National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tundra coral reefs

  1. EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    089 -- Coral Reef Protection EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection Establishes the Coral Reef Task Force EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection (114.01 KB) More Documents & Publications EO 13158: Marine Protected Areas (2000) EO 13031: Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership (1996) EO 12969: Federal Acquisition and Community Right-To-Know (1995)

  2. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  3. Mineral accretion technology for coral reef restoration, shore protection, and adaptation to rising sea level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hilbertz, W.

    1997-12-31

    Electrolysis of seawater is used to precipitate limestone on top of underwater steel structures to create growing artificial reefs to enhance coral growth, restore coral reef habitat, provide shelter for fish, shellfish, and other marine organisms, generate white sand for beach replenishment, and protect shore lines from wave erosion. Films and slides will be shown of existing structures in Jamaica, Panama, and the Maldives, and projects being developed in these and other locations will be evaluated. The method is unique because it creates the only artificial reef structures that generate the natural limestone substrate from which corals and coral reefs are composed, speeding the settlement and growth of calcareous organisms, and attracting the full range of other reef organisms. The structures are self-repairing and grow stronger with age. Power sources utilized include batteries, battery chargers, photovoltaic panels, and windmills. The cost of seawalls and breakwaters produced by this method is less than one tenth that of conventional technology. Because the technology is readily scaled up to build breakwaters and artificial islands able to keep pace with rising sea level it is capable of playing an important role in protecting low lying coastal areas from the effects of global climate change.

  4. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  5. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  6. Proxy Records of the Indonesian Low and the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from Stable Isotope Measurements of Indonesian Reef Corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Earth`s largest atmospheric convective center is the Indonesian Low. It generates the Australasian monsoon, drives the zonal tropospheric Walker Circulation, and is implicated in the genesis of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term variability of the Indonesian Low is poorly characterized, yet such information is crucial for evaluating whether changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are a possible manifestation of global warming. Stable oxygen isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 18}O) in shallow-water reef coral skeletons track topical convective activity over hundreds of years because the input of isotopically-depleted rainwater dilutes seawater {delta}{sup 18}O. Corals also impose a temperature-dependent fractionation on {delta}{sup 18}O, but where annual rainfall is high and sea surface temperature (SST) variability is low the freshwater flux effect dominates.

  7. Natural input of arsenic into a coral-reef ecosystem by hydrothermal fluids and its removal by Fe(III) oxyhydroxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichler, T.; Veizer, J.; Hall, G.E.M.

    1999-05-01

    The coral reef that circles Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea, is exposed to the discharge of a hot, mineralized hydrothermal fluid. The hydrothermal fluids have a pH of {approximately}6 and are slightly reducing and rich in As. Seven individual vents discharge an estimated 1500 g of As per day into an area of approximately 50 x 100 m that has an average depth of 6 m. Despite the amount of As released into the bay, corals, clams, and fish do not show a response to the elevated values. The authors analyzed hydrothermal precipitates for their chemical and mineralogical composition in order to determine As sinks. Two mechanisms efficiently control and buffer the As concentration: (1) dilution by seawater and (2) incorporation in and adsorption on Fe(III) oxyhydroxides that precipitate when the hydrothermal fluids mix with ambient seawater. Fe(III) oxyhydroxides contain up to 76,000 ppm As, by an order of magnitude the highest As values found in a natural marine environment. Following adsorption, As is successfully retained in the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide deposits because oxidizing conditions prevail and high As activity allows for the formation of discrete As minerals, such as claudetite, arsenic oxide, and scorodite.

  8. ARM - Coral Reef Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They accumulate layer upon layer on an annual basis and leave a record of their growth (and the climate) much like rings on trees or rings on fish scales. Scientists can drill into ...

  9. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2013-05-29

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  10. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  11. Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Bonfils-1.jpg Why it Matters: Simulations at NERSC are the first to investigate long-term climate...

  12. Quaternary sedimentation and diagenesis in a high-latitude reef, Houtman Abrolhos Islands, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, M.R.; Collins, L.B. (Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)); Wyrwoll, K.H.; Hatcher, B.G. (Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia))

    1990-05-01

    The Houtman Abrolhos reefs are located 80 km off the west coast of Australia between latitudes 28 and 29{degree} south. The islands are situated on three Pleistocene carbonate reef platforms which rise above the surrounding shelf. The modern coral reefs are close to the geographic limit for coral growth in the southern hemisphere and survive due to the presence of the Leeuwin current (a poleward-flowing warm stream). Two major shallow-water benthic communities coexist in the Abrolhos: a macroalgal-dominated community on the windward platform margins and a coral-dominated community on the leeward margins. These communities overlap-particularly in the platform lagoons, where competition between macroalgae and corals is intense. This interaction has been suggested as a major factor controlling the growth of cord reefs at high latitudes. The Holocene carbonate sediments lack nonskeletal components and are dominated by coral and coralline algal fragments with subordinate molluskan and echinoderm debris. The accumulations can be grouped into the following major facies: (1) coral framestone and coralline algal/serpulid boundstone, (2) submarine sand sheets, (3) subaerial coral storm ridges, (4-) peritidal to subtidal shingle and rubble veneers composed of dominantly coral debris, and (5) eolian dunes and beach sand. The Holocene sediment is a thin (< 2 m) veneer on the Pleistocene reef platform, which is emergent as small islands. The Pleistocene platform is composed of reef facies that can be directly related to the Holocene sediments. The platform is composed of framestone and boundstone facies (corals and coralline algal/serpulid facies), rudstones (submarine coral rubble facies), planar-bedded skeletal grainstones dipping 12-13{degree} (submarine sand sheet and peritidal shingle facies), and large 15-m-high eolianite dunes (eolian dune facies).

  13. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dataset: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic...

  14. Sedimentologic succession of uplifted coral community, Urvina Bay, Isabela Island, Galapagos Archipelago, Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colgan, M.W.; Hollander, D.

    1987-05-01

    In March 1954, along the west-central coast of Isabela Island, an upward movement of magma suddenly raised Urvina Bay over 6 m and exposed several square kilometers of carbonate deposits covering a young aa lava flow (around 1000 years old). Results from 6 transect lines across the uplift, 30 cores, and 10 trenches describe the sedimentologic and ecologic transition from barren basalt to diverse carbonate sediments with small coral reefs. Along horizontal transects spanning from 0 to 7 m paleowater depth, there is a seaward progression from beaches, mangroves, and basalt to thick deposits (> 1.6 m) of carbonate sands and small coral reefs. Variation in water depth, degree of wave exposure, and irregularity of the aa lava topography provided many microhabitats where coral, calcareous algae, and mollusks settled and grew. Eight hermatypic coral species are found throughout the shelf, and three species (i.e., Pavona clavus, Pocillopora damicornis, and Porites lobata) produced five small, isolated, monospecific, coral-reef frameworks. The vertical section seen in cores and trenches shows that calcium carbonate increased upward, whereas volcanic sediments decreased; however, episodic layers occur with high concentrations of basaltic sands. In vertical samples from the central portion of the shelf, the coral population changed from small, isolated colonies of Psammocora (Plesioseris) superficalis near the basalt basement to large reef-forming colonies of Pocillopora damicornis farther upsection. Reefs of the Galapagos Islands are small and less diverse than most Pacific reefs. Nonetheless, understanding their temporal successional development should throw light on the origin and history of larger oceanic reefs in the Pacific.

  15. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems.more » Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.« less

  16. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M; Sloan, Victoria L; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Euskirchen, Eugenie S; McGuire, A. David; Norby, Richard J; Walker, Anthony P; Warren, Jeffrey; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2015-01-01

    Arctic tundra is characterized by short-statured plant communities underlain by carbon (C)-rich soils and permafrost. Ecosystem C and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant growth in the Arctic. We synthesized available literature on tundra roots and discussed their representation in terrestrial biosphere models. Belowground biomass in tundra ecosystems can be an order of magnitude larger than aboveground biomass. Data on root production and turnover in tundra is sparse, limiting our understanding of the controls over root dynamics in these systems. Roots are shallowly distributed in the thin layer of soil that thaws each year, and are often found in the organic horizon at the soil surface. Species-specific differences in root distribution, mycorrhizal colonization, and resource partitioning may affect plant species competition under changing climatic conditions. Model representation of belowground processes has increased in complexity over recent years, but data are desperately needed to fill the gaps in model treatment of tundra roots. Future research should focus on estimates of root production and lifespan, and interactions between roots and the surrounding soil across the diversity of tundra ecosystems in the Arctic.

  17. The effect of changes in sea surface temperature on linear growth of Porites coral in Ambon Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corvianawatie, Corry Putri, Mutiara R.; Cahyarini, Sri Y.

    2015-09-30

    Coral is one of the most important organisms in the coral reef ecosystem. There are several factors affecting coral growth, one of them is changes in sea surface temperature (SST). The purpose of this research is to understand the influence of SST variability on the annual linear growth of Porites coral taken from Ambon Bay. The annual coral linear growth was calculated and compared to the annual SST from the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature version 3b (ERSST v3b) model. Coral growth was calculated by using Coral X-radiograph Density System (CoralXDS) software. Coral sample X-radiographs were used as input data. Chronology was developed by calculating the coral’s annual growth bands. A pair of high and low density banding patterns observed in the coral’s X-radiograph represent one year of coral growth. The results of this study shows that Porites coral extents from 2001-2009 and had an average growth rate of 1.46 cm/year. Statistical analysis shows that the annual coral linear growth declined by 0.015 cm/year while the annual SST declined by 0.013°C/year. SST and the annual linear growth of Porites coral in the Ambon Bay is insignificantly correlated with r=0.304 (n=9, p>0.05). This indicates that annual SST variability does not significantly influence the linear growth of Porites coral from Ambon Bay. It is suggested that sedimentation load, salinity, pH or other environmental factors may affect annual linear coral growth.

  18. Climate change: Effects on reef island resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberdorfer, J.A.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1988-06-27

    The salinity, depth, quantity, and reliability of fresh groundwater resources on coral reef islands and coastlines are environmentally important parameters. Groundwater influences or controls the terrestrial flora, salinity, and nutrient levels in the near-shore benthic environment, the rate and nature of sediment diagenesis, and the density of human habitation. Data from a number of Indo-Pacific reef islands suggest that freshwater inventory is a function of rainfall and island dimensions. A numerical model (SUTRA) has been used to simulate the responses of atoll island groundwater to changes in recharge (precipitation), sea level, and loss of island area due to flooding. The model has been calibrated for Enjebi Island, Enewetak Atoll, where a moderately permeable, water-table aquifer overlies a high-permeability formation. Total freshwater inventory is a monotonic but nonlinear function of recharge. If recharge and island area are constant, rising sea level increases the inventory of fresh water by increasing the useful volume of the aquifer above the high-permeability zone. Flooding of land area reduces the total freshwater inventory approximately in proportion to the loss of recharge area. The most significant results of the model simulation, however, are the findings that the inventory of low-salinity water (and by extrapolation, potable water) is disproportionately sensitive to changes in recharge, island dimensions, or recharge. Island freshwater resources may therefore be unexpectedly vulnerable to climate change.

  19. EA-212-D_Coral_Rescission.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Order authorizing Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (2.19 MB) More Documents & Publications Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC EA-213-A Coral Power,

  20. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-01-13

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  1. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack

  2. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  3. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in Arctic tundra soils

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David E.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Bargar, John; Janot, Noemie; Regier, Tom Z.

    2015-12-07

    Climate change is warming tundra ecosystems in the Arctic, resulting in the decomposition of previously-frozen soil organic matter (SOM) and release of carbon (C) to the atmosphere; however, the processes that control SOM decomposition and C emissions remain highly uncertain. In this study, we evaluate geochemical factors that influence anaerobic production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the active layers of four ice-wedge polygons. Surface and soil pore waters were collected during the annual thaw season over a two-year period in an area containing waterlogged, low-centered polygons and well-drained, high-centered polygons. We report spatial and seasonal patterns ofmore » dissolved gases in relation to the geochemical properties of Fe and organic C as determined using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Iron was present as Fe(II) in soil solution near the permafrost boundary but enriched as Fe(III) in the middle of the active layer, similar to dissolved aromatic-C and organic acids. Dissolved CH4 increased relative to dissolved CO2 with depth and varied with soil moisture in the middle of the active layer in patterns that were positively correlated with the proportion of dissolved Fe(III) in transitional and low-centered polygon soils but negatively correlated in the drier flat- and high-centered polygons. These results suggest that microbial-mediated Fe oxidation and reduction influence respiration/fermentation of SOM and production of substrates (e.g., low-molecular-weight organic acids) for methanogenesis. As a result, we infer that geochemical differences induced by water saturation dictate microbial products of SOM decomposition, and Fe geochemistry is an important factor regulating methanogenesis in anoxic tundra soils.« less

  4. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in Arctic tundra soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David E.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Bargar, John; Janot, Noemie; Regier, Tom Z.

