gnedenkov; P. S. Gordienko…

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Characterization of Defocused Electron Beams and Welds in Stainless Steel and Refractory Metals using the Enhanced Modified Faraday Cup Diagnostic  

SciTech Connect

As the first part of a project to compare new generation, continuous wave, laser welding technology to traditional electron beam welding technology, electron beam welds were made on commercially pure vanadium refractory metal and 21-6-9 austenitic stainless steel. The electron beam welds were made while employing EB diagnostics to fully characterize the beams so that direct comparisons could be made between electron beam and laser beams and the welds that each process produces.

Elmer, J W

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

437

Implications of changes in the post-weld heat treatment requirements on properties of steels and welds for offshore structures  

SciTech Connect

The reductions in the post-weld heat treatment temperatures and hold times proposed in revisions to pressure vessel (BS5500) and offshore steel (EN 10225) codes are considered in relation to their effects on resistance to fracture initiation. A review of the effects of the proposed changes on the mechanical properties and residual stresses in medium strength C-Mn steels and welds is described. It is concluded that the proposed reductions in temperature and hold time will, in general, minimize the changes in mechanical properties which would occur under current PWHT procedures. However, the levels of residual stresses will be significantly higher, and this will reduce the margin against fracture initiation.

Pisarski, H.G. [TWI, Cambridge (United Kingdom). Structural Integrity Dept.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Proposal of an Arc Detection Technique Based on RF Measurements for the ITER ICRF Antenna  

SciTech Connect

RF arc detection is a key operational and safety issue for the ICRF system on ITER. Indeed the high voltages inside the antenna put it at risk of arcing, which could cause substantial damage. This paper describes the various possibilities explored by circuit simulation and the strategy now considered to protect the ITER ICRF antenna from RF arcs.

Huygen, S.; Dumortier, P.; Durodie, F.; Messiaen, A.; Vervier, M.; Vrancken, M. [LPP/ERM-KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, Brussels (Belgium); Wooldridge, E. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre (United Kingdom)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Electric Arc Locator in Photovoltaic Power Systems Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in detecting the partial discharges associated with the production of an electric arc in a high voltage power in fault detection and localization. In [1] we have shown that electric arc (or partial dischargeElectric Arc Locator in Photovoltaic Power Systems Using Advanced Signal Processing Techniques

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

EDFA Gain Flattening Using Long-Period Fibre Gratings Based on the Electric Arc Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of new stresses during the electric arc discharges as the main mechanism for their formation [5]. #12EDFA Gain Flattening Using Long-Period Fibre Gratings Based on the Electric Arc Technique O. Frazão of the long-period fibre grating is based on the electric arc technique. 1. Introduction. The gain flattening

Haddadi, Hamed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 -User's Guide Page 1 of 49  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 - User's Guide Page 1 of 49 CESAM-OPJ-GIS Document current as of March 28, 2012 10:27 AM Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 User's Guide D R AFT #12;Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 - User's Guide Page 2 of 49 CESAM

US Army Corps of Engineers

442

Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 -User's Guide Page 1 of 50  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 - User's Guide Page 1 of 50 CESAM-OPJ-GIS Document current as of June 27, 2012 10:09 AM Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 User's Guide D R AFT #12;Sediment Budget Analysis System (SBAS) for ArcGIS 10 - User's Guide Page 2 of 50 CESAM

US Army Corps of Engineers

443

The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots  

SciTech Connect

Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

Anders, Andre

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

Self-organisation Processes In The Carbon ARC For Nanosynthis  

SciTech Connect

The atmospheric pressure carbon arc in inert gases such as helium is an important method for the production of nanomaterials. It has recently been shown that the formation of the carbon deposit on the cathode from gaseous carbon plays a crucial role in the operation of the arc, reaching the high temperatures necessary for thermionic emission to take place even with low melting point cathodes. Based on observed ablation and deposition rates, we explore the implications of deposit formation on the energy balance at the cathode surface, and show how the operation of the arc is self-organised process. Our results suggest that the can arc operate in two di erent regimes, one of which has an important contribution from latent heat to the cathode energy balance. This regime is characterised by the enhanced ablation rate, which may be favourable for high yield synthesis of nanomaterials. The second regime has a small and approximately constant ablation rate with a negligible contribution from latent heat.

