National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tungsten arc welding

  1. Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    \\ Visible Light Emissions during Gas Tungsten· Arc Welding and Its Application to Weld Image. EAGAR ABSTRACT. An experimental study was carried out to map the light emissions from a gas tungsten arc. The emissions were found to be dramat- ically different with different shielding gases, welding current and base

  2. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  3. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  4. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Chen, Wei [ORNL; Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  5. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  6. Welding arc initiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Correy, T.B.

    1989-05-09

    An improved inert gas shielded tungsten arc welder is disclosed of the type wherein a tungsten electrode is shielded within a flowing inert gas, and, an arc, following ignition, burns between the energized tungsten electrode and a workpiece. The improvement comprises in combination with the tungsten electrode, a starting laser focused upon the tungsten electrode which to ignite the electrode heats a spot on the energized electrode sufficient for formation of a thermionic arc. Interference problems associated with high frequency starters are thus overcome. 3 figs.

  7. Dilution Control in Gas-Tungsten-Arc Welds Involving Superaustenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-Based Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    ) were produced by varying the independent welding parameters of arc power and volumetric filler and decreasing arc power. These effects are quantitatively interpreted based on a previously proposed processing be correlated exclusively to the ratio of the volumetric filler-metal feed rate (Vfm) to arc power (VI), i

  8. DC arc weld starter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campiotti, Richard H. (Tracy, CA); Hopwood, James E. (Oakley, CA)

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  9. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn–29.5Al–0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated Al–MgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the Mg–Al dissimilar joint. - Highlights: • Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. • The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. • The formation of Mg–Al intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  10. Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei

    Hot cracking in tungsten inert gas welding of magnesium alloy AZ91D W. Zhou*, T. Z. Long and C. K of the plates were produced using tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding method. The TIG arc was also used to deposit welding beads on some of the thin plates. No cracking was found in the butt joints. However, hot cracking

  11. Three-dimensional modeling of the plasma arc in arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, G.; Tsai, H. L.; Hu, J.

    2008-11-15

    Most previous three-dimensional modeling on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) focuses on the weld pool dynamics and assumes the two-dimensional axisymmetric Gaussian distributions for plasma arc pressure and heat flux. In this article, a three-dimensional plasma arc model is developed, and the distributions of velocity, pressure, temperature, current density, and magnetic field of the plasma arc are calculated by solving the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, as well as part of the Maxwell's equations. This three-dimensional model can be used to study the nonaxisymmetric plasma arc caused by external perturbations such as an external magnetic field. It also provides more accurate boundary conditions when modeling the weld pool dynamics. The present work lays a foundation for true three-dimensional comprehensive modeling of GTAW and GMAW including the plasma arc, weld pool, and/or electrode.

  12. Percussive arc welding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollar, Jr., Donald L. (Overland Park, KS)

    2002-01-01

    A percussive arc welding apparatus includes a generally cylindrical actuator body having front and rear end portions and defining an internal recess. The front end of the body includes an opening. A solenoid assembly is provided in the rear end portion in the internal recess of the body, and an actuator shaft assembly is provided in the front end portion in the internal recess of the actuator body. The actuator shaft assembly includes a generally cylindrical actuator block having first and second end portions, and an actuator shaft having a front end extending through the opening in the actuator body, and the rear end connected to the first end portion of the actuator block. The second end portion of the actuator block is in operational engagement with the solenoid shaft by a non-rigid connection to reduce the adverse rebound effects of the actuator shaft. A generally transversely extending pin is rigidly secured to the rear end of the shaft. One end of the pin is received in a slot in the nose housing sleeve to prevent rotation of the actuator shaft during operation of the apparatus.

  13. ABSTRACT. Keyhole plasma arc welding is a unique arc welding process for deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    ABSTRACT. Keyhole plasma arc welding is a unique arc welding process for deep penetration. To ensure the quality of the welds, the presence of the keyhole is crit- ical. Understanding of the keyhole will certainly benefit the improvement of the process and weld quality. Currently, the size of the keyhole

  14. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Einerson, Carolyn J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1989-01-01

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections.

  15. Method for controlling gas metal arc welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, H.B.; Einerson, C.J.; Watkins, A.D.

    1987-08-10

    The heat input and mass input in a Gas Metal Arc welding process are controlled by a method that comprises calculating appropriate values for weld speed, filler wire feed rate and an expected value for the welding current by algorithmic function means, applying such values for weld speed and filler wire feed rate to the welding process, measuring the welding current, comparing the measured current to the calculated current, using said comparison to calculate corrections for the weld speed and filler wire feed rate, and applying corrections. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Costing of Joining Methods -Arc Welding Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Costing of Joining Methods - Arc Welding Costs ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems.S. Colton © GIT 2009 5 #12;LaborLabor Di t ti f ldi· Direct time of welding ­ time to produce a length of weld ­ labor rate ­ multiplication gives labor cost per length · Set-up time, etc. · Personal time

  17. Dynamic Behaviors of Plasma Reflection during Keyhole Arc Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    Dynamic Behaviors of Plasma Reflection during Keyhole Arc Welding YuMing Zhang and Yi Ma Welding Engineering College of Engineering University of Kentucky #12;Keyhole Double-Sided Arc Welding Work PAW Torch: in any existing arc welding process? No ! Why Not in Keyhole PAW? No current through the keyhole ! Plasma

  18. WELDING RESEARCH -s11WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -s11WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-electrode gas metal arc welding (DE-GMAW) is a novel weld- ing process recently developed to increase welding productivity while maintaining the base its non- consumable tungsten electrode with a consumable welding wire electrode result- ing in a new

  19. Thermocapillary and arc phenomena in stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, S.W.

    1993-10-01

    Goal was to study effect of power level and distribution on thermocapiilary-induced weld shape and of arc factors on weld shape. Thermocapillarity was apparent in both conduction mode EB welds and GTA welds, particularly in the former. A non-Gaussian arc distribution is suggested for accounting for the differences between the twoss processes. At higher current levels (200--300 A), plasma shear force also contributes to weld shape development. Evidence suggests that thermocapillary flow reversal is not a factor in normal GTA welds; EDB flow reversal occurs only at high power density levels where the keyhole mode is present.

  20. A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF DOUBLE-SIDED ARC WELDING PROCESS IN SHIP STRUCTURE MANUFACTURING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF DOUBLE-SIDED ARC WELDING PROCESS IN SHIP STRUCTURE MANUFACTURING Yu Meeting, August 21-22, 2002 #12;Objective o Determine the feasibility of double-sided arc welding process in butt welding of DH-36 plates #12;Background: Process o Double-sided arc welding (DSAW): a novel arc

  1. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Wasson, Andrew J [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Fairchild, Doug P [ExxonMobil, Upstream Research Company (URC); Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  2. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal vapor dominated laser-arc hybrid welding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribic, B.; DebRoy, T.; Burgardt, P.

    2011-04-15

    During laser-arc hybrid welding, plasma properties affect the welding process and the weld quality. However, hybrid welding plasmas have not been systematically studied. Here we examine electron temperatures, species densities, and electrical conductivity for laser, arc, and laser-arc hybrid welding using optical emission spectroscopy. The effects of arc currents and heat source separation distances were examined because these parameters significantly affect weld quality. Time-average plasma electron temperatures, electron and ion densities, electrical conductivity, and arc stability decrease with increasing heat source separation distance during hybrid welding. Heat source separation distance affects these properties more significantly than the arc current within the range of currents considered. Improved arc stability and higher electrical conductivity of the hybrid welding plasma result from increased heat flux, electron temperatures, electron density, and metal vapor concentrations relative to arc or laser welding.

  3. Effects of shielding gas compositions on arc plasma and metal transfer in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Z. H.; Liao, S. M.; Tsai, H. L.

    2010-02-15

    This article presents the effects of shielding gas compositions on the transient transport phenomena, including the distributions of temperature, flow velocity, current density, and electromagnetic force in the arc and the metal, and arc pressure in gas metal arc welding of mild steel at a constant current input. The shielding gas considered includes pure argon, 75% Ar, 50% Ar, and 25% Ar with the balance of helium. It is found that the shielding gas composition has significant influences on the arc characteristics; droplet formation, detachment, transfer, and impingement onto the workpiece; and weld pool dynamics and weld bead profile. As helium increases in the shielding gas, the droplet size increases but the droplet detachment frequency decreases. For helium-rich gases, the current converges at the workpiece with a 'ring' shape which produces non-Gaussian-like distributions of arc pressure and temperature along the workpiece surface. Detailed explanations to the physics of the very complex but interesting transport phenomena are given.

  4. Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Study of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation of the spray to globular transition in gas metal arc welding: a spectroscopic investigation F Valensi1.iop.org/JPhysD/46/224005 Abstract The gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process is strongly influenced by the composition

  5. CHANGES IN SOLIDIFICATION MODE, AND THE MEASUREMENT OF COOLING RATES FOLLOWING SOLIDIFICATION DURING ARC WELDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    SOLIDIFICATION DURING ARC WELDING 2.1 INTRODUCTION The solidification process in a weld pool has been shown to have a considerable in- fluence upon the properties of the resultant weld. It influences elements, and hence the homogeneity of the weld. Previous work on the cooling behaviour of welds (Garland

  6. Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel, of the K44X assemblies are excellent. Keywords: ferritic stainless steel, welding, oxidation, tensile test of massive components, manifolds can now be made of stainless steel, using tubes or thin sheets rolled

  7. Effects of current on droplet generation and arc plasma in gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J.; Tsai, H. L.

    2006-09-01

    In gas metal arc welding (GMAW), a technology using pulsed currents has been employed to achieve the one-droplet-per-pulse (ODPP) metal transfer mode with the advantages of low average currents, a stable and controllable droplet generation, and reduced spatter. In this paper, a comprehensive model was developed to study the effects of different current profiles on the droplet formation, plasma generation, metal transfer, and weld pool dynamics in GMAW. Five types of welding currents were studied, including two constant currents and three wave form currents. In each type, the transient temperature and velocity distributions of the arc plasma and the molten metal, and the shapes of the droplet and the weld pool were calculated. The results showed that a higher current generates smaller droplets, higher droplet frequency, and higher electromagnetic force that becomes the dominant factor detaching the droplet from the electrode tip. The model has demonstrated that a stable ODPP metal transfer mode can be achieved by choosing a current with proper wave form for given welding conditions.

  8. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    submerged arc welding and plasma arc welding. This study isAdministration PAW: plasma arc welding PEL: permissiblesubmerged arc welding and plasma arc welding. Overall

  9. Method and device for reducing overpenetration at the start of plasma arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, J.M.; Lehmann, J.M.; Ryan, P.M.

    2000-03-14

    A shim for improving plasma arc weld quality has ends tapered at about 25{degree} and notches at each end roughly centered over the corner between the tapered ends and main body of the shim. The improved shim allows lower starting plasma arc heat input and reduces the occurrence of sagging, or overpenetration, of the weld.

  10. Method and device for reducing overpenetration at the start of plasma arc welds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, John M. (Jackson Township, Stark County, OH); Lehmann, John M. (Bedford County, VA); Ryan, Patrick M. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    1998-01-01

    A shim for improving plasma arc weld quality has ends tapered at about 25.degree. and notches at each end roughly centered over the corner between the tapered ends and main body of the shim. The improved shim allows lower starting plasma arc heat input and reduces the occurrence of sagging, or overpenetration, of the weld.

  11. Improved Microstructure and Properties of 6061 Aluminum Alloy Weldments Using a Double-Sided Arc Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    Welding Process Y.M. ZHANG, C. PAN, and A.T. MALE Due to its popularity and high crack sensitivity, 6061 aluminum alloy was selected as a test material for the newly developed double-sided arc welding (DSAW systematically. The percentage of fine equiaxed grains in the fully penetrated welds is greatly increased

  12. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Welding M. Grujicic, S. Ramaswami, J.S. Snipes, R. Yavari, A. Arakere, C.-F. Yen, and B.A. Cheeseman-mechanical finite-element procedure is developed to model conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt of the workpiece and the weld temperature- dependent and by allowing the potential work of plastic deformation

  13. Stainless steel submerged arc weld fusion line toughness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Held, P.R.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This effort evaluated the fracture toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines. The incentive was to explain why cracks grow into the fusion line in many pipe tests conducted with cracks initially centered in SAWS. The concern was that the fusion line may have a lower toughness than the SAW. It was found that the fusion line, Ji. was greater than the SAW toughness but much less than the base metal. Of greater importance may be that the crack growth resistance (JD-R) of the fusion line appeared to reach a steady-state value, while the SAW had a continually increasing JD-R curve. This explains why the cracks eventually turn to the fusion line in the pipe experiments. A method of incorporating these results would be to use the weld metal J-R curve up to the fusion-line steady-state J value. These results may be more important to LBB analyses than the ASME flaw evaluation procedures, since there is more crack growth with through-wall cracks in LBB analyses than for surface cracks in pipe flaw evaluations.

  14. Effect of Microstructure on Mechanical Properties of High Strength Steel Weld Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keehan, Enda

    2004-01-01

    , Egypt The following papers were also published during the period, but are omitted in this thesis due to overlap or because the subject is outside the scope of this thesis: (10) (11) (12) (13) Göteborg, November 2004 VII Some wise words by fellow... for example gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). However as strength levels increase it becomes more difficult to fulfil impact toughness requirements with flexible and productive welding methods such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding...

  15. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Thick Section Ni-base Alloys – Advanced Modeling and Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debroy, Tarasankar; Palmer, Todd; Zhang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Hybrid laser-arc welding of nickel-base alloys can increase productivity and decrease costs during construction and repair of critical components in nuclear power plants. However, laser and hybrid welding of nickel-base alloys is not well understood. This project sought to understand the physical processes during hybrid welding necessary to fabricate quality joints in Alloy 690, a Ni- Cr-Fe alloy. This document presents a summary of the data and results collected over the course of the project. The supporting documents are a collection of the research that has been or will be published in peer-reviewed journals along with a report from the partner at the national lab. Understanding the solidification behavior of Alloy 690 is important for knowing the final properties of the weldment. A study was undertaken to calculate the solidification parameters, such as temperature gradient, solidification rate, and cooling rate in Alloy 690 welds. With this information and measured cell and dendrite arm spacings, an Alloy 690 map was constructed to guide process parameter development and interpret fusion zones in later hybrid welds. This research is contained in “Solidification Map of a Nickel Base Alloy.” The keyhole formed under high laser intensity gives the hybrid welding technique the greater penetration depths compared to arc welding. However, keyhole behavior can form defects in the material, so knowing transient keyhole characteristics is important. With international collaborators, a study was undertaken to validate a new process monitoring tool known as inline coherent imaging (ICI), which is able to measure the keyhole depth with spatial and temporal resolutions on the order of 10 microns and 10 microseconds. ICI was validated for five alloy systems, including Alloy 690. Additionally, the keyhole growth rates at the start of welding were measured with unprecedented accuracy. This research is contained in “Real Time Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Keyhole Depth by Laser Interferometry.” During full penetration welding of thick sections, root defects can form, which result in unacceptable weld quality. A study was undertaken to determine the competing forces in root defect formation by independently changing the weight forces and surface tension forces. The weight force was altered by changing the plate thickness, and the surface tension force was altered by changing the surface condition at the bottom surface. Root defects do depend on these two forces. This research is contained in “Mitigation of Root Defect in Laser and Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding.” Validation of the hybrid laser-arc model is necessary to properly model heat and mass transfer and fluid flow in Alloy 690 hybrid welds. Therefore, the developed model was validated for low carbon steel. Temperatures calculated by the model were included into a microstructural model in order to calculate the phase fractions. Process maps were developed for the selection of welding parameters to avoid martensite formation. This research is contained in “Fusion Zone Microstructure in Full Penetration Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Low Alloy Steel.” Alloy 690 suffers from ductility dip cracking, a form of hot cracking. This type of cracking inhibits the use of multipass welding to join Alloy 690. Our partners at ORNL performed some hot ductility testing with Alloy 690 samples using digital image correlation. The results of this work is contained in the report “Summary of 690 ductility dip cracking testing using Gleeble and digital image correlation.” Macro-porosity is a limiting factor in the widespread deployment of laser and hybrid laser-arc welding for construction and repair of nuclear power plant components. Keyhole instability and fluctuation results in the formation of large bubbles, which become trapped at the advancing solid- liquid interface as pores. Laser and hybrid laser-arc welds were fabricated for a range of conditions. Porosity levels in the welds were measured in X-ray computed tomography (CT), which provides very detailed data on the size and lo

  16. Inverter-based GTA welding machines improve fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammons, M.

    2000-05-01

    While known as precision process, many fabricators using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process fight several common problems that hinder quality, slow production, frustrate the operator and otherwise prevent the process from achieving its full potential. These include a limited ability to tailor the weld bead profile, poor control of the arc direction and arc wandering, poor arc starting, unstable or inconsistent arcs in the AC mode, high-frequency interference with electronics and tungsten contamination. Fortunately, new GTA welding technology--made possible by advances with inverter-based power sources and micro-processor controls--can eliminate common productivity gremlins. Further, new AC/DC inverter-based GTA power sources provide advanced arc shaping capabilities. As a result, many fabricators adopting this new technology have experienced phenomenal production increases, taken on new types of projects and reduced costs. Most importantly, the operators enjoy welding more.

  17. Laser-ultrasonic inspection of hybrid laser-arc welded HSLA-65 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lévesque, D.; Rousseau, G.; Monchalin, J.-P. [National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, QC (Canada); Wanjara, P.; Cao, X. [National Research Council Canada, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-02-18

    The hybrid laser-arc welding (HLAW) process is a relatively low heat input joining technology that combines the synergistic qualities of both the high energy density laser beam for deep penetration and the arc for wide fit-up gap tolerance. This process is especially suitable for the shipbuilding industry where thick-gauge section, long steel plates have been widely used in a butt joint configuration. In this study, preliminary exploration was carried out to detect and visualize the welding defects using laser ultrasonics combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). Results obtained on 9.3 mm thick butt-welded HSLA-65 steel plates indicated that the laser-ultrasonic SAFT inspection technique can successfully detect and visualize the presence of porosity, lack of fusion and internal crack defects. This was further confirmed by X-ray digital radiography and metallography. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the laser-ultrasonic technology for the automated inspection of hybrid laser-arc welds.

  18. Contrib. Plasma Phys. 51, No. 2-3, 293 296 (2011) / DOI 10.1002/ctpp.201000061 LTE Experimental Validation in a Gas Metal Arc Welding Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Validation in a Gas Metal Arc Welding Plasma Column F. Valensi1,2 , S. Pellerin1 , A. Boutaghane3 , K, France 7 CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l'Aum^one, 95315 Cergy-Pontoise cedex, France Received 12 Spectroscopy, Boltzmann Plot, Sola method, LTE. During gas metal arc welding (GMAW), the plasma obtained has

  19. Video Game Device Haptic Interface for Robotic Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corrie I. Nichol; Milos Manic

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in technology for video games have made a broad array of haptic feedback devices available at low cost. This paper presents a bi-manual haptic system to enable an operator to weld remotely using the a commercially available haptic feedback video game device for the user interface. The system showed good performance in initial tests, demonstrating the utility of low cost input devices for remote haptic operations.

  20. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    -welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel, MIL A46100. The model predictions concerning-tempered, high-hardness, low-alloy martensitic, ar- mor-grade steel). A summary of Johnson-Cook material- modelBallistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel

  1. WELDING RESEARCH -s229WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -s229WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dual-bypass gas metal arc welding (DB agrees with experimental data. Introduction Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is an arc welding process- minum alloy welded structures have been widely applied. The use of aluminum as an alternative material

  2. Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma diagnostics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spectroscopy This article has been welding by optical emission spectroscopy F Valensi1,2 , S Pellerin1 , A Boutaghane3 , K Dzierzega4 de Bourges), BP 4043, 18028 Bourges cedex, France 7 CTAS-Air Liquide Welding, Saint Ouen l

  3. Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Multiphysics Modeling and Simulations of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel Gas Metal Arc-welding of MIL A46100, a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel. The model consists of five distinct) of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel MIL A46100 (Ref 1). It is hoped that the availability

  4. METAL TRANSFER CONTROL IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING L.A. Jones, T.W. Eagar, J.H. Lang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    controls both the metal transfer process and the base-plate heating process. It would be advantageousMETAL TRANSFER CONTROL IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING L.A. Jones, T.W. Eagar, J.H. Lang Massachusetts, precision current control, and flexible real-time computer control is described. 1 Introduction Gas metal

  5. Effect of welding on impact toughness of butt-joints in a titanium alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Wei

    Effect of welding on impact toughness of butt-joints in a titanium alloy Wei Zhou a, *, K.G. Chew b Abstract Impact toughness of a gas tungsten arc welded TiÁ/6AlÁ/4V alloy butt-joint was evaluated at room located either in the parent metal, in the heat- affected zone (HAZ), or in the weld metal. Optical

  6. High-Heat Flux Testing of Irradiated Tungsten based Materials for Fusion Applications using Infrared Plasma Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans Jr, James O; Schaich, Charles Ross; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis; Byun, Thak Sang

    2014-01-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research has proved challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat flux testing facility based on water-wall Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) is now being used for materials and small component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12,000 C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, are currently in use. The first PAL system provides a maximum incident heat flux of 4.2 MW/m2 over an area of 9x12 cm2. The second PAL available at ORNL provides a maximum incident heat flux of 27 MW/m2 over an area of 1x10 cm2. The absorbed heat fluxes into a tungsten target for the two PALs are approximately 1.97 and 12.7 MW/m2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design of the new PAL facilities as well as the design and implementation of the Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interested, such as those for plasma facing components. Moreover, IMTS designs are underway to extend the testing of small mock-ups for assessing the combined heating and thermomechanical effects of cooled, irradiated components. For the testing of material coupons , the specimens are placed in a shallow recess within the molybdenum holder that is attached to a water-cooled copper alloy rod. As the measurement of the specimen temperature for PAL is historically challenging since traditional approaches of temperature measurement cannot be employed due to the infrared heating and proximity of the PAL reflector to the specimen that does not allow a direct line of site, experiments for temperature calibration are presented. Finally, results for the high-heat flux testing of tungsten-based materials using the PAL are presented. As a demonstration of the system, results will be shown of thermal fatigue and high-heat flux testing of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in the HFIR reactor to neutron dose consistent to ITER lifetime.

  7. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rooney, Stephen J. (East Berne, NY)

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  8. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheaffer, Donald A. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA); Tung, David M. (Livermore, CA); Schroder, Kevin (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  9. WELDING RESEARCH -s231WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -s231WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-electrode gas metal arc welding (DE the welding wire and the bypass torch. To control the base metal current at the desired level, a group. Introduction Gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is a major process for metals joining. Conventional GMAW is normally

  10. Optimization of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Process for Maximum Ballistic Limit in MIL A46100 Steel Welded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler-tempered, high-hardness, low-alloy martensitic, armor-grade steel) and validated by comparing the model Steel Welded All-Metal Armor M. Grujicic, S. Ramaswami, J.S. Snipes, R. Yavari, C.-F. Yen, and B

  11. Fracture properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of stainless steel cladding to increase the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws depends greatly on the properties of the irradiated cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). 10 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. WELDING RESEARCH -S59WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH -S59WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. The fatigue crack propaga- tion behavior of 316L stainless steel gas metal arc welds has been investigated using the K-increasing testing procedure. A series- come closure for all the gas metal arc welds tested. Crack closure measurements obtained through

  13. The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeVore, Robin Kent

    1973-01-01

    fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED WELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT... DENSITY A Thesis by ROBIN KENT DEVORE Approved as to style and content by: C alarm n of o itte Hea o partment e er Member December 1973 ABSTRACT The Effective Spectral Irradiance of Ultraviolet Radiations from Inert-Gas-Shielded Welding...

  14. Improved gas metal arc welding multi-physics process model and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    -welding of MIL A46100 (a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using fillera, b, c). The present work deals with GMAW of armor-grade martensitic steels. In our prior work-grade steel butt-welds M. Grujicic, J.S. Snipes, R. Galgalikar, S. Ramaswami and R. Yavari Department

  15. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  16. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochanadel, Patrick W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lienert, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jesse N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Raymond J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Matthew Q [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  17. ~DELING OF METAL TRANSFKR IN GAS METAL ARC WELDING Yong -Seog Kim and T. W. Eagar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology ABSTRACT The droplet size is predicted using both the static force balance theory and the pinch i ns t a bility theor y as a function of welding cur rent . Experimental to explain metal transfer mechanisms. These include the static force balance theory (Refs. 2, 4), the pinch

  18. CLOSURE WELD DEVELOPMENT FOR 3013 OUTER CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.; Howard, S.; Peterson, K.; Stokes, M.