    2015-12-07

    Climate change is warming tundra ecosystems in the Arctic, resulting in the decomposition of previously-frozen soil organic matter (SOM) and release of carbon (C) to the atmosphere; however, the processes that control SOM decomposition and C emissions remain highly uncertain. In this study, we evaluate geochemical factors that influence anaerobic production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the active layers of four ice-wedge polygons. Surface and soil pore waters were collected during the annual thaw season over a two-year period in an area containing waterlogged, low-centered polygons and well-drained, high-centered polygons. We report spatial and seasonal patterns of dissolved gases in relation to the geochemical properties of Fe and organic C as determined using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Iron was present as Fe(II) in soil solution near the permafrost boundary but enriched as Fe(III) in the middle of the active layer, similar to dissolved aromatic-C and organic acids. Dissolved CH4 increased relative to dissolved CO2 with depth and varied with soil moisture in the middle of the active layer in patterns that were positively correlated with the proportion of dissolved Fe(III) in transitional and low-centered polygon soils but negatively correlated in the drier flat- and high-centered polygons. These results suggest that microbial-mediated Fe oxidation and reduction influence respiration/fermentation of SOM and production of substrates (e.g., low-molecular-weight organic acids) for methanogenesis. As a result, we infer that geochemical differences induced by water saturation dictate microbial products of SOM decomposition, and Fe geochemistry is an important factor regulating methanogenesis in anoxic tundra soils.

  5. Black Coral Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coral Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Black Coral Capital Address: 55 Union Street, 3rd Floor Place: Boston, Massachusetts Zip: 02108 Region: Greater Boston Area Product:...

  6. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; et al

    2015-05-13

    The nitrate (NO3–) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO3– derived from atmospheric deposition versus that derived from microbial nitrification.

  7. EA-213 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Coral Power, LLC Order authorizing Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-213 Coral Power, LLC More Documents & Publications EA-232 OGE Energy...

  8. EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -D Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC Order rescinding the authorization of Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC More ...

  9. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Order authorizing Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (2.19 MB) More Documents & ...

  10. EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3-A Coral Canada US Inc EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc Order authorizing Coral Canada US Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc (1.63 MB) More ...

  11. EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC to export electric energy to Canada. EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC (1.48 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC EA-253-A Coral Canada ...

  12. EA-293-A Coral Energy Management, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electric energy to Canada EA-293-A Coral Energy Management, LLC (465.78 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-253-A Coral Canada ...

  13. Sedimentology and diagenesis of windward-facing fore-reef calcarenites, Late Pleistocene of Barbados, West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    Late Pleistocene reef terraces in southeastern Barbardos developed extensive fore-reef sand facies during deposition in response to high-energy windward-facing conditions. Sedimentology and diagenesis of these deposits illustrate significant contrasts with previous studies from the leeward west coast. These calcarenites are dominantly skeletal packstones with less common grainstones and wackestones present. The fore-reef sand facies occurs within progradational reef sequences, being conformably overlain by deep-water head coral facies. Medium-bedded, laterally continuous sand sheets retain original depositional slopes, dipping seaward at 10/degrees/-15/degrees/. These fore-reef deposits, in places, are over 30 m thick (average 20 m) and developed rapidly during late Pleistocene glacio-eustatic sea level highstands. Sedimentation rate ranges from 2 to 5 m/1000 years. Areal extent of fore-reef calcarenites in southeastern Barbados is estimated to be 8-10 km/sup 2/. Lithologically, the packstones are composed of an abundance of coralline red algae and the benthic foraminifer Amphistegina sp. Other volumetrically significant allochems include echinoids, mollusks, rhodoliths, peloids, and micritized grains. Micrite in the wackestone and packstone lithologies is likely derived from intense physical/mechanical abrasion of shoal-water reef facies. Diagenesis of these lithologies reflects a complex interplay of meteoric, mixing zone, and marine environments as a result of glacio-eustasy. Differences in diagenetic character are derived from differences in terrace ages, terrace geometry, a paleotopographic control on meteoric ground-water distribution, and high-energy coastal conditions. Diagenetic fabrics include equant, blocky meteoric phreatic calcite; limpid dolomite of mixing zone origin: and peloidal and isopachous fibrous cements from marine precipitation.

  14. CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund AgencyCompany Organization Australian Greenhouse Office Sector Energy...

  15. Resistance and resilience of tundra plant communities to disturbance by winter seismic vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, N.A.; Raynolds, M.K.; Jorgenson, J.C.; DuBois, K.E. )

    1992-02-01

    Effects of winter seismic exploration on arctic tundra were evaluated on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, four to five growing seasons after disturbance. Plant cover, active layer depths, and track depression were measured at plots representing major tundra plant communities and different levels of initial disturbance. Results are compared with the initial effects reported earlier. Little resilience was seen in any vegetation type, with no clearly decreasing trends in community dissimilarity. Active layer depths remained greater on plots in all nonriparian vegetation types, and most plots still had visible trails. Decreases in plant cover persisted on most plots, although a few species showed recovery or increases in cover above predisturbance level. Moist sedge-shrub tundra and dryas terraces had the largest community dissimilarities initially, showing the least resistance to high levels of winter vehicle disturbance. Community dissimilarity continued to increase for five seasons in moist sedge-shrub tundra, with species composition changing to higher sedge cover and lower shrub cover. The resilience amplitude may have been exceeded on four plots which had significant track depression.

  16. Simulation of subsurface thermal regimes of polygonal tundra at Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Richard T. Mills; Jitendra Kumar; Vladimir Romanovsky; Peter E. Thornton; Gautam Bisht; Colleen M. Iversen; Nathan Collier

    2016-01-27

    Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to atmosphere under warming climate. Ice--wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. The microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behaviour under current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites at Barrow, Alaska spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygon and representative of broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multi--phase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using high resolution LiDAR DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high resolution model mesh. Best available soil data from field observations and literature was utilized to represent the complex hetogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. This data collection provides the complete set of input files, forcing data sets and computational meshes for simulations using PFLOTRAN for four sites at Barrow Environmental Observatory. It also document the complete computational workflow for this modeling study to allow verification, reproducibility and follow up studies.

  17. AmeriFlux US-ICt Imnavait Creek Watershed Tussock Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICt Imnavait Creek Watershed Tussock Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Tussock Tundra (Biocomplexity Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Biocomplexity Station was deployed in 2004, and it has been in operation during the melt seasons ever since.

  18. AmeriFlux US-ICs Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICs Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Wet Sedge Tundra (Fen Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Fen Station was deployed at the end of Summer 2007.

  19. AmeriFlux US-ICh Imnavait Creek Watershed Heath Tundra

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bret-Harte, Syndonia [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Euskirchen, Eugenie [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-ICh Imnavait Creek Watershed Heath Tundra. Site Description - The Imnavait Creek Watershed Heath Tundra (Ridge Station) is located near Imnavait Creek in Alaska, north of the Brooks Range in the Kuparuk basin near Lake Toolik and the Toolik Field Station. The Kuparuk River has its headwaters in the Brooks Range and drains through northern Alaska into the Arctic Ocean. Within these headwaters lies the Imnavait basin at an average elevation of 930 m. Water tracks run down the hill in parallel zones with a spacing of approximately 10 m. The Ridge Station was deployed at the end of Summer 2007.

  20. Pathways of anaerobic organic matter decomposition in tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Mann, Benjamin F.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-11-23

    Arctic tundra soils store a large quantity of organic carbon that is susceptible to decomposition and release to the atmosphere as methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) under a warming climate. Anaerobic processes that generate CH4 and CO2 remain unclear because previous studies have focused on aerobic decomposition pathways. To predict releases of CO2 and CH4 from tundra soils, it is necessary to identify pathways of soil organic matter decomposition under the anoxic conditions that are prevalent in Arctic ecosystems. Here molecular and spectroscopic techniques were used to monitor biological degradation of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) during anoxic incubation ofmore » tundra soils from a region of continuous permafrost in northern Alaska. Organic and mineral soils from the tundra active layer were incubated at –2, +4, or +8°C for up to 60 days to mimic the short-term thaw season. Results suggest that, under anoxic conditions, fermentation converted complex organic molecules into simple organic acids that were used in concomitant Fe-reduction and acetoclastic methanogenesis reactions. Nonaromatic compounds increased over time as WEOC increased. Organic acid metabolites initially accumulated in soils but were mostly depleted by day 60 because organic acids were consumed to produce Fe(II), CO2, and CH4. We conclude that fermentation of nonprotected organic matter facilitates methanogenesis and Fe reduction reactions, and that the proportion of organic acids consumed by methanogenesis increases relative to Fe reduction with increasing temperature. As a result, the decomposition pathways observed in this study are important to consider in numerical modeling of greenhouse gas production in the Arctic.« less

  1. Pathways of anaerobic organic matter decomposition in tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Mann, Benjamin F.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Graham, David E.; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-11-23

    Arctic tundra soils store a large quantity of organic carbon that is susceptible to decomposition and release to the atmosphere as methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) under a warming climate. Anaerobic processes that generate CH4 and CO2 remain unclear because previous studies have focused on aerobic decomposition pathways. To predict releases of CO2 and CH4 from tundra soils, it is necessary to identify pathways of soil organic matter decomposition under the anoxic conditions that are prevalent in Arctic ecosystems. Here molecular and spectroscopic techniques were used to monitor biological degradation of water-extractable organic carbon (WEOC) during anoxic incubation of tundra soils from a region of continuous permafrost in northern Alaska. Organic and mineral soils from the tundra active layer were incubated at –2, +4, or +8°C for up to 60 days to mimic the short-term thaw season. Results suggest that, under anoxic conditions, fermentation converted complex organic molecules into simple organic acids that were used in concomitant Fe-reduction and acetoclastic methanogenesis reactions. Nonaromatic compounds increased over time as WEOC increased. Organic acid metabolites initially accumulated in soils but were mostly depleted by day 60 because organic acids were consumed to produce Fe(II), CO2, and CH4. We conclude that fermentation of nonprotected organic matter facilitates methanogenesis and Fe reduction reactions, and that the proportion of organic acids consumed by methanogenesis increases relative to Fe reduction with increasing temperature. As a result, the decomposition pathways observed in this study are important to consider in numerical modeling of greenhouse gas production in the Arctic.

  2. Dynamics of the recovery of damaged tundra vegetation: preliminary results of revegetation experiments of maritime tundra with Elymus mollis on Adak Island, Alaska. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amundsen, C C; McCord, R A

    1982-08-01

    The vegetation of the central Aleutian Islands, Alaska is maritime tundra (Amundsen, 1977). While maritime tundra is not characterized by the presence of permafrost, the soil temperatures remain low (5 to 7/sup 0/C) year-round (Williams, 1980). The low soil temperature, a high level of soil moisture, and a low level of incident solar radiation are thought to delay the development of the vegetation. Natural revegetation of natural or man made open areas is relatively slow. Disturbed areas from World War II military activity are not completely revegetated after almost 40 years. Because of the windy and wet climate of the region, exposed soil is unstable and subject to extensive freeze-thaw action and erosion. Insults to the vegetation, both marine and aeolian, are common. Successful reproduction by seed is uncommon among species of this flora. The primary means of reproduction appears to be by vegetative propagules which are usually fragments of the shoot and rhizome. While the transport of the fragments by wind and water aids in the dispersal of the propagules, the same action often removes these fragments from open areas. This later activity further delays the revegetation of open and disturbed areas. Elymus mollis Trin. is the most successful major native species found to date as it fragments due to wind and water action and transplants easily. Transplanting experiments with sprigs of Elymus mollis Trin. have been conducted on Adak Island, Alaska since 1977. Preliminary results indicate that Elymus mollis may be transplanted for revegetation with a survival rate of at least 90 percent. Experiments were set up in 1979 to determine appropriate planting density, sprig rhizome length, and best time of year for transplanting. Preliminary results for these experiments are reported here.