Ng, Jonathan; Raitses, Yevgeny

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma  

SciTech Connect

The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

446

A Distributed Arc-Consistency Algorithm T. Nguyen, Y. Deville  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cient way of tackling constraint satisfaction problems (CSP). In particular, various arc and hardware design. Informally, a CSP is com- posed of a nite set of variables, each of which is taking values the variables can simultaneously take. Resolving a CSP consists in nding one or all complete assignments

Deville, Yves

447

A Generic ArcConsistency Algorithm and its Specializations 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

con­ straint satisfaction problems (CSP). In particular, various arc­consistency algorithms have been constraints) and d is the size of the largest domain. Being applicable to the whole class of (binary) CSP as constraint satisfaction problems (CSP). A CSP is defined by a finite set of variables taking values from

Deville, Yves

448

A Generic Arc-Consistency Algorithm and its Specializations1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satisfaction problems (CSP). In particular, various arc-consistency algorithms have been proposed, originating is the size of the largest domain. Being applicable to the whole class of (binary) CSP, these algorithms do satisfaction problems (CSP). A CSP is de ned by a nite set of variables taking values from nite domains

Deville, Yves

449

75th Diamond anniversary American Welding Society annual meeting  

SciTech Connect

Detailed summaries are given for 85 technical sessions papers, 16 brazing and soldering conference papers, 11 education program papers, 15 thermal spray symposium papres, 9 industrial technology sessions papers 2, invited lectures, and 8 posters presented at the 75th annual convention of the American Welding Society. Also included are the names and addresses of all authors, speakers, and presiding officers.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Experimental validation of finite element codes for welding deformations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute for Energy Technology, N-2027 Kjeller, Norway. Abstract A single pass Metal Inert Gas welding. Hamidec , H. G. Fjærd , A. Moa , M. Belletc a SINTEF Materials Technology, N-0314 Oslo, Norway. b University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo, Norway. c CEMEF Ecole des Mines de Paris, Sophia Antipolis, France. d

Boyer, Edmond

451

.Heat Generation Patterns and Temperature Profiles in_ Electroslag Welding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l .Heat Generation Patterns and Temperature Profiles in_ Electroslag Welding ) · T. DEBROY, J process parameters such as the voltage profiles, heat generation patterns and temperature profiles with equivalent slag, electrode and other geometrical variable; Calcu- 0 lations show that the heat generation

Eagar, Thomas W.

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc welder post Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PHYSICAL PLANT AND OPERATIONS Summary: : SPECIAL TOOLS REQUIRED (if any): Safety Boots Portable welder Welding helmet Barricades Safety Glasses... for possible hazards. Plan...

453

Generation of high charge state ions in vacuum arc ion sources by a ``current jump'' method  

SciTech Connect

In the investigation of ion charge state distributions (CSD) in vacuum arc plasmas, good correlation between increase in arc operating voltage and mean ion charge state has been established. Therefore, to increase the mean charge state of a vacuum arc plasma, it is necessary to find ways to increase the arc operating voltage. The voltage can be increased via transients associated with the arc current by means of which a rather high operation voltage can be established across the discharge gap. Experiments were performed both in Tomsk and Berkeley with the discharge system of a vacuum arc ion source. To effect a step current rise an additional power supply was connected to the usual vacuum arc supply. This power supply made it possible to increase the vacuum arc current up to 1 kA for several {micro}s. As a rule the current jump was produced after 100--200 {micro}s into the main discharge pulse when all principal parameters of the vacuum arc were already established. To measure the CSD a time-of-flight method was used. As followed from experiments, superposition of a short, high current pulse to the vacuum arc current pulse is accompanied by a jump in arc operation voltage. Subsequently during the current step the voltage falls exponentially to one hundred volts after the completion of the current jump, and the arc voltage takes its conventional value (20--40V). Because of this increase in arc operation voltage, an enhancement of high charge station ion fractions was observed. For example, with a Ti-cathode with conventional arc parameters there is only very small value to Ti{sup 4+} ion fraction in the vacuum arc plasma. Applying strong magnetic field increases the fraction of these ions up to 20% of the total beam current. The current jump enhanced this value up to 40%.