    2009-11-10

    Excess plutonium materials in the DOE complex are packaged and stored in accordance with DOE-STD-3013. This standard specifies requirements for the stabilization of such materials and subsequent packaging in dual nested seal-welded containers. Austenitic stainless steels have been selected for container fabrication. The inner 3013 container provides contamination control while the outer 3013 container is the primary containment vessel and is the focus of this paper. Each packaging site chose a process for seal welding the outer 3013 containers in accordance with its needs and expertise. The two processes chosen for weld closure were laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Following development efforts, each system was qualified in accordance with DOE-STD-3013 prior to production use. The 3013 outer container closure weld joint was designed to accommodate the characteristics of a laser weld. This aspect of the joint design necessitated some innovative process and equipment considerations in the application of the GTAW process. Details of the weld requirements and the development processes are presented and several potential enhancements for the GTAW system are described.

  19. WELDING RESEARCH -S249WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -S249WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Double-sided arcing uses two torches on the opposite sides of the workpiece to force the welding current to flow through the thickness. If a keyhole is established through the thickness, part of the welding current will flow through the keyhole and maintain

  20. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron irradiated stainless steel submerged-arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of stainless steel cladding increasing the resistance of an operating nuclear reactor pressure vessel to extension of surface flaws is highly dependent upon the irradiated properties of the cladding. Therefore, weld overlay cladding irradiated at temperatures and fluences relevant to power reactor operation was examined. The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged-arc, single-wire, oscillating electrode method. Three layers of cladding were applied to provide a cladding thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. There was considerable dilution of the type 309 in the first layer of cladding as a result of excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens for the irradiation study were taken from near the base plate/cladding interface and also from the upper layers of cladding. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to neutron fluences of 2 x 10/sup 23/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding showed a 5 to 40% increase in yield strength accompanied by a slight increase in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing.

  1. Evaluation of laser welding techniques for hydrogen transmission. Final report, September 1977-November 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mucci, J

    1980-05-01

    This program was established to determine the feasibility of laser beam welding as a fabrication method for hydrogen transmission and is a precursor in the effort to systematically provide the technological base necessary for large-scale, economic pipeline transmission of fuel for a hydrogen energy system. The study contributes to the technology base by establishing the effect of conventional weld processes and laser beam welding on the mechanical properties of two classes of steels in an air and high pressure gaseous hydrogen environment. Screening evaluation of the tensile, low-cycle fatigue and fracture toughness properties and metallurgical analyses provide the basis for concluding that laser beam welding of AISI 304L stainless steel and ASTM A106B carbon steel can produce weldments of comparable quality to those produced by gas-tungsten arc and electron beam welding and is at least equally compatible with 13.8 MPa (2000 psig) gaseous hydrogen environment.

  2. Weld microstructure development and properties of precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, J.A. ); Garrison, W.R. Jr. )

    1999-08-01

    The weld microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and solidification cracking susceptibility of three precipitation-strengthened martensitic stainless steels--PH 13-8 Mo, Custom 450 and 15-5 PH--were investigated. Liquid tin quenching of gas tungsten arc welds revealed that all three welds solidified as single-phase ferrite with a high degree of microsegregation. However, during further solidification and cooling almost complete homogenization occurred as a result of solid-state diffusion. The welds in all three alloys exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and generally exhibited tensile and impact properties similar to those of the base metal. However, in almost all cases, the weld Charpy impact energies were somewhat less than those of the base metals. The cracking behavior and mechanical properties are discussed in terms of microstructural evolution.

  3. Charpy toughness and tensile properties of a neutron-irradiated stainless steel submerged arc weld cladding overlay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Berggren, R.G.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1984-09-01

    The cladding was applied to a pressure vessel steel plate by the submerged arc, single-wire, oscillating-electrode method. Three layers of cladding provided a thickness adequate for fabrication of test specimens. The first layer was type 309, and the upper two layers were type 308 stainless steel. The type 309 was diluted considerably by excessive melting of the base plate. Specimens were taken from near the base plate-cladding interface and also from the upper layers. Charpy V-notch and tensile specimens were irradiated at 288/sup 0/C to a fluence of 2 x 10/sup 23/ neutrons/m/sup 2/ (>1 MeV). When irradiated, both types 308 and 309 cladding increased 5 to 40% in yield strength and slightly increased in ductility in the temperature range from 25 to 288/sup 0/C. All cladding exhibited ductile-to-brittle transition behavior during impact testing. The type 308 cladding, microstructurally typical of that in reactor pressure vessels, showed very little degradation in either upper-shelf energy or transition temperature due to irradiation. Conversely, the impact properties of the specimens containing the highly diluted type 309 cladding, microstructurally similar to that produced during some off-normal welding conditions in existing reactors, experienced significant increases in transition temperature and drops of up to 50% in upper-shelf energy. The impact energies of the Charpy specimens containing the type 309 layer strongly reflected the amount of the type 309 actually in the specimen, falling into two distinct high- and low-energy populations with the low-energy population corresponding to a higher fraction of type 309 in the specimen.

  4. Microstructural, mechanical and weldability assessments of the dissimilar welds between ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naffakh Moosavy, Homam, E-mail: homam_naffakh@iust.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aboutalebi, Mohammad-Reza; Seyedein, Seyed Hossein [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology (IUST), Tehran 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mapelli, Carlo [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Massa 34, Milan 20156 (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys has been investigated to identify the relationship between the microstructure of the welds and the resultant mechanical and weldability characteristics. ??-Strengthened nickel-base Alloy 500 and ??-strengthened nickel-base Alloy 718 were used for dissimilar welding. Gas tungsten arc welding operations were utilized for performing the autogenous dissimilar welding. Alloy 500 and Alloy 718 base metals showed various types of phases, carbides, intermetallics and eutectics in their microstructure. The results for Alloy 500 weld metal showed severe segregation of titanium to the interdendritic regions. The Alloy 718 weld metal compositional analysis confirmed the substantial role of Nb in the formation of low-melting eutectic-type morphologies which can reduce the weldability. The microstructure of dissimilar weld metal with dilution level of 65% wt.% displayed semi-developed dendritic structure. The less segregation and less formation of low-melting eutectic structures caused to less susceptibility of the dissimilar weld metal to the solidification cracking. This result was confirmed by analytic modeling achievements. Dissolution of ??-Ni{sub 3}Nb precipitations took place in the Alloy 718 heat-affected zone leading to sharp decline of the microhardness in this region. Remelted and resolidified regions were observed in the partially-melted zone of Alloy 500 and Alloy 718. Nevertheless, no solidification and liquation cracking happened in the dissimilar welds. Finally, this was concluded that dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys can successfully be performed. - Highlights: • Dissimilar welding of ??- and ??-strengthened nickel-base superalloys is studied. • Microstructural, mechanical and weldability aspects of the welds are assessed. • Microstructure of welds, bases and heat-affected zones is characterized in detail. • The type, morphology and distribution of the phases are thoroughly investigated. • Dissimilar welding is successfully performed without occurrence of any hot cracks.

  5. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  6. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hooper, Frederick M (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  7. Method for welding beryllium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, Raymond D. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Frank M. (Espanola, NM); O'Leary, Richard F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  8. WELDING RESEARCH FEBRUARY 2008, VOL. 87-s44

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH FEBRUARY 2008, VOL. 87-s44 ABSTRACT. Consumable double- electrode gas metal arc welding (DE- GMAW) is an innovative welding process that can significantly increase the deposi- tion rate arc welding(GMAW)gunandconstantcurrent (CC) power supply to a conventional GMAW setup -- Fig. 1

  9. Chapter 7 -Welding The dangers in welding, cutting, heating and grinding should never be underestimated.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    36 Chapter 7 - Welding The dangers in welding, cutting, heating and grinding should never and to understand the hazards involved. Spot the hazard Hazards associated with welding include: · The arc itself eyes can become extremely red and sore and in extreme cases suffer permanent damage. · Welding gases

  10. WELDING RESEARCH JANUARY 2004-S6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH JANUARY 2004-S6 ABSTRACT. The influence of microstruc- ture on the fatigue crack propagation be- havior of gas metal arc welds in 316L and AL6XN austenitic stainless steels has been effects as the fatigue crack propa- gated from the base metal into the weld metal. The results

  11. TABLE OF CONTENTS Welding and Cutting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 30 Nov 14 10-i Section 10 TABLE OF CONTENTS Welding and Cutting Section: Page 10.A ............................................................................................... 10-5 10.E Oxyfuel Gas Welding and Cutting .................................................................. 10-7 10.F Arc Welding and Cutting

  12. UC Berkeley Welding/Cutting Permit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    #12;#12;UC Berkeley Welding/Cutting Permit MUST BE POSTED ON SITE All equipment to be used for welding or cutting has been inspected and approved. All personnel (including supervisors) are trained, or protected by fire-resistant shields. (Where floors have been wet down, personnel operating arc welding

  13. Weld Surfacing Edited by Dr I.A. Bucklow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    V01.II Weld Surfacing Edited by Dr I.A. Bucklow ConferenceTechnicalDirector Organised by The Welding Institute in associationwith The Surface Engineering Society THE WELDING INSTITUTE #12;L becomesconfigurationally frozen at a temperature of about 1150°Cduring deposition by the manual-metal-arc welding technique

  14. Method for welding beryllium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  15. Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.

    2012-04-03

    Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

  16. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI series 5. Volume 2, Appendices E and F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Menke, B.H. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel irradiation (HSSI) Program was aimed at obtaining a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two weldments with high-copper contents to determine the shift and shape of the K{sub lc} curve as a consequence of irradiation. The program included irradiated Charpy V-notch impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens in addition to compact fracture toughness specimens. Compact specimens with thicknesses of 25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm [1T C(T), 2T C(T), and 4T C(T), respectively] were irradiated. Additionally, unirradiated 6T C(T) and 8T C(T) specimens with the same K{sub lc} measuring capacity as the irradiated specimens were tested. The materials for this irradiation series were two weldments fabricated from special heats of weld wire with copper added to the melt. One lot of Linde 0124 flux was used for all the welds. Copper levels for the two welds are 0.23 and 0.31 wt %, while the nickel contents for both welds are 0.60 wt %. Twelve capsules of specimens were irradiated in the pool-side facility of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C and an average fluence of about 1.5 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). This volume, Appendices E and F, contains the load-displacement curves and photographs of the fracture toughness specimens from the 72W weld (0.23 wt % Cu) and the 73 W weld (0.31 wt % Cu), respectively.

  17. Cathodic arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    Rectangular vacuum-arc plasma source, Jan. 2, 1996. [40] A.A. Anders, Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition (in preparation) (from the cathodic arc plasma. In most cases, a magnetic

  18. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  19. Modelling of friction stir welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colegrove, Paul Andrew

    the operator does not require the skills required for arc welding. • No edge preparation, shielding gas or filler metal is required. (Although shielding gas is used for some high temperature materials.) • Low distortion, shrinkage and residual stresses... is Friction Stir Processing, where material is processed (without being welded) to improve its mechanical properties. This enables the casting of components that are cun'ently machined with the clitical areas being processed to improve their hardness and...

  20. NSF Grant Number: DMI-0114982 PI: YuMing Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    Tungsten Arc Welding Process? #12;Is G-GTAW a Plasma Arc Welding? PAW · Arc is constrained by the orifice: Control of Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Pool Surface Award Dates: 10/1/2001 -9/30/2004 Research Team Drs. A. G-GTAW · Arc is not constrained by the orifice. #12;Advantages In Comparison with PAW · PAW

  1. Towards Real Time Diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Mcjunkin; Dennis C. Kunerth; Corrie Nichol; Evgueni Todorov; Steve Levesque; Feng Yu; Robert Danna Couch

    2013-07-01

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  2. Towards real time diagnostics of Hybrid Welding Laser/GMAW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McJunkin, T. R.; Kunerth, D. C.; Nichol, C. I. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3570 (United States); Todorov, E.; Levesque, S. [Edison Welding Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Methods are currently being developed towards a more robust system real time feedback in the high throughput process combining laser welding with gas metal arc welding. A combination of ultrasonic, eddy current, electronic monitoring, and visual techniques are being applied to the welding process. Initial simulation and bench top evaluation of proposed real time techniques on weld samples are presented along with the concepts to apply the techniques concurrently to the weld process. Consideration for the eventual code acceptance of the methods and system are also being researched as a component of this project. The goal is to detect defects or precursors to defects and correct when possible during the weld process.

  3. Effects of irradiation temperature on Charpy and tensile properties of high-copper, low upper-shelf, submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Berggren, R.G.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents analyses of the Charpy impact and tensile test data, including adjustments for irradiation temperature and fluence normalization which make possible comparison of the irradiation sensitivity of the different welds. Analyses revealed dependence of yield and ultimate strength on irradiation temperature {minus}0.8 MPA/{degrees}C, respectively. Similarly, the Charpy impact energy changes due to irradiation temperature were {minus}0.5{degrees}C/{degrees}C for transition shift and {minus}0.05 J/{degrees}C for upper-shelf energy decrease. After adjustment to an irradiation temperature of 288{degrees}C and normalization to a fluence of 8 {times} 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2} percentage increases in yield strength due to irradiation ranged from about 21 to 35% while those for ultimate strength ranged from about 13 to 20%. The Charpy transition temperature shifts ranged from 59 to 123{degrees}C while the postirradiation upper-shelf energies ranged from 58 to 79 J.

  4. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  5. BRITTLE FRACTURE IN HEAT-AFFECTED ZONES OF GIRTH WELDS OF MODERN LINE PIPE STEEL (X100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BRITTLE FRACTURE IN HEAT-AFFECTED ZONES OF GIRTH WELDS OF MODERN LINE PIPE STEEL (X100) A.-S. BILAT welds of modern line pipe steel, such as X100, issued from a pulsed automatic gas metal arc welding). The brittle zone is located in the coarse-grained heat-affected zone of the weld. The reproduction of two heat

  6. Architecture of the Object Oriented ARC framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Rushikesh K.

    in the ARC logical ring ARC Sotware Components ARC Sotware Components ARC Sotware Components ARC Sotware Components ARC Sotware Components > > >

  7. WELDING RESEARCH -s85WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -s85WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Measurement of weld pool surface is a difficult but urgent task in the welding community. It plays an important role not only in developing the next- generation intelligent welding machines but also for modeling complex welding processes. In recent years

  8. WELDING RESEARCH -S25WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH -S25WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Stress-relief cracking is a major cause of weld conventional TEM and STEM techniques. The results of this study form a basis for heat treatment and welding fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel may require welding at both the installation and fabrication stages, and in

  9. WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH -s55WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Dissimilar metal weld (DMW) failures between carbon along the weld interface and the formation of locally high stresses associated with thermal ex- pansion mismatch. The formation of a soft carbon denuded region near the weld in- terface has been identified

  10. WELDING RESEARCH -s57WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    WELDING RESEARCH -s57WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Low heat input is typically desired for welding high welding. However, a high current, and thus a high heat input, is required to melt more wire to achieve the HAZ size, microstructure, and the hard- ness of high-strength steel ASTM A514 welded by DE

  11. Increasing Productivity of Welding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhrig, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is universally recognized that welding is the most economical way to permanently join metals. Recent advances in welding, specifically, the continuous electrode wire processes make welding even more attractive for manufacturing. As welding...

  12. Prediction of Weld Penetration in FCAW of HSLA steel using Artificial Neural Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asl, Y. Dadgar; Mostafa, N. B.; Panahizadeh, V. R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyedkashi, S. M. H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-01-17

    Flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) is a semiautomatic or automatic arc welding process that requires a continuously-fed consumable tubular electrode containing a flux. The main FCAW process parameters affecting the depth of penetration are welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed. Shallow depth of penetration may contribute to failure of a welded structure since penetration determines the stress-carrying capacity of a welded joint. To avoid such occurrences; the welding process parameters influencing the weld penetration must be properly selected to obtain an acceptable weld penetration and hence a high quality joint. Artificial neural networks (ANN), also called neural networks (NN), are computational models used to express complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) method is used to predict the effects of welding current, arc voltage, nozzle-to-work distance, torch angle and welding speed on weld penetration depth in gas shielded FCAW of a grade of high strength low alloy steel. 32 experimental runs were carried out using the bead-on-plate welding technique. Weld penetrations were measured and on the basis of these 32 sets of experimental data, a feed-forward back-propagation neural network was created. 28 sets of the experiments were used as the training data and the remaining 4 sets were used for the testing phase of the network. The ANN has one hidden layer with eight neurons and is trained after 840 iterations. The comparison between the experimental results and ANN results showed that the trained network could predict the effects of the FCAW process parameters on weld penetration adequately.

  13. Wonder Weld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are using the process shown here to create a super-strong weld for the upgrade of a key component of the Lab's experimental nuclear fusion reactor.

  14. Tungsten as first wall material in the main chamber of ASDEX Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The carbon tiles were shaped to reduce edge erosion and coated with 0 6 ¡ 1 5 µm tungsten by Plasma Arc experiments are using carbon as plasma facing material. Due to the codepo- sition of tritium with carbon a future fusion reactor has to minimise the graphite plasma facing components [1]. A promising alternative

  15. WELDING RESEARCH -s281WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH -s281WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Superaustenitic stainless steel alloys can often pose difficulties dur- ing fusion welding due to the unavoidable microsegregation of Mo and tramp ele. A method of producing austenitic welds is proposed that can po- tentially circumvent these issues by de

  16. WELDING RESEARCH -S125WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH -S125WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. Microstructural evolution and solidification cracking susceptibility of dissimilar metal welds between AL- 6XN super austenitic stainless steel and two, differential thermal analysis, and Varestraint testing tech- niques. Welds were prepared over the en- tire

  17. WELDING RESEARCH -s77WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    WELDING RESEARCH -s77WELDING JOURNAL ABSTRACT. The microstructure of AL- 6XN plates joined via a double-sided fric- tion stir weld has been investigated. The microstructural zones that develop during friction stir welding (FSW) reflect de- creasing strains and less severe thermal cy- cles with increasing

  18. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  19. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, John O. (Santa Fe, NM); Sklar, Edward (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  20. Review Article Timing of collision of the KohistanLadakh Arc with India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seno, Tetsuzo

    Review Article Timing of collision of the Kohistan­Ladakh Arc with India and Asia: Debateiar_774 was regarded as of Jurassic­Cretaceous age and was welded to Asia and India by Northern and Southern Sutures respectively. Formation of this arc, timings of its collisions with Asia and India, and position of collision

  1. Preparation of tungsten oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bulian, Christopher J. (Yankton, SD); Dye, Robert C. (Los Alamos, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jorgensen, Betty S. (Jemez Springs, NM); Perry, W. Lee (Jemez Springs, NM)

    2009-09-22

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O) was prepared from a precursor solution of ammonium paratungstate in concentrated aqueous hydrochloric acid. The precursor solution was rapidly added to water, resulting in the crash precipitation of a yellow white powder identified as WO.sub.3.H.sub.2O nanosized platelets by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Annealing of the powder at 200.degree. C. provided cubic phase WO.sub.3 nanopowder, and at 400.degree. C. provided WO.sub.3 nanopowder as a mixture of monoclinic and orthorhombic phases.

  2. Arc Position Sensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    device. Basically, an ECL can determine positions of arcs within an electric arc furnace in real time. No other measurement technique can give this kind of information....

  3. High strength uranium-tungsten alloy process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  4. High strength uranium-tungsten alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Hogan, Billy M. (Los Alamos, NM); Lewis, Homer D. (Bayfield, CO); Dickinson, James M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    Alloys of uranium and tungsten and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 4 wt % to about 35 wt %. Tungsten particles are dispersed throughout the uranium and a small amount of tungsten is dissolved in the uranium.

  5. PDC IC WELD FAILURE EVALUATION AND RESOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.; Howard, S.; Maxwell, D.; Fiscus, J.

    2012-04-16

    During final preparations for start of the PDCF Inner Can (IC) qualification effort, welding was performed on an automated weld system known as the PICN. During the initial weld, using a pedigree canister and plug, a weld defect was observed. The defect resulted in a hole in the sidewall of the canister, and it was observed that the plug sidewall had not been consumed. This was a new type of failure not seen during development and production of legacy Bagless Transfer Cans (FB-Line/Hanford). Therefore, a team was assembled to determine the root cause and to determine if the process could be improved. After several brain storming sessions (MS and T, R and D Engineering, PDC Project), an evaluation matrix was established to direct this effort. The matrix identified numerous activities that could be taken and then prioritized those activities. This effort was limited by both time and resources (the number of canisters and plugs available for testing was limited). A discovery process was initiated to evaluate the Vendor's IC fabrication process relative to legacy processes. There were no significant findings, however, some information regarding forging/anneal processes could not be obtained. Evaluations were conducted to compare mechanical properties of the PDC canisters relative to the legacy canisters. Some differences were identified, but mechanical properties were determined to be consistent with legacy materials. A number of process changes were also evaluated. A heat treatment procedure was established that could reduce the magnetic characteristics to levels similar to the legacy materials. An in-situ arc annealing process was developed that resulted in improved weld characteristics for test articles. Also several tack welds configurations were addressed, it was found that increasing the number of tack welds (and changing the sequence) resulted in decreased can to plug gaps and a more stable weld for test articles. Incorporating all of the process improvements for the actual can welding process, however, did not result in an improved weld geometry. Several possibilities for the lack of positive response exist, some of which are that (1) an insufficient number of test articles were welded under prototypic conditions, (2) the process was not optimized so that significant improvements were observable over the 'noise', and (3) the in-situ arc anneal closed the gap down too much so the can was unable to exhaust pressure ahead of the weld. Several operational and mechanical improvements were identified. The weld clamps were changed to a design consistent with those used in the legacy operations. A helium puff operation was eliminated; it is believed that this operation was the cause of the original weld defect. Also, timing of plug mast movement was found to correspond with weld irregularities. The timing of the movement was changed to occur during weld head travel between tacks. In the end a three sequential tack weld process followed by a pulse weld at the same current and travel speed as was used for the legacy processes was suggested for use during the IC qualification effort. Relative to legacy welds, the PDC IC weld demonstrates greater fluctuation in the region of the weld located between tack welds. However, canister weld response (canister to canister) is consistent and with the aid of the optical mapping system (for targeting the cut position) is considered adequate. DR measurements and METs show the PDC IC welds to have sufficient ligament length to ensure adequate canister pressure/impact capacity and to ensure adequate stub function. The PDC welding process has not been optimized as a result of this effort. Differences remain between the legacy BTC welds and the PDC IC weld, but these differences are not sufficient to prevent resumption of the current PDC IC qualification effort. During the PDC IC qualification effort, a total of 17 cans will be welded and a variety of tests/inspections will be performed. The extensive data collected during that qualification effort should be of a sufficient population to determ

  6. High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardt, D.E.; Lee, S.G.

    1996-08-06

    A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics. 4 figs.

  7. High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hardt, David E. (Concord, MA); Lee, Steven G. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1996-01-01

    A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics.

  8. Operation of thoriated tungsten cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, J.E. )

    1993-01-20

    The operating temperature of thoriated tungsten cathodes used in electric thrusters depends on the surface coverage of thorium, which is determined by a balance of rate processes which supply and deplete the surface layer. The fundamental processes and rates are first reviewed in detail, then a phenomenological model based on these rate processes is described. The model indicates that the thermionic emission capabilities of thoriated tungsten cathodes decay rapidly because of thorium depletion at temperatures encountered in electric thrusters.

  9. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO); Davis, John W. (Ballwin, MO)

    2000-07-18

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by sintering a stack of individual copper and tungsten powder blend layers having progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in successive powder blend layers in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  10. TUNGSTEN--2000 81.1 By Kim B. Shedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TUNGSTEN--2000 81.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Jason of uses (see Tungsten in the 20th Century section of this report). During 2000, U.S. demand for tungsten.S. and world tungsten statistics for 2000 and the previous 4 years are listed in table 1. Most data

  11. Fusion welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Kenneth C. (Export, PA); Jones, Eric D. (Salem, PA); McBride, Marvin A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  12. Rotating arc spark plug

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  13. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  14. Automatica 43 (2007) 876884 www.elsevier.com/locate/automatica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    2007-01-01

    an innovative plasma arc welding process referred to as the quasi-keyhole process to achieve less application; Penetration; Keyhole; GTAW; PAW 1. Introduction Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been the primary pro- cess penetration must be assured. The majority of research in arc welding process sensing and control has been

  15. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  16. Process Of Bonding Copper And Tungsten

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slattery, Kevin T. (St. Charles, MO); Driemeyer, Daniel E. (Manchester, MO)

    1999-11-23

    Process for bonding a copper substrate to a tungsten substrate by providing a thin metallic adhesion promoting film bonded to a tungsten substrate and a functionally graded material (FGM) interlayer bonding the thin metallic adhesion promoting film to the copper substrate. The FGM interlayer is formed by thermal plasma spraying mixtures of copper powder and tungsten powder in a varied blending ratio such that the blending ratio of the copper powder and the tungsten powder that is fed to a plasma torch is intermittently adjusted to provide progressively higher copper content/tungsten content, by volume, ratio values in the interlayer in a lineal direction extending from the tungsten substrate towards the copper substrate. The resulting copper to tungsten joint well accommodates the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the materials.