  3. Organic Carbon Transformation and Mercury Methylation in Tundra Soils from Barrow Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liang, L.; Wullschleger, Stan; Graham, David; Gu, B.; Yang, Ziming

    2016-04-20

    This dataset includes information on soil labile organic carbon transformation and mercury methylation for tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska. The soil cores were collected from high-centered polygon (trough) at BEO and were incubated under anaerobic laboratory conditions at both freezing and warming temperatures for up to 8 months. Soil organic carbon including reducing sugars, alcohols, and organic acids were analyzed, and CH4 and CO2 emissions were quantified. Net production of methylmercury and Fe(II)/Fe(total) ratio were also measured and provided in this dataset.

  4. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-08

    The nitrate (NO??) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO?? derived from at NO?? signal with ??N averaging 4.8 1.0 (standard error of the mean) and ??O averaging 70.2 1.7. In active layer pore waters, NO?? primarily occurred at concentrations suitable for isotopic analysis in the relatively dry and oxic centers of high-centered polygons. The average ??N and ??O of NO?? from high-centered polygons were 0.5 1.1 and 4.1 0.6, respectively. When compared to the ??N of reduced nitrogen (N) sources, and the ??O of soil pore waters, it was evident that NO?? in high-centered polygons was primarily from microbial nitrification. Permafrost NO?? had ??N ranging from approximately 6 to 10, similar to atmospheric and microbial NO??, and highly variable ??O ranging from approximately 2 to 38. Permafrost ice wedges contained a significant atmospheric component of NO??, while permafrost textural ice contained a greater proportion of microbially derived NO??. Large-scale permafrost thaw in this environment would release NO?? with a ??O signature intermediate to that of atmospheric and microbial NO?. Consequently, while atmospheric and microbial sources can be readily distinguished by the NO?? dual isotope technique in tundra environments, attribution of NO?? from thawing permafrost will not be straightforward. The NO?? isotopic signature, however, appears useful in identifying NO?? sources in extant permafrost ice.

  5. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2009-01-30

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  6. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2010-01-08

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  7. Coral Power LLC (Nevada) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Coral Power LLC Place: Nevada Phone Number: (916) 653-1097 Website: wwwcers.water.ca.govcoral.cfm Outage Hotline: (916) 653-1097 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  8. Coral Power LLC (California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coral Power LLC Place: California Phone Number: (858)- 320-1500 Outage Hotline: (858)- 320-1500 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861...

  9. Modeling the spatio-temporal variability in subsurface thermal regimes across a low-relief polygonal tundra landscape: Modeling Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Peter E. Thornton; Jitendra Kumar; Colleen M. Iversen; Richard T. Mills; Gautam Bisht; Nathan Collier; Vladimir Romanovsky

    2016-01-27

    This Modeling Archive is in support of an NGEE Arctic discussion paper under review and available at http://www.the-cryosphere-discuss.net/tc-2016-29/. Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to atmosphere under warming climate. Ice--wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. The microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behaviour under current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites at Barrow, Alaska spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygon and representative of broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multi--phase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN) was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using high resolution LiDAR DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high resolution model mesh. Best available soil data from field observations and literature was utilized to represent the complex hetogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. This data collection provides the complete set of input files, forcing data sets and computational meshes for simulations using PFLOTRAN for four sites at Barrow Environmental Observatory. It also document the complete computational workflow for this modeling study to allow verification, reproducibility and follow up studies.

  10. EA-212 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Mexico. EA-212 Coral Power, LLC (16.9 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC EA-184 Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

  11. Geohydrology of Enewetak Atoll islands and reefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buddemeier, R.W.

    1981-05-06

    Extensive tidal studies in island wells and the lagoon at Enewetak Atoll have shown that island ground water dynamics are controlled by a layered aquifer system. The surface aquifer of unconsolidated Holocene material extends to a depth of approximately 15 m, and has a hydraulic conductivity K = 60 m/day. From 15 to 60 m (approximate lagoon depth) the reef structure consists of successive layers of altered Pleistocene materials, with bulk permeability substantially higher than that of the surface aquifer. Because of wave set-up over the windward reef and the limited pass area for outflow at the south end of the atoll, lagoon tides rise in phase with the ocean tides but fall later than the ocean water level. This results in a net lagoon-to-ocean head which can act as the driving force for outflow through the permeable Pleistocene aquifer. This model suggests that fresh water, nutrients or radioactive contaminants found in island ground water or reef interstitial water may be discharged primarily into the ocean rather than the lagoon. Atoll island fresh water resources are controlled by recharge, seawater dilution due to vertical tidal mixing between the surface and deeper aquifers, and by loss due to entrainment by the outflowing water in the deeper aquifers. Estimated lagoon-ot-ocean transit times through the deep aquifer are on the order of a few years, which corresponds well to the freshwater residence time estimates based on inventory and recharge. Islands in close proximity to reef channels have more fresh ground water than others, which is consistent with a locally reduced hydraulic gradient and slower flow through the Pleistocene aquifers.

  12. Cesium-137 inventories in Alaskan Tundra, lake and marine sediments: An indicator of recent organic material transport?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Tundra sampling was accomplished in 1989--1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68{degree}37` N, 149{degree}17` W). Inventories of {sup 137}Cs (102--162 mBq/cm{sup 2}) are close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude. Accumulated inventories of {sup 137}Cs in tundra decrease by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70{degree}13` N, 148{degree}30` W). Atmospheric deposition of {sup 137}Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This suggests a recent loss of {sup 137}Cs and possibly associated organic matter from tundra over the northern portions of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. Sediments from Toolik Lake (68{degree}38` N, 149{degree}38` W) showed widely varying {sup 137}Cs inventories, from a low of 22 mBq/cm{sup 2} away from the lake inlet, to a high between 140 to >200 mBq/cm{sup 2} near the main stream inflow. This was indicative of recent accumulation of cesium and possibly organic material associated with it in arctic lakes, although additional sampling is needed.

  13. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; et al

    2015-06-08

    The nitrate (NO₃⁻) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO₃⁻ derived from at NO₃⁻ signal with δ¹⁵N averaging –4.8 ± 1.0‰ (standard error of the mean) and δ¹⁸O averaging 70.2 ±1.7‰. In active layer pore waters, NO₃⁻ primarily occurred at concentrations suitable for isotopic analysis in the relatively dry and oxic centers of high-centered polygons. The average δ¹⁵N and δ¹⁸O of NO₃⁻ from high-centered polygons were 0.5 ± 1.1‰ and –4.1 ± 0.6‰, respectively. When compared to the δ¹⁵N of reduced nitrogen (N) sources,more » and the δ¹⁸O of soil pore waters, it was evident that NO₃⁻ in high-centered polygons was primarily from microbial nitrification. Permafrost NO₃⁻ had δ¹⁵N ranging from approximately –6‰ to 10‰, similar to atmospheric and microbial NO₃⁻, and highly variable δ¹⁸O ranging from approximately –2‰ to 38‰. Permafrost ice wedges contained a significant atmospheric component of NO₃⁻, while permafrost textural ice contained a greater proportion of microbially derived NO₃⁻. Large-scale permafrost thaw in this environment would release NO₃⁻ with a δ¹⁸O signature intermediate to that of atmospheric and microbial NO₃. Consequently, while atmospheric and microbial sources can be readily distinguished by the NO₃⁻ dual isotope technique in tundra environments, attribution of NO₃⁻ from thawing permafrost will not be straightforward. The NO₃⁻ isotopic signature, however, appears useful in identifying NO₃⁻ sources in extant permafrost ice.« less

  14. Isotopic identification of soil and permafrost nitrate sources in an Arctic tundra ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Throckmorton, Heather M.; Newman, Brent D.; Perkins, George B.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Chowdhury, Taniya Roy; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Graham, David E.; Norby, Richard J.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-08

    The nitrate (NO₃⁻) dual isotope approach was applied to snowmelt, tundra active layer pore waters, and underlying permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, USA, to distinguish between NO₃⁻ derived from at NO₃⁻ signal with δ¹⁵N averaging –4.8 ± 1.0‰ (standard error of the mean) and δ¹⁸O averaging 70.2 ±1.7‰. In active layer pore waters, NO₃⁻ primarily occurred at concentrations suitable for isotopic analysis in the relatively dry and oxic centers of high-centered polygons. The average δ¹⁵N and δ¹⁸O of NO₃⁻ from high-centered polygons were 0.5 ± 1.1‰ and –4.1 ± 0.6‰, respectively. When compared to the δ¹⁵N of reduced nitrogen (N) sources, and the δ¹⁸O of soil pore waters, it was evident that NO₃⁻ in high-centered polygons was primarily from microbial nitrification. Permafrost NO₃⁻ had δ¹⁵N ranging from approximately –6‰ to 10‰, similar to atmospheric and microbial NO₃⁻, and highly variable δ¹⁸O ranging from approximately –2‰ to 38‰. Permafrost ice wedges contained a significant atmospheric component of NO₃⁻, while permafrost textural ice contained a greater proportion of microbially derived NO₃⁻. Large-scale permafrost thaw in this environment would release NO₃⁻ with a δ¹⁸O signature intermediate to that of atmospheric and microbial NO₃. Consequently, while atmospheric and microbial sources can be readily distinguished by the NO₃⁻ dual isotope technique in tundra environments, attribution of NO₃⁻ from thawing permafrost will not be straightforward. The NO₃⁻ isotopic signature, however, appears useful in identifying NO₃⁻ sources in extant permafrost ice.

  15. Effect of shading by the table coral Acropora Hyacinthus on understory corals. [Acropora; Pocillopora

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimson, J.

    1985-02-01

    Field surveys at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, show that coral density and diversity is much lower beneath Acropora table corals than in adjacent unshaded areas. Additionally, the understory community is predominantly composed of massive and encrusting species, while branching Acropora and Pocillopora predominate in unshaded areas. Results of experiments in which coral fragments were transferred to the shade of table Acropora and to adjacent unshaded areas show that shading slows the growth and leads to higher mortality of branching species, while massive and encrusting species are unaffected. Light measurements made beneath table Acropora show that illumination and irradiance values fall to levels at which most hermatypic corals do not occur. The fast-growing but fragile table Acropora are abundant in a wide variety of atoll habitats and grow rapidly to form a canopy approx. = 50 cm above the substrate. However, table Acropora also have high mortality rates, so that there is continuous production of unshaded areas. The growth and death of tables thus create local disturbances, and the resulting patchwork of recently shaded and unshaded areas may enhance coral diversity in areas of high coral cover.

  16. Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) The Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) is a joint procurement activity among three of the Department of Energy's National Laboratories launched in 2014 to build state-of-the-art high-performance computing technologies that are essential for supporting U.S. national nuclear security and are key tools used for

  17. Coral Gables, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coral Gables, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.72149, -80.2683838 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  18. Press Materials for Argonne CORAL announcement | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Livermore (CORAL) initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy announced a 200 million investment to deliver a next-generation supercomputer, known as Aurora, to the Argonne...

  19. Apparatus for simultaneously disreefing a centrally reefed clustered parachute system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    A single multi-line cutter is connected to each of a cluster of parachutes by a separate short tether line that holds the parachutes, initially reefed by closed loop reefing lines, close to one another. The closed loop reefing lines and tether lines, one from each parachute, are disposed within the cutter to be simultaneously cut by its actuation when a central line attached between the payload and the cutter is stretched upon deployment of the cluster. A pyrotechnic or electronic time delay may be included in the cutter to delay the actual simultaneous cutting of all lines until the clustered parachutes attain a measure of stability prior to being disreefed. A second set of reefing lines and second tether lines may be provided for each parachute, to enable a two-stage, separately timed, step-by-step disreefing.

  20. Apparatus for simultaneously disreefing a centrally reefed clustered parachute system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, D.W.

    1988-06-21

    A single multi-line cutter is connected to each of a cluster of parachutes by a separate short tether line that holds the parachutes, initially reefed by closed loop reefing lines, close to one another. The closed loop reefing lines and tether lines, one from each parachute, are disposed within the cutter to be simultaneously cut by its actuation when a central line attached between the payload and the cutter is stretched upon deployment of the cluster. A pyrotechnic or electronic time delay may be included in the cutter to delay the actual simultaneous cutting of all lines until the clustered parachutes attain a measure of stability prior to being disreefed. A second set of reefing lines and second tether lines may be provided for each parachute, to enable a two-stage, separately timed, step-by-step disreefing. 13 figs.