Bugaev, A.S.; Oks, E.M.; Yushkov, G.Y.; Brown, I.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical Intra-oceanic Arc1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass Inclusions in Mariana Arc Phenocrysts: A New Perspective on Magmatic Evolution in a Typical at Dallas, Box 830688, Richardson, TX 75083-0688, USA A B S T R A C T Major element compositions of glass of these lavas reflects accumulation of plagioclase. Glass inclusions also show the common occurrence of felsic

Stern, Robert J.

455

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development program. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Failure of dissimilar metal welds is a major cause of forced outage in fossil boilers. A research project was carried out to: Develop a clearer understanding of the underlying causes of dissimilar weld failures; develop a methodology for estimating the residual life of service welds; develop a critical discriminatory test to predict the relative performance of welds; and develop guidelines for improved-performance dissimilar welds. The research methodology included review of prior experience as well as evaluation of a large number of failed and unfailed welds obtained from boiler superheaters or reheaters. The evaluations included metallography, mechanical testing and boiler inspections; in many cases, tube loading histories at the dissimilar weld locations were estimated. This work resulted in a clearer understanding of the root cause of weld failures. Furthermore, a quantitative relationship was derived between failure susceptibility and weld metal ''system'' loads, cycles, and temperatures (all critical parameters in weld performance). Accelerated discriminatory tests, including a number of geometries and modes of stressing and thermal cycling, were examined. The shortest time to failure, good reproducibility, and the capability to control loads and monitor cracking were achieved in a test which involved applying four-point bending loads to internally pressurized full-size tubular specimens. Tests at 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F), which involved temperature cycling, had failure times of only 400 h for stainless-steel fillers and 1500 h for nickel-base fillers. Guidelines for improved welds were derived from all the program results. They include and offer guidance on the considerations of weld-filler selection, weld geometry, heat treatment, etc., in relation to expected service conditions and on locating DMWs to optimize service performance. 7 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Stability analysis of multi-phase AC arc discharge for in-flight glass melting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A stable multi-phase AC arc was generated to by transformers at a commercial electric system. The arc discharge behavior and the stability were investigated by the high-speed video camera observation synchronized with the voltage waveform analysis. The effect of the number of phase and the flaming gas addition into the arc region on the arc behavior and the arc stability were studied. Results showed that the re-ignition occurred between adjacent electrodes periodically. Two kinds of the stability analysis methods were introduced. The estimated fluctuation degree showed that an increase of the number of the phase leads to the stable multi-phase AC arc. The deviation of the arc voltage from the average arc voltage was estimated to evaluate the uniformity of the multi-phase AC arc. Although an addition of the oxygen flame into the arc region leads to lower uniformity, the modification of the electrode position can improve the uniformity of the multi-phase AC arc.

Manabu Tanaka; Yosuke Tsuruoka; Yaping Liu; Tsugio Matsuura; Takayuki Watanabe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Microsoft Word - FEAA064O_ORNL_Welding Single Cystal_Factsheet_Rev01.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloys Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloys (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) FACT SHEET I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS A. Prime Participant: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) B. Project Partners (no project funds to these partners): General Electric Corporation Siemens-Westinghouse Corporation Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) PCC Airfoils Honeywell Aerospace Services Pratt and Whitney Corporation South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objective It is the purpose of this project to investigate the potential for weld refurbishment and repair of single crystal gas turbine engine components and to determine processes, process conditions, and alloy compositions that will make such weld processing possible.

458

MAGENCO: A map generalization controller for Arc/Info  

SciTech Connect

The Arc/Info GENERALIZE command implements the Douglas-Peucker algorithm, a well-regarded approach that preserves line ``character`` while reducing the number of points according to a tolerance parameter supplied by the user. The authors have developed an Arc Macro Language (AML) interface called MAGENCO that allows the user to browse workspaces, select a coverage, extract a sample from this coverage, then apply various tolerances to the sample. The results are shown in multiple display windows that are arranged around the original sample for quick visual comparison. The user may then return to the whole coverage and apply the chosen tolerance. They analyze the ergonomics of line simplification, explain the design (which includes an animated demonstration of the Douglas-Peucker algorithm), and discuss key points of the MAGENCO implementation.