  17. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  18. Spectroscopic characterization and imaging of laser- and unipolar arc-induced plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aussems, Damien U. B.; Nishijima, Daisuke; Brandt, Christian; Doerner, Russell P.; Cardozo, Niek J. Lopes

    2014-08-14

    Tungsten plasmas induced by unipolar arcs were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy and imaging, and compared with laser-induced tungsten plasmas. The unipolar arcs were initiated in the linear-plasma simulator PISCES-A at UCSD under fusion relevant conditions. The electron temperature and density of the unipolar arc plasmas were in the range 0.5–0.7?eV and 0.7–2.0?×?10{sup 20?}m{sup ?3}, respectively, and increased with increasing negative bias voltage, but did not correlate with the surface temperature. In comparison, the electron temperature and density of the laser-induced plasmas were in the range 0.6–1.4?eV and 7?×?10{sup 19}–1?×?10{sup 22?}m{sup ?3}, respectively.

  19. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  20. WSRC-MS-99-00210

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    included standard machining, gas-tungsten arc (GTA) welding, pinch welding, and casting. Each assembly is small enough to hold in two hands and weighs 44 pounds or less....

  1. TUNGSTEN--2001 80.1 By Kim B. Shedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TUNGSTEN--2001 80.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared- temperature lubricants. U.S. apparent consumption of all tungsten materials in 2001 remained approximately as compared with that of 2000. No tungsten was mined in the United States in 2001. U.S. supply of tungsten raw

  2. TUNGSTEN--1999 80.1 By Kim B. Shedd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TUNGSTEN--1999 80.1 TUNGSTEN By Kim B. Shedd Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Eric. U.S. tungsten mines remained closed in 1999. China continued to be the largest supplier of tungsten imports to the United States. Russia was also a significant supplier. In 1999, 66% of all tungsten imports

  3. Diffusion of tungsten clusters on tungsten (110) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dong; Hu, Wangyu; Yang, Jianyu; Deng, Huiqiu; Sun, Lixian; Gao, Fei

    2009-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation and modified analytic embedded-atom method, we have investigated the self-diffusion of clusters on a tungsten (110) surface. As compared to the linear-chain configuration, the close-packed islands for tungsten clusters containing more than nine adatoms have been predicted to be more stable with the relatively lower binding energies. The migration energies show an interesting and oscillating behavior with increasing cluster size. The tetramer, hexamer and octamer have obviously higher migration energies than the others. The different atomic configurations and diffusion mechanisms have been determined during the diffusion processes. It is clear that the dimer-shearing mechanism occurs inside the hexamer, while it occurs at the periphery of heptamer. The successive hopping mechanism of individual atom is of critical importance in the migration of the clusters containing five or fewer adatoms. In addition, the diffusion of a cluster with nine adatoms is achieved through the changes of the cluster shape.

  4. EVALUATION OF CONSTANT CURRENT WELD CONTROL FOR PINCH WELDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P; STANLEY, S; HOWARD, H

    2005-10-11

    Modern weld controllers typically use current to control the weld process. SRS uses a legacy voltage control method. This task was undertaken to determine if the improvements in the weld control equipment could be implemented to provide improvements to the process control. The constant current mode of operation will reduce weld variability by about a factor of 4. The constant voltage welds were slightly hotter than the constant current welds of the same nominal current. The control mode did not appear to adversely affect the weld quality, but appropriate current ranges need to be established and a qualification methodology for both welding and shunt calibrations needs to be developed and documented.

  5. Plasma effect on weld pool surface reconstruction by shape-from-polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coniglio, N.; Mathieu, A.

    2014-03-31

    The polarimetric state of the thermal radiations emitted by the weld metal contains geometric information about the emitting surface. Even though the analysed thermal radiation has a wavelength corresponding to a blind spectral window of the arc plasma, the physical presence of the arc plasma itself interferes with the rays radiated by the weld pool surface before attaining the polarimeter, thus modifying the geometric information transported by the ray. In the present work, the effect of the arc plasma-surrounding zone on the polarimetric state and propagation direction of the radiated ray is analyzed. The interaction with the arc plasma zone induces a drop in ray intensity and a refraction of ray optical path.

  6. Characterization of tungsten films and their hydrogen permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemani?, Vincenc Kova?, Janez; Lungu, Cristian; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Zajec, Bojan

    2014-11-01

    Prediction of tritium migration and its retention within fusion reactors is uncertain due to a significant role of the structural disorder that is formed on the surface layer after plasma exposure. Tungsten films deposited by any of the suitable methods are always disordered and contain a high density of hydrogen traps. Experiments on such films with hydrogen isotopes present a suitable complementary method, which improves the picture of the hydrogen interaction with fusion relevant materials. The authors report on the morphology, composition, and structure of tungsten films deposited by the thermionic vacuum arc method on highly permeable Eurofer substrates. Subsequently, hydrogen permeation studies through these films were carried out in a wide pressure range from 20 to 1000 mbars at 400?°C. The final value of the permeation coefficient for four samples after 24?h at 400?°C was between P?=?3.2?×?10{sup ?14}?mol?H{sub 2}/(m?s?Pa{sup 0.5}) and P?=?1.1?×?10{sup ?15}?mol H{sub 2}/(m s Pa{sup 0.5}). From the time evolution of the permeation flux, it was shown that diffusivity was responsible for the difference in the steady fluxes, as solubility was roughly the same. This is confirmed by XRD data taken on these samples.

  7. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diez, Fernando Martinez (Peoria, IL); Stump, Kevin S. (Sherman, IL); Ludewig, Howard W. (Groveland, IL); Kilty, Alan L. (Peoria, IL); Robinson, Matthew M. (Peoria, IL); Egland, Keith M. (Peoria, IL)

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  8. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Ying, E-mail: yingzou@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  9. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, Paul R [Richland, WA

    1986-01-01

    A portable, hand held electric arc saw has a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc to erode a workpiece. Electric current is supplied to the blade by biased brushes and a slip ring which are mounted in the frame. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads stretched between two pulleys are used to facilitate movement of the electric arc saw. The pulleys are formed of dielectric material to electrically insulate the crawler treads from the frame.

  10. Weld Results SUNY Stony Brook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Weld Results Yan Zhan SUNY Stony Brook June 13rd, 2013 1 #12;Outline · Studied Parameters · Results Analysis ­ Contours Plots For the Weld Region ­ Axial Velocity Profile at Different Locations Near the Weld ­ Plots of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and Momentum Thickness Near the Weld ­ Line Plot Goes From Inlet

  11. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lienert Named American Welding Society Fellow Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow Lienert was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of Fellows during...

  12. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  13. Electric arc saw apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deichelbohrer, P.R.

    1983-08-08

    A portable, hand-held electric arc saw apparatus comprising a small frame for supporting an electrically conducting rotary blade which serves as an electrode for generating an electric arc between the blade and a workpiece of opposite polarity. Electrically conducting means are provided on said frame for transmitting current to said blade. A pair of freely movable endless belts in the form of crawler treads are employed to facilitate movement of the apparatus relative to the workpiece.

  14. WELDING RESEARCH -s51WELDING JOURNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    . The use of nickel- based filler metals produces a thinner martensite layer compared to stainless steel alloy welds. The concentration gradients were converted to martensite start (Ms) tem- perature gradients and used to explain the differences in martensite layer widths that have been observed in the partially

  15. J. Haidar ) Rhee Kannatey-Asibu )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , "Plasma diagnos- tics in gas metal arc welding by optical emission spec- troscopy", , J. Phys. D tungsten arc welding", , J. Appl. Phys p . ) Nemchinsky V A, "The effect of the type of plasma gas ) Murphy A B, "Metal vapour in atmospheric-pressure arcs", , J. Phys. D ) Murphy A B, "The effects of metal

  16. High strength and density tungsten-uranium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    Alloys of tungsten and uranium and a method for making the alloys. The amount of tungsten present in the alloys is from about 55 vol % to about 85 vol %. A porous preform is made by sintering consolidated tungsten powder. The preform is impregnated with molten uranium such that (1) uranium fills the pores of the preform to form uranium in a tungsten matrix or (2) uranium dissolves portions of the preform to form a continuous uranium phase containing tungsten particles.

  17. Ion charge state fluctuations in vacuum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yushkov, Georgy Yu

    2004-01-01

    known that cathodic vacuum arc plasmas contain multiple ionfunctions [16]. The arc plasma is known to be “noisy,” thatcondensation of cathodic arc plasma. They are also used as

  18. Friction stir welding tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle; Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID), Clark; Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID), Barnes; Timothy A. (Ammon, ID)

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  19. Investigation of electromagnetic welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pressl, Daniel G. (Daniel Gerd)

    2009-01-01

    We propose several methodologies to study and optimize the electromagnetic process for Electromagnetic Forming (EMF) and Welding (EMW), thereby lowering the necessary process energy up to a factor of three and lengthening ...

  20. Weld failure detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  1. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  2. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  3. Optimization of Target Parameters for a Tungsten

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    and tungsten to sol. axis 50cm long of tungsten in sol. axis #12;Meson Productions at 8GeV 28819 (pos: 13613 neg: 15206) 27220 (pos: 13202 neg: 14018) Meson Hg (13.54 g/cm3) with optimization 50% W (9.65 g/cm3 · Fit: peak at 43.5 cm #12;Meson Productions at 8GeV 28819 (pos: 13613 neg: 15206) 29069 (pos: 14099 neg

  4. Comparison Between Keyhole Weld Model and Laser Welding Experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A series of laser welds were performed using a high-power diode-pumped continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser welder. In a previous study, the experimental results of those welds were...

  5. Chopping effect observed at cathodic arc initiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2000-01-01

    generation by vacuum arc plasma guns,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. ,probe L L SCR C C D I arc plasma source and filter cathode Rto IEEE Trans. Plasma Science Cathodic arcs or “vacuum” arcs

  6. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  7. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  8. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  9. Growth of tungsten oxide on carbon nanowalls templates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hua; Su, Yan; Chen, Shuo; Quan, Xie

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Tungsten oxide deposited on carbon nanowalls by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. ? This composite has two-dimensional uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. ? Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. - Abstract: In the present work we present a simple approach for coupling tungsten oxide with carbon nanowalls. The two-dimensional carbon nanowalls with open boundaries were grown using plasma enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition, and the subsequent tungsten oxide growth was performed in the same equipment by direct heating of a tungsten filament. The tungsten oxide coating is found to have uniform morphology with a crystalline structure of monoclinic tungsten trioxide. Surface photoelectric voltage measurements show that this product has photoresponse properties. The method of synthesis described here provides an operable route to the production of two-dimensional tungsten oxide nanocomposites.

  10. Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Boise, ID); Reutzel, Edward W. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

  11. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  12. Masatsu kakuhan setsugo "Friction Stir Welding Complete aspects of FSW" Japan Welding Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Masatsu kakuhan setsugo ­ "Friction Stir Welding ­ Complete aspects of FSW" Japan Welding Society years ago that the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) method was proposed by TWI. Because FSW is a solid state welding method, the peak temperature reached during FSW welding is lower than the traditional welding

  13. Nozzle Weld Beads Stony Brook University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nozzle Weld Beads Yan Zhan Stony Brook University 12/27/2011 #12;Location of interests: welded)Fig. 1 Hg nozzle assembly Location of the Interested Weld #12;Surface Topology of the Weld Bead is a crude assumption ­ Start with a symmetric torus geometry · Circular axis is the nominal line of the weld

  14. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  15. Shell Hoop Prestress Generated by Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meuser, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    can be generated by the welding process. The data are notagainst the yoke for welding. TEST SETUP Annealed Type 304in two passes using TIG welding. After strain measurements

  16. Arc Position Sensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 02 (CRACApril JanuaryAps_notifyArc

  17. Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORS FROM BOILING NITRIC ACIDCathodic Arc

  18. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  19. Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lienert named American Welding Society Fellow November 29, 2012 Thomas J. Lienert of the Lab's Metallurgy group was inducted into the American Welding Society's 2012 Class of...

  20. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    P. J. Martin, Handbook of Vacuum Arc Science and Technology.charge state distributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The originand the broadening of vacuum-arc ion charge state

  1. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    distributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The origin of species,"spectrum for thallium arc plasma, as measured for 400 A,and thallium vacuum arc plasmas. For comparison, the data

  2. Robotic weld overlay coatings for erosion control. Final technical progress report, July 1992--July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, B.F.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1995-10-15

    The erosion behavior of weld overlay coatings has been studied. Eleven weld overlay alloys were deposited on 1018 steel substrates using the plasma arc welding process and erosion tested at 400{degrees}C at 90{degrees} and 30{degrees} particle impact angles. The microstructure of each coating was characterized before erosion testing. A relative ranking of the coatings erosion resistance was developed by determining the steady state erosion rates. Ultimet, Inconel-625, and 316L SS coatings showed the best erosion resistance at both impact angles. It was found that weld overlays that exhibit good abrasion resistance did not show good erosion resistance. Erosion tests were also performed for selected wrought materials with chemical composition similar to weld overlays. Eroded surfaces of the wrought and weld alloys were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Microhardness tests were performed on the eroded samples below the erosion surface to determine size of the plastically deformed region. It was found that one group of coatings experienced significant plastic deformation as a result of erosion while the other did not. It was also established that, in the steady state erosion regime, the size of the plastically deformed region is constant.

  3. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, Kamal N. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  4. Arc fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  5. CARBON DIFFUSION ACROSS DISSIMILAR STEEL WELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    CARBON DIFFUSION ACROSS DISSIMILAR STEEL WELDS By Julia Margaret Race St. John's College, Cambridge. 111 #12;#12;ABSTRACT Dissimilar steel welds are used extensively in the power generation industry to the high alloy side of the weld. This leaves an area on one side of the weld denuded of carbon

  6. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    465.   Sapp ME.  A History of Welding: from Hepheastus to whistoryfolder/welding/index.html.   Saric M, Markicevic, be retrieved from American Welding Society publications. The

  7. Double, Double Toil and Trouble: Tungsten Burns and Helium Bubbles...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    larger when it bursts, creating more surface debris. The colors indicate helium atoms (blue) and tungsten atoms (red). The Science When simulated helium (He) bubbles grow quickly,...

  8. Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomically Thin Heterostructures based on...

  9. Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 1 Copyright © 2007 ESRI. All rights reserved. Arc Hydro Arc Hydro: GIS in Water Resources Seminar/Workshop Gainesville, Florida ­ November 15, 2007 Christine Dartiguenave, ESRI inc. cdartiguenave@esri.com #12;Hydrologic Modeling with Arc Hydro Tools 2 2Arc Hydro

  10. Laser welding of fused quartz

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S.; Carpenter, Robert W.; Archer, III, McIlwaine

    2003-06-10

    Refractory materials, such as fused quartz plates and rods are welded using a heat source, such as a high power continuous wave carbon dioxide laser. The radiation is optimized through a process of varying the power, the focus, and the feed rates of the laser such that full penetration welds may be accomplished. The process of optimization varies the characteristic wavelengths of the laser until the radiation is almost completely absorbed by the refractory material, thereby leading to a very rapid heating of the material to the melting point. This optimization naturally occurs when a carbon dioxide laser is used to weld quartz. As such this method of quartz welding creates a minimum sized heat-affected zone. Furthermore, the welding apparatus and process requires a ventilation system to carry away the silicon oxides that are produced during the welding process to avoid the deposition of the silicon oxides on the surface of the quartz plates or the contamination of the welds with the silicon oxides.

  11. Design of bulk nanocrystalline tungsten alloys via nano-phase separation sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Mansoo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    An accelerated sintering method called 'nano-phase separation sintering' is developed, with specific applicability to nanostructured tungsten alloys. Nanocrystalline tungsten alloys containing minority additions of chromium ...

  12. Formation of metal oxides by cathodic arc deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, S.; Anders, A.; Rubin, M.; Wang, Z.; Raoux, S.; Kong, F.; Brown, I.G.

    1995-03-01

    Metal oxide thin films are of interest for a number of applications. Cathodic arc deposition, an established, industrially applied technique for formation of nitrides (e.g. TiN), can also be used for metal oxide thin film formation. A cathodic arc plasma source with desired cathode material is operated in an oxygen atmosphere, and metal oxides of various stoichiometric composition can be formed on different substrates. We report here on a series of experiments on metal oxide formation by cathodic arc deposition for different applications. Black copper oxide has been deposited on ALS components to increase the radiative heat transfer between the parts. Various metal oxides such as tungsten oxide, niobium oxide, nickel oxide and vanadium oxide have been deposited on ITO glass to form electrochromic films for window applications. Tantalum oxide films are of interest for replacing polymer electrolytes. Optical waveguide structures can be formed by refractive index variation using oxide multilayers. We have synthesized multilayers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AI{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Si as possible basic structures for passive optoelectronic integrated circuits, and Al{sub 2-x}Er{sub x}O{sub 3} thin films with a variable Er concentration which is a potential component layer for the production of active optoelectronic integrated devices such as amplifiers or lasers at a wavelength of 1.53 {mu}m. Aluminum and chromium oxide films have been deposited on a number of substrates to impart improved corrosion resistance at high temperature. Titanium sub-oxides which are electrically conductive and corrosion resistant and stable in a number of aggressive environments have been deposited on various substrates. These sub-oxides are of great interest for use in electrochemical cells.

  13. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    less hazardous compared to MIG welding, these areas as wellareas where high concentrations occurred; 3) although resistance welding is considered less hazardoushazardous welding operations such as resistance welding should also be effectively controlled. Those who work in areas

  14. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    nickel and manganese in shipyard welding fumes.  Welding on weld fume exposures in a shipyard confined space welding 1: Manufacturing 2: Shipyard 3: Railroad 4: Automobile 0:

  15. Thermal compression wafer bonding of tungsten applied to fabrication of small-period tungsten woodpile structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klotzkin, David

    properties Multilayer structure Nanomaterials Optical materials and properties In this paper, we report of a 3D tungsten woodpile structure using this method. The structure is fabricated by holographic region of the electromagnetic spectrum and then to bond these 2D- structures to form a 3D

  16. Tungsten Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to:Tucson Electric Power Co Jump to:TudelTungsten

  17. Cathodic Arc Deposition of Copper Oxide Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacGill, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    compatibility. A cathodic arc plasma source with a copperon operating a cathodic arc plasma source with a copperdeposited using a cathodic arc plasma source with a copper

  18. Ion energy distribution functions of vacuum arc plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byon, Eungsun; Anders, Andre

    2002-01-01

    functions of vacuum arc plasmas Eungsun Byon and Andréfunctions of vacuum arc plasmas Eungsun Byon and Andréenergies of vacuum arc plasmas 1-7 because these energies

  19. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2005-01-01

    functions of vacuum arc plasmas," J. Appl. Phys. , vol. 93,macroparticles in vacuum arc plasmas," in preparation, 2005.A. Anders, Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition: From Fractal

  20. Cathodic Arcs: Fractal Voltage and Cohesive Energy Rule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Gera, Yu. Yushkov

    2005-01-01

    Applications of Vacuum-Arc-Produced Plasma, Ion and Electronparameters of cathodic arc plasma, many researches decidedof a coaxial cathodic arc plasma source, and analyzing the

  1. Physics of arcing, and implications to sputter deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2005-01-01

    A. Anders, Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition: From FractalApplications of Vacuum-Arc-Produced Plasma, Ion and Electronstandard) textbooks on plasmas [1], arcs are introduced as

  2. Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Failure Modes of Vacuum Plasma Spray Tungsten Coating Created on Carbon Fibre Composites under Thermal Loads

  3. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  4. NEUTRAL-BEAM PLASMA SOURCE METAL-ARC PROTECTION CIRCUIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deVries, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    e r . METAL ARCS IN PLASMAS Metal-arcs in plasma sources are1981 NEUTRAL-BEAM PLASMA SOURCE METAL-ARC PROTECTION CIRCUIT48 NEUTRAL-BEAM PLASMA SOURCE METAL-ARC PROTECTION CIRCUIT*

  5. Reducing ion beam noise of vacuum arc ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Hollinger, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    in the expanding vacuum arc plasma and operating in the ion3 Schematic of the vacuum arc plasma generator (arc cathodeUnfortunately, vacuum arc plasmas are rapidly fluctuating

  6. Pre-resistance-welding resistance check

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Destefan, Dennis E. (Broomfield, CO); Stompro, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A preweld resistance check for resistance welding machines uses an open circuited measurement to determine the welding machine resistance, a closed circuit measurement to determine the parallel resistance of a workpiece set and the machine, and a calculation to determine the resistance of the workpiece set. Any variation in workpiece set or machine resistance is an indication that the weld may be different from a control weld.

  7. Using Arc Marine in ArcGIS 10 Tutorial for Beginners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Using Arc Marine in ArcGIS 10 Tutorial for Beginners Introduction Arc Marine (or the ArcGIS Marine Data Model - MDM), is a geodatabase model tailored specifically for the marine GIS community. Created by researchers from Oregon State University, Duke

  8. ON THE WELDED TUBE MAP BENJAMIN AUDOUX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audoux, Benjamin

    ON THE WELDED TUBE MAP BENJAMIN AUDOUX Abstract. This paper investigates the so-called Tube map which connects welded knots, that is a quotient of the virtual knot theory, to ribbon torus-knots with a given filling are in one-to-one correspondence with welded knots before quo- tient under classical

  9. Components of the Creep Strength of Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Components of the Creep Strength of Welds M. Murugananth and H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia Department://www.msm.cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT Modern power plant steels and welding alloys, designed to resist creep deforma- tion at high in the sense that it covers all common ferritic steels and welding alloys of the type used in the construc

  10. Contamination and solid state welds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Bernice E.

    2007-05-01

    Since sensitivity to contamination is one of the verities of solid state joining, there is a need for assessing contamination of the part(s) to be joined, preferably nondestructively while it can be remedied. As the surfaces that are joined in pinch welds are inaccessible and thus provide a greater challenge, most of the discussion is of the search for the origin and effect of contamination on pinch welding and ways to detect and mitigate it. An example of contamination and the investigation and remediation of such a system is presented. Suggestions are made for techniques for nondestructive evaluation of contamination of surfaces for other solid state welds as well as for pinch welds. Surfaces that have good visual access are amenable to inspection by diffuse reflection infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy. Although other techniques are useful for specific classes of contaminants (such as hydrocarbons), DRIFT can be used most classes of contaminants. Surfaces such as the interior of open tubes or stems that are to be pinch welded can be inspected using infrared reflection spectroscopy. It must be demonstrated whether or not this tool can detect graphite based contamination, which has been seen in stems. For tubes with one closed end, the technique that should be investigated is emission infrared spectroscopy.

  11. Arc$c Climate Dynamics James Overland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Carbon Chemistry- Mathis, Evans, Cross · Pacific Ecosystems- Stabeno, Moore, Mordy than in other regions of the globe (Arc%c Amplifica%on) Arc partnerships Contributed to wri$ng of the NOAA Arc%c Vision and Strategy Plan Part

  12. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  13. Polaron absorption in amorphous tungsten oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, Lars; Azens, Andris; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2001-08-15

    Amorphous thin films of tungsten oxide were deposited by sputtering onto glass substrates covered by conductive indium--tin oxide. The density and stoichiometry were determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Lithium ions were intercalated electrochemically into the films. The optical reflectance and transmittance were measured in the wavelength range from 0.3 to 2.5 {mu}m, at a number of intercalation levels. The polaron absorption peak becomes more symmetric and shifts to higher energies until an intercalation level of 0.25 to 0.3 Li{sup +}/W, where a saturation occurs. The shape of the polaron peak is in very good agreement with the theory of Bryksin [Fiz. Tverd. Tela 24, 1110 (1982)]. Within this model, the shift of the absorption peak is interpreted as an increase in the Fermi level of the material as more Li ions are inserted. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Tungsten-doped thin film materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xiang, Xiao-Dong; Chang, Hauyee; Gao, Chen; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Schultz, Peter G.