  1. EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC (18.43 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-212 Coral Power, LLC EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C

  2. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC | Department of Energy export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC:

  3. Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings May 18, 2011 - 4:32pm Addthis Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. |

  4. Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in Scleractinia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl,Jennifer; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Hexacorallia includes the Scleractinia, or stony corals, characterized by having an external calcareous skeleton made of aragonite, and the Corallimorpharia, or mushroom corals, that lack such a skeleton. Although each group has traditionally been considered monophyletic, some molecular phylogenetic analyses have challenged this, suggesting that skeletal features are evolutionarily plastic, and reviving notions that the scleractinian skeleton may be ephemeral and that the group itself may be polyphyletic. Nevertheless, the most comprehensive phylogenetic study of Hexacorallia supported scleractinian monophyly (REF), and so this remains controversial. In order to resolve this contentious issue, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of nine scleractinians and four corallimorpharians and performed phylogenetic analysis that also included three outgroups (an octocoral and two sea anemones). Our data provide the first strong evidence that Scleractinia is paraphyletic and that the Corallimorpharia is derived from within the group, from which we conclude that skeletal loss has occurred in the latter group secondarily. It is possible that a driving force in such skeletal loss could be the high levels of CO{sub 2} in the ocean during the mid-Cretaceous, which would have impacted aragonite solubility. We estimate from molecular divergence measures that the Corallimorpharia arose in the mid-Cretaceous, approximately 87 million years ago (Ma), supporting this view. These data also permit us to date the origin of Scleractinia to 265 Ma, narrowing the gap between the group's phylogenetic origin and its earliest fossil record.

  5. Coral Terrace, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Coral Terrace is a census-designated place in Miami-Dade County, Florida.1 References ...

  6. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2004-07-01

    Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. We began injecting CO2 in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well on May 6, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in three reefs, the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, and Dover 35 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshop, Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, and Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting. A technical paper was submitted to the Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

  7. Response of a tundra ecosytem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990-94 growing season (June-August) to determine the local and regional patterns, of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993-94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993-94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990-91 growing seasons. Measurements were made on small (e.g. 0.5 m{sup 2}) plots using a portable gas-exchange system and cuvette. The sample design allowed frequent measurements of net CO{sub 2} exchange and respiration over diurnal and seasonal cycles, and a large spatial extent that incorporated both locally and regionally diverse tundra surface types. Measurements both within and between ecosystem types typically extended over soil water table depth and temperature gradients, allowing for the indirect analysis of the effects of anticipated climate change scenarios on net CO{sub 2} exchange. In situ experiments provided a direct means for testing hypotheses.

  8. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1996-11-01

    The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

  9. InSAR Detection and Field Evidence for Thermokarst after a Tundra Wildfire, Using ALOS-PALSAR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Iwahana, Go; Uchida, Masao; Liu, Lin; Gong, Wenyu; Meyer, Franz; Guritz, Richard; Yamanokuchi, Tsutomu; Hinzman, Larry

    2016-03-08

    Thermokarst is the process of ground subsidence caused by either the thawing of ice-rich permafrost or the melting of massive ground ice. The consequences of permafrost degradation associated with thermokarst for surface ecology, landscape evolution, and hydrological processes have been of great scientific interest and social concern. Part of a tundra patch affected by wildfire in northern Alaska (27.5 km2) was investigated here, using remote sensing and in situ surveys to quantify and understand permafrost thaw dynamics after surface disturbances. A two-pass differential InSAR technique using L-band ALOS-PALSAR has been shown capable of capturing thermokarst subsidence triggered by a tundramore » fire at a spatial resolution of tens of meters, with supporting evidence from field data and optical satellite images. We have introduced a calibration procedure, comparing burned and unburned areas for InSAR subsidence signals, to remove the noise due to seasonal surface movement. In the first year after the fire, an average subsidence rate of 6.2 cm/year (vertical) was measured. Subsidence in the burned area continued over the following two years, with decreased rates. The mean rate of subsidence observed in our interferograms (from 24 July 2008 to 14 September 2010) was 3.3 cm/year, a value comparable to that estimated from field surveys at two plots on average (2.2 cm/year) for the six years after the fire. These results suggest that this InSAR-measured ground subsidence is caused by the development of thermokarst, a thawing process supported by surface change observations from high-resolution optical images and in situ ground level surveys.« less

  10. Effects of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics of tundra and riparian vegetation: A project in the R4D program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Models were proposed as research tools to test the basic understanding of the structure and function of arctic ecosystems, as a means for providing initial management assessments of potential response to energy-related development, and as a vehicle for extrapolation of research results to other arctic sites and landscapes. This final summary report reviews progress made on models at a variety of scales from nutrient uptake by individual roots to nutrient availability within arctic landscapes, and examines potentials and critical limitations of these models for providing insight on patch and landscape level function in tundra regions.

  11. 2015 DOE Final UF Report. Effects of Warming the Deep Soil and Permafrost on Ecosystem Carbon Balance in Alaskan Tundra. A Coupled Measurement and Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuur, Edward

    2015-06-11

    The major research goal of this project was to understand and quantify the fate of carbon stored in permafrost ecosystems using a combination of field and laboratory experiments to measure isotope ratios and C fluxes in a tundra ecosystem exposed to experimental warming. Field measurements centered on the establishment of a two-factor experimental warming using a snow fence and open top chambers to increase winter and summer temperatures alone, and in combination, at a tundra field site at the Eight Mile Lake watershed near Healy, Alaska. The objective of this experimental warming was to significantly raise air and deep soil temperatures and increase the depth of thaw beyond that of previous warming experiments. Detecting the loss and fate of the old permafrost C pool remains a major challenge. Because soil C has been accumulating in these ecosystems over the past 10,000 years, there is a strong difference between the radiocarbon isotopic composition of C deep in the soil profile and permafrost compared to that near the soil surface. This large range of isotopic variability is unique to radiocarbon and provides a valuable and sensitive fingerprint for detecting the loss of old soil C as permafrost thaws.

  12. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 | Department of Energy export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice Vol 72 No 118 EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC (51.25 KB)

  13. CORAL Fact Sheet__FINAL AS ISSUED_UPDATED

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact S heet: Collaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) The C ollaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) i s a j oint p rocurement activity a mong t hree o f t he D epartment o f E nergy's N ational L aboratories launched i n 2 014 to b uild s tate---of---the---art h igh---performance c omputing t echnologies t hat a re e ssential f or supporting U.S. national nuclear security a nd a re k ey t ools u sed f or t echnology advancement a nd s cientific

  14. Temperature and vital effect controls on Bamboo coral (Isididae) isotopegeochemistry: A test of the "lines method"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, T M; Spero, H J; Guilderson, T P; LaVigne, M; Clague, D; Macalello, S; Jang, N

    2011-03-01

    Deep-sea bamboo corals hold promise as long-term climatic archives, yet little information exists linking bamboo coral geochemistry to measured environmental parameters. This study focuses on a suite of 10 bamboo corals collected from the Pacific and Atlantic basins (250-2136 m water depth) to investigate coral longevity, growth rates, and isotopic signatures. Calcite samples for stable isotopes and radiocarbon were collected from the base the corals, where the entire history of growth is recorded. In three of the coral specimens, samples were also taken from an upper branch for comparison. Radiocarbon and growth band width analyses indicate that the skeletal calcite precipitates from ambient dissolved inorganic carbon and that the corals live for 150-300 years, with extension rates of 9-128 {micro}m/yr. A linear relationship between coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C indicates that the isotopic composition is influenced by vital effects ({delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope of 0.17-0.47). As with scleractinian deep-sea corals, the intercept from a linear regression of {delta}{sup 18}O versus {delta}{sup 13}C is a function of temperature, such that a reliable paleotemperature proxy can be obtained, using the 'lines method.' Although the coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope is maintained throughout the coral base ontogeny, the branches and central cores of the bases exhibit {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C values that are shifted far from equilibrium. We find that a reliable intercept value can be derived from the {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C regression of multiple samples distributed throughout one specimen or from multiple samples within individual growth bands.

  15. A reduced order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for regional- and climate-scale land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-04-04

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometer scale (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a particular reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "Proper Orthogonal Decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally-resolvedmore » fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We applied this technique to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface-subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the four study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (< 0.1%) for two validation years not used in training the ROM. We also demonstrated that our approach: (1) efficiently corrects for coarse-resolution model bias and (2) can be used for polygonal tundra sites not included in the training dataset with relatively good accuracy (< 1.5% relative error), thereby allowing for the possibility of applying these ROMs across a much larger landscape. This method has the potential to efficiently increase the resolution of land models for coupled climate simulations, allowing LSMs to be used at spatial scales consistent with

  16. A reduced-order modeling approach to represent subgrid-scale hydrological dynamics for land-surface simulations: application in a polygonal tundra landscape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pau, G. S. H.; Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.

    2014-09-17

    Existing land surface models (LSMs) describe physical and biological processes that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. For example, biogeochemical and hydrological processes responsible for carbon (CO2, CH4) exchanges with the atmosphere range from the molecular scale (pore-scale O2 consumption) to tens of kilometers (vegetation distribution, river networks). Additionally, many processes within LSMs are nonlinearly coupled (e.g., methane production and soil moisture dynamics), and therefore simple linear upscaling techniques can result in large prediction error. In this paper we applied a reduced-order modeling (ROM) technique known as "proper orthogonal decomposition mapping method" that reconstructs temporally resolvedmore » fine-resolution solutions based on coarse-resolution solutions. We developed four different methods and applied them to four study sites in a polygonal tundra landscape near Barrow, Alaska. Coupled surface–subsurface isothermal simulations were performed for summer months (June–September) at fine (0.25 m) and coarse (8 m) horizontal resolutions. We used simulation results from three summer seasons (1998–2000) to build ROMs of the 4-D soil moisture field for the study sites individually (single-site) and aggregated (multi-site). The results indicate that the ROM produced a significant computational speedup (> 103) with very small relative approximation error (< 0.1%) for 2 validation years not used in training the ROM. We also demonstrate that our approach: (1) efficiently corrects for coarse-resolution model bias and (2) can be used for polygonal tundra sites not included in the training data set with relatively good accuracy (< 1.7% relative error), thereby allowing for the possibility of applying these ROMs across a much larger landscape. By coupling the ROMs constructed at different scales together hierarchically, this method has the potential to efficiently increase the resolution of land models for coupled

  17. IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. quinlan; A. Wylie

    2006-06-01

    Recycled CO2 is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO2 injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and has produced at an average rate of 61 BOPD (Jan-Dec, 2005). The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 29 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO2 injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO2 injection volume has reached approximately 2.18 BCF. The CO2 injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been stabilized at an average rate of 57 BOPD (July-Dec, 2005). Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization was completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves are showing trends that indicate significant

  18. Implementing A Novel Cyclic CO2 Flood In Paleozoic Reefs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

    2005-03-31

    Recycled CO{sub 2} is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO{sub 2} injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and is presently producing 52 BOPD. The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 21 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO{sub 2} injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO{sub 2} injection volume has reached approximately 1.6 BCF. The CO{sub 2} injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been successfully increased to a stable rate of 73 BOPD. Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant

  19. Radiocarbon-Based Ages and Growth Rates of Bamboo Corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Flood-Page, S; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L; Fallon, S J; McCulloch, M

    2004-12-12

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present {Delta}{sup 14}C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletal carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.

  20. Subaerial exposure and erosion in Capitan reef (Permian), Guadalupe Mountains, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melim, L.A.; Scholle, P.A.

    1989-03-01

    A prominent subaerial exposure surface has been identified within the Capitan reef in Rattlesnake Canyon. Equivalent to the middle Yates interval in the back reef, the exposure surface records planation of the reef during a sea level drop to below the shelf edge. This is the first exposure surface recorded within the reef, although several are known within the back reef facies. The surface is quite planar and can be traced shelfward for nearly 1 km before it is lost in near-back reef grainstones. The surface does not appear to correlate directly with one of the Yates sandstone beds. Channels cut into the surface have a maximum relief of nearly 2 m. Gypsum molds (now calcite filled) and mud cracks are found in the channel-filling sands. In nonchannel areas, a thin (1 to 5-cm) zone of reddened pebbles is sometimes present. Although the exposure horizon has only a thin sediment veneer, the extensive truncation of the underlying beds implies significant sediment transport across the surface. This is presumably reflected in one of several prominent clastic lowstand wedges found in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Delaware basin.