Ganter, J.H.; Cashwell, J.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Systematic Search for High Surface Brightness Giant Arcs in a Sloan Digital Sky Survey Cluster Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for gravitationally-lensed giant arcs conducted on a sample of 825 SDSS galaxy clusters. Both a visual inspection of the images and an automated search were performed and no arcs were found. This result is used to set an upper limit on the arc probability per cluster. We present selection functions for our survey, in the form of arc detection efficiency curves plotted as functions of arc parameters, both for the visual inspection and the automated search. The selection function is such that we are sensitive only to long, high surface brightness arcs with g-band surface brightness mu_g 10. Our upper limits on the arc probability are compatible with previous arc searches. Lastly, we report on a serendipitous discovery of a giant arc in the SDSS data, known inside the SDSS Collaboration as Hall's arc.

J. Estrada; J. Annis; H. T. Diehl; P. B. Hall; T. Las; H. Lin; M. Makler; K. W. Merritt; V. Scarpine; S. Allam; D. Tucker

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

460

Corrosion-fatigue crack growth behavior of surface crack on AH36 TMCP steel weld in seawater  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue crack growth behavior in seawater of surface crack on the weld was studied with a structural steel, AH36, manufactured by the thermo-mechanical control process (TMCP). Crack growth rate was measured for the surface cracks located in different regions of weld, such as the heat affected zone, the weld metal and the base metal. Influence of the welding condition was investigated with the variation of heat inputs of 80, 120 and 180 kJ/cm. Electrochemical analysis of each region of the weld was also performed to investigate the corrosion behavior between the weld and the base metal.

Kweon, Y.G.; Jeong, H.D.; Chang, R.W. [Research Inst. of Industrial Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of). Welding Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tungsten arc welding" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kratt, Et Al., Kratt, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "To test if it would have been possible to find the Tungsten Mountain geothermal system with a shallow temperature survey, more than 80 2-meter-deep temperatures were recorded during a two week period in late June and early July, 2007. These measurements spanned an 8-km-long zone parallel to the range front and extended eastward from the range front up to 2 km towards the playa's edge (Figure 1). Two-meter temperatures ranged from 14.0°C up to a maximum of 26.7° C. The higher temperatures correspond to the area of exploration drilling, although anomalously high temperatures extend northeastward beyond the area of drilling. These

462

2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique 2-M Probe Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Coolbaugh et al. (2007), Sladek et al. (2007), and Kratt, et al. (2008, this volume) describe a shallow temperature survey system in which temperatures can be measured quickly and inexpensively at 2 m depths. This system was tested at Desert Queen based on its structural setting and availability of thermal gradient well data obtained in the 1970's from which to make thermal anomaly comparisons. The system was subsequently used at Tungsten Mountain and Teels and Rhodes Marshes to help locate blind geothermal systems. Of the new, blind geothermal sites identified through collaboration with the minerals industry, shallow temperature surveys were

463

Thermal Gradient Holes At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Tungsten Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Collaboration with the gold mining industry has brought two new geothermal discoveries to the attention of the geothermal community. Exploration holes at Tungsten Mountain and McGuiness Hills (Figure 1) in 2004 and 2005 encountered hot water and steam at depths of meters with fluid geothermometry indicating reservoir temperatures of 170 to 200oC. More information can be obtained from the Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology web site (www.nbmg.unr.edu/geothermal/gtmap.pdf), and from a PowerPoint presentation titled 'Geothermal Exploration Short Stories' posted on the Geothermal Resources Council web site

464

In-process acoustic emission monitoring of dissimilar metal welding: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A system to provide real-time, in-process acoustic emission monitoring to detect and locate flaws in bimetallic welds has been demonstrated. This system could provide reliable inspection of critical welds in cases where conventional NDE would be costly or impossible to apply. Tests were completed on four sample welds to determine the sensitivity of the system. Artificial flaws were introduced into two test samples and the acoustic emission results were verified by radiography and visual inspection techniques.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Decathlon 2011 Project Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHIP CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 1 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2011 Team SCI-Arc/Caltech CHIP COMPACT HYPER_INSULATED PROTOTYPE Project Manual August 11,2011 Project Manager (Design and Construction): Reed Finlay (reed_finlay@sciarc.edu) Project Manager (PR and Development): Elisabeth Neigert (elisabeth_neigert@sciarc.edu) CHIP 2 011 SCI---ARC / C altech S olar D ecathlon 2 011 As---Built P roject M anual 2 D.O.E. S olar D ecathlon 2 011 Table o f C ontents Summary o f C hanges 2 Rules C ompliance C hecklist 3 Structural C alculations 6 Detailed W ater B udget 7 Summary o f U nlisted E lectrical C omponents 9 Summary o f R econfigurable F eatures 10 Interconnection A pplication F orm 11 Energy A nalysis R esults a nd D iscussion

466

Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications  

SciTech Connect

The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used.