    2003-12-09

    A dielectric thin film material for high frequency use, including use as a capacitor, and having a low dielectric loss factor is provided, the film comprising a composition of tungsten-doped barium strontium titanate of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0. Also provided is a method for making a dielectric thin film of the general formula (Ba.sub.x Sr.sub.1-x)TiO.sub.3 and doped with W, where X is between about 0.5 and about 1.0, a substrate is provided, TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr are deposited on the substrate, and the substrate containing TiO.sub.2, the W dopant, Ba, and optionally Sr is heated to form a low loss dielectric thin film.

  15. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Zimmerman, G.; Jacques, S.

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or ``welded`` using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage. 8 figs.

  16. Intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glinsky, Michael (Livermore, CA); London, Richard (Orinda, CA); Zimmerman, George (Lafayette, CA); Jacques, Steven (Portland, OR)

    1998-10-27

    A method and device are provided for performing intraluminal tissue welding for anastomosis of a hollow organ. A retractable catheter assembly is delivered through the hollow organ and consists of a catheter connected to an optical fiber, an inflatable balloon, and a biocompatible patch mounted on the balloon. The disconnected ends of the hollow organ are brought together on the catheter assembly, and upon inflation of the balloon, the free ends are held together on the balloon to form a continuous channel while the patch is deployed against the inner wall of the hollow organ. The ends are joined or "welded" using laser radiation transmitted through the optical fiber to the patch. A thin layer of a light-absorbing dye on the patch can provide a target for welding. The patch may also contain a bonding agent to strengthen the bond. The laser radiation delivered has a pulse profile to minimize tissue damage.

  17. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Essien, Marcelino (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, M. Eric (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  18. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  19. Atomistic computer simulation analysis of nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engwall, Alison Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloys are harder, stronger, more resistant to degradation, and safer to electrodeposit than chromium. Atomistic computer simulations have previously met with success in replicating the ...

  20. Tungsten carbide-cobalt by Three Dimensional Printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Andrew, III

    1998-01-01

    Three Dimensional Printing is an additive manufacturing process for rapid prototyping ceramic and metallic parts [Sachs, et al, 1990]. Green (not sintered) tungsten carbide-cobalt parts must have a density greater than 50% ...

  1. Microstructured tungsten thermophotovoltaic selective emitters c by Natalija (Zorana) Jovanovi?.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Natalija Zorana

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates the fabrication, modeling, characterization, and application of tungsten two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structures as selective emitters and means of achieving higher efficiencies ...

  2. Characterization of arcs in frequency domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Inca, R.; Siegl, G.; Faugel, H.; Braun, F.; Eckert, B.; Bobkov, V.; El Khaldi, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2009-11-26

    Arc detection systems are developed for ICRH on ITER to prevent arcs from damaging the RF components. One of the detectors, the Sub-Harmonic Arc Detector (SHAD) is based on the detection of the frequencies emitted in the MHz range by arcs [R1]. To ensure the high level of reliability required for this safety system, it is necessary to demonstrate that these frequencies present a signal with a Signal to Noise Ratio high enough to be detected under the wide range of operational conditions (frequency, power, configuration) and for the different types of arcs that can appear in the feeding lines and on the antennas (vacuum arc, glow discharge, multipactor-induced discharge). For each type of arc, we analyze the evolution of the frequency spectrum relative to the evolution of other electrical parameters (reflected power, voltage)

  3. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds Oct. 24, 2012 Yan Zhan 1 #12;Outline · Line Plot of TI at the Pipe Exit · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 4 - 9) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ with a weld ­ 2.5M · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 10 - 15) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ without a weld ­ 3

  5. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    -Grade Martensitic Steel M. Grujicic, A. Arakere, S. Ramaswami, J.S. Snipes, R. Yavari, C-F. Yen, B.A. Cheeseman-metallurgy, to a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel (MIL A46100). The main outcome of this procedure-metallurgy concepts and principles of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel MIL A46100 [Ref 1

  6. Random Curves by Conformal Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Astala; P. Jones; A. Kupiainen; E. Saksman

    2009-12-17

    We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle given in terms of the exponential of Gaussian Free Field. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

  7. Random Curves by Conformal Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astala, K; Kupiainen, A; Saksman, E

    2009-01-01

    We construct a conformally invariant random family of closed curves in the plane by welding of random homeomorphisms of the unit circle given in terms of the exponential of Gaussian Free Field. We conjecture that our curves are locally related to SLE$(\\kappa)$ for $\\kappa<4$.

  8. Influence of Mn and Ni on the microstructure and toughness of C-Mn-Ni weld metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Farrar, R.A. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    A systematic investigation has been carried out to study the microstructure and toughness of C-Mn-Ni low-alloy shielded metal arc (SMA) weld metals. The manganese and nickel concentrations were progressively changed to determine their influence on weld microstructure and mechanical properties as well as to identify their interactions. The results obtained showed that manganese and nickel have considerable effect on the weld metal microstructure, and both Mn and Ni affect the microstructure in a similar way, i.e., promoting acicular ferrite at the expense of proeutectoid ferrite (grain boundary ferrite and ferrite sideplates). The results in the top bead also showed that there is an optimum composition range that produces an optimum balance of weld metal microstructures. For optimum toughness, a combination of 0.6--1.4% manganese and 1.0--3.7% nickel is suggested. Additions beyond this limit promotes the formation of martensite and other microstructural features, which may be detrimental to weld metal toughness.

  9. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Jerred; L. Zirker; I. Charit; J. Cole; M. Frary; D. Butt; M. Meyer; K. L. Murty

    2010-10-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400oC has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  10. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding (Book) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding In fusion welding, parts...

  11. Charge state dependence of cathodic vacuum arc ion energy and velocity distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    velocity in vacuum arc plasmas by arc current perturbationin aluminum vacuum arc plasma. We show that the conflictingdistinguished. Cathodic vacuum arc plasma is well known to

  12. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  13. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, H.B.

    1992-10-13

    A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

  14. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, H.B.

    1991-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  15. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

    1992-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  16. Passively damped vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tan, Chin-An; Kang, Bongsu; Cai, Wayne W.; Wu, Tao

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an anvil, and a passive damping mechanism (PDM). The controller generates an input signal having a calibrated frequency. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction at the calibrated frequency in response to the input signal to form a weld in a work piece. The PDM is positioned with respect to the system, and substantially damps or attenuates vibration in an undesirable second direction. A method includes connecting the PDM having calibrated properties and a natural frequency to an anvil of an ultrasonic welding system. Then, an input signal is generated using a weld controller. The method includes vibrating a welding horn in a desirable direction in response to the input signal, and passively damping vibration in an undesirable direction using the PDM.

  17. Arc Geometry and Algebra: Foliations, Moduli Spaces, String ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-02

    yields a modular operad structure on the homology level. .... 1.4.2 Elements as weighted arc families A weight function wt on an arc family ...... Figure 6. I, the identity and II, the arc family ? yielding the BV operator ..... weighted arc family obtained by scaling all weights of arcs incident to ?i of ? homoge- ..... A careful analysis.

  18. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM); Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, Mark F. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  19. Gamma-Normal Probability Distribution Arc Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesam

    2014-11-04

    ... Engineering, Mazandaran University of Science and Technology, Babol, Iran ... the arcs are assumed to represent transportation time or cost rather than the ...

  20. Effect of welding sequence on welding-induced-alignment-distortion in packaging of butterfly laser diode modules: Simulation and experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Y M; Eichele, C; Shi, F G

    2005-01-01

    and M. Rodighiero, “Laser welding produces high-yield as-Y. M. Lin, and F. G. Shi, “Welding induced alignment dis-packages: effect of laser welding sequence,” in Proc. SPIE,

  1. Modelling of friction stir spot welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, Aidan

    2013-07-09

    1.2 Friction stir process descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2.1 Friction stir welding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2.2 Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.2.3 Pinless FSSW... processes . . . . . . . 25 2.3.5 Empirical testing and validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 vii 2.3.6 Microstructural modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 2.3.7 Modelling of related non-welding processes . . . . . . . 42 2.4 Constitutive data...

  2. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  3. Tungsten dust impact on ITER-like plasma edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, R. D. Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2015-01-15

    The impact of tungsten dust originating from divertor plates on the performance of edge plasma in ITER-like discharge is evaluated using computer modeling with the coupled dust-plasma transport code DUSTT-UEDGE. Different dust injection parameters, including dust size and mass injection rates, are surveyed. It is found that tungsten dust injection with rates as low as a few mg/s can lead to dangerously high tungsten impurity concentrations in the plasma core. Dust injections with rates of a few tens of mg/s are shown to have a significant effect on edge plasma parameters and dynamics in ITER scale tokamaks. The large impact of certain phenomena, such as dust shielding by an ablation cloud and the thermal force on tungsten ions, on dust/impurity transport in edge plasma and consequently on core tungsten contamination level is demonstrated. It is also found that high-Z impurities provided by dust can induce macroscopic self-sustained plasma oscillations in plasma edge leading to large temporal variations of edge plasma parameters and heat load to divertor target plates.

  4. Tungsten-dependent formaldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase: Reaction mechanism from quantum chemical calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Rongzhen

    Tungsten-dependent formaldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase: Reaction mechanism from quantum chemical April 2011 Keywords: Tungstoenzyme Formaldehyde oxidoreductase Reaction mechanism Density functional theory Enzyme catalysis Formaldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Pyrococcus furiosus is a tungsten

  5. Room-Temperature Z-Selective Homocoupling of alpha-Olefins by Tungsten Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinescu, Smaranda C.

    3,5-Dimethylphenylimido complexes of tungsten can be prepared using procedures analogous to those employed for other tungsten catalysts, as can bispyrrolide species and MonoAryloxide-Pyrrolide (MAP) species. Homocouplings ...

  6. Dynamic Characterization of Spot Welds | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Welds Dynamic Characterization of Spot Welds Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland....

  7. Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically fully coupled CFD study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Material flow during friction stir welding: A...

  8. Welding apparatus and methods for using ultrasonic sensing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Johnson, John A.; Larsen, Eric D.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    2006-08-22

    A welding apparatus using ultrasonic sensing is described and which includes a movable welder having a selectively adjustable welding head for forming a partially completed weld in a weld seam defined between adjoining metal substrates; an ultrasonic assembly borne by the moveable welder and which is operable to generate an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward the partially completed weld, and is further reflected from same; and a controller electrically coupled with the ultrasonic assembly and controllably coupled with the welding head, and wherein the controller receives information regarding the ultrasonic signal and in response to the information optimally positions the welding head relative to the weld seam.

  9. A Submarine Welded Ignimbrite-Crystal-Rich Sandstone Facies Associatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ignimbrite). Breccia units composed of welded ignimbrite clasts and crystal-rich matrix (e.g., Comstock and Anthony Road ignimbrite breccias) imply that some welded...

  10. Welding of Dissimilar Materials Combinations for Automotive Applicatio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0, 2011 Welding of Dissimilar Materials Combinations for Automotive Applications Jerry E. Gould Technology Leader Resistance and Solid State Welding ph: 614-688-5121 e-mail:...

  11. Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

    2011-09-14

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  12. Groundwater Modeling in ArcView: by integrating ArcView, MODFLOW and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengupta, Raja

    Groundwater Modeling in ArcView: by integrating ArcView, MODFLOW and MODPATH Abstract Modeling. This paper addresses groundwater modeling which is one of the many entities in environmental modeling in ArcView 3.2a. The objective was to create an integrated system where a user could do groundwater

  13. Improving Fatigue Performance of AHSS Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhili; Yu, Xinghua; Erdman, III, Donald L.; Wang, Yanli; Kelly, Steve; Hou, Wenkao; Yan, Benda; Wang, Zhifeng; Yu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Reported herein is technical progress on a U.S. Department of Energy CRADA project with industry cost-share aimed at developing the technical basis and demonstrate the viability of innovative in-situ weld residual stresses mitigation technology that can substantially improve the weld fatigue performance and durability of auto-body structures. The developed technology would be costeffective and practical in high-volume vehicle production environment. Enhancing weld fatigue performance would address a critical technology gap that impedes the widespread use of advanced high-strength steels (AHSS) and other lightweight materials for auto body structure light-weighting. This means that the automotive industry can take full advantage of the AHSS in strength, durability and crashworthiness without the concern of the relatively weak weld fatigue performance. The project comprises both technological innovations in weld residual stress mitigation and due-diligence residual stress measurement and fatigue performance evaluation. Two approaches were investigated. The first one was the use of low temperature phase transformation (LTPT) weld filler wire, and the second focused on novel thermo-mechanical stress management technique. Both technical approaches have resulted in considerable improvement in fatigue lives of welded joints made of high-strength steels. Synchrotron diffraction measurement confirmed the reduction of high tensile weld residual stresses by the two weld residual stress mitigation techniques.

  14. Welding the AT-400A Containment Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon, E.

    1998-11-01

    Early in 1994, the Department of Energy assigned Sandia National Laboratories the responsibility for designing and providing the welding system for the girth weld for the AT-400A containment vessel. (The AT-400A container is employed for the shipment and long-term storage of the nuclear weapon pits being returned from the nation's nuclear arsenal.) Mason Hanger Corporation's Pantex Plant was chosen to be the production facility. The project was successfully completed by providing and implementing a turnkey welding system and qualified welding procedure at the Pantex Plant. The welding system was transferred to Pantex and a pilot lot of 20 AT-400A containers with W48 pits was welded in August 1997. This document is intended to bring together the AT-400A welding system and product (girth weld) requirements and the activities conducted to meet those requirements. This document alone is not a complete compilation of the welding development activities but is meant to be a summary to be used with the applicable references.

  15. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menotti, James Louis (Dickinson, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  16. Polymer Welding: Strength Through Entanglements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ting Ge; Flint Pierce; Dvora Perahia; Gary S. Grest; Mark O. Robbins

    2012-11-29

    Large-scale simulations of thermal welding of polymers are performed to investigate the rise of mechanical strength at the polymer-polymer interface with the welding time. The welding process is in the core of integrating polymeric elements into devices as well as in thermal induced healing of polymers; processes that require development of interfacial strength equal to that of the bulk. Our simulations show that the interfacial strength saturates at the bulk shear strength much before polymers diffuse by their radius of gyration. Along with the strength increase, the dominant failure mode changes from chain pullout at the interface to chain scission as in the bulk. Formation of sufficient entanglements across the interface, which we track using a Primitive Path Analysis is required to arrest catastrophic chain pullout at the interface. The bulk response is not fully recovered until the density of entanglements at the interface reaches the bulk value. Moreover, the increase of interfacial strength before saturation is proportional to the number of interfacial entanglements between chains from opposite sides.

  17. FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FRACTURE AND CREEP IN AN ALL-TUNGSTEN DIVERTOR FOR ARIES James P. Blanchard University of Wisconsin proposing an all-tungsten divertor for their tokamak designs. In designing such a component, fracture a series of fracture mechanics-based analyses to demonstrate the feasibility of using an all- tungsten

  18. Asymmetric injection of cathodic arc plasma into a macroparticle filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    setup. The cathodic arc plasma source is flange-mounted andfirewall" twist filter arc plasma source F IG. 1 Current (A)Injection of Cathodic Arc Plasma into a Macroparticle Filter

  19. Filtered cathodic arc deposition with ion-species-selective bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Lim, Sunnie H.N.

    2006-01-01

    Photograph of a cathodic arc plasma source with two cathodesof ions of cathodic arc plasmas. The selection was made forAbstract A dual-cathode arc plasma source was combined with

  20. MULTIPLY STRIPPED ION GENERATION IN THE METAL VAPOR VACUUM ARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.

    2010-01-01

    the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge. A new kind offrom a metal vapor vacuum arc plasma has been used to obtaindrives the vacuum arc plasma is created. The fundamental

  1. Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasma sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

    2005-01-01

    A. Anders, Cathodic Arc Plasma Deposition: From Fractalion current from vacuum arc plasma sources E. M. Oks, K. P.ion current from vacuum arc plasma sources E. M. Oks, K. P.

  2. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian; Oks, Efim

    2005-01-01

    charge states in vacuum arc plasmas using a 'current spike'of pulsed vacuum arc plasmas in strong magnetic fields",of electrons in vacuum arc plasmas", Rev. Sci. Instrum. ,

  3. Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

    2004-01-01

    in high current vacuum arc plasma in a magnetic field," IEEEdistributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The origin of species,"high-current vacuum arc plasmas," IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. ,

  4. Multi-mode ultrasonic welding control and optimization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tang, Jason C.H.; Cai, Wayne W

    2013-05-28

    A system and method for providing multi-mode control of an ultrasonic welding system. In one embodiment, the control modes include the energy of the weld, the time of the welding process and the compression displacement of the parts being welded during the welding process. The method includes providing thresholds for each of the modes, and terminating the welding process after the threshold for each mode has been reached, the threshold for more than one mode has been reached or the threshold for one of the modes has been reached. The welding control can be either open-loop or closed-loop, where the open-loop process provides the mode thresholds and once one or more of those thresholds is reached the welding process is terminated. The closed-loop control provides feedback of the weld energy and/or the compression displacement so that the weld power and/or weld pressure can be increased or decreased accordingly.

  5. Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Paul S. (Santa Fe, NM); Korzekwa, Deniece R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    Purification of tantalum by plasma arc melting. The level of oxygen and carbon impurities in tantalum was reduced by plasma arc melting the tantalum using a flowing plasma gas generated from a gas mixture of helium and hydrogen. The flowing plasma gases of the present invention were found to be superior to other known flowing plasma gases used for this purpose.

  6. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  7. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1985-08-05

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

  8. Low voltage arc formation in railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawke, R.S.

    1987-11-17

    A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

  9. Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines...

  10. Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Boron nitride ablation studies in arc jet facilities You are accessing a document...

  11. Design of Welding Alloys Creep and Toughness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marimuthu, Murugananth

    The subject of welding is challenging because of its complexity and because its applications are in the majority of cases, safety critical. The work presented in this thesis deals with both these aspects from the point of view of welding alloys...

  12. Manual tube-to-tubesheet welding torch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiefer, Joseph H. (Tampa, FL); Smith, Danny J. (Tampa, FL)

    1982-01-01

    A welding torch made of a high temperature plastic which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and the back side of a tube plate and has a ballooned end in which an electrode, filler wire guide, fiber optic bundle, and blanketing gas duct are disposed.

  13. Selection of Processes for Welding Steel Rails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    structure. · Particular attention is given to thermit, flash and oxyacetylene processes with some discussion for welding of steel rail. The traditional pro- cesses of thermit, oxacetylene and flash welding are well is brought to an elevated temperature, and the heat diffuses into the bulk of the metal. Thermit, electroslag

  14. Effect of Scratches on Pinch Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P

    2005-10-11

    Fill stems for tritium reservoirs have stringent scratch requirements such that any indications that appear to have depth are cause for rework or rejection. A scoping study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of scratches approximately 0.0015 to 0.002 inch deep on the fitness for service and bond quality. The stems were characterized using borescope before and after welding. The four stems were welded with near optimal weld parameters, proof tested, and examined metallographically. The stems were radiographed, proof tested, and examined metallographically. The scratches did not adversely affect (1) the weld integrity based on radiography, (2) the ability to withstand the proof pressure, and (3) the weld quality based on metallographic cross-sections. Based on these limited results at a nominal weld current, the weld process is very robust. It may be able to recover from manufacturing defects and inspection anomalies worse than those expected for typical fill stem manufacturing processes; additional testing specific to each application over a range of weld heats is needed to verify applicability of these results.

  15. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filippi, Arthur M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Sprecace, Richard P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1987-01-01

    This invention identifies methods and articles designed to circumvent metallurgical problems associated with hermetically closing an all cast iron nuclear waste package by welding. It involves welding nickel-carbon alloy inserts which are bonded to the mating plug and main body components of the package. The welding inserts might be bonded in place during casting of the package components. When the waste package closure weld is made, the most severe thermal effects of the process are restricted to the nickel-carbon insert material which is far better able to accommodate them than is cast iron. Use of nickel-carbon weld inserts should eliminate any need for pre-weld and post-weld heat treatments which are a problem to apply to nuclear waste packages. Although the waste package closure weld approach described results in a dissimilar metal combination, the relative surface area of nickel-to-iron, their electrochemical relationship, and the presence of graphite in both materials will act to prevent any galvanic corrosion problem.

  16. MODELLING OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN NOVEL HIGH STRENGTH STEEL WELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    MODELLING OF MICROSTRUCTURE IN NOVEL HIGH STRENGTH STEEL WELDS by Gethin Rees Ernmanuel College . . . . Nomenclature List CHAPTER 1 Introduction 1.1 An Introduction to the Welding Process 1.1.1 The Welding Processes . . 1.1.2 The Welding Thermal Cycle 1.2 An Introduction to the Metallurgy of Steel 1.2.1 Pure Iron

  17. AUTOMATING WELDED GUSSET PLATE CONNECTIONS IN PLANAR TRUSS STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    AUTOMATING WELDED GUSSET PLATE CONNECTIONS IN PLANAR TRUSS STRUCTURES Benjamin Linder Department generates the weld geometry and the gusset plate geometry for each joint of a truss. The program of welded truss connections using gusset plates. The following steps are necessary for the design of welded

  18. Weld: A Multithreading Technique Towards Latency-tolerant VLIW Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Thomas M.

    Weld: A Multithreading Technique Towards Latency- tolerant VLIW Processors Emre Ã?zer, Thomas M architecture model, named Weld, for VLIW processors. Weld integrates multithreading support into a VLIW a novel hardware technique called operation welding that merges operations from different threads

  19. Optical Inspection of Welding Seams Fabian Timm1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical Inspection of Welding Seams Fabian Timm1,2 , Thomas Martinetz1 , and Erhardt Barth1,2 1 present a framework for automatic inspection of welding seams based on specular reflections. To this end by using welding techniques. Soldering and welding techniques are common in diverse areas such as printed

  20. Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busby, Cathy

    Subaqueous Explosive Eruption and Welding of Pyroclastic Deposits Peter Kokelaar and Cathy Busby fabrics indicative of welding of glass shards and pumice at temperatures >500"C. The occurrence emplacement temperature in pyroclas- tic deposits is welding. Welding is hot-state viscous deformation

  1. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yanni [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Li, Jinglong, E-mail: lijinglg@nwpu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Xiong, Jiangtao [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  2. Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

    2011-06-06

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  3. IDS120h GEOMETRY SHIELDING VESSELS: STAINLESS STEEL vs. TUNGSTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY SHIELDING VESSELS: STAINLESS STEEL vs. TUNGSTEN SHIELDING MATERIAL: 60%WC+40%H2 O shielding vessels (STST OR W) Different cases of shielding material. >mars1510/MCNP >10-11 MeV NEUTRON ENERGY CUTOFF >SHIELDING:60%WC+40%H2 O (STST or W VESSELS), 80%WC+20%He, 80%W+20%He (W VESSELS) >4 MW

  4. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothman, Albert J. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  5. FABRICATION OF GAS-FILLED TUNGSTEN-COATED GLASS SHELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; BAUGH,W; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx} 0.15 {micro}m/hr coatings with {approx} 2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {micro}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx} 100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 C.

  6. Fabrication of Gas-Filled Tungsten-Coated Glass Shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikroo, A.; Baugh, W.; Steinman, D.A.

    2004-03-15

    Deuterium (D{sub 2}) filled glass shells coated with a high Z element are needed for high energy density (HED) experiments by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We report here on our initial attempt to produce such shells. Glass shells made using the drop tower technique were coated with gold, palladium or tungsten, or a mixture of two of these elements. It was found that gold and palladium coatings did not stick well to the glass and resulted in poor or delaminated films. Tungsten coatings resulted in films suitable for these targets. Bouncing of shells during coating resulted in uniform tungsten coatings, but the surface of such coatings were filled with small nodules. Proper agitation of shells using a tapping technique resulted in smooth films with minimal particulate contamination. For coating rates of {approx}0.15 {mu}m/hr coatings with {approx}2 nm RMS surface finish could be deposited. The surface roughness of coatings at higher rates, 0.7 {mu}m/hr, was considerably worse ({approx}100 nm RMS). The columnar structure of the coatings allowed permeation filling of the tungsten coated glass shells with deuterium at 300 deg. C.

  7. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  8. An Application of Augmented Reality (AR) in the Teaching of an Arc Welding Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, J. W. S.

    Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology that utilizes computer vision methods to overlay virtual objects onto the real world scene so as to make them appear to co-exist with the real objects. Its main objective ...

  9. Heat and Metal Transfer in Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Argon and Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    condensation on the side of the electrode. I. INTRODUCTION THE shielding gas composition is a critical process. Massachusens Institute of Technology. Cambridge, MA 02 {39. Manuscript submitted August II. 1993- stead, a 90 pet helium-10 pet iron vapor gas mixture was used in the calculations. A more in

  10. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falabella, S.

    1995-11-21

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission. 3 figs.

  11. On the mechanism of operation of a cathode spot cell in a vacuum arc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Bochkarev, M. B.; Barengolts, S. A.

    2014-05-05

    The erosive structures formed on a tungsten cathode as a result of the motion of the cathode spot of a vacuum arc over the cathode surface have been examined. It has been found that the average mass of a cathode microprotrusion having the shape of a solidified jet is approximately equal to the mass of ions removed from the cathode within the lifetime of a cathode spot cell carrying a current of several amperes. The time of formation of a new liquid-metal jet under the action of the reactive force of the plasma ejected by the cathode spot is about 10?ns, which is comparable to the lifetime of a cell. The growth rate of a liquid-metal jet is ?10{sup 4}?cm/s. The geometric shape and size of a solidified jet are such that a new explosive emission center (spot cell) can be initiated within several nanoseconds during the interaction of the jet with the dense cathode plasma. This is the underlying mechanism of the self-sustained operation of a vacuum arc.

  12. Motion characteristics of long ac arcs in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu Shanqiang; He Jinliang; Zeng Rong; Zhang Bo; Xu Guozheng; Chen Weijiang

    2007-01-29

    Experiments on the motion of long alternating current arcs in atmospheric air show that the anode and cathode arc roots have different motion characteristics because of different formation mechanisms. During a half cycle of the arc current, the anode arc root moves towards the direction of magnetic force and occasionally has a jumping motion, while the cathode arc root moves sufficiently slow to consider it stationary and hardly has any jump. The arc column has a complex shape and moves under the drive of the magnetic force and is also quickened by the lower arc root.

  13. Detection of arcs in automotive electrical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishrikey, Matthew David

    2005-01-01

    At the present time, there is no established method for the detection of DC electric arcing. This is a concern for forthcoming advanced automotive electrical systems which consist of higher DC electric power bus voltages, ...

  14. Hawley ArcGIS Desktop III: GIS Workflows and Analysis Page 1 ArcGIS Desktop III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bier, Martin

    Hawley ArcGIS Desktop III: GIS Workflows and Analysis Page 1 ArcGIS Desktop III: GIS Workflows and Analysis Overview This 2-day course builds on the skills and knowledge taught in ArcGIS Desktop II: Tools a challenging analysis project. Audience This course is for experienced ArcGIS users who want to learn more

  15. ArcGIS Explorer Online Extended Use Quick Guide ArcGIS Explorer Online--GIS for Everyone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ArcGIS Explorer Online Extended Use Quick Guide ArcGIS Explorer Online--GIS for Everyone Creating notes, photo links, and presentations ArcGIS Explorer Online (AGXO) is a browser-based GIS viewer, perform queries and create presentations. This quick guide is an extension of the Introduction to ArcGIS

  16. Klystron Gun Arcing and Modulator Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gold, S

    2004-05-04

    The demand for 500 kV and 265 amperes peak to power an X-Band klystron brings up protection issues for klystron faults and the energy dumped into the arc from the modulator. This situation is made worse when more than one klystron will be driven from a single modulator, such as the existing schemes for running two and eight klystrons. High power pulsed klystrons have traditionally be powered by line type modulators which match the driving impedance with the load impedance and therefore current limit at twice the operating current. Multiple klystrons have the added problems of a lower modulator source impedance and added stray capacitance, which converts into appreciable energy at high voltages like 500kV. SLAC has measured the energy dumped into klystron arcs in a single and dual klystron configuration at the 400 to 450 kV level and found interesting characteristics in the arc formation. The author will present measured data from klystron arcs powered from line-type modulators in several configurations. The questions arise as to how the newly designed solid-state modulators, running multiple tubes, will react to a klystron arc and how much energy will be dumped into the arc.

  17. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  18. Prediction of Welding Distortion Panagiotis Michaleris and Andrew DeBiccari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    1 Prediction of Welding Distortion Panagiotis Michaleris and Andrew DeBiccari Edison Welding Institute Columbus, Ohio ABSTRACT. This paper presents a numerical analysis technique for predicting welding induced distortion. The technique combines two dimensional welding simulations with three dimensional

  19. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-matallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved, 1) To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug. 2) investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys. 3) Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  20. Method and apparatus for real time weld monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, Keng H. (Lemont, IL); Hunter, Boyd V. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for real time weld monitoring. An infrared signature emitted by a hot weld surface during welding is detected and this signature is compared with an infrared signature emitted by the weld surface during steady state conditions. The result is correlated with weld penetration. The signal processing is simpler than for either UV or acoustic techniques. Changes in the weld process, such as changes in the transmitted laser beam power, quality or positioning of the laser beam, change the resulting weld surface features and temperature of the weld surface, thereby resulting in a change in the direction and amount of infrared emissions. This change in emissions is monitored by an IR sensitive detecting apparatus that is sensitive to the appropriate wavelength region for the hot weld surface.

  1. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  2. Studies on nickel-tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usha, K. S. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India); Sivakumar, R., E-mail: krsivakumar1979@yahoo.com [Directorate of Distance Education, Alagappa University, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [Department of Physics, Alagappa Chettiar College of Engineering and Technology, Karaikudi - 630 004 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Nickel-Tungsten oxide (95:5) thin films were prepared by rf sputtering at 200W rf power with various substrate temperatures. X-ray diffraction study reveals the amorphous nature of films. The substrate temperature induced decrease in energy band gap with a maximum transmittance of 71%1 was observed. The Micro-Raman study shows broad peaks at 560 cm{sup ?1} and 1100 cm{sup ?1} correspond to Ni-O vibration and the peak at 860 cm{sup ?1} can be assigned to the vibration of W-O-W bond. Photoluminescence spectra show two peaks centered on 420 nm and 485 nm corresponding to the band edge emission and vacancies created due to the addition of tungsten, respectively.

  3. The OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeter front end electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.E.; Charalambous, A. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Anderson, K. )

    1994-08-01

    A pair of small angle silicon-tungsten (Si-W) calorimeters has been built to measure the luminosity to a precision better than 0.1% in the OPAL experiment at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at CERN near Geneva. Each calorimeter contains 19 layers of tungsten (W) plates and silicon (Si) detectors, corresponding to a total of 22 radiation lengths, sampled by about 1 m[sup 2] of detectors divided into 304 x64 independently read out channels. A complete electronics system has been developed, from the preamplifier up to the VME read out and control interface. It includes a fast trigger based on analogue sums. This paper describes how a large number of channels have been implemented in a dense environment, thanks to the use of ASIC's directly bonded on the detector.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  5. Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Pilli, Siva Prasad; Carlson, Blair; Carsley, John; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Eisenmenger, Mark

    2014-02-04

    A Design of Experiment based approach is used to systematically investigate relationships between 8 different welding factors (4 related to tool geometry, 4 related to weld process control) and resulting weld properties including strength, elongation and formability in 1.2mm-2mm thick friction stir welding of AA5182-O for TWB application. The factors that result in most significant effects are elucidated. The interactions between several key factors like plunge depth, tool tilt, pin feature and pin length on the overall weld quality is discussed. Appropriate levels of factors that lead to excellent weld properties are also identified.

  6. COMPARISON OF AIR AND DEUTERIUM ON PINCH WELD BOND APPEARANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P

    2005-10-11

    The effect that air and deuterium internal atmospheres have on the pinch weld bond quality was evaluated by conducting a scoping study using type 304L stainless steel LF-7 test stems that were fabricated for an associated study. Welds were made under cool, yet nominal conditions to exacerbate the influence of the atmosphere. The bond quality of the welds was directly related to the internal atmosphere with the air atmosphere welds being of lower quality than the deuterium atmosphere welds for nominally identical welding conditions.

  7. Deflection of light by using tungsten bronze crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jelsma, L.F.; McWright, G.M.; Schumacher, F.A.; Neurgaonkar, R.R.

    1988-07-05

    This paper reports our preliminary results on an electrooptical light deflector for streak camera applications that uses tungsten bronze SBN:60% crystals. We found the performance of these ferroelectric crystals to be an order of magnitude better than the best LiNbO/sub 3/ crystals currently available. We discuss the theory and performance of this crystal as well as other bronze crystals for application to the streak camera. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Vacuum Arc Melting Unit Arc Melting is used for melting metals typically to form alloys. Heating is via an electric arc struck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    Vacuum Arc Melting Unit Arc Melting is used for melting metals­ typically to form alloys. Heating unit is used as a power source. Heat generated by the electric arc struck between the electrode unit. The vacuum unit with rotary and diffusion pumps can attain a vacuum of 106 m bar. The cold

  9. Charge state and time resolved plasma composition of a pulsed zirconium arc in a nitrogen environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Hultman, Lars; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2004-01-01

    of a pulsed cathodic arc plasma was investigated atof a growing film in arc plasma deposition. In the presencea titanium cathodic arc plasma at varying nitrogen pressure,

  10. The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2013-01-01

    in metal vapor vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources," Plasmathe separation of cathodic arc plasma and macroparticles incharge states in vacuum arc plasmas in a magnetic field,"

  11. Ultrathin diamond-like carbon films deposited by filtered carbon vacuum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Fong, Walton; Kulkarni, Ashok; Ryan, Francis W.; Bhatia, C. Singh

    2001-01-01

    Ion velocities in vacuum arc plasmas,” J. Appl. Phys. , vol.Brown, “Transport of vacuum arc plasma through straight anda filtered cathodic arc,” Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. , pp.

  12. Material and time dependence of the voltage noise generated by cathodic vacuum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre

    2005-01-01

    associated with plasma production and arc impedance, it wasbecause it is known that arc plasma parameters have almost “Applications of Vacuum-Arc-Produced Plasma, Ion and Electron

  13. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF DUCTILE-PHASE TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Odette, George R.; Cunningham, Kevin; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-03-03

    The objective of this study is to develop the materials science of fiber-reinforced tungsten composites as candidates for plasma-facing components in future fusion reactors.

  14. Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

    1980-01-03

    The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  15. Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trent, Jett B. (Knoxville, TN); Murphy, Jimmy L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  16. Ion source with improved primary arc collimation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1983-12-16

    An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

  17. Supplementary Materials Christopher H. Lin Mausam Daniel S. Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mausam

    Supplementary Materials Christopher H. Lin Mausam Daniel S. Weld Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 {chrislin,mausam,weld}@cs.washington.edu Theorem

  18. MODULAR MAGIC SUDOKU JOHN LORCH AND ELLEN WELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorch, John D.

    MODULAR MAGIC SUDOKU JOHN LORCH AND ELLEN WELD Abstract. A modular magic sudoku solution. 05B15. 1 #12;2 JOHN LORCH AND ELLEN WELD sudoku solution in (1) and the solution x2 given in Section

  19. Checking Your Car's 4000 Welds is Serious Business. Scientists...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Business. Scientists Just Made it Easier. March 4, 2015 - 10:45am Addthis Robotic welding is vital to auto manufacturing, but double checking the welds is done by hand....

  20. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

  1. Influence of a transverse magnetic field on arc root movements in a dc plasma torch: Diamagnetic effect of arc column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Keun Su

    2009-03-23

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on the anodic arc root movement inside a dc plasma torch has been investigated. The arc voltage fluctuation, which represents the degree of the arc instability, was reduced to 28.6% of the original value and the high frequency components in the voltage signal also decreased in their magnitudes. The inherent arc instability in a dc thermal plasma torch seems to be suppressed by a diamagnetic effect of the arc column. Furthermore, the measured voltage wave forms indicated that the arc root attachment mode would be controllable by a transverse magnetic field.

  2. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    helmets.   American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal welding.   American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal electrodes.  American  Industrial Hygiene Association 

  3. Ion source based on the cathodic arc

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1994-02-01

    A cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated, is described. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the dual purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles. 3 figures.

  4. Effect of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Creep Rupture Properties of Grade 91 Steel Heavy Section Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Leijun

    2012-11-02

    This project will conduct a systematic metallurgical study on the effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the creep rupture properties of P91 heavy section welds. The objective is to develop a technical guide for selecting PWHT parameters, and to predict expected creep-rupture life based on the selection of heat treatment parameters. The project consists of four interdependent tasks: Experimentally and numerically characterize the temperature fields of typical post-weld heat treatment procedures for various weld and joint configurations to be used in Gen IV systems. Characterize the microstructure of various regions, including the weld fusion zone, coarse-grain heat-affected zone, and fine-grain heat affected zone, in the welds that underwent the various welding and PWHT thermal histories. Conduct creep and creep-rupture testing of coupons extracted from actual and physically simulated welds. Establish the relationship among PWHT parameters, thermal histories, microstructure, creep, and creep-rupture properties.

  5. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald; Tu, Chia-Hao; Chang Chi; Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming; Lee, Hsin-Li; Tzeng, Yonhua; Auciello, Orlando

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Personalized Online Education --A Crowdsourcing Challenge Daniel S. Weld1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mausam

    Personalized Online Education -- A Crowdsourcing Challenge Daniel S. Weld1 Eytan Adar2 Lydia- chanical Turk, may prove useful for optimizing personalized curricula (Dai, Mausam, and Weld 2010; Shahaf and Horvitz 2010; Dai, Mausam, and Weld 2011; Lin, Mausam, and Copyright c 2012, Association

  7. Temporal Information Extraction Xiao Ling and Daniel S. Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temporal Information Extraction Xiao Ling and Daniel S. Weld Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195-2350, U.S.A. {xiaoling, weld- supervised probabilistic sequential models (Banko et al. 2007; Wu and Weld 2007), and numerous other ap

  8. REAL TIME ULTRASONIC ALUMINUM SPOT WELD MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regalado, W. Perez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr. [Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research, Physics Department, University of Windsor, 292 Essex Hall, 401 Sunset Ave. N9B 3P4 Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-02-22

    Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

  9. APPLICATION OF MILLISECOND PULSED LASER WELDING IN MEMS P. Bozorgi*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    APPLICATION OF MILLISECOND PULSED LASER WELDING IN MEMS PACKAGING P. Bozorgi* , C.B. Burgner, Z:YAG pulsed laser is used as a localized heating source to micro-weld a 350 µm titanium cap to the substrate distortion of the welding, several geometries at the cap and substrate interface were investigated

  10. CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING Peng Cheng, Andrew J. Birnbaum, Y Egland Technology and Solutions Division Caterpillar Inc. Peoria, IL KEYWORDS Welding, Distortion, Correction, Laser Forming ABSTRACT Welding-induced distortion is an intrinsic phenomenon arising due

  11. Conformal welding and the sewing equations Eric Schippers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schippers, Eric

    Conformal welding and the sewing equations Eric Schippers Department of Mathematics University of Manitoba Winnipeg Rutgers 2014 Eric Schippers (Manitoba) Conformal welding Rutgers 1 / 41 #12;Introduction Schippers (Manitoba) Conformal welding Rutgers 2 / 41 #12;Introduction Our work in general We began

  12. CONFORMAL WELDING AND KOEBE'S THEOREM CHRISTOPHER J. BISHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Christopher

    CONFORMAL WELDING AND KOEBE'S THEOREM CHRISTOPHER J. BISHOP Abstract. It is well known that not every orientation preserving homeomorphism of the circle to itself is a conformal welding, but in this paper we prove several results which state that every homeomorphism is \\almost" a welding in a precise

  13. Lithium-Assisted Electrochemical Welding in Silicon Nanowire Battery Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Teng

    Lithium-Assisted Electrochemical Welding in Silicon Nanowire Battery Electrodes Khim Karki, Eric of lithium- assisted welding between physically contacted silicon nano- wires (SiNWs) induced by electrochemical lithiation and delithiation. This electrochemical weld between two SiNWs demonstrates facile

  14. Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    1 Minimization of welding residual stress and distortion in large structures P. Michaleris at Champaign Urbana, Urbana, IL Abstract Welding distortion in large structures is usually caused by buckling due to the residual stress. In cases where the design is fixed and minimum weld size requirements

  15. In-situ Characterization of Titanium Laser Welding Vincent Fays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    In-situ Characterization of Titanium Laser Welding Vincent Fays Supervisors: M.Leparoux1, J here is a preliminary work on titanium laser welding. Its main objective is to investigate of correlation could be drawn between the characterization measurements and the weld quality. In order to do so

  16. Apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bitsoi, Rodney J. (Ririe, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pace, David P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds is described in which is utilized in combination with a moveable welder for forming a partially completed weld, and an ultrasonic generator mounted on a moveable welder in which is reciprocally moveable along a path of travel which is laterally disposed relative to the partially completed weld.

  17. Connecting ARC/INFO and SNACTor Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Connecting ARC/INFO and SNACTor Project Report June 1991 Stuart C. Shapiro, Hans Chalupsky;Connecting ARC/INFO* and SNACTor --- Project Report1 Stuart C. Shapiro2 , Hans Chalupsky2 and Hsueh

  18. A study of vacuum arc ion velocities using a linear set of probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohenbild, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    method; aluminum plasma; arc current constant at 200 A.velocity in vacuum arc plasmas by arc current perturbationin the vicinity of the arc plasma source. submitted to J.

  19. Ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots in the absence and presence of a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, George Yu.

    2001-01-01

    velocity in vacuum arc plasmas by arc current perturbation,field increases the plasma impedance, arc burning voltage,is well-known that the vacuum arc plasma is produced at non-

  20. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  1. Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of Melt Damage of Tungsten Armour under Multiple Transients Expected in ITER and Validations Against JET-ILW Experiments

  2. The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Structure of the Tungsten Coatings Deposited by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation for Nuclear Fusion Applications

  3. Modeling rf breakdown arcs II: plasma / materials interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke; Proslier, Thomas; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Veitzer, S

    2010-01-01

    Continuing the description of rf vacuum arcs from an earlier paper, we describe some aspects of the interaction of vacuum arcs that involve the surface. This paper describes aspects of plasma materials interactions that affect the arc and models measurement of the surface field using the Tonks-Frenkel and the spinodal electrohydrodynamic instabilities, a realistic model for the generation and evaluation of high field enhancements, unipolar arcs, creep and other effects.

  4. Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram Sharafatb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Formation of tungsten coatings by gas tunnel type plasma spraying Akira Kobayashia,*, Shahram deposited as a coating, it can protect the substrate surface from high heat flux. In this study, tungsten (W) sprayed coatings were formed on stainless steel substrates by gas tunnel type plasma spraying at a short

  5. Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J. Keinonen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Hydrogen interaction with point defects in tungsten K. Heinola, T. Ahlgren, K. Nordlund, and J-principles calculations were used in determining the binding and trapping properties of hydrogen to point defects in tungsten. Hydrogen zero-point vibrations were taken into account. It was concluded that the monovacancy can

  6. Structures and defects of WO3x nanorods grown by in-situ heating tungsten filament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Hongjun

    Structures and defects of WO3Àx nanorods grown by in-situ heating tungsten filament Huairuo Zhang a nanorods were grown on the tips of electrochemical etched W filaments by in-situ heating under different work, we prepare tungsten oxide nanorods by heating the electrochemical etched W filaments under

  7. Nanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanostructured tungsten carbide catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells X. G. Yanga and C. Y/air polymer electrolyte fuel cell using nanoscale tungsten carbide as the anode catalyst and carbon supported as to whether the carbides perform the catalysis in the H2/CO fuel streams. Furthermore, the mechanism based

  8. Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gwo-Ching

    Texture evolution of vertically aligned biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure biaxial tungsten nanorods using RHEED surface pole figure technique R Krishnan1 , Y Liu2 , C Gaire2 , L (RHEED) pole figure technique. The initial polycrystalline film begins to show the inception of biaxial

  9. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  10. Weld overlay coatings for erosion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, B.; DuPont, J.N.; Marder, A.R.

    1993-03-03

    A literature review was made. In spite of similarities between abrasive wear and solid particle erosion, weld overlay hardfacing alloys that exhibit high abrasion resistance may not necessarily have good erosion resistance. The performance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys in erosive environments has not been studied in detail. It is believed that primary-solidified hard phases such as carbides and intermetallic compounds have a strong influence on erosion resistance of weld overlay hardfacing alloys. However, relationships between size, shape, and volume fraction of hard phases in a hardfacing alloys and erosion resistance were not established. Almost all hardfacing alloys can be separated into two major groups based upon chemical compositions of the primary solidified hard phases: (a) carbide hardening alloys (Co-base/carbide, WC-Co and some Fe base superalloys); and (b) intermetallic hardening alloys (Ni-base alloys, austenitic steels, iron-aluminides).

  11. Innovative Flash Control in Inertia Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.S.

    2003-04-25

    Inertia welding is widely used to join cylindrically shaped objects such as disks and shafts in turbine engines, turbochargers, etc. Flash control in many of these applications is not critical because the excess material is on external surfaces and can readily be removed by machining. Internal flash on hollow vessels, however, may be difficult or impossible to remove and may be either controlled by the use of flash traps or the part can be used as welded. Both internal flash and flash traps reduce internal volume and the conditions are not always acceptable. To address this short-coming, several innovative methods have been tested to determine their effect on flash control in inertia welding of hollow vessels. The methods include introduction of high pressure inert gas and incorporation of an expendable mandrel to divert the flash. Both gas and internal mandrels appear promising methods for diverting flash.

  12. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Adam; Gu, Genda; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc < T < Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. We demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  13. Remote electrical arc suppression by laser filamentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Elise; Kasparian, Jérôme; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the interaction of narrow plasma channels formed in the filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses, with a DC high voltage. The laser filaments prevent electrical arcs by triggering corona that neutralize the high-voltage electrodes. This phenomenon, due to the electric field modulation and free electron release around the filament, opens new prospects to lightning and over-voltage mitigation.

  14. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Adam [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Gu, Genda [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kondo, Takeshi [The Univ. of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Takeuchi, Tsunehiro [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan)

    2014-10-31

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc < T < Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. We demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  15. Exploring the Deep... Using ArcMap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    started Exploring the Ocean Environment Introduction #12;The ArcMap User Interface Table of Contents off the layers above that layer in the Table of Contents. Table of Contents A list of data frames of the current map file. Coordinates Displays the coordinates, in the currently-selected units, of the cursor

  16. Energy Savings in Electric Arc Furnace Melting 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lubbeck, W.

    1982-01-01

    Arc furnace melting which at one time was almost exclusively used to produce alloy steel and steel castings is now widely accepted in the industry as an efficient process to produce all types of steel and iron. Presently, about 28% of steel...

  17. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore »creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ? T ? Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  18. March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE Energy Depositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber Walls under IFE March 8-9, 2001 #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry Chamber on analysis ­ Remaining issues #12;March 8, 2001 A. R. Raffray, et al., Assessment of Carbon and Tungsten Dry

  19. Theory of the arc discharge in air blast breakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-08-01

    The complete set of equations obtaining in the arc's length element are given. The arc length is determined when the external circuit equations are closed by an expression for the arc inductance as a function of the radius and length, in addition to our relationships for the radius and voltage gradients.

  20. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air. Applicability of the results of the thesis to an industrial steelmaking furnace is considered. iv #12; Dedicated am very thankful to Lane Roquemore for helping get the Arc Furnace o# the ground and for his

  1. PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    1 PYROLYSIS OF METHANE IN A SUPERSONIC, ARC-HEATED FLOW F.K. Lu,* C.M. Roseberry, J.M. Meyers and D arc pyrolysis of methane at supersonic conditions, representative of conditions in the reformer location of an aibreathing hypersonic vehicle. The rationale for arc pyrolysis is provided. Major

  2. INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING ARCVIEW ArcViewsoftwareisavailableintheUTSLab,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    SciencesBuilding,Room241and in Mills Library, Gateway Data/GIS Lab, Room 111A. Arc the ArcView GIS icon. If you are in the Map Collection or the Gateway Data/GIS Lab: Before starting copy of the data files.) Select Start. Select Programs. Select ArcView GIS. If your first screen does

  3. Dynamics of femtosecond laser produced tungsten nanoparticle plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.; Farid, N.; School of Physics and Optical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 ; Kozhevin, V. M.