  1. Regional distribution and chemical characterization of Permian Capitan fore-reef slope dolomite: Implications for paleohydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melim, L.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Dolomitized fore-reef slope facies recently have become significant targets for petroleum exploration in the Permian basin and elsewhere. Despite this, very little is known about the dolomitization process that largely controls porosity distribution in this facies. An integrated field, petrographic, and geochemical study has been conducted in the fore-reef slope strata of the Permian Capitan Formation to provide insight into this problem. Dolomitization of the Capitan fore-reef slope facies ranges from 0 to 100%. Regionally, the variation is related to stratigraphic age, with older forereef slope facies more dolomitized than younger facies. This generalization is consistent throughout the Guadalupe Mountains and appears to continue into the subsurface. On a local scale, more permeable beds were the first dolomitized, and within these, dolomitization decreases downslope. In the Capitan reef facies, dolomitization is restricted to vertical karst breccia pipes and other zones of high primary porosity. The majority of Capitan dolomite is finely crystalline (5-30 {mu}) with average {delta}{sup 18}O = 0.9 and {delta}{sup 13}C = 5.9. A second coarser (130-{mu}) dolomite generation is also present but is not as volumetrically important. The relative positive (for the Late Permian) {delta}{sup 18}O values indicates an evaporitively concentrated dolomitizing fluid. The most likely paleohydrologic model for the main phase of forereef slope dolomitization calls for descending hypersaline brines passing through the reef facies in vertical karst breccia pipes and then following permeable beds down the foreslope. Several sources are possible for these brines, with the most likely being the hypersaline back-reef lagoonal environment.

  2. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voolstra, Christian R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Matz, Mikhail V.; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M.; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Monica

    2011-01-31

    Background: Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. Methodology/Principal Findings: We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7percent of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineagespecific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Conclusion/Relevance: This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals? evolutionary response to global climate change.

  3. Effect of warming on the degradation and production of low-molecular-weight labile organic carbon in an Arctic tundra soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ziming; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Liang, Liyuan; Graham, David E.; Gu, Baohua

    2016-01-16

    The fate of soil organic carbon (SOC) stored in the Arctic permafrost is a key concern as temperatures continue to rise in the northern hemisphere. Studies and conceptual models suggest that SOC degradation is affected by the composition of SOC, but it is unclear exactly what portions of SOC are vulnerable to rapid breakdown and what mechanisms may be controlling SOC degradation upon permafrost thaw. Here, we examine the dynamic consumption and production of labile SOC in an anoxic incubation experiment using soil samples from the active layer at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska, USA. Free-reducing sugars, alcohols, andmore » low-molecular-weight (LMW) organic acids were analyzed during incubation at either –2 or 8 °C for up to 240 days. Results show that simple sugar and alcohol SOC largely account for the initial rapid release of CO2 and CH4 through anaerobic fermentation, whereas the fermentation products, acetate and formate, are subsequently utilized as primary substrates for methanogenesis. Iron(III) reduction is correlated to acetate production and methanogenesis, suggesting its important role as an electron acceptor in tundra SOC respiration. These observations are further supported in a glucose addition experiment, in which rapid CO2 and CH4 production occurred concurrently with rapid production and consumption of labile organics such as acetate. However, addition of tannic acid, as a more complex organic substrate, showed little influence on the overall production of CO2 and CH4 and organic acids. Together our study shows that LMW labile organics in SOC control the initial rapid release of green-house gases upon warming. We thus present a conceptual framework for the labile SOC transformations and their relations to fermentation, iron reduction and methanogenesis, thereby providing the basis for improved model prediction of climate feedbacks in the Arctic.« less

  4. An application utilizing horizontal re-entries versus waterflooding for depleting a mid-life Niagaran Reef

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pieters, D.A.; Pearce, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    Waterflooding has been the preferred secondary recovery technique for mid-life Michigan Niagaran reefs that were large enough to economically warrant it. Since these pinnacle reefs average 50-550 acres, the success in waterflooding such a limited space has been a hit or miss proposition depending on the pinpoint accuracy in locating injector and producer. This paper presents a case history for the Colfax 25 reef where five horizontal drainholes were positioned across the field in a pattern to access and drain all areas of the reservoir. This particular reef was chosen based on identified incremental reserves, areal extent and on past production history which displayed reservoir characteristics that were favorable for horizontal wells. The application was tremendously successful. Production in all wells doubled as gas oil ratios were significantly reduced. Start-up costs were slightly below those of a conventional water flood and operating costs were substantially lower than would be incurred for a waterflood.

  5. Intra-annual variability of the radiocarbon content of corals from the Galapagos Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.A. Geophysics Program AK-50, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA ); Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H. ); Grootes, P.M. Quatenary Isotope Lab. AK-60, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA ); Stuiver, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors report AMS [sup 14]C measurements on sub annual samples of coral from the Galapagos Islands that span the period, 1970-1973. Both the major 1972 El Nino/Southern Oscillation event and intra-annual changes in regional upwelling of [sup 14]C-depleted waters associated with alternation of surface-ocean current patterns are evident in the record. These data show that the corals preserve a detailed record of past intra-annual variations of the [sup 14]C content of surface ocean water.

  6. Planning and management of the Nido Reef Complex Oil Field development, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry, R.Y.

    1981-01-01

    As Operator for the Northeast Palawan consortium, Philippines-Cities Service, Inc., commenced the Philippines first commercial offshore oil production from the Nido Reef Complex Oil Field on February 1, 1979, some 11 months after a decision by management to start development. The relative speed at which design, fabrication, and construction were accomplished is attributed to the use of the concepts of project planning, task force approach, and project management. This paper presents the above concepts as applied to the Nido Complex.

  7. Test results on the Frenchman's Reef Solar Data Acquisition and Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-15

    The test procedures and the results obtained are described from an evaluation test program conducted on the Frenchman's Reef Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS), Sunlogger Model 10000-1, produced by Andover Controls Corporation. The purpose of the test program was to verify the accuracy of control functions and to determine the performance of the system in the environment of the planned installation site.

  8. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kimball, J.; Tripati, R. E.; Dunbar, R.

    2015-12-04

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzedmorein CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as ?47 values. We analyzed ?47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured ?47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between ?47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between ?47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct ?47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset between the corals

  9. EECBG Success Story: Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The city of Cape Coral, Florida -- a town of located on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico -- is using funding from the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program to help reduce the city’s energy use by 40% over the next 15 years. Learn more.

  10. Reconstruction of deglacial sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific from selective analysis of a fossil coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, N.; Finch, A.A.; Tudhope, A.W.; Newville, M.; Sutton, S.R.; Ellam, R.M.

    2010-07-13

    The Sr/Ca of coral skeletons demonstrates potential as an indicator of sea surface temperatures (SSTs). However, the glacial-interglacial SST ranges predicted from Sr/Ca of fossil corals are usually higher than from other marine proxies. We observed infilling of secondary aragonite, characterized by high Sr/Ca ratios, along intraskeletal pores of a fossil coral from Papua New Guinea that grew during the penultimate deglaciation (130 {+-} 2 ka). Selective microanalysis of unaltered areas of the fossil coral indicates that SSTs at {approx}130 ka were {le} 1 C cooler than at present in contrast with bulk measurements (combining infilled and unaltered areas) which indicate a difference of 6-7 C. The analysis of unaltered areas of fossil skeletons by microprobe techniques may offer a route to more accurate reconstruction of past SSTs.

  11. Blast induced subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests over coral

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Glenn, H.D.; Bryan, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site and elsewhere. Attempts to account for the differences quantitatively have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of coral-like Au/ZnO catalyst and photocatalytic degradation of Orange II dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.K.; Lee, G.J.; Davies, S.H.; Masten, S.J.; Amutha, R.; Wu, J.J.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ? Coral-like Au/ZnO was successfully prepared using green synthetic method. ? Gold nanoparticles were deposited on the ZnO structure using NaBH{sub 4} and ?-D-glucose. ? Coral-like Au/ZnO exhibited superior photocatalytic activity to degrade Orange II. - Abstract: A porous coral-like zinc oxide (c-ZnO) photocatalyst was synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The coral-like structure was obtained by precipitating Zn{sub 4}(CO{sub 3})(OH){sub 6}H{sub 2}O (ZnCH), which forms nanosheets that aggregate together to form microspheres with the coral-like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicate that after heating at 550 C the ZnCH microspheres can be converted to ZnO microspheres with a morphology similar to that of ZnCH microspheres. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows this conversion takes place at approximately 260 C. A simple electrostatic self-assembly method has been employed to uniformly disperse Au nanoparticles (1 wt.%) on the ZnO surface. In this procedure ?-D-glucose was used to stabilize the Au nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscope images indicate that the diameter of coral-like ZnO microspheres (c-ZnO) is about 8 ?m. X-ray diffraction reveals that the ZnO is highly crystalline with a wurtzite structure and the Au metallic particles have an average size of about 13 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies have confirmed the presence of ZnO and also showed that the Au is present in the metallic state. The photocatalytic degradation of Orange II dye, with either ultraviolet or visible light, is faster on Au/c-ZnO than on c-ZnO.

  13. Significance of cyclic Pennsylvanian-Permian coral/algal buildups Snaky Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, K.L. ); Isaacson, P.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Five cyclic algal, hydrozoan, and coral buildups occur within a thick sequence of Pennsylvanian-Permian (Virgilian through Wolfcampain) carbonates in south-central Idaho. The Juniper Gulch Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation, as described by Skipp and coworkers, is approximately 600 m thick and contains four depositional facies, including: (1) open circulation outer( ) platform, (2) hydrozoan and phylloid algal mound-dominated carbonate buildup, (3) backmound, restricted platform/lagoon, and (4) restricted inner platform facies. Several microlithofacies, including lime mud-rich bafflestone, diversely fossiliferous packstone and grainstone, bryozoan lime floatstone, and phylloid algal and hydrozoan (Palaeoaplysina) lime bindstone are described within the phylloid algal mounds. Successional faunal assemblage stages are recognized within the buildups. Colonial rugose corals comprise a stabilization stage. When the algal communities of the diversification stage reached wave base, because of their rapid upward growth, cross-bedded oolitic grainstone and occasional cross-bedded dolomite shoals developed. Supratidal to high intertidal platform sedimentation is represented by dolomitic Palaeoaplysina bindstone, algal mat bindstone, and vuggy dolomite. Five vertical sequences of buildup development, each terminate by intertidal, supratidal, or erosional events, are seen in the Juniper Gulch Member in the North Howe stratigraphic section of the southern Lost River Range. The carbonate platform was constructed within a depositional basin that includes an eroded highland to the west, and a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate inner platform with craton uplifts to the east.

  14. Executive Order 13031-Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Executive Order 12969-Federal Acquisition and Community RightTo-Know EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL ...

  15. Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Executive Order 13158-Marine Protected Areas More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection ARPA-E Technical Support Memo Appendices Microsoft Word - ...

  16. CORAL: a stepping stone for establishing the Indian fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkataraman, M.; Natarajan, R.; Raj, Baldev

    2007-07-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) has been successfully demonstrated in the pilot plant, CORAL (COmpact Reprocessing facility for Advanced fuels in Lead shielded cell). Since commissioning in 2003, spent mixed carbide fuel from FBTR of different burnups and varying cooling period, have been reprocessed in this facility. Reprocessing of the spent fuel with a maximum burnup of 100 GWd/t has been successfully carried out so far. The feed backs from these campaigns with progressively increasing specific activities, have been useful in establishing a viable process flowsheet for reprocessing the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) spent fuel. Also, the design of various equipments and processes for the future plants, which are either under design for construction, namely, the Demonstration Fast Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (DFRP) and the Fast reactor fuel Reprocessing Plant (FRP) could be finalized. (authors)

  17. Reservoir performance of a gravity-stable, vertical CO[sub 2] miscible flood: Wolfcamp reef reservoir, Wellman Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bangia, V.K.; Yau, F.F.; Hendricks, G.R. )

    1993-11-01

    A gravity-stable, vertical CO[sub 2] miscible flood was implemented in the Wellman Unit Wolfcamp reef reservoir in 1983. CO[sub 2] was injected into the crest of the reservoir to displace the oil vertically downward, and water was injected into the lower water-swept region of the reservoir to maintain reservoir pressure at slightly above the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP). Excellent production response to increased CO[sub 2] injection was observed. The reservoir performance was encouraging and indicated excellent volumetric conformance and ultimate recovery. This paper reviews the operating strategy and project performance from inception through mid-1991.