Brown, Ian; Oks, Efim

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ACHIEVING THE REQUIRED COOLANT FLOW DISTRIBUTION FOR THE ACCELERATOR PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM (APT) TUNGSTEN NEUTRON SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The Accelerator Production of Tritium neutron source consists of clad tungsten targets, which are concentric cylinders with a center rod. These targets are arranged in a matrix of tubes, producing a large number of parallel coolant paths. The coolant flow required to meet thermal-hydraulic design criteria varies with location. This paper describes the work performed to ensure an adequate coolant flow for each target for normal operation and residual heat-removal conditions.

D. SIEBE; K. PASAMEHMETOGLU

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Electrical conductivities of aluminum, copper, and tungsten observed by an underwater explosion  

SciTech Connect

Conductivities of dense aluminum, copper, and tungsten are evaluated using exploding wire discharges in water. Evolutions of the radius and the electrical resistance of exploding wire are measured together with direct pyrometric estimation of the temperature. The conductivities are evaluated based on the measurements and their density dependence is compared with theoretical predictions at a fixed temperature. The results indicate that regardless of materials, the conductivity has a minimum around 3% of solid density at temperature of 5000 K.

Sasaki, Toru [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kamitomioka 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko [Department of Energy Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fracture and Creep in an All-Tungsten Divertor for ARIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture and Creep in an All- Tungsten Divertor for ARIES Jake Blanchard University of Wisconsin by these designs Fracture Thermal creep #12;The Design #12;Major Input Parameters Parameter Value Units Surface c/a=10 Fracture Results 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 StressIntensity(MPa-m1/2) Crack Depth (mm) c

California at San Diego, University of

470

Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles  

SciTech Connect

Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? W–Ni–Co induces a greater oxidative burst response than W–Ni–Fe in lung macrophages.

Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Tungsten oxide nanowire-reduced graphene oxide aerogel for high-efficiency visible light photocatalysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A light, 3-D, porous aerogel was fabricated by way of a simple approach from 1-D tungsten oxide nanowires and 2-D reduced graphene oxide sheets. The as-prepared graphene oxide, tungsten oxide nanowires, and tungsten oxide-reduced graphene oxide (W18O49-RGO) aerogel were characterised. The photocatalytic activities of as-prepared aerogel under visible light irradiation were investigated through the degradation of six different organic dyes including Rhodamine B, reactive black 39, reactive yellow 145, weak acid black BR, methyl orange, and weak acid yellow G. In comparison with the pure W18O49 nanowires, the prepared W18O49-RGO aerogel had significantly improved photocatalytic efficiency. Also, the photocatalysis of W18O49-RGO aerogel maintained its efficiency after 30 cycles for each of the six dyes. The photocatalytic mechanism was studied by adding hole and radical scavengers: the results confirmed that the holes generated in W18O49-RGO aerogel played a key role in the visible light photocatalytic process.

Xiubing Li; Siwei Yang; Jing Sun; Peng He; Xuguang Xu; Guqiao Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

473

Study of electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten as hydrogen electrodes in alkaline water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten were characterized for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the electrolysis of 30 w/o KOH alkaline water at 25 C. The rate-determining step (rds) of the HER was suggested based on the Tafel slope of polarization and the capacitance of electrode-solution interface determined by ac impedance measurement. The HER on the nickel- and cobalt-based codeposits was enhanced significantly compared with that o the electrolytic nickel and cobalt with comparable deposit loadings. The decrease in the HER overpotential was more pronounced on the molybdenum-containing codeposits, particularly on cobalt-molybdenum which also showed a high stability. The enhancement of the HER was attributed to both the synergetic composition and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of te electrodes and the effect of their and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes and the effect of their surface increase were distinguished quantitatively. The linear relations between HER overpotential and surface roughness factor of the electrodes on a Y-log(X) plot were obtained experimentally and interpreted based on the Tafel law.

Fan, C.; Piron, D.L.; Sleb, A.; Paradis, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - advance revolutionary weld Sample Search...  