    2013-11-28

    We investigated the expansion features of femtosecond laser generated tungsten nanoparticle plumes in vacuum. Fast gated images showed distinct two components expansion features, viz., plasma and nanoparticle plumes, separated by time of appearance. The persistence of plasma and nanoparticle plumes are ?500 ns and ?100 ?s, respectively, and propagating with velocities differed by 25 times. The estimated temperature of the nanoparticles showed a decreasing trend with increasing time and space. Compared to low-Z materials (e.g., Si), ultrafast laser ablation of high-Z materials like W provides significantly higher nanoparticle yield. A comparison between the nanoparticle plumes generated by W and Si is also discussed along with other metals.

  4. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Shih-Jye [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Ju, Shin-Pon, E-mail: jushin-pon@mail.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Department of Medicinal and Applied Chemistry, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-07

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  5. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degree}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K{sub Ia} curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  6. Aplicaciones de Arc GISAplicaciones de Arc GIS en Recursos de Aguaen Recursos de Agua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Aplicaciones de Arc GISAplicaciones de Arc GIS en Recursos de Aguaen Recursos de Agua Alejandra 14: 440 personas/km2 vrs India y Japón 338vrs India y Japón 338 perper/km2./km2. El uso del agua se ha incrementado un 1.6% de 1970 aEl uso del agua se ha incrementado un 1.6% de 1970 a 1995 con 2

  7. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, Jr., Holt (Hopewell, NJ); Harris, Ian D. (Dublin, OH); Ratka, John O. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Spiegelberg, William D. (Parma, OH)

    1994-01-01

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined.

  8. Method and apparatus for welding precipitation hardenable materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, H. Jr.; Harris, I.D.; Ratka, J.O.; Spiegelberg, W.D.

    1994-06-28

    A method for welding together members consisting of precipitation age hardened materials includes the steps of selecting a weld filler material that has substantially the same composition as the materials being joined, and an age hardening characteristic temperature age threshold below that of the aging kinetic temperature range of the materials being joined, whereby after welding the members together, the resulting weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) are heat treated at a temperature below that of the kinetic temperature range of the materials joined, for obtaining substantially the same mechanical characteristics for the weld and HAZ, as for the parent material of the members joined. 5 figures.

  9. Residual Stress Measurements in Side Bonded Resistance Welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAUL, KORINKO

    2005-04-18

    Resistance upset welding is used to attach small diameter machined tubes to small gas vessels. Recently there has been interest in determining the level of residual stresses caused by this attachment method and its influence on environmental interactions. A test program was initiated to determine the residual stresses present due to welding using the nominal weld parameters and varying the interference between the foot and the counter bore. In this paper, the residual stress measurement technique is described, the welding conditions are provided, and the residual stress due to welding at the nominal conditions are presented.

  10. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancinelli, B. R.; Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H.; Prevosto, L.

    2014-07-14

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7?×?10{sup 4}?A/s.

  11. Magnetized Cascade Arc Source forMagnetized Cascade Arc Source for Ionization and Fuelling in TCSUIonization and Fuelling in TCSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    , the arc source can also be run during FRC sustainment to provide steady state plasma fuelling. The deuterium plasma produced by the arc source is tied to the external axial magnetic field lines, providing and is used for initial breakdown and arc sustainment. Plasma densities of 1020 m-3 and electron temperatures

  12. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  13. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  14. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  15. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  16. Method for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    A method for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds is disclosed and which includes providing a pair of transducers which are individually positioned on the opposite sides of a partially completed weld to be inspected; moving the transducers along the length of and laterally inwardly and outwardly relative to the partially completed weld; pulsing the respective transducers to produce an ultrasonic signal which passes through or is reflected from the partially completed weld; receiving from the respective transducers ultrasonic signals which pass through or are reflected from the partially completed welds; and analyzing the ultrasonic signal which has passed through or is reflected from the partially completed weld to determine the presence of any weld defects.

  17. Characteristic of a triple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, W.; Li, M.; Chen, L.

    2012-02-15

    In order to generate a better ion beam, a triple-cathode vacuum arc plasma source has been developed. Three plasma generators in the vacuum arc plasma source are equally located on a circle. Each generator initiated by means of a high-voltage breakdown between the cathode and the anode could be operated separately or simultaneously. The arc plasma expands from the cathode spot region in vacuum. In order to study the behaviors of expanding plasma plume generated in the vacuum arc plasma source, a Langmuir probe array is employed to measure the saturated ion current of the vacuum arc plasma source. The time-dependence profiles of the saturated current density of the triple vacuum arc plasma source operated separately and simultaneously are given. Furthermore, the plasma characteristic of this vacuum arc plasma source is also presented in the paper.

  18. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  19. CRAD, Welding, Cutting and Brazing Assessment Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This assessment is to verify hot work requirements associated with welding, cutting, burning, brazing, grinding and other spark- or flame-producing operations have been implemented. Verify that the requirements implemented are appropriate for preventing loss of life and property from fire, and personal injury from contact with or exposure to molten metals, vapors, radiant energy, injurious rays and sparks.

  20. Capacitor discharge process for welding braided cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Rick D. (Corvallis, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A capacitor discharge process for welding a braided cable formed from a plurality of individual cable strands to a solid metallic electrically conductive member comprises the steps of: (a) preparing the electrically conductive member for welding by bevelling one of its end portions while leaving an ignition projection extending outwardly from the apex of the bevel; (b) clamping the electrically conductive member in a cathode fixture; (c) connecting the electrically conductive member clamped in the cathode fixture to a capacitor bank capable of being charged to a preselected voltage value; (d) preparing the braided cable for welding by wrapping one of its end portions with a metallic sheet to form a retaining ring operable to maintain the individual strands of the braided cable in fixed position within the retaining ring; (e) clamping the braided cable and the retaining ring as a unit in an anode fixture so that the wrapped end portion of the braided cable faces the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member; and (f) moving the cathode fixture towards the anode fixture until the ignition projection of the electrically conductive member contacts the end portion of the braided cable thereby allowing the capacitor bank to discharge through the electrically conductive member and through the braided cable and causing the electrically conductive member to be welded to the braided cable via capacitor discharge action.

  1. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Camp

    2008-03-04

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  2. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krauss, Alan R. (24461 W. Blvd. De John, Naperville, IL 60564)

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  3. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-10-02

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ionsource. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials inthe Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-likebehavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arctriggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsecand 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150microsec, respectively. Both ion charge states and ion velocities decayfurther towards steady state values, which are not reached within the 300microsec pulses used here. It is argued that the exceptionally high vaporpressure and charge exchange reactions are associated with theestablishment of steady state ion values.

  4. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D.

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  5. Arc Casting Intermetallic Alloy (Materials Preparation Center)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    Arc casting of intermetallic (La-Ni-Sn) AB5 alloy used for metal hydride hydrogen storage. Upon solidification the Sn is partially rejected and increases in concentration in the remaining liquid. Upon completing solidification there is a great deal of internal stress in the ingot. As the ingot cools further the stress is relieved. This material was cast at the Ames Laboratorys Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov

  6. Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun; Yan, Qingzhi Lang, Shaoting

    2014-05-14

    A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (?-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, ?-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, ?-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

  7. Volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivekanandan, Nagarajan, E-mail: viveknaren@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India); Sriram, Padmanaban; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Bhuvaneswari, Narayanan; Saranya, Kamalakannan [Department of Medical Physics, Cancer Institute, Chennai (India)

    2012-04-01

    A treatment planning study was performed to evaluate the performance of volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc (RA) against 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques for esophageal cancer. Computed tomgraphy scans of 10 patients were included in the study. 3D-CRT, 4-field IMRT, and single-arc and double-arc RA plans were generated with the aim to spare organs at risk (OAR) and healthy tissue while enforcing highly conformal target coverage. The planning objective was to deliver 54 Gy to the planning target volume (PTV) in 30 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on target conformity and dose-volume histograms of organs at risk (lung, spinal cord, and heart). The monitor unit (MU) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated to measure the treatment efficiency. The IMRT plan improves target conformity and spares OAR when compared with 3D-CRT. Target conformity improved with RA plans compared with IMRT. The mean lung dose was similar in all techniques. However, RA plans showed a reduction in the volume of the lung irradiated at V{sub 20Gy} and V{sub 30Gy} dose levels (range, 4.62-17.98%) compared with IMRT plans. The mean dose and D{sub 35%} of heart for the RA plans were better than the IMRT by 0.5-5.8%. Mean V{sub 10Gy} and integral dose to healthy tissue were almost similar in all techniques. But RA plans resulted in a reduced low-level dose bath (15-20 Gy) in the range of 14-16% compared with IMRT plans. The average MU needed to deliver the prescribed dose by RA technique was reduced by 20-25% compared with IMRT technique. The preliminary study on RA for esophageal cancers showed improvements in sparing OAR and healthy tissue with reduced beam-on time, whereas only double-arc RA offered improved target coverage compared with IMRT and 3D-CRT plans.

  8. EFFECTS OF WELDING ON WELDMENT MECHANICAL PERFORMANCE IN TWO AUSTENITIC STEELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strum, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Progress, Jan. 1979, p. 76. Welding Journal, June 1976, p .G.A. Ratz: Aug. 1968. C. Syn, Welding Research Council (WRC)Thesis, LBL-9208, May 1979. Welding Journal, July 1971, p.

  9. Gamma Spectrum from Neutron Capture on Tungsten Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, Aaron; Summers, Neil; Sleaford, Brad; Firestone, Richard B; Belgya, T.; Revay, Z.S.

    2010-04-29

    An evaluation of thermal neutron capture on the stable tungsten isotopes is presented, with preliminary results for the compound systems 183;184;185;187W. The evaluation procedure compares the g-ray cross-section data collected at the Budapest reactor, with Monte Carlo simulations of g-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process. The statistical-decay code DICEBOX was used for the Monte Carlo simulations. The evaluation yields new gamma rays in 185W and the confirmation of spins in 187W, raising the number of levels below which the level schemes are considered complete, thus increasing the number of levels that can be used in neutron data libraries.

  10. Microstructural development and solidification cracking susceptibility of Cu deposits on steel: Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuPont, John N.

    using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process with cold wire feed. The deposits were found) drawing. LENSTM utilizes a Nd-YAG laser to produce a melt pool on a substrate attached to an X-Y table. Powder metal from coaxial powder feed nozzles is injected into the melt pool as the table is moved along

  11. Performance of a Clad Tungsten Rod Spallation Neutron Source Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, Walter F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Louthan, McIntyre R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Willcutt, Gordon J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Ferguson, Phillip D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); James, Michael R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2005-09-15

    Tungsten rods, slip-clad with Type 304L stainless steel, performed successfully as a spallation neutron source target operating to a peak fluence of {approx}4 x 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2}. The target was used as a neutron source during the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) materials irradiation program at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Tungsten rods of 2.642-mm diameter were slip-fit in Type 304L stainless steel tubes that had an inner diameter of 2.667 mm. The radial gap was filled with helium at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) calculations suggest a time-averaged peak power deposition in the W of 2.25 kW/cm{sup 3}. Thermal-hydraulic calculations indicate that the peak centerline W temperature reached 271 deg. C. The LAHET calculations were also used to predict neutron and proton fluxes and spectra for the complex geometry used in the irradiation program. Activation foil sets distributed throughout the experiment were used to determine target neutronics performance as a comparison to the LAHET calculations. Examination of the irradiated target assemblies revealed no significant surface degradation or corrosion on either the Type 304L or the W surfaces. However, it was clear that the irradiation changed material properties because post-proton-irradiation measurements on Type 304L test samples from the APT program demonstrated increases in the yield strength and decreases in the ductility and fracture toughness with increasing dose, and the wrought W rod samples became brittle. Fortunately, the slip-clad target design subjects the materials to very low stress.

  12. Apparatus for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the concurrent nondestructive evaluation of partially completed welds is described and which is used in combination with an automated welder and which includes an ultrasonic signal generator mounted on the welder and which generates an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward one side of the partially completed welds; an ultrasonic signal receiver mounted on the automated welder for detecting ultrasonic signals which are transmitted by the ultrasonic signal generator and which are reflected or diffracted from one side of the partially completed weld or which passes through a given region of the partially completed weld; and an analysis assembly coupled with the ultrasonic signal receiver and which processes the ultrasonic signals received by the ultrasonic signal receiver to identify welding flaws in the partially completed weld.

  13. Effect of Pulsed Nd: YAG Laser Powers On 304 Stainless Steel Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candan, L.; Demir, A.; Akman, E. [University of Kocaeli, Laser Technologies Research and Application Center, Kocaeli (Turkey)

    2007-04-23

    In this study, optimum welding parameters are obtained for 1mm thickness type 304 stainless steel welding using the Lumonics JK760TR pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters such as pulse duration, focal position, frequency, laser power, welding speed, and shielding gas (N2) pressure on penetration defining welding quality are investigated. Also comparisons of overlap ratios are presented between theory and experiment for pulse duration, frequency and welding speed.

  14. An investigation of residual stress in welded joints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffat, William Hugh

    1951-01-01

    . flummery and Conclusions VII. '-. &uggested Procedure for I"uture Investigation 18 o i' VIII. ? . Ppendix IX. Bibliography LIST OP EIGURES Ro. Title Page 1. 'welded Plates snd Gptical Gage Used by Soulton and Martin ~ ~ 6 2. Dr. Rao~s Method... AN INVESTIGATION OF RESIDUAL STRESS IN WELDED JOINTS INTRODUCTION The object of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the magnitude of transverse and longi- tudial residual stress in a welded Joint. These are the stresses in a direction...

  15. Friction Stir Welding High Strength Low Alloy Steel using a Multilayer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Friction Stir Welding High Strength Low Alloy Steel using a Multilayer Approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Friction Stir Welding High Strength Low Alloy Steel using...

  16. Multiphysics Design and Simulation of a Tungsten-Cermet Nuclear Thermal Rocket 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appel, Bradley

    2012-10-19

    fuel safety have sparked interest in an NTR core based on tungsten-cermet fuel. This work investigates the capability of modern CFD and neutronics codes to design a cermet NTR, and makes specific recommendations for the configuration of channels...

  17. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.A.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Blewer, R.S.

    1990-12-11

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose. 2 figs.

  18. Tungsten bridge for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A tungsten bridge device for the low energy ignition of explosive and energetic materials is disclosed. The device is fabricated on a silicon-on-sapphire substrate which has an insulating bridge element defined therein using standard integrated circuit fabrication techniques. Then, a thin layer of tungsten is selectively deposited on the silicon bridge layer using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Finally, conductive lands are deposited on each end of the tungsten bridge layer to form the device. It has been found that this device exhibits substantially shorter ignition times than standard metal bridges and foil igniting devices. In addition, substantially less energy is required to cause ignition of the tungsten bridge device of the present invention than is required for common metal bridges and foil devices used for the same purpose.

  19. Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composite Prepared by Sol-Gel Synthesis and Spark Plasma Sintering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2009-02-13

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The sol-gel derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO{sub 3}) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g.cm{sup -3} or 93% relative density. In addition those parts were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus the sample retained its stored chemical energy.

  20. Sintering and joining of low temperature co-fired tungsten and aluminum oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonyongmaneerat, Yuttanant

    2006-01-01

    Conventional methods used to fabricate co-fired tungsten/alumina composites usually rely on high temperature processing (>1500C). As it would be beneficial or even necessary for some applications to produce such composites ...

  1. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  2. Ductile filler metal alloys for welding nickel aluminide alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McNabb, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2003-04-08

    Nickel aluminum alloys are welded utilizing a nickel based alloy containing zirconium but substantially free of titanium and niobium which reduces the tendency to crack.

  3. Weld monitor and failure detector for nuclear reactor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1987-01-01

    Critical but inaccessible welds in a nuclear reactor system are monitored throughout the life of the reactor by providing small aperture means projecting completely through the reactor vessel wall and also through the weld or welds to be monitored. The aperture means is normally sealed from the atmosphere within the reactor. Any incipient failure or cracking of the weld will cause the environment contained within the reactor to pass into the aperture means and thence to the outer surface of the reactor vessel where its presence is readily detected.

  4. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven...

  5. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  6. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, F.A.; Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquefying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper. 6 figs.

  7. Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA)

    1989-05-23

    Molybdenum-copper and tungsten-copper alloys are prepared by a consumable electrode method in which the electrode consists of a copper matrix with embedded strips of refractory molybdenum or tungsten. The electrode is progressively melted at its lower end with a superatmospheric inert gas pressure maintained around the liquifying electrode. The inert gas pressure is sufficiently above the vapor pressure of copper at the liquidus temperature of the alloy being formed to suppress boiling of liquid copper.

  8. Anomalous behaviour of molybdenum in steel welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhary, Habib Ullah

    their applications to other areas, like steam generators and heaters. The range of applications includes chemical reactor vessels, nuclear power gener- ation components and also superheaters of steam generators. They have recently been used in hydrotreating vessels... hardening effect. Typical applications are: pres- sure vessels for transport and storage, submarines, heavy road vehicles etc. 1.2.1 The Effect of Molybdenum on Weld Metal There is a microstructural effect which is especially prominent in molybdenum...

  9. Theory of Parabolic Arcs in Interstellar Scintillation Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James M. Cordes; Barney J. Rickett; Daniel R. Stinebring; William A. Coles

    2004-07-03

    Our theory relates the secondary spectrum, the 2D power spectrum of the radio dynamic spectrum, to the scattered pulsar image in a thin scattering screen geometry. Recently discovered parabolic arcs in secondary spectra are generic features for media that scatter radiation at angles much larger than the rms scattering angle. Each point in the secondary spectrum maps particular values of differential arrival-time delay and fringe rate (or differential Doppler frequency) between pairs of components in the scattered image. Arcs correspond to a parabolic relation between these quantities through their common dependence on the angle of arrival of scattered components. Arcs appear even without consideration of the dispersive nature of the plasma. Arcs are more prominent in media with negligible inner scale and with shallow wavenumber spectra, such as the Kolmogorov spectrum, and when the scattered image is elongated along the velocity direction. The arc phenomenon can be used, therefore, to constrain the inner scale and the anisotropy of scattering irregularities for directions to nearby pulsars. Arcs are truncated by finite source size and thus provide sub micro arc sec resolution for probing emission regions in pulsars and compact active galactic nuclei. Multiple arcs sometimes seen signify two or more discrete scattering screens along the propagation path, and small arclets oriented oppositely to the main arc persisting for long durations indicate the occurrence of long-term multiple images from the scattering screen.

  10. ArcSafe® with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Form ArcSafe with Pulsed Arrested Spark Discharge &24; The world's only advanced electrical wiring diagnostic capable of detecting insulation defects in complex wiring systems...

  11. Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrical Code Article 690.11 requires photovoltaic systems on or penetrating a building to include a DC arc-fault protection device. In order to satisfy this...

  12. A Dynamic Traveling Salesman Problem with Stochastic Arc Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Toriello

    2012-08-31

    Aug 31, 2012 ... Abstract: We propose a dynamic traveling salesman problem (TSP) with stochastic arc costs motivated by applications, such as dynamic ...

  13. PV Arc Fault Detector Challenges Due to Module Frequency Response...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This poster does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Introduction PV system arc faults have led to a number of rooftop fires which have caused significant...

  14. High Charge State Ions Extracted from Metal Plasmas in the Transition Regime from Vacuum Spark to High Current Vacuum Arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Georgy, Yu. Yushkov, Andre

    2008-01-01

    of expanding vacuum arc plasmas”, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. ,in high current vacuum arc plasma in a magnetic field,” IEEEdistributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The origin of species”,

  15. Puzzling differences in bismuth and lead plasmas: evidence for the significant role of neutrals in cathodic vacuum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-01

    for Pb and Bi cathodic arc plasmas revealed unexpectedCathodic vacuum arc plasmas are generally considered to beand (iv) the condensing arc plasma itself, because non-

  16. Production of neutrals and their and effects on the ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.

    2007-01-01

    states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas André Anders a , EfimRussia Abstract Cathodic arc plasmas are considered fullybeen known that cathodic arc plasmas go through an initial

  17. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01

    in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmas were measured andI. INTRODUCTION Vacuum arc plasma is well known to be highlymeasured for vacuum arc plasmas. Aluminum plasma, for

  18. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Intasiri, Sawate; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Anders, Andre

    2007-01-01

    filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma sources with selectivedual filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma sources operated inrepetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma sources operating in

  19. Effect of ion mass and charge state on transport of vacuum ARC plasmas through a biased magnetic filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byon, Eungsun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Kwon, Sik-Chol; Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    G. Brown, "Transport of vacuum arc plasmas through magneticto rid cathodic arc plasma of macro- and nanoparticles: afrom cathodic arc plasmas," Surf. Coat. Technol. , vol. 133-

  20. Mo-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon deposited by dual filtered cathodic vacuum arc with selective pulsed bias voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasaja, Nitisak; Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Vilaithong, Thiraphat; Intasiri, Sawate

    2006-01-01

    filtered cathodic vacuum arc plasma sources with selectiverepetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma sources operating inthe pulse length from each arc plasma source. They concluded

  1. Electrical properties of a-C:Mo films produced by dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sansongsiri, Sakon

    2008-01-01

    cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma system. Fig. 2. Filmfiltered cathodic arc plasma deposition Sakon Sansongsiri a,filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition Sakon Sansongsiri a,

  2. Time-dependence ion charge state distributions of vacuum arcs: An interpretation involving atoms and charge exchange collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2004-01-01

    functions of vacuum arc plasmas," J. Appl. Phys. , vol. 93,distributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The origin of species,"energetic condensation of cathodic arc plasma. More detailed

  3. Tungsten coating for improved wear resistance and reliability of microelectromechanical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Mani, Seethambal S. (Albuquerque, NM); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Edgewood, NM); Blewer, Robert S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A process is disclosed whereby a 5-50-nanometer-thick conformal tungsten coating can be formed over exposed semiconductor surfaces (e.g. silicon, germanium or silicon carbide) within a microelectromechanical (MEM) device for improved wear resistance and reliability. The tungsten coating is formed after cleaning the semiconductor surfaces to remove any organic material and oxide film from the surface. A final in situ cleaning step is performed by heating a substrate containing the MEM device to a temperature in the range of 200-600 .degree. C. in the presence of gaseous nitrogen trifluoride (NF.sub.3). The tungsten coating can then be formed by a chemical reaction between the semiconductor surfaces and tungsten hexafluoride (WF.sub.6) at an elevated temperature, preferably about 450.degree. C. The tungsten deposition process is self-limiting and covers all exposed semiconductor surfaces including surfaces in close contact. The present invention can be applied to many different types of MEM devices including microrelays, micromirrors and microengines. Additionally, the tungsten wear-resistant coating of the present invention can be used to enhance the hardness, wear resistance, electrical conductivity, optical reflectivity and chemical inertness of one or more semiconductor surfaces within a MEM device.

  4. Advanced Integration in Multi-Scale Mechanics and Welding Process Simulation in Weld Integrity Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitek, J.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.; Brust, F.W.; Babu, S.

    2008-01-30

    In this project, mathematical models that predict the microstructure in pipeline steel welds were to be developed. These models were to be integrated with thermal models that describe the time-temperature history in the weld as a function of location in order to derive the spatial variation of microstructure in the weld. The microstructure predictions were also to be combined with microstructure-hardness relations, based on the additivity principle, to determine the spatial variation of hardness in the weld. EMC2 also developed microstructural models based on empirical relationships. ORNL was to pursue the development of more fundamental, theoretically based models. ORNL applied a previously developed model for inclusion formation to predict the extent and nature of inclusions that form during weld cooling from the liquid. This inclusion model was directly integrated with computational thermodynamics capability. A convenient user interface was developed for both the inclusion model and the thermodynamic phase-stability calculations. The microstructure model was based on the simultaneous transformation theory analysis as applied to the transformation of austenite to various ferrite constituents during weld cooling. The model available on the Materials Algorithm Project web site was used. Extensive modification of this model was required to correct problems with compilation and calculations as a function of the computational platform (Unix, Linux, Windows, etc.) that was used. The user interface for the inclusion model and thermodynamic phase-stability calculations was delivered to EMC2 along with the modified and correct microstructure model. Evaluation of the theoretically based model will be carried out and the predictions will be compared with experimental results as well as predictions based on the empirical models developed by EMC2.

  5. Entropy in an Arc Plasma Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminska, A.; Dudeck, M

    2008-03-19

    The entropy properties in a D.C. argon arc plasma source are studied. The local thermodynamical entropy relations are established for a set of uniform sub-systems (Ar, Ar{sup +}, e) in order to deduce the entropy balance equation in presence of dissipative effects and in the case of a thermal non equilibrium. Phenomenological linear laws are deduced in near equilibrium situation. The flow parameters inside the plasma source are calculated by a Navier-Stokes fluid description taking into account a thermal local non equilibrium. The entropy function is calculated in the plasma source using the values of the local variables obtained from the numerical code.