  18. Decadal- to interannual-scale source water variations in the Caribbean Sea recorded by Puerto Rican coral radiocarbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilbourne, K H; Quinn, T M; Guilderson, T P; Webb, R S; Taylor, F W

    2006-12-05

    Water that forms the Florida Current, and eventually the Gulf Stream, coalesces in the Caribbean from both subtropical and equatorial sources. The equatorial sources are made up of, in part, South Atlantic water moving northward and compensating for southward flow at depth related to meridional overturning circulation. Subtropical surface water contains relatively high amounts of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), whereas equatorial waters are influenced by the upwelling of low {sup 14}C water and have relatively low concentrations of {sup 14}C. We use a 250-year record of {Delta}{sup 14}C in a coral from southwestern Puerto Rico along with previously published coral {Delta}{sup 14}C records as tracers of subtropical and equatorial water mixing in the northern Caribbean. Data generated in this study and from other studies indicate that the influence of either of the two water masses can change considerably on interannual to interdecadal time scales. Variability due to ocean dynamics in this region is large relative to variability caused by atmospheric {sup 14}C changes, thus masking the Suess effect at this site. A mixing model produced using coral {Delta}{sup 14}C illustrates the time varying proportion of equatorial versus subtropical waters in the northern Caribbean between 1963 and 1983. The results of the model are consistent with linkages between multidecadal thermal variability in the North Atlantic and meridional overturning circulation. Ekman transport changes related to tradewind variability are proposed as a possible mechanism to explain the observed switches between relatively low and relatively high {Delta}{sup 14}C values in the coral radiocarbon records.

  19. Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

    2008-04-23

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

  20. Microsoft Word - Tundra Activity2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    each category is: lichen, shrub, and caribou. 2. As an extension, find the Iupiat translation for at least ten words on your chart. 3. Over the next few days, go outside and...

  1. A new species of antipatharian coral (Cnidaria: Anthozoa: Antipatharia: Schizopathidae) from the Pacific coast of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opresko, Dennis M; Breedy, Odalisca

    2010-09-01

    A new species of black coral, Aphanipathes colombiana (Cnidaria:Antipatharia) from the Caribbean coast of Colombia is described. The species forms small flabellate colonies with anisomorphic polypar spines. It is morphologically similar to the western Atlantic species A. thyoides (Pourtales) but its hypostomal polypar spines are not reduced in size. The new species also resembles the Indo-Pacific species A. reticulata van Pesch but it has smooth-surfaced polypar spines, whereas in A. reticulata these spines have small tubercles on their surface

  2. Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

  3. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and

  4. Silicification of evaporites in Permian (Guadalupian) back-reef carbonates of the Delaware basin, west Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmer-Scholle, D.; Scholle, P.A.; Brady, P.V. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1993-09-01

    Outcrops of the Seven Rivers, Yates, and Tansill Formations contain widespread evaporites replaced by quartz and calcite. The original evaporites consisted of discrete horizons, scattered nodules, enterolithic layers, and individual crystals or crystal fragments of gypsum and/or anhydrite within a finely crystalline dolomite matrix. The fluid inclusions in the replacive megaquartz are primary,and many contain both hydrocarbons and water. Daughter minerals of halite, gypsum, or possibly antarcticite (CaCl[sub 2] [center dot] 6H[sub 2]O) are also found within the aqueous inclusions. Homogenization-temperature data for hydrocarbon and aqueous fluid inclusions average 67.7C and 67.1C, respectively. Hydrocarbon-bearing and aqueous inclusions are thus interpreted to have formed simultaneously from the same fluids. Eutectic melting and final melting temperatures for aqueous inclusions indicate that the fluids were concentrated brines consisting of CaCl[sub 2] and NaCl. Oxygen-isotope values for the megaquartz replacements averaged 28.4[per thousand] (SMOW), indicating precipitation from evaporative waters with an isotopic composition of +2.9 [per thousand] (SMOW). Evaporite silicification was coeval with or slightly postdated hydrocarbon migration. The fluid-inclusion data provide a record of the fluid temperatures and compositions that prevailed during silica precipitation. These data, coupled with regional stratigraphy and published geothermal gradients, suggest a burial depth of approximately 1.3 km during silicification. The source of the silica for evaporite replacement is problematic. The authors postulate, however, that silica may have been derived from dissolution of siliciclastics in back-reef units.

  5. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Past Sea Level Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the information given in the following table, which lists the sea level for the last 250,000 years, as recorded by thoriumuranium dating of coral reefs off Papua New Guinea. ...

  7. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic

  8. Fluvial and deltaic facies and environments of the late permian back-reef shelves of the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Artesia Group is a sequence of carbonates, evaporites, and clastics that was deposited across the back-reef shelves of the Permian Basin during late Permian time. There has been some controversy over the depositional environments of the clastic members of the Artesia Group and the role of sea level fluctuations in their accumulation. However, the results of a regional core study of the Queen Formation of the Artesia Group indicate that they were largely deposited in desert fluvial and deltaic environments during low-stands of sea level. Three fluvial-deltaic facies are recognized within the clastic members of the Queen. The first consists of medium to very find sandstones and silty sandstones with cross-beds, ripple cross-laminae, and planar and wavy laminae. This facies forms wavy sheets that thicken and thin along linear trends, and was deposited in sandy braided streams. The second facies consists of very find to fine sandstones, silty sandstones, and siltstones with ripple cross-laminae, planar and wavy laminae, cross-beds, clay drapes and pedogenetic cutans, as well as siltstones and silty mudstones with haloturbation structures and evaporite nodules. This facies forms thick planar sheets, and was deposited in fluvial sandflats and adjacent fluvial-dominated continental sabkhas. The third facies consists of cyclic deposits of haloturbated silty mudstones that grade into siltstones and very fine sandstones with crossbeds, planar and wavy laminae, haloturbation structures and evaporite nodules. Each cycle forms a lobate body that is bounded by carbonates or evaporites and which was deposited in sheet deltas that formed along the landward margins of a back-reef lagoon.

  9. 137Cs Inter-Plant Concentration Ratios Provide a Predictive Tool for Coral Atolls with Distinct Benefits Over Transfer Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Bogen, K; Corado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2007-07-17

    Inter-plant concentration ratios (IPCR), [Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in coral atoll tree food-crops/Bq g{sup -1} {sup 137}Cs in leaves of native plant species whose roots share a common soil volume], can replace transfer factors (TF) to predict {sup 137}Cs concentration in tree food-crops in a contaminated area with an aged source term. The IPCR strategy has significant benefits relative to TF strategy for such purposes in the atoll ecosystem. IPCR strategy applied to specific assessments takes advantage of the fact tree roots naturally integrate 137Cs over large volumes of soil. Root absorption of {sup 137}Cs replaces large-scale, expensive soil sampling schemes to reduce variability in {sup 137}Cs concentration due to inhomogeneous radionuclide distribution. IPCR [drinking-coconut meat (DCM)/Scaevola (SCA) and Tournefortia (TOU) leaves (native trees growing on all atoll islands)] are log normally distributed (LND) with geometric standard deviation (GSD) = 1.85. TF for DCM from Enewetak, Eneu, Rongelap and Bikini Atolls are LND with GSD's of 3.5, 3.0, 2.7, and 2.1, respectively. TF GSD for Rongelap copra coconut meat is 2.5. IPCR of Pandanus fruit to SCA and TOU leaves are LND with GSD = 1.7 while TF GSD is 2.1. Because IPCR variability is much lower than TF variability, relative sampling error of an IPCR field sample mean is up 6- to 10-fold lower than that of a TF sample mean if sample sizes are small (10 to 20). Other IPCR advantages are that plant leaf samples are collected and processed in far less time with much less effort and cost than soil samples.

  10. Evaluating the Potential for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices to Act as Artificial Reefs or Fish Aggregating Devices. Based on Analysis of Surrogates in Tropical, Subtropical, and Temperate U.S. West Coast and Hawaiian Coastal Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, Sharon H.; Hamilton, Christine D.; Spencer, Gregory C.; Ogston, Heather O.

    2015-05-12

    Wave energy converters (WECs) and tidal energy converters (TECs) are only beginning to be deployed along the U.S. West Coast and in Hawai‘i, and a better understanding of their ecological effects on fish, particularly on special-status fish (e.g., threatened and endangered) is needed to facilitate project design and environmental permitting. The structures of WECs and TECs placed on to the seabed, such as anchors and foundations, may function as artificial reefs that attract reef-associated fishes, while the midwater and surface structures, such as mooring lines, buoys, and wave or tidal power devices, may function as fish aggregating devices (FADs), forming the nuclei for groups of fishes. Little is known about the potential for WECs and TECs to function as artificial reefs and FADs in coastal waters of the U.S. West Coast and Hawai‘i. We evaluated these potential ecological interactions by reviewing relevant information about fish associations with surrogate structures, such as artificial reefs, natural reefs, kelps, floating debris, oil and gas platforms, marine debris, anchored FADs deployed to enhance fishing opportunities, net-cages used for mariculture, and piers and docks. Based on our review, we postulate that the structures of WECs and TECs placed on or near the seabed in coastal waters of the U.S. West Coast and Hawai‘i likely will function as small-scale artificial reefs and attract potentially high densities of reef-associated fishes (including special-status rockfish species [Sebastes spp.] along the mainland), and that the midwater and surface structures of WECs placed in the tropical waters of Hawai‘i likely will function as de facto FADs with species assemblages varying by distance from shore and deployment depth. Along the U.S. West Coast, frequent associations with midwater and surface structures may be less likely: juvenile, semipelagic, kelp-associated rockfishes may occur at midwater and surface structures of WECs in coastal waters of

  11. Thriving Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soil and transpire it into the air, a process called evapotranspiration. That water vapor, in turn, acts as a greenhouse gas, trapping heat, raising temperatures, and...

  12. The unseen iceberg: Plant roots in arctic tundra (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ecosystems in the Arctic. Authors: Iversen, Colleen M 1 ; Sloan, Victoria L 1 ; Sullivan, Patrick F. 2 ; Euskirchen, Eugenie S 2 ; McGuire, A. David 2 ; Norby, Richard...

  13. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic. Authors: Sullivan, Paddy ; Sloan, Victoria ; Warren, Jeff ; McGuire, Dave ; Euskirchen, Eugenie ;...

  14. A large drop in atmospheric [sup 14]C/[sup 12]C and reduced melting in the younger dryas, documented with [sup 230]Th ages of corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, R.L.; Beck, J.W. ); Burr, G.S.; Donahue, D.J. ); Chappell, J.M.A. ); Bloom, A.L. ); Druffel, E.R.M. ); Taylor, F.W. )

    1993-05-14

    Paired carbon-14 ([sup 14]C) and thorium-230 ([sup 230]Th) ages were determined on fossil corals from the Huon Peninsula, Papua New Guinea. The ages were used to calibrate part of the [sup 14]C time scale and to estimate rates of sea-level rise during the last deglaciation. An abrupt offset between the [sup 14]C and [sup 230]Th ages suggests that the atmospheric [sup 14]C/[sup 12]C ratio dropped by 15 percent during the latter part of and after the Younger Dryas (YD). This prominent drop coincides with greatly reduced rates of sea-level rise. Reduction of melting because of cooler conditions during the YD may have caused an increase in the rate of ocean ventilation, which caused the atmospheric [sup 14]C/[sup 12]C ratio to fall. The record of sea-level rise also shows that globally averaged rates of melting were relatively high at the beginning of the YD. Thus, these measurements satisfy one of the conditions required by the hypothesis that the diversion of meltwater from the Mississippi to the St. Lawrence River triggered the YD event. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Millennial-scale ocean acidification and late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Liang, Liyuan; Braga, Dr Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification by atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased almost continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago. It is expected to impair tropical reef development, but effects on reefs at the present day and in the recent past have proved difficult to evaluate. We present evidence that acidification has already significantly reduced the formation of calcified bacterial crusts in tropical reefs. Unlike major reef builders such as coralline algae and corals that more closely control their calcification, bacterial calcification is very sensitive to ambient changes in carbonate chemistry. Bacterial crusts in reef cavities have declined in thickness over the past 14 000 years with largest reduction occurring 12 000 10 000 years ago. We interpret this as an early effect of deglacial ocean acidification on reef calcification and infer that similar crusts were likely to have been thicker when seawater carbonate saturation was increased during earlier glacial intervals, and thinner during interglacials. These changes in crust thickness could have substantially affected reef development over glacial cycles, as rigid crusts significantly strengthen framework and their reduction would have increased the susceptibility of reefs to biological and physical erosion. Bacterial crust decline reveals previously unrecognized millennial-scale acidification effects on tropical reefs. This directs attention to the role of crusts in reef formation and the ability of bioinduced calcification to reflect changes in seawater chemistry. It also provides a long-term context for assessing anticipated anthropogenic effects.