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and Restoration Technologies 3 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Development of a mobile welding robot for double-hull structures Summary: . Bostelman R, Jacoff A, Bunch R (1999) Delivery...

475

Resistance mash welding for joining of copper conductors for electric motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The automotive industry is developing designs and manufacturing processes for a new generation of electric motors intended for use in hybrid and electric vehicles. This paper is focused on using solid-state welding to join rectangular wires in the fabrication of motor stators. Resistance welding has not typically been applied to copper due to its very high electrical conductivity; however through optimization of the current and pressure profiles, excellent quality copper-to-copper joints have been demonstrated with a technique known as resistance mash welding. A better understanding of resistance mash welding characteristics will help advancements in its application for stators. The limitations of this application will be discussed.

John S. Agapiou; Thomas A. Perry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Effect of strength mismatch on fracture toughness of HSLA steel weld joints  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this experimental work is to present the results of measured toughness and strength on mismatched weld joints made on HSLA steel grade HT 80. In the determined over and undermatched weld joints the local mismatching in the through thickness direction was found by hardness measurement. It seems that local mismatch because of WM low toughness has controlled the fracture behavior of weld metal and HAZ in both cases instead of the global one. Direct local CTOD({delta}{sub 5}) technique is found to be particular useful for the determination of fracture toughness values on mismatched weld joints.

Rak, I.; Gliha, V.; Gubeljak, N.; Praunseis, Z. [Univ. of Maribor (Slovenia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Kocak, M. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. of Material Research

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Resistance Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloy to Steel with Transition Material - From Process to Performance  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes work to date on resistance spot welding (RSW) of aluminum alloy to mild steel from process development to performance evaluation. A cold-rolled strip material is introduced as a transition material to aid the resistance welding process. The optimal welding parameters and electrode selections were established using a combination of experimental and analytical approaches. The mechanical behaviors of welded samples was evaluated using static and dynamic strength tests and cyclic fatigue tests. A statistical analysis was also performed to analyze the effect of different failure modes on the sample's peak load and energy absorption.

Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Shao, H; Kimchi, Menachem; Menachem Kimchi and Wanda Newman

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

478

UT of bimetallic welds by shear horizontal waves and electromagnetic ultrasonic (EMUS) probes  

SciTech Connect

Bimetallic transition welds include in most cases besides the austenitic weldment an austenitic buttering. Their inspection by ultrasound is strongly complicated by a high degree of elastic anisotropy. The elastic anisotropy results in phase and group velocities of the elastic wave-modes, which are functions of the propagation direction inside the weld metal and which cause skewing of the sound beams. The coarse grain structure leads to enhanced scattering. Furthermore, there exists a mismatch of the acoustical impedances between the weld metal and the base metal, which depends on the angle of incidence at the interface base metal/weld metal and weld metal/buttering. Due to these facts up to now using standard UT-techniques only the HAZ`s are inspected from both sides. In many cases dissimilar metal welds are only accessible from one side. Therefore, US-techniques are necessary which are capable to inspect the whole weld even if there is only access from one side. By improvement of the technology of the EMUS-probes and of the EMUS-instrumentation for the US-transduction of SH-waves a reliable technique for the ISI of dissimilar metal welds and also of austenitic welds is available. The contribution will shortly introduce into the physical basis of the SH-wave technique and present the results of test specimen measurements. The main part of the paper will report about the experiences and the results of field applications in different nuclear power plants.

Huebschen, G.; Salzburger, H.J.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren, Saarbruecken (Germany)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - american welding society Sample Search...  

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to Industry Radiography Cameras, Summary: , an inspection company that performs pipeline weld inspections, such as All American Inspections, must... (American Society of...

480

Optimising Friction Stir Welding parameters to maximise tensile strength of AA6061 aluminium alloy joints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AA6061 aluminium alloy (Al-Mg-Si) has widely accepted in the fabrication of light weight structures. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid-state joining process which offers several advantages over other fusion welding processes. The welding parameters such as tool rotational speed, welding speed, axial force and tool pin profile play a major role in deciding the joint strength. An attempt has been made to develop a mathematical model to predict tensile strength. Response surface method (RSM) has been used to develop the model and it is optimised using Hooke and Jeeves search technique to attain maximum tensile strength.

K. Elangovan; V. Balasubramanian; S. Babu; M. Balasubramanian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z