  6. ScanArc ASA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbonOpen EnergyPonsa,Sasol ChevronSavannahScanArc

  7. AdaptiveARC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Pennsylvania:AdaptiveARC

  8. Characterization of monitor for laser welding.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leong, K. H.; Hunter, B. V

    2002-05-15

    This patent-pending robust on-line weld process monitor developed by Argonne National Laboratory is capable of non-intrusively sensing weld surface changes, weld penetration, occurrence of weld spatter, direction of motion of workpiece relative to cover gas flow, and presence of surface impurities like oil on the workpiece. The development of the weld monitor took into account the constraints and operating environment of the factory floor in addition to monitoring needs for quality assurance. The non-intrusive weld monitor is rugged and simple to use, does not require power to operate, is weld spatter protected and low cost. This process monitor is available as a stand-alone monitor with laser pointing suitable as an inexpensive addition to an existing processing system. For constrained configurations, the monitor can be easily integrated into an existing optic module resulting in through-the-optic viewing. The stand-alone monitor's flexibility is suitable for test and evaluation or research and development applications where flexibility in pointing or change in optics is required. A photograph of the monitor is shown in Figure 1. The reproducibility of the monitor's signal output will depend on the accuracy and repeatability in aiming. Laser aiming that comes with the monitor offers the best overall accuracy and ease. Costs can be reduced further with conventional gunsights with loss in accuracy and ease. The reproducibility of the monitor's output will depend on the field of view, the aiming method and the capability to manually aim and lock in position. In practice, even with laser aiming, the accuracy will be compromised by the mechanical system used to allow for aiming adjustments. 10 to 20% changes may be result from using a flexible connector. Improved reproducibility can be obtained at the expense of time taken to aim accurately. The integrated version of the monitor is recommended for process operations. This integrated monitor is available as an option on Spawr Industries reflective optics for high power laser beams or as a modification to the user's beam delivery optics. The advantage of the integrated design is that the monitor is pre-aimed and does not suffer from bumping and space constraints. Excellent reproducibility of the data can then be obtained. Both versions of the monitor are supplied with a BNC connector for detecting the voltage output of the sensor. The standard sensor is optimized for the monitoring of ferrous or steel alloys and other metals that have similar properties. Sensitivity to changes in penetration of < 0.05 mm can be expected. Monitoring of aluminum alloys will require a different sensor that is available as an option. A gas connection is also supplied for the clean gas purge to maintain the cleanliness of the window of the sensor. The gas (air or nitrogen) supplied should be oil and particle free to prevent fogging of the detector window.

  9. Measurements of the Ion Species of Cathodic Arc Plasma in an Axial Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oks, Efim

    2011-01-01

    distributions of a vacuum arc plasma," Rev. Sci. Instrum. ,by filtered cathodic arc plasma," physica status solidi (a),in high current vacuum arc plasma in a magnetic field," IEEE

  10. A Summary of Recent Experimental Research on Ion Energy and Charge States of Pulsed Vacuum Arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oks, Efim M.

    2008-01-01

    Ion velocities in vacuum arc plasmas, J. Appl. Phys. , 2000,Anders, Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium, IEEE Trans.in ca- thodic vacuum arc plasmas, J. Appl. Phys, 2007, vol.

  11. Ultrathin ta-C films on heads depositied by twist-filtered cathodic arc carbon plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Ryan, Francis W.

    2000-01-01

    Ion velocities in vacuum arc plasmas. submitted to J. Appl.to rid cathodic arc plasma of macro- and nanoparticles: aBrown, Transport of vacuum arc plasma through straight and

  12. Approaches to rid cathodic arc plasmas of macro- and nanoparticles: A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Sablev, and R. I. Stupka, Plasma arc apparatus for applyingMagnetically filtered cathodic arc plasma apparatus, PatentRectangular vacuum-arc plasma source, Patent 5,480,527, Jan.

  13. Temporal Development of Ion Beam Mean Charge State in Pulsed Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2008-01-01

    temperature in the vacuum arc plasma and thus higher ioncharged ions in the vacuum arc plasma. The physical aspectsion charge states in vacuum arc plasma were subject of our

  14. Ion Species and Charge States of Vacuum Arc Plasma with Gas Feed and Longitudinal Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oks, Efim

    2010-01-01

    in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas,” J. Appl. Phys. , vol. 102,models of the cathodic arc plasma and its interaction withand Charge States of Vacuum Arc Plasma with Gas Feed and

  15. ON THE CURRENT INTENSITY LIMIT OF A VACUUM ARC ION SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    for the metal vapor vacuum arc plasma discharge employed. inin the basic vacuum arc plasma source, and we have drawnThe vacuum arc is a prolific source of metal plasma, and the

  16. Investigation of non-hydrogenated DLC:Si prepared by cathodic arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Othon R.; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule

    2002-01-01

    source filtered cathodic arc plasma, and the mechanical andpulse. Typical arc current in the plasma sources were 250 Athe cathodic arc source is 1.4 (the plasma stream consists

  17. Observation of two distinct negative trions in tungsten disulfide monolayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boulesbaa, Abdelaziz; Huang, Bing; Wang, Kai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Mahjouri-Samani, Masoud; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Xiao, Kai; Yoon, Mina; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; et al

    2015-09-25

    We report on the observation of two distinct photogenerated negative trion states TA and TB in two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (2D-WS2) monolayers. These trions are postulated to emerge from their parent excitons XA and XB, which originate from spin-orbit-split (SOS) levels in the conduction band (CB) and valence band (VB). Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggests that Pauli blocking controls a competition process between TA and TB photoformation, following dissociation of XA and XB through hole trapping at internal or substrate defect sites. While TA arises directly from its parent XA, TB emerges through a different transition accessible only after XB dissociates throughmore »a hole trapping channel. This discovery of additional optically-active band-edge transitions in atomically-thin metal dichalcogenides may revolutionize optoelectronic applications and fundamental research opportunities for many-body interaction physics. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of two-dimensional tungsten disulfide monolayers (2D-WS2) grown on sapphire substrates revealed two transient absorption spectral peaks that are attributed to distinct negative trions at ~2.02 eV (T1) and ~1.98 eV (T2). The dynamics measurements indicate that trion formation by the probe is enabled by photodoped electrons that remain after trapping of holes from excitons or free electron-hole pairs at defect sites in the crystal or on the substrate. Dynamics of the excitons XA and XB’s characteristic absorption bands, at ~2.03 and ~2.40 eV, respectively, were separately monitored and compared with the photoinduced absorption features. Selective excitation of the lowest exciton level XA using ?pump 1, which implies that the electron that remains from the dissociation of exciton XA is involved in the creation of this trion with a binding energy ~ 10 meV with respect to XA. The absorption peak that corresponds to trion T2 appears when ?pump > 2.4 eV, which is just sufficient to excite exciton XB. The dynamics of trion T2 formation are found to correlate with the disappearance of the bleach of XB exciton, which indicates the involvement of holes participating in the bleach dynamics of exciton XB. Static electrical-doping photoabsorption measurements confirm the presence of an induced absorption peak similar to that of T2. Since the proposed trion formation process here involves exciton dissociation through hole-trapping by defects in the 2D crystal or substrate, this discovery highlights the strong role that defects have in defining the optical and electrical properties of 2D metal chalcogenides, which is relevant to a broad spectrum of basic science and technology applications.« less

  18. Reduced ternary molybdenum and tungsten sulfides and hydroprocessing catalysis therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilsenbeck, S.J.; McCarley, R.E.; Schrader, G.L.; Xie, X.B.

    1999-02-16

    New amorphous molybdenum/tungsten sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(L{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}, where L is molybdenum or tungsten and M is a ternary metal, has been developed. Characterization of these amorphous materials by chemical and spectroscopic methods (IR, Raman, PES) shows that the (M{sub 6}S{sub 8}){sup 0} cluster units are present. Vacuum thermolysis of the amorphous Na{sub 2x}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH first produces poorly crystalline NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} by disproportionation at 800 C and well-crystallized NaMo{sub 6}S{sub 8} at {>=} 900 C. Ion-exchange of the sodium material in methanol with soluble M{sup 2+} and M{sup 3+} salts (M=Sn, Co, Ni, Pb, La, Ho) produces the M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}(Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8})S{sub x}{hor_ellipsis}yMeOH compounds. Additionally, the new reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides with the general formula M{sup n+}{sub 2x/n}Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8+x}(MeOH){sub y}[MMOS] (M=Sn, Co, Ni) is an effective hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalyst both as-prepared and after a variety of pretreatment conditions. Under specified pretreatment conditions with flowing hydrogen gas, the SnMoS type catalyst can be stabilized, and while still amorphous, can be considered as ``Chevrel phase-like`` in that both contain Mo{sub 6}S{sub 8} cluster units. Furthermore, the small cation NiMoS and CoMoS type pretreated catalyst is shown to be very active HDS catalysts with rates that exceeded the model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts. 9 figs.

  19. ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Silicon Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Silicon Photovoltaics and Photonics Annual Report 2005 ARC Centre of Excellence for Advanced Silicon Photovoltaics and Photonics Annual Report 2005 #12;Centre of Excellence for Advanced Silicon Photovoltaics and Photonics is a Centre of Excellence of The Australian

  20. Mechanism of carbon nanostructure synthesis in arc plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keidar, M.; Shashurin, A.; Volotskova, O.; Raitses, Y.; Beilis, I. I.

    2010-05-15

    Plasma enhanced techniques are widely used for synthesis of carbon nanostructures. The primary focus of this paper is to summarize recent experimental and theoretical advances in understanding of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) synthesis mechanism in arcs, and to describe methods of controlling arc plasma parameters. Fundamental issues related to synthesis of SWNTs, which is a relationship between plasma parameters and SWNT characteristics are considered. It is shown that characteristics of synthesized SWNTs can be altered by varying plasma parameters. Effects of electrical and magnetic fields applied during SWNT synthesis in arc plasma are explored. Magnetic field has a profound effect on the diameter, chirality, and length of a SWNT synthesized in the arc plasma. An average length of SWNT increases by a factor of 2 in discharge with magnetic field and an amount of long nanotubes with the length above 5 {mu}m also increases in comparison with that observed in the discharge without a magnetic field. In addition, synthesis of a few-layer graphene in a magnetic field presence is discovered. A coupled model of plasma-electrode phenomena in atmospheric-pressure anodic arc in helium is described. Calculations indicate that substantial fraction of the current at the cathode is conducted by ions (0.7-0.9 of the total current). It is shown that nonmonotonic behavior of the arc current-voltage characteristic can be reproduced taking into account the experimentally observed dependence of the arc radius on arc current.

  1. Research Article A Customization of the Arc Marine Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Research Article A Customization of the Arc Marine Data Model to Support Whale Tracking via Mate Marine Mammal Institute, Oregon State University Dawn J Wright Department of Geosciences Oregon State University Tomas Follett Marine Mammal Institute, Oregon State University Abstract The Arc Marine

  2. Applicability of moire deflection tomography for diagnosing arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Yunyun; Song Yang; He Anzhi; Li Zhenhua

    2009-01-20

    The argon arc plasma whose central temperature, 1.90x10{sup 4} K, is used as a practical example for an experiment to research the applicability of moire deflection tomography in arc plasma flow-field diagnosis. The experimental result indicates that moire deflection of the measured argon arc plasma is very small, even smaller than that of a common flame with the maximal temperature of nearly 1.80x10{sup 3} K. The refractive-index gradient in moire deflection tomography mainly contributes to the temperature gradient in essence when the probe wavelength and pressure are certain in plasma diagnosis. The applicable temperature ranges of moire deflection tomography in the argon arc plasma diagnosis are given with the probe wavelength 532 nm at 1 atm in certain measuring error requirements. In a word, the applicable temperature range of moire deflection tomography for arc plasma diagnosis is intimately related to the probe wavelength and the practical measuring requirements.

  3. Probing instabilities in arc plasma devices using binary gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorui, S.; Vysohlid, M.; Heberlein, J. V. R.; Pfender, E.

    2007-07-15

    This paper presents an experimental approach to identify the sources of instabilities in arc plasma devices. The phenomena of demixing in arcs have been utilized to explore the characteristics of different instabilities. Problems in explaining the observed behavior with our current understanding of the phenomena are discussed. Hydrogen is used as a secondary gas with argon as the primary plasma gas for this study. Results indicate that the observed behavior such as steady, takeover, and restrike modes of instabilities in arcs may essentially originate from the thin boundary layer over the anode wall primarily at the location of the anodic arc root. The bulk core flow apparently does not play any significant role in such instabilities. Arc currents rather than flow rates control the behavior of the instabilities in frequency space. Bifurcation of the system behavior and evidence for the existence of quadratic zones in flow space of binary gas mixtures separating steady and unsteady behavior are discussed.

  4. Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasma sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oks, E.M.; Savkin, K.P.; Yushkov, G.Yu.; Nikolaev, A.G.; Anders, A.; Brown, I.G.

    2006-03-15

    The total ion current generated by a vacuum arc plasma source was measured. The discharge system investigated allowed ion collection from the arc plasma streaming through a hemispherical mesh anode with geometric transparency of 72%. A range of different cathode materials was investigated, and the arc current was varied over the range of 50-500 A. We find that the normalized ion current (I{sub ion}/I{sub arc}) depends on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5% to 19% and generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The application of a strong axial magnetic field in the cathode and arc region leads to increased normalized ion current, but only by virtue of enhanced ion charge states formed in a strong magnetic field.

  5. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; Craig Tyler

    2010-08-01

    Engineers from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have demonstrated an innovative method for seal or pinch welding stainless steel tubing. Sometimes a tube has fuel or contamination that must be contained, or the tube needs to be shortened or cut for handling, and the tube needs to have a guaranteed sealed weld that is both quick and easy. This technique was demonstrated in a laboratory using a resistance welding system with specially designed electrodes to ensure a tube end is seal welded or if a long tube is to be shortened, the severed ends are seal welded. The unique electrodes design is integral to achieving the sealed ends. This process could readily be adapted for robotic--remote handling or for contact handling in a glovebox or hood.

  6. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W. (Tijeras, NM); Mahoney, A. Roderick (Albuquerque, NM); Milewski, John O (Santa Fe, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  7. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

    2007-02-01

    During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

  8. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe for weld fatigue resistance.

  9. Adsorption of carbonyl sulfide on nickel and tungsten films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, J.M.; Nasser, F.A.K.

    1985-07-18

    The interaction of carbonyl sulfide with evaporated nickel and tungsten films has been investigated in the temperature range 195-450 K using gas pressures ranging from 1 to 13 N m/sup -2/. Rapid but mainly associative chemisorption of COS occurred on both metals at 195 K. Further adsorption of COS on W at temperatures 293-450 K was extremely slow and accompanied by more CO desorption than COS adsorbed. Sulfidation of Ni film by COS occurred at temperatures greater than or equal to 293 K with the liberation of carbon monoxide. The rate of adsorption increased with temperature but was independent of COS pressure. The activation energy (E/sub x/) increased with extent (X) of sulfidation to a limiting value of 97 kJ mol/sup -1/. A linear relationship was obtained from the plot of E/sub x/ against 1/X, suggesting the applicability of Cabrera-Mott theory to the sulfidation of Ni film by COS. 20 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  10. DISPLACEMENT CASCADE SIMULATION IN TUNGSTEN AT 1025 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Nandipati, Giridhar; Roche, Kenneth J.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-09-30

    Molecular dynamics simulation was employed to investigate the irradiation damage properties of bulk tungsten at 1025 K (0.25 melting temperature). A comprehensive data set of primary cascade damage was generated up to primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies 100 keV. The dependence of the number of surviving Frenkel pairs (NFP) on the PKA energy (E) exhibits three different characteristic domains presumably related to the different cascade morphologies that form. The low-energy regime < 0.2 keV is characterized by a hit-or-miss type of Frenkel pair (FP) production near the displacement threshold energy of 128 eV. The middle regime 0.3 – 30 keV exhibits a sublinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) associated with compact cascade morphology with a slope of 0.73. Above 30 keV, the cascade morphology consists of complex branches or interconnected damage regions. In this extended morphology, large interstitial clusters form from superposition of interstitials from nearby damage regions. Strong clustering above 30 keV results in a superlinear dependence of log(NFP) vs log(E) with a slope of 1.365. At 100 keV, an interstitial cluster of size 92 and a vacancy cluster of size 114 were observed.

  11. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  12. An Archean Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    indicate splitting of the arc. HMG and associated parts of the Abitibi greenstone belts bear a strong resemblance to modern rifted intraoceanic arcs of the western Pacific....

  13. Effect of underlayer on coalescence of silver islands grown by filtered cathodic arc deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byon, Eungsun; Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    1. A miniature pulsed cathodic arc plasma source 14) with ausing a pulsed cathodic arc plasma source with a Nb cathode.

  14. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

  15. Planning to Gather Information Chung T. Kwok and Daniel S. Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planning to Gather Information Chung T. Kwok and Daniel S. Weld ctkwok, weld, relevant information sources to satisfy a user's information request (Etzioni & Weld 1994; Knoblock 1995 the relevant sources (Etzioni & Weld 1994). These motivations inspire the Occam1 planning sys- 1 William

  16. Crowdsourcing Multi-Label Classification Jonathan Bragg Mausam Daniel S. Weld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mausam

    Crowdsourcing Multi-Label Classification Jonathan Bragg Mausam Daniel S. Weld Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195 {jbragg, mausam, weld summarizes (Bragg, Mausam, and Weld 2013), to appear at HCOMP 2013. References Bragg, J.; Mausam; and Weld, D

  17. F i W ldi PFusion Welding -Processes ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    F i W ldi PFusion Welding - Processes ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. · Heat + filler material = weld· Heat + filler

  18. F i W ldiFusion Welding ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    F i W ldiFusion Welding ver. 1 ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. · Heat + filler material = weld· Heat + filler

  19. Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding, material microstructure and properties in friction stir welding welds of AA5083 (a non welding, Johnson-Cook material model 1. Introduction In this study, an attempt is made to modify

  20. TRANSMISSION WELDING OF GLASSES BY FEMTOSECOND LASER: STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    TRANSMISSION WELDING OF GLASSES BY FEMTOSECOND LASER: STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Paper M processing parameters enables transmission welding. The morphology of the weld cross section was studied of the weld seams were studied through spatially resolved nanoindentation, and indentation fracture analysis

  1. The application of nanosecond-pulsed laser welding technology in MEMS packaging with a shadow mask$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    The application of nanosecond-pulsed laser welding technology in MEMS packaging with a shadow mask wiring is not pre- ferred. A comprehensive review on laser welding was given in [6]. The laser welding of laser welding is to create the liquid pool by absorption of incident radiation, allow it to grow

  2. Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding.pichelin@b .ch Context: Wood can be welded using linear vibration welding tech- niques similar to the ones in plastic and metal industry[1] . Wood welding allows bonding strength similar to glued joints. However, due

  3. Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmignani, B

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of welds of thick steel pieces of interest for the thermonuclear fusion ITER machine

  4. GIS Fundamentals Lesson 8: Buffering and Overlay Lesson 8: Buffering and Overlay in ArcGIS -ArcMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher J.

    GIS Fundamentals Lesson 8: Buffering and Overlay Lesson 8: Buffering and Overlay in ArcGIS - Arc. You should read chapter 9 in the GIS Fundamentals textbook. Data: All data are in \\L9 subdirectory within the bounds of an "in" polygon. 1 #12;GIS Fundamentals Lesson 8: Buffering and Overlay Surface DIST

  5. Effect of stainless steel weld overlay cladding on the structural integrity of flawed steel plates in bending. Series 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.; Merkle, J.G.; Berggren, R.G.; Goodwin, G.M.; Swain, R.L.; Owings, T.D.

    1985-04-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Stainless Steel Cladding Evaluations were undertaken to study the interaction of stainless steel cladding on the inside surface of a reactor pressure vessel with flaws initiating and propagating in base metal. With the more recent focus of safety studies on overcooling type transients, for which the behavior of small flaws is important, stainless steel cladding may have a key role in controlling the propagation and/or arrest of propagating flaws. A complicating factor in understanding the role of stainless steel cladding in this setting is the scarcity of data on its fracture toughness as a function of radiation dose and the fabrication process. The initial phase of the HSST evaluations addresses this question by testing the response of 51-mm-thick flawed plates clad with single-wire, submerged-arc weld overlays of different toughness levels. The tests completed indicate that cladding of moderate toughness had a limited ability to enhance the structural arrest toughness of a beam in bending. The specimen design and fabrication techniques employed for this first completed series of tests resulted in flaw and specimen configurations that prevented adequate control of the stress state at pop-in of the hydrogen-charged electron-beam welds. As a result, analyses of the tests by two approximate techniques and by the ORMGEN-ADINA-ORVIRT finite-element programs were not completely consistent.

  6. Quiz # 7, STAT 383, Prof. Suman Sanyal, April 8, 2009 (Q2, Page 354) To decide whether the pipe welds in a nuclear power plant meet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    welds in a nuclear power plant meet specifications, a random sample of welds is to be selected : µ nuclear power plants is to determine if welds

  7. Influence of Aluminum Content on Grain Refinement and Strength of AZ31 Magnesium GTA Weld Metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babu, N. Kishore [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28

    The goal is to characterize the effect of Al content on AZ31 weld metal, the grain size and strength, and examine role of Al on grain refinement. The approach is to systematically vary the aluminum content of AZ31 weld metal, Measure average grain size in weld metal, and Measure cross-weld tensile properties and hardness. Conclusions are that: (1) increased Al content in AZ31 weld metal results in grain refinement Reason: higher undercooling during solidification; (2) weld metal grain refinement resulted in increased strength & hardness Reason: grain boundary strengthening; and (3) weld metal strength can be raised to wrought base metal levels.

  8. Historical overview on Vacuum suitable Welding and fatigue resistance in Research Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    New inventions change the approach of vacuum suitable welding for research purpose. With orbital welding, laser welding and robot welding the possibilities increase to fabricate larger vessels more accurately. Despite this development there is still no perfect understanding on how to avoid virtual leaks and how to make such joints suitable for dynamic stress. By recalling its historical development, it is apparent how welding mistakes began occurring systematically and how to avoid them. With ASDEX-Upgrade as an example, it is shown how the attempt to conduct vacuum suitable welding has decreased the fatigue strength. ITER could repeat the mistakes of ASDEX-Upgrade even for unwanted welding (accidental fusing of joints).

  9. Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds. Phase 2: Results of duplex-type experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degrees}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. {open_quotes}Mean{close_quote} curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K{sub la} curve were fit to the data with only the {open_quotes}reference temperature{close_quotes} as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined.

  10. Microstructure characterization of laser welded Ti-6Al-4V fusion zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Pei-quan; Li, Leijun, E-mail: leijun.li@ualberta.ca; Zhang, Chunbo

    2014-01-15

    The as-welded microstructure of laser-welded Ti-6Al-4V is characterized as a function of CO2 key-hole mode laser welding speed. Martensitic ?? is the predominant phase, with some ? and retained ?. Phase transformation is affected by the cooling rate through laser welding speed. A higher welding speed of 1.6 to 2.0 m/min produced more martensite ?? and less retained ? in the welds. 1.4 m/min welding speed produced small amounts of ?, besides the martensite ??. A trace of ? titanium hydride phase seems to have formed in the weld fusion zone. Moiré fringes are a common feature in the TEM microstructure, due to abundance of multi-phase interfaces. Tensile twins and clusters of dislocations indicate that plastic deformation has happened in the as-welded microstructure, indicating the local stress levels to be approaching the yield stress on-cooling during laser welding.

  11. Matching univalent functions and conformal welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grong, Erlend; Vasil'ev, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Given a conformal mapping $f$ of the unit disk $\\mathbb D$ onto a simply connected domain $D$ in the complex plane bounded by a closed Jordan curve, we consider the problem of constructing a matching conformal mapping, i.e., the mapping of the exterior of the unit disk $\\mathbb D^*$ onto the exterior domain $D^*$ regarding to $D$. The answer is expressed in terms of a linear differential equation with a driving term given as the kernel of an operator dependent on the original mapping $f$. Examples are provided. This study is related to the problem of conformal welding and to representation of the Virasoro algebra in the space of univalent functions.