  16. EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) EO 13112: Invasive Species (1999) EO 13112: Invasive Species (51.32 KB) More Documents & Publications EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection EA-2006: Draft Environmental Assessment Memorandum of Understanding, Responsibilities of Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds

  17. Comparing bacterial community composition of healthy and dark spot-affected Siderastrea siderea in Florida and the Caribbean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gray, Michael A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-10-07

    Coral disease is one of the major causes of reef degradation. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) was described in the early 1990's as brown or purple amorphous areas of tissue on a coral and has since become one of the most prevalent diseases reported on Caribbean reefs. It has been identified in a number of coral species, but there is debate as to whether it is in fact the same disease in different corals. Further, it is questioned whether these macroscopic signs are in fact diagnostic of an infectious disease at all. The most commonly affected species in the Caribbean ismore » the massive starlet coral Siderastrea siderea. We sampled this species in two locations, Dry Tortugas National Park and Virgin Islands National Park. Tissue biopsies were collected from both healthy colonies and those with dark spot lesions. Microbial-community DNA was extracted from coral samples (mucus, tissue, and skeleton), amplified using bacterial-specific primers, and applied to PhyloChip G3 microarrays to examine the bacterial diversity associated with this coral. Samples were also screened for the presence of a fungal ribotype that has recently been implicated as a causative agent of DSS in another coral species, but the amplifications were unsuccessful. S. siderea samples did not cluster consistently based on health state (i.e., normal versus dark spot). Various bacteria, including Cyanobacteria and Vibrios, were observed to have increased relative abundance in the discolored tissue, but the patterns were not consistent across all DSS samples. Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that DSS in S. siderea is linked to a bacterial pathogen or pathogens. This dataset provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the bacterial community associated with the scleractinian coral S. siderea.« less

  18. Comparing bacterial community composition of healthy and dark spot-affected Siderastrea siderea in Florida and the Caribbean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Tom, Lauren M.; DeSantis, Todd Z.; Gray, Michael A.; Andersen, Gary L.; Mormile, Melanie R.

    2014-10-07

    Coral disease is one of the major causes of reef degradation. Dark Spot Syndrome (DSS) was described in the early 1990's as brown or purple amorphous areas of tissue on a coral and has since become one of the most prevalent diseases reported on Caribbean reefs. It has been identified in a number of coral species, but there is debate as to whether it is in fact the same disease in different corals. Further, it is questioned whether these macroscopic signs are in fact diagnostic of an infectious disease at all. The most commonly affected species in the Caribbean is the massive starlet coral Siderastrea siderea. We sampled this species in two locations, Dry Tortugas National Park and Virgin Islands National Park. Tissue biopsies were collected from both healthy colonies and those with dark spot lesions. Microbial-community DNA was extracted from coral samples (mucus, tissue, and skeleton), amplified using bacterial-specific primers, and applied to PhyloChip G3 microarrays to examine the bacterial diversity associated with this coral. Samples were also screened for the presence of a fungal ribotype that has recently been implicated as a causative agent of DSS in another coral species, but the amplifications were unsuccessful. S. siderea samples did not cluster consistently based on health state (i.e., normal versus dark spot). Various bacteria, including Cyanobacteria and Vibrios, were observed to have increased relative abundance in the discolored tissue, but the patterns were not consistent across all DSS samples. Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that DSS in S. siderea is linked to a bacterial pathogen or pathogens. This dataset provides the most comprehensive overview to date of the bacterial community associated with the scleractinian coral S. siderea.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Forest-tundra_LANL-28 Jan-2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Circumpolar pattern Why Why focus focus on on the the subarctic subarctic forest? forest? Models predict: * Rapid advance of trees and shrubs i p t l b l i in response to global...

  20. Ecological effects of a major oil spill on Panamanian coastal marine communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, J.B.C.; Cubit, J.D.; Keller, B.D.; Batista, V.; Burns, K.; Caffey, H.M.; Caldwell, R.L.; Garrity, S.D.; Getter, C.D.; Gonzalez, C.; Guzman, H.M.; Kaufmann, K.W.; Knap, A.H.; Levings, S.C.; Marshall, M.J.; Steger, R.; Thompson, R.C.; Weil, E. )

    1989-01-06

    In 1986 more than 8 million liters of crude oil spilled into a complex region of mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs just east of the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal. This was the largest recorded spill into coastal habitats in the tropical Americas. Many populations of plants and animals in both oiled and unoiled sites had been studied previously, thereby providing an unprecedented measure of ecological variation before the spill. Documentation of the spread of oil and its biological effects begun immediately. Intertidal mangroves, seagrasses, algae, and associated invertebrates were covered by oil and died soon after. More surprisingly, there was also extensive mortality of shallow subtidal reef corals and infauna of seagrass beds. After 1.5 years only some organisms in areas exposed to the open sea have recovered.

  1. Impact of oil in the tropical marine environment. Technical pub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cintron, G.; Lugo, A.E.; Martinez, R.; Cintron, B.B.; Encarnacion, L.

    1981-11-01

    Oil spills have a devastating effect on biologically rich coastal environments. This report investigates this problem, covering damage by oil to biological systems, the use of dispersants (toxicity and considerations for dispersant use), impact of oil and dispersants on coral reefs, impact of oil on seagrass beds and sandy beaches, impact of oil on mangroves (seedling survival and tolerance, regeneration, forest type vulnerability, and cleanup and recovery activities in mangroves), conclusions, and recommendations. The study concludes that coral reefs and seagrass beds may escape significant spill damage if pollution is not chronic and if dispersants are not used. Sandy and rocky shores may be severely impacted but recover quickly. Mangroves are the most vulnerable coastal ecosystem. Recommendations are that oil spill contingency plans must be prepared for all areas, and that the necessary equipment for the plans must be in place.

  2. Sedimentology and sequence stratigraphy of upper Pleistocene carbonates of southeastern Barbardos, West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphrey, J.D.; Kimbell, T.N. (Univ. of Texas, Richardson (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Upper Pleistocene reef-associated carbonates of southeastern Barbados have been studied in outcrop and core. Reef terraces, formed during glacio-eustatic sea level highstands and subsequently uplifted, are characterized by thick and areally extensive sequences of allochthonous and autochthonous fore-reef calcarenites. Depositional textures are primarily packstones, and grainstones, wackestones, and coral floatstones are volumetrically less significant. Sediments are coarse- to fine-grained reef-derived allochems and micrite, and autochthonous benthic foraminifera and coralline red algae. Rates of sediment accumulation of fore-reef calcarenites range from about 1 to 4 m/1,000 yr. Although of relatively small scale, the carbonate terraces of southeastern Barbados provide excellent analogs for sequence stratigraphic concepts in carbonate settings. The terraces are primarily highstand systems tract deposits separated by type 1 unconformities. These highstand deposits are characterized by reef development and the progradation of fore-reef calcarenites. Extensive fore-reef deposits resulted from mechanical erosion of the reef framework on this high-energy, windward coastline. Type 1 unconformities are characterized by thin caliche layers developed during lowstand subaerial exposure. Thin basal transgressive systems tract deposits are characterized by incorporation of extraformational clasts derived from the underlying sequence during sea level rise. Slope-front erosion, vertical shift in the position of freshwater lens, and shift in the position of coastal onlap are all consequences of the interplay between eustasy and tectonics. These effects and the development of facies geometries on Barbados are primarily controlled by the glacio-eustatic component, inasmuch as rates of eustatic changes of sea level are at least two orders of magnitude greater than the maximum average rates of tectonic uplift. 12 figs.

  3. OSTIblog Articles in the carbon sequestration Topic | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information sequestration Topic Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World by Kathy Chambers 17 Apr, 2014 in 17081 Goose-BNL.jpg Carbon Sequestration - Helping to Save Our Beautiful World Read more about 17081 Warmer winters are changing bird migratory patterns, warmer seawater is linked to coral reef bleaching in the Florida Keys and Puerto Rico, and more extreme climate events are affecting society and ecosystems. According to the

  4. Coral Power LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE Activity Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  5. Coral Power LLC (Washington) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 4410 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Industrial: 0.0221kWh...

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Rate of Coral Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  7. EA-253-A_Coral_Canada.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  8. EA-293-A_Coral_Rescission.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  9. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Graham, David E

    2015-01-01

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 C showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4. High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.

  10. Stoichiometry and temperature sensitivity of methanogenesis and CO2 production from saturated polygonal tundra in Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Herndon, Elizabeth M; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Wullschleger, Stan D; Graham, David E

    2015-01-01

    Arctic permafrost ecosystems store ~50% of global belowground carbon (C) that is vulnerable to increased microbial degradation with warmer active layer temperatures and thawing of the near surface permafrost. We used anoxic laboratory incubations to estimate anaerobic CO2 production and methanogenesis in active layer (organic and mineral soil horizons) and permafrost samples from center, ridge and trough positions of water-saturated low-centered polygon in Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow AK, USA. Methane (CH4) and CO2 production rates and concentrations were determined at 2, +4, or +8 C for 60 day incubation period. Temporal dynamics of CO2 production and methanogenesis at 2 Cmore » showed evidence of fundamentally different mechanisms of substrate limitation and inhibited microbial growth at soil water freezing points compared to warmer temperatures. Nonlinear regression better modeled the initial rates and estimates of Q10 values for CO2 that showed higher sensitivity in the organic-rich soils of polygon center and trough than the relatively drier ridge soils. Methanogenesis generally exhibited a lag phase in the mineral soils that was significantly longer at 2 C in all horizons. Such discontinuity in CH4 production between 2 C and the elevated temperatures (+4 and +8 C) indicated the insufficient representation of methanogenesis on the basis of Q10 values estimated from both linear and nonlinear models. Production rates for both CH4 and CO2 were substantially higher in organic horizons (20% to 40% wt. C) at all temperatures relative to mineral horizons (<20% wt. C). Permafrost horizon (~12% wt. C) produced ~5-fold less CO2 than the active layer and negligible CH4. High concentrations of initial exchangeable Fe(II) and increasing accumulation rates signified the role of iron as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic C degradation in the mineral horizons.« less

  11. Pathways and transformations of dissolved methane and dissolved inorganic carbon in Arctic tundra watersheds: Evidence from analysis of stable isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Throckmorton, Heather M.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Newman, Brent D.; Altmann, Garrett L.; Conrad, Mark S.; Muss, Jordan D.; Perkins, George B.; Smith, Lydia J.; Torn, Margaret S.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2015-11-08

    Arctic soils contain a large pool of terrestrial C and are of interest due to their potential for releasing significant carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. Due to substantial landscape heterogeneity, predicting ecosystem-scale CH4 and CO2 production is challenging. This study assessed dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC = Σ (total) dissolved CO2) and CH4 in watershed drainages in Barrow, Alaska as critical convergent zones of regional geochemistry, substrates, and nutrients. In July and September of 2013, surface waters and saturated subsurface pore waters were collected from 17 drainages. Based on simultaneous DIC and CH4 cycling, we synthesized isotopic and geochemical methods to develop a subsurface CH4 and DIC balance by estimating mechanisms of CH4 and DIC production and transport pathways and oxidation of subsurface CH4. We observed a shift from acetoclastic (July) toward hydrogenotropic (September) methanogenesis at sites located toward the end of major freshwater drainages, adjacent to salty estuarine waters, suggesting an interesting landscape-scale effect on CH4 production mechanism. The majority of subsurface CH4 was transported upward by plant-mediated transport and ebullition, predominantly bypassing the potential for CH4 oxidation. Thus, surprisingly, CH4 oxidation only consumed approximately 2.51± 0.82% (July) and 0.79 ± 0.79% (September) of CH4 produced at the frost table, contributing to <0.1% of DIC production. DIC was primarily produced from respiration, with iron and organic matter serving as likely e- acceptors. Furthermore, this work highlights the importance of spatial and temporal variability of CH4 production at the watershed scale and suggests broad scale investigations are required to build better regional or pan-Arctic representations of CH4 and CO2 production.