  12. Matching univalent functions and conformal welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlend Grong; Pavel Gumenyuk; Alexander Vasil'ev

    2008-06-05

    Given a conformal mapping $f$ of the unit disk $\\mathbb D$ onto a simply connected domain $D$ in the complex plane bounded by a closed Jordan curve, we consider the problem of constructing a matching conformal mapping, i.e., the mapping of the exterior of the unit disk $\\mathbb D^*$ onto the exterior domain $D^*$ regarding to $D$. The answer is expressed in terms of a linear differential equation with a driving term given as the kernel of an operator dependent on the original mapping $f$. Examples are provided. This study is related to the problem of conformal welding and to representation of the Virasoro algebra in the space of univalent functions.

  13. Effect of interfacial interactions on the thermal conductivity and interfacial thermal conductance in tungsten–graphene layered structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagannadham, K., E-mail: jag-kasichainula@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Graphene film was deposited by microwave plasma assisted deposition on polished oxygen free high conductivity copper foils. Tungsten–graphene layered film was formed by deposition of tungsten film by magnetron sputtering on the graphene covered copper foils. Tungsten film was also deposited directly on copper foil without graphene as the intermediate film. The tungsten–graphene–copper samples were heated at different temperatures up to 900?°C in argon atmosphere to form an interfacial tungsten carbide film. Tungsten film deposited on thicker graphene platelets dispersed on silicon wafer was also heated at 900?°C to identify the formation of tungsten carbide film by reaction of tungsten with graphene platelets. The films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. It was found that tungsten carbide film formed at the interface upon heating only above 650?°C. Transient thermoreflectance signal from the tungsten film surface on the samples was collected and modeled using one-dimensional heat equation. The experimental and modeled results showed that the presence of graphene at the interface reduced the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity and the interfacial thermal conductance of the layer structure. Heating at 650 and 900?°C in argon further reduced the cross-plane thermal conductivity and interface thermal conductance as a result of formation nanocrystalline tungsten carbide at the interface leading to separation and formation of voids. The present results emphasize that interfacial interactions between graphene and carbide forming bcc and hcp elements will reduce the cross-plane effective thermal conductivity in composites.

  14. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  15. Engineering Computations Modeling of ballistic-failure mechanisms in gas metal arc welds of mil a46100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    -hardness armor-grade martensitic steel) workpieces using filler-metal electrodes made46100 armor-grade steel Mica Grujicic Subrahmanian Ramaswami Jennifer Snipes Rohan Galgalikar Ramin of mil a46100 armor-grade steel", Engineering Computations, Vol. 32 Iss 3 pp. 705 - 741 Permanent link

  16. Lidar arc scan uncertainty reduction through scanning geometry optimization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.; Brown, G.

    2015-10-07

    Doppler lidars are frequently operated in a mode referred to as arc scans, wherein the lidar beam scans across a sector with a fixed elevation angle and the resulting measurements are used to derive an estimate of the n minute horizontal mean wind velocity (speed and direction). Previous studies have shown that the uncertainty in the measured wind speed originates from turbulent wind fluctuations and depends on the scan geometry (the arc span and the arc orientation). This paper is designed to provide guidance on optimal scan geometries for two key applications in the wind energy industry: wind turbine powermore »performance analysis and annual energy production. We present a quantitative analysis of the retrieved wind speed uncertainty derived using a theoretical model with the assumption of isotropic and frozen turbulence, and observations from three sites that are onshore with flat terrain, onshore with complex terrain and offshore, respectively. The results from both the theoretical model and observations show that the uncertainty is scaled with the turbulence intensity such that the relative standard error on the 10 min mean wind speed is about 30 % of the turbulence intensity. The uncertainty in both retrieved wind speeds and derived wind energy production estimates can be reduced by aligning lidar beams with the dominant wind direction, increasing the arc span and lowering the number of beams per arc scan. Large arc spans should be used at sites with high turbulence intensity and/or large wind direction variation when arc scans are used for wind resource assessment.« less

  17. mARC: Memory by Association and Reinforcement of Contexts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbert Rimoux; Patrice Descourt

    2013-12-10

    This paper introduces the memory by Association and Reinforcement of Contexts (mARC). mARC is a novel data modeling technology rooted in the second quantization formulation of quantum mechanics. It is an all-purpose incremental and unsupervised data storage and retrieval system which can be applied to all types of signal or data, structured or unstructured, textual or not. mARC can be applied to a wide range of information clas-sification and retrieval problems like e-Discovery or contextual navigation. It can also for-mulated in the artificial life framework a.k.a Conway "Game Of Life" Theory. In contrast to Conway approach, the objects evolve in a massively multidimensional space. In order to start evaluating the potential of mARC we have built a mARC-based Internet search en-gine demonstrator with contextual functionality. We compare the behavior of the mARC demonstrator with Google search both in terms of performance and relevance. In the study we find that the mARC search engine demonstrator outperforms Google search by an order of magnitude in response time while providing more relevant results for some classes of queries.

  18. A study of the mechanism of laser welding defects in low thermal expansion superalloy GH909

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Fei; Wang, Chunming, E-mail: yanxiangfei225@163.com; Wang, Yajun; Hu, Xiyuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Li, Jianmin; Li, Guozhu

    2013-04-15

    In this paper, we describe experimental laser welding of low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909. The main welding defects of GH909 by laser in the weld are liquation cracks and porosities, including hydrogen and carbon monoxide porosity. The forming mechanism of laser welding defects was investigated. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum, X-ray diffractometer and other methodologies. The results demonstrated that porosities appearing in the central weld were related to incomplete removal of oxide film on the surface of the welding samples. The porosities produced by these bubbles were formed as a result of residual hydrogen or oxygenium in the weld. These elements failed to escape from the weld since laser welding has both a rapid welding speed and cooling rate. The emerging crack in the heat affected zone is a liquation crack and extends along the grain boundary as a result of composition segregation. Laves–Ni{sub 2}Ti phase with low melting point is a harmful phase, and the stress causes grain boundaries to liquefy, migrate and even crack. Removing the oxides on the surface of the samples before welding and carefully controlling technological parameters can reduce welding defects and improve formation of the GH909 alloy weld. - Highlights: ? It is a new process for the forming of GH909 alloy via laser welding. ? The forming mechanism of laser welding defects in GH909 has been studied. ? It may be a means to improve the efficiency of aircraft engine production.

  19. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  20. Nanoparticles synthesis of tungsten disulfide via AOT-based microemulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghoreishi, S.M.; Meshkat, S.S.; Department of Chemical Engineering, Urmia University of Technology, Urmia 57155-419 ; Ghiaci, M.; Dadkhah, A.A.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: A controlled synthesis of WS2 nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) via microemulsion was applied for the first time to prepare WS2 (7–12 nm) by acidification of the water cores of the AOT reverse microemulsion. Highlights: ? An innovative reverse microemulsion technique was developed for WS{sub 2} synthesis. ? WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were obtained with narrow size distribution in range of 7–12 nm. ? Operating cost of microemulsion was lower in contrast to quartz reactor method. ? WS{sub 2} morphology could be controlled to obtain highly active and selective catalysts. ? Lower size of WS{sub 2} in this study overcomes the shortcoming of quartz reactor method. -- Abstract: The tungsten disulfide (WS{sub 2}) nanoparticles (most probably inorganic fullerene (IF)) with a narrow size distribution were synthesized by a reverse micelle technique for the first time. The particle size was controlled by varying water-to-surfactant molar ratio (W{sub 0}), aging time and reagent concentration. The synthesized WS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by zetasizer, UV–visible spectrophotometers and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The WS{sub 2} nanoparticles with particle diameter size of 7–12 nm were obtained via 24 h aging time. The particle size was controlled by changing the aging time and molar ratio of water/surfactant. Doubling W{sub 0} increased the amount and particle size of WS{sub 2} by 22 and 26%, respectively. The effect of aging time in the range of 6–24 h was investigated and the complete disappearance of yellowish color at 24 h resulted in an optically clear solution, which was the indication of WS{sub 2} formation with 100% conversion of reactant ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}WS{sub 4}) in the batch reactor.

  1. Growth and field-emission property of tungsten oxide nanotip arrays Jun Zhou, Li Gong, Shao Zhi Deng,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Growth and field-emission property of tungsten oxide nanotip arrays Jun Zhou, Li Gong, Shao Zhi of 010 . The tungsten oxide nanotips exhibit excellent field-emission properties with a low threshold field for an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2 4.37 MV/m and uniform emission from the entire arrays

  2. High temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten James S.K.-L. Gibson a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (essentially helium ions) from the plasma as well as 14 MeV neutrons. While the rate of helium production dueHigh temperature indentation of helium-implanted tungsten James S.K.-L. Gibson a,n , Steve G Hardening a b s t r a c t Nanoindentation has been performed on tungsten, unimplanted and helium

  3. Hot Pin Welding of Thin Poly(vinyl chloride) Sheet James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Ven, James D.

    Hot Pin Welding of Thin Poly(vinyl chloride) Sheet James D. Van de Ven, Arthur G. Erdman Mechanical of welding two thin sheets of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) with a heated pin, thus allowing construction of a relationship between the weld temperature and weld strength. Constructing a relationship between weld strength

  4. Acoustic stabilization of electric arc instabilities in nontransferred plasma torches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rat, V.; Coudert, J. F.

    2010-03-08

    Electric arc instabilities in dc plasma torches lead to nonhomogeneous treatments of nanosized solid particles or liquids injected within thermal plasma jets. This paper shows that an additional acoustic resonator mounted on the cathode cavity allows reaching a significant damping of these instabilities, particularly the Helmholtz mode of arc oscillations. The acoustic resonator is coupled with the Helmholtz resonator of the plasma torch limiting the amplitude of arc voltage variations. It is also highlighted that this damping is dependent on friction effects in the acoustic resonator.

  5. Numerical simulation of carbon arc discharge for nanoparticle synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundrapu, M.; Keidar, M.

    2012-07-15

    Arc discharge with catalyst-filled carbon anode in helium background was used for the synthesis of carbon nanoparticles. In this paper, we present the results of numerical simulation of carbon arc discharges with arc current varying from 10 A to 100 A in a background gas pressure of 68 kPa. Anode sublimation rate and current voltage characteristics are compared with experiments. Distribution of temperature and species density, which is important for the estimation of the growth of nanoparticles, is obtained. The probable location of nanoparticle growth region is identified based on the temperature range for the formation of catalyst clusters.

  6. FAILURE STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF VPS TUNGSTEN COATINGS FOR HAPL FIRST WALL ARMOR Hyoungil Kim, Jaafar El-Awady, Jennifer Quan, Shahram Sharafat, Vijay Gupta and Nasr Ghoniem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    FAILURE STRENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF VPS TUNGSTEN COATINGS FOR HAPL FIRST WALL ARMOR Hyoungil Kim a compression/tension stress wave through the composite layered structure. The tensile strength in the coating is then related to the displacement velocity of the free surface of the tungsten coating. VPS tungsten coated

  7. The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2013-01-01

    fusion devices," Nuclear Fusion, vol. 50, p. 125004, 2010. [irradiated tungsten," Nuclear Fusion, vol. 49, p. 032002,LHD divertor plasma," Nuclear Fusion, vol. 51, p. 102001,

  8. Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, Patrick T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

  9. Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oakley, D.J.; Feld, S.H.

    1984-02-22

    A welding fixture is described for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

  10. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  11. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pernicka, John C. (Fort Collins, CO); Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO)

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  12. Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Feld, Sam H. (West Richland, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A welding fixture for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

  13. Inspection apparatus for evaluating a partially completed weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, Jonn A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01

    An inspection apparatus for evaluating a partially completed weld is described and which is utilized in combination with an automated movable welder which moves across a supporting surface, and wherein the inspection apparatus includes a coupling member mounted on the welder; a frame member mounted on the coupling member; an ultrasonic sensor mounted on the frame member and disposed in ultrasonic sound transmitting relation relative to the partially completed weld; and a drive assembly for adjusting the position of the ultrasonic sensor relative to the partially completed weld.

  14. Addressing employee concerns about welding in a nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, J.C.; Hansen, D.D.; O'Leary, P.D.

    1988-03-01

    A leading utility contracted with EG and G Idaho to perform a comprehensive, independent evaluation of the utility's welding program with respect to the safety-related welds made at one of its nuclear power plants. The purpose of this paper is to review a number of the employee concerns and the technical basis for the disposition of these concerns. In addition, recommendations are presented that may help to prevent the recurrence of employee concerns in future nuclear power plant construction, and thereby costly delays may be avoided and welding productivity and quality improved.

  15. OPTIMIZATION STUDY FOR FILL STEM MANUFACTURINGAND PINCH WELD PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P; Karl Arnold, K

    2006-09-06

    A statistically designed experiment was conducted as part of a six sigma project for Fill Stem Manufacturing and Pinch Weld Processing. This multi-year/multi-site project has successfully completed a screening study and used those results as inputs to this optimization study. Eleven welds were made using fairly tight current and cycle range. The welds demonstrate increased burst strength, longer closure length, more net displacement, and improved bond rating with increased current. However, excessive melting remains a concern from a processing viewpoint and may cause adverse metallurgical interactions. Therefore, the highest current levels specified cannot be utilized. A Validation Study is proposed for the Defense Programs Inert Facility.

  16. Effect of silver incorporation in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly Bose, R.; Kumar, R. Vinod; Sudheer, S. K.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P. [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariyavattom, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India); Reddy, V. R.; Ganesan, V. [UGC - DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017, Madhyapradesh (India)

    2012-12-01

    Silver incorporated tungsten oxide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of silver incorporation in micro structure evolution, phase enhancement, band gap tuning and other optical properties are investigated using techniques such as x-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Effect of silver addition in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films are investigated. It is found that the texturing and phase formation improves with enhancement in silver content. It is also found that as the silver incorporation enhances the thickness of the films increases at the same time the strain in the film decreases. Even without annealing the desired phase can be achieved by doping with silver. A broad band centered at the wavelength 437 nm is observed in the absorption spectra of tungsten oxide films of higher silver incorporation and this can be attributed to surface plasmon resonance of silver atoms present in the tungsten oxide matrix. The transmittance of the films is decreased with increase in silver content which can be due to increase in film thickness, enhancement of scattering, and absorption of light caused by the increase of grain size, surface roughness and porosity of films and enhanced absorption due to surface plasmon resonance of silver. It is found that silver can act as the seed for the growth of tungsten oxide grains and found that the grain size increases with silver content which in turn decreases the band gap of tungsten oxide from 3.14 eV to 2.70 eV.

  17. Welding for testability: An approach aimed at improving the ultrasonic testing of thick-walled austenitic and dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Sabine; Dugan, Sandra [Materials Testing Institute University of Stuttgart (MPA), Pfaffenwaldring 32, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Barth, Martin; Schubert, Frank; Köhler, Bernd [Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing, Dresden Branch (IZFP-D), Maria-Reiche-Str. 2, 01109 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-02-18

    Austenitic and dissimilar welds in thick walled components show a coarse grained, dendritic microstructure. Therefore, ultrasonic testing has to deal with beam refraction, scattering and mode conversion effects. As a result, the testing techniques typically applied for isotropic materials yield dissatisfying results. Most approaches for improvement of ultrasonic testing have been based on modeling and improved knowledge of the complex wave propagation phenomena. In this paper, we discuss an alternative approach: is it possible to use a modified welding technology which eliminates the cause of the UT complications, i.e. the large-grained structure of the weld seams? Various modification parameters were tested, including: TIG current pulsing, additional DC and AC magnetic fields, and also additional external vibrations during welding. For all welds produced under different conditions, the grain structure of the weld seam was characterized by optical and GIUM microstructure visualizations on cross sections, wave field propagation measurements, and ultrasonic tests of correct detectability of flaws. The mechanical properties of the welds were also tested.

  18. FusionArc optimization: A hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matuszak, Martha M.; McShan, Daniel L.; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Steers, Jennifer M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 and Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Long, Troy; Edwin Romeijn, H. [Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Fraass, Benedick A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California 90048 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To introduce a hybrid volumetric modulated arc therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (VMAT/IMRT) optimization strategy called FusionArc that combines the delivery efficiency of single-arc VMAT with the potentially desirable intensity modulation possible with IMRT.Methods: A beamlet-based inverse planning system was enhanced to combine the advantages of VMAT and IMRT into one comprehensive technique. In the hybrid strategy, baseline single-arc VMAT plans are optimized and then the current cost function gradients with respect to the beamlets are used to define a metric for predicting which beam angles would benefit from further intensity modulation. Beams with the highest metric values (called the gradient factor) are converted from VMAT apertures to IMRT fluence, and the optimization proceeds with the mixed variable set until convergence or until additional beams are selected for conversion. One phantom and two clinical cases were used to validate the gradient factor and characterize the FusionArc strategy. Comparisons were made between standard IMRT, single-arc VMAT, and FusionArc plans with one to five IMRT/hybrid beams.Results: The gradient factor was found to be highly predictive of the VMAT angles that would benefit plan quality the most from beam modulation. Over the three cases studied, a FusionArc plan with three converted beams achieved superior dosimetric quality with reductions in final cost ranging from 26.4% to 48.1% compared to single-arc VMAT. Additionally, the three beam FusionArc plans required 22.4%-43.7% fewer MU/Gy than a seven beam IMRT plan. While the FusionArc plans with five converted beams offer larger reductions in final cost-32.9%-55.2% compared to single-arc VMAT-the decrease in MU/Gy compared to IMRT was noticeably smaller at 12.2%-18.5%, when compared to IMRT.Conclusions: A hybrid VMAT/IMRT strategy was implemented to find a high quality compromise between gantry-angle and intensity-based degrees of freedom. This optimization method will allow patients to be simultaneously planned for dosimetric quality and delivery efficiency without switching between delivery techniques. Example phantom and clinical cases suggest that the conversion of only three VMAT segments to modulated beams may result in a good combination of quality and efficiency.

  19. Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    event and causal factor analysis. Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1092-1998...

  20. ARC-HEATED GAS FLOW EXPERIMENTS FOR HYPERSONIC PROPULSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    the Supersonic Wind Tunnel. I have enjoyed working with Rod Duke, who has been an important asset to my research to be injected into the engine combustors. To investigate this approach, the UTA Arc-Heated #12;vi Wind Tunnel

  1. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chekh, Yu.; Zhirkov, I. S.; Delplancke-Ogletree, M. P.

    2010-02-15

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10{sup -2} mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  2. Ohmic contacts for solar cells by arc plasma spraying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Mandayam C. (Seekonk, MA); Roessler, Barton (Barrington, RI); Loferski, Joseph J. (Providence, RI)

    1982-01-01

    The method of applying ohmic contacts to a semiconductor, such as a silicon body or wafer used in solar cells, by the use of arc plasma spraying, and solar cells resulting therefrom.

  3. Arc Reversals in Hybrid Bayesian Networks with Deterministic Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinicioglu, Esma N.; Shenoy, Prakash P.

    2009-05-01

    This article discusses arc reversals in hybrid Bayesian networks with deterministic variables. Hybrid Bayesian networks contain a mix of discrete and continuous chance variables. In a Bayesian network representation, a continuous chance variable...

  4. Arc-Eager Parsing with the Tree Constraint Joakim Nivre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arc-Eager Parsing with the Tree Constraint Joakim Nivre Uppsala University Daniel Fern for greedy deterministic dependency parsers (Nivre, Hall, and Nilsson 2004; Goldberg and Nivre 2012), beam

  5. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  6. ArcGIS for Desktop Student Trial Software Instructions -Version 10.0 10.3 The ArcGIS for Desktop 1-year Student License provides a 1-year term license for ArcGIS for Desktop and Extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    ArcGIS for Desktop Student Trial Software Instructions - Version 10.0 ­ 10.3 The ArcGIS for Desktop. Check your system requirements to make sure your computer has the hardware and software required the process of activating and downloading your ArcGIS for Desktop Student Trial software. b. Log in using your

  7. Synthesis of silicon nanotubes by DC arc plasma method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tank, C. M.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L.

    2012-06-05

    Plasma synthesis is a novel technique of synthesis of nanomaterials as they provide high rate of production and promote metastable reactions. Very thin walled silicon nanotubes were synthesized in a DC direct arc thermal plasma reactor. The effect of parameters of synthesis i.e. arc current and presence of hydrogen on the morphology of Si nanoparticles is reported. Silicon nanotubes were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Local Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM).

  8. Role of substrate temperature at graphene synthesis in arc discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xiuqi; Keidar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Substrate temperature required for synthesis of graphene in arc discharge plasma was studied. It was shown that increase of the copper substrate temperature up to melting point leads to increase in the amount of graphene production and quality of graphene sheets. Favorable range of substrate temperatures for arc-based graphene synthesis was determined in relatively narrow range of about 1340-1360K which is near the melting point of copper.

  9. Arc-Fault Detector Algorithm Evaluation Method Utilizing Prerecorded Arcing Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D SFederal8823 Revision 02 (CRACAprilArc-Fault Detector

  10. Modeling of the Thermal Field in Dissimilar Alloy Ultrasonic Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedrasiak, P.; Shercliff, H. R.; Chen, Y. C.; Wang, L.; Prangnell, P.; Robson, J.

    2014-12-10

    This paper describes a finite element model for predicting the temperature field in high power ultrasonic welding aluminum AA6111 to two dissimilar alloys, magnesium AZ31, and low carbon steel DC04. Experimental thermocouple and other evidence...

  11. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF STEEL WELDED COVERPLATE INCLUDING COMPOSITE DOUBLERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petri, Brad

    2008-05-15

    With the increasing focus on welded bridge members resulting in crack initiation and propagation, there is a large demand for creative solutions. One of these solutions includes the application of composite doublers over ...

  12. Promising Inspection Technique for Vehicle Welding Offers Efficient...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    technology that could check all welds in real-time on the production line. This new technology could make this process faster and more efficient, allowing vehicles to be...

  13. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  14. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF WELDED CONNECTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. SOHN; C. FARRAR; M. FUGATE; J. CZARNECKI

    2001-05-01

    Structural health monitoring is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. The goal of the research effort reported herein is to develop a robust and cost-effective monitoring system for welded beam-column connections in a moment resisting frame structure. The structural health monitoring solution for this application will integrate structural dynamics, wireless data acquisition, local actuation, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMs) technology, and statistical pattern recognition algorithms. This paper provides an example of the integrated approach to structural health monitoring being undertaken at Los Alamos National Laboratory and summarizes progress to date on various aspects of the technology development.

  15. Arc-parallel flow within the mantle wedge: Evidence from the accreted Talkeetna arc, south central Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alaska Luc Mehl and Bradley R. Hacker Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa. Hacker, G. Hirth, and P. B. Kelemen, Arc-parallel flow within the mantle wedge: Evidence from

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 88, NO. B9, PAGES 7429-7448, SEPTEMBER 10,1983 --BACK ARC THRUSTING IN THE EASTERN SUNDA ARC, INDONESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaffrey, Robert

    THRUSTING IN THE EASTERN SUNDA ARC, INDONESIA: A CONSEQUENCE OF ARC-CONTINENT COLLISION Eli A. Silver Center, Jalan Diponegoro 57, Bandung, Indonesia Abstract. The structure of the eastern Sunda convergence

  17. ARCS Additional FirstYear PhD Student Award The Atlanta chapter of ARCS has just informed me that they will honor us with another graduate student

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    ARCS Additional FirstYear PhD Student Award The Atlanta chapter of ARCS has just informed me meets their definition listed above. Sincerely, Harry A. Dailey, Ph.D. Professor and Director

  18. Review on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science M. Rieth a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    material optimization, and irradiation performance testing, which are complemented by a funda- mentalReview on the EFDA programme on tungsten materials technology and science M. Rieth a, , J Karlsruhe, Institute for Materials Research, Karlsruhe, Germany b EFDA-Close Support Unit, Garching, Germany

  19. Transient Thermal and Stress Response of A Helium-Cooled Tungsten Plate-Type Divertor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    Transient Thermal and Stress Response of A Helium- Cooled Tungsten Plate-Type Divertor X.R. Wang, A and shutdown operations have been analyzed with a coupled transient thermo-fluid and thermal-stress approach and investigated for power plant applications with a goal of accommodating a heat flux of 10 MW/m2 . The concepts

  20. Utilization of geothermal energy in the mining and processing of tungsten ore. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, M.V.; Lacy, S.B.; Lowe, G.D.; Nussbaum, A.M.; Walter, K.M.; Willens, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    The engineering, economic, and environmental feasibility of the use of low and moderate temperature geothermal heat in the mining and processing of tungsten ore is explored. The following are covered: general engineering evaluation, design of a geothermal energy system, economics, the geothermal resource, the institutional barriers assessment, environmental factors, an alternate geothermal energy source, and alternates to geothermal development. (MHR)