  12. TIMS U-series dating and stable isotopes of the last interglacial event in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, M.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Chen, J.H. ); Aharon, P. ); Zhu, Z.R.; Chappell, J. ); Bloom, A. )

    1993-06-01

    The extensive flight of uplifted reef terraces which occurs along the Vitiaz strait on the northern flank of the Huon Peninsula in PNG (Papua New Guinea) contains a particularly good record of sea level changes in the last 250 ky. The Huon terraces were the target of an international expedition which took place in July--August 1988. In particular, the authors searched for suitable samples for U-series dating in a reef complex designated as VII, which is correlated with the last interglacial episode and high sea level stand. This complex is composed of a barrier reef (VIIb), a lagoon, and a fringing reef (VIIa). Twelve corals from these terraces and two corals from the older reef complex VIII were selected for analysis. The petrography, oxygen and carbon isotope compositions, and magnesium and strontium concentrations were determined along with the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium and thorium. The simplest model for sea level height for terrace VII is a continuous rise between 134 and 118 ky. Alternatively, there may have been two periods of rapid sea level rise. In contrast, in the Bahamas, there is evidence that sea level remained rather constant over the time interval 132 to 120 ky. The absence of ages between 132 and 120 ky in PNG could be the result of changes in the local tectonic uplift rates during that time, or erosion that disrupted the continuous record. In any event, the authors find no basis for accepting a single brief time for the age of the last interglacial and applying this age as a precise chronometer for worldwide correlation, or as a test of climatic models. The older ages reported here precede the Milankovitch solar insolation peak at 128 ky, and the younger ages are [approximately]10 ky after this peak. If the present high-precision data are correct, then it will be necessary to reassess the validity of the Milankovitch theory of climatic changes. 76 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) - A pulsed laser system that measures reflected light ... wide tires) designed to travel across the tundra, preventing damage to the tundra. ...

  14. SREL Reprint #3319

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Development and characterization of 29 microsatellite markers for the sergeant major damselfish (Abudefduf saxatilis) using paired-end Illumina shotgun sequencing Victor J. Piñeros1, Carla Gutiérrez-Rodríguez1, and Stacey L. Lance2 1Departamento de Biología Evolutiva, Instituto de Ecología A.C., 91070 Xalapa, Veracruz, Mexico 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802, USA Abstract: We isolated and characterized microsatellite loci for the coral reef fish

  15. Coastal ecosystems of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, R.C.; Markovits, P.S.; Kirkwood, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide training on recent developments in understanding coastal ecosystems in the southeastern United States for Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) field personnel and other natural resource managers in the region. Major emphasis was given to three types of systems: marshes, mangroves, and sea grasses. Other systems such as coral reefs, mud flats, bottomland hardwoods, and estuaries were discussed in less detail. Twenty-three papers were presented during the workshop. One of these was abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA.

  16. Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

  17. Coral Springs, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.271192, -80.2706044 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  18. EECBG Success Story: Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the next 15 years. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles The new energy efficient IT Data Center in Savannah, Georgia. | Courtesy of the City of Savannah, GA. EECBG Success Story: ...

  19. Plutonium and americium behavior in coral atoll environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Eagle, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Inventories of /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am greatly in excess of global fallout levels persist in the benthic environments of Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. Quantities of /sup 239 +240/Pu and lesser amounts of /sup 241/Am are continuously mobilizing from these sedimentary reservoirs. The amount of /sup 239 +240/Pu mobilized to solution at any time represents 0.08 to 0.09% of the sediment inventories to a depth of 16 cm. The mobilized /sup 239 +240/Pu has solute-like characteristics and different valence states coexist in solution - the largest fraction of the soluble plutonium is in an oxidized form (+V,VI). The adsorption of plutonium to sediments is not completely reversible because of changes that occur in the relative amounts of the mixed oxidation states in solution with time. Further, any characteristics of /sup 239 +240/Pu described at one location may not necessarily be relevant in describing its behavior elsewhere following mobilization and migration. The relative amounts of /sup 241/Am to /sup 239 +240/Pu in the sedimentary deposits at Enewetak and Bikini may be altered in future years because of mobilization and radiological decay. Mobilization of /sup 239 +240/Pu is not a process unique to these atolls, and quantities in solution derived from sedimentary deposits can be found at other global sites. These studies in the equatorial Pacific have significance in assessing the long-term behavior of the transuranics in any marine environment. 22 references, 1 figure, 13 tables.

  20. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.

    1992-04-01

    Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

  1. Coastal Zone Management Act and related legislation: Revision 3. Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15

    In recognition of the increasing pressures upon the nation`s coastal resources, Congress enacted the Coastal Zone Management Act in 1972. Its purpose is to encourage states to preserve, protect, develop, and, where possible, restore or enhance such valuable natural resources as wetlands, floodplains, estuaries, beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs, as well as the fish and wildlife utilizing those habitats. A unique feature of the Act is that participation by states is voluntary. One key provision for encouraging states to participate is the availability of federal financial assistance to any coastal state or territory, including those on the Great Lakes, which is willing to develop and implement a comprehensive coastal management program. Additionally, the Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) was passed in 1983. This report contains the legislative history and statues associated with each Act. Regulations for implementation and other guidance are included.

  2. Abundance, diversity, and resource use in an assemblage of Conus species in Enewetak lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, A.J.

    1980-10-01

    Eight species of the gastropod genus Conus co-occur in sand substrate and an adjacent meadow of Halimeda stuposa in Enewetak lagoon, an unusually diverse assemblage for this type of habitat. Population density is high, and large species predominate; they represent all major feeding groups in the genus: predators on polychaetes, enteropneusts, gastropods, and fishes. Although the two most common Conus species eat primarily the same prey species, they mainly take prey of different sizes in different microhabitats. The results suggest that sufficient microhabitat heterogeneity and prey diversity exist to permit spatial segregation and specialization on different prey resources by the different Conus species present. Between-species dissimilarity in resource use thus agrees with previous observations on more diverse Conus assemblages of subtidal coral reef platforms. Prey species diversity is inversely related to body size, confirming and extending a previously identified pattern among Conus species that prey on sedentary polychaetes.

  3. Philippines: Environment and natural resource management study. World Bank country study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study addresses the most significant issues of natural-resource management in the Philippines. These include the disappearence or degradation of forests; erosion and changes in hydrological regimes; the conversion of mangrove swamps to fishponds; degradation of coral reefs; and depletion of nearshore fisheries through overfishing and destructive techniques. The issues addressed concern the extent and rate of degradation of these resource stocks, the impact thereof on the national economy, and the scope for ameliorative measures through policy responses, management changes, and investments. The Government is responsible for management of public resources, which include over half of the land area of the Philippines as well as the coastal waters. Historically, public management has been less than optimal, as evidenced by an unsustainable rate of deforestation and the recent stagnation or decline in extractive fisheries.

  4. Did the Mississippian Lodgepole buildup at Dickinson Field (North Dakota) form as a gas seep ({open_quotes}vent{close_quotes}) community?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longman, M.W.

    1996-10-01

    The Lower Mississippian Lodgepole carbonate buildup reservoir at Dickinson Field in Stark County, North Dakota, has been widely reported as being a Waulsortian (or Waulsortian-like) mound. The term {open_quotes}Waulsortian mound{close_quotes} is used for a variety of Early Mississippian carbonate buildups that share a number of features including an abundance of carbonate mud, a {open_quotes}framework{close_quotes} of organisms such as fenestrate bryozoans and crinoids that tended to trap or baffle sediment, and a general absence of marine-cemented reef framework. Although the age of the Lodgepole mound at Dickinson Field qualifies it to be a Waulsortian mound, petrographic study of cores reveals that the reservoir rocks are quite unlike those in true Waulsortian mounds. Instead of being dominated by carbonate mud, the Lodgepole mound core is dominated by marine cement. Furthermore, ostracods and microbial limestones are common in the mound core where they occur with crinoid debris and small amounts of bryozoan, coral, and brachiopod debris. The abundant microbial limestones and marine cement indicate that the Dickinson mound formed as a lithified reef on the sea floor rather than as a Waulsortian mud mound. The microbial limestones, marine cement, and common ostracods in the mount core, and the fact that the mound nucleated almost directly o top of the Bakken Shale, suggest that the Dickinson Lodgepole mound formed at the site of a submarine spring and gas seep.

  5. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  6. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 16, 2015 [Feature Stories and Releases] Getting an Inside View of Arctic Clouds Bookmark and Share Researchers investigate the polar atmosphere's unique properties Researchers are using unmanned aerial systems to study Arctic atmospheric processes, especially where the tundra and ocean meet. Researchers are using unmanned aerial systems to study Arctic atmospheric processes, especially where the tundra and ocean meet. On the north coast of Alaska, where the barren tundra meets the icy

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and nutrient cycles in tundra are driven by complex interactions between plants and their environment. However, root dynamics are one of the least understood aspects of plant...

  8. Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    "The Senate's vote today to clear the way for environmentally responsible oil and gas ... frozen tundra has the potential to yield billions of barrels of domestically produced oil. ...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    sand with very little natural rock bottom and reef habitat. Without artificial reefs, fish and marine life typically would become widely dispersed. In the Gulf of Mexico...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    sand with very little natural rock bottom and reef habitat. Without artificial reefs, fish and marine life typically would become widely dispersed. In the Gulf of Mexico...

  11. AmeriFlux US-Atq Atqasuk

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Oechel, Walt [San Diego State University; Zona, Donatella [San Diego State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Atq Atqasuk. Site Description - This site is 100 km south of Barrow, Alaska, Variety of moist-wet coastal sedge tundra, and moist-tussock tundra surfaces in the more well-drained upland.

  12. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    PNNL, Florida HERO, and Energy Smart Home Plans helped Ravenwood Homes achieve a HERS 15 with PV or HERS 65 without PV on a home in Florida with SEER 16 AC, concrete block and rigid foam walls, high-performance windows, solar water heating, and 5.98 kW PV.

  13. Oil and gas exploration and development in Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nations, D.; Doss, A.K.; Ubarra, R.

    1984-07-01

    Recent oil and gas exploration activity has been widespread throughout Arizona. Development drilling has continued in the Dineh-bi-keyah and Teec-nos-Pos fields in the northeastern corner, and exploratory drilling continues to test potential Paleozoic reservoirs elsewhere on the plateau. Several shallow wells north of the Grand Canyon encountered shows and limited recoveries of oil from Permian and Triassic rocks. The greatest activity has occurred along the Overthrust trend from northwestern to southeastern Arizona. Several million acres were leased and eight exploratory wells drilled along this trend. None were discoveries, but the presence of a Laramide thrust fault in the vicinity of Tombstone was established. The other tests have neither proved nor disproved the concept of the Overthrust belt in southern Arizona. Recent discoveries in the nonmarine Tertiary and marine Paleozoic of southern Nevada have stimulated interest in the oil potential of similar rocks and structures in the Basin and Range province of Arizona, which are coincident with the Overthrust trend. Reported gas discoveries by Pemex in Miocene marine sediments of the Gulf of California have stimulated leasing in the Yuma area, where one uncompleted well is reported to be a potential producer. The Pedregosa basin of extreme southeastern Arizona remains an area of great interest to explorationists because of the presence of a 25,000-ft (7600-m) sequence of Paleozoic marine sediments similar to those of the Permian basin, and Cretaceous marine rocks, including coral-rudist reefs, similar to those that produce in Texas and Mexico.

  14. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  15. Marine botany. Second edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawes, C.J.

    1998-12-01

    Marine plants are a diverse group that include unicellular algae, seaweeds, seagrasses, salt marshes, and mangrove forests. They carry out a variety of ecological functions and serve as the primary producers in coastal wetlands and oceanic waters. The theme that connects such a wide variety of plants is their ecology, which was also emphasized in the 1981 edition. The goal of this revision is to present taxonomic, physiological, chemical, and ecological aspects of marine plants, their adaptations, and how abiotic and biotic factors interact in their communities. The data are presented in a concise, comparative manner in order to identify similarities and differences between communities such as salt marsh and mangroves or subtidal seaweeds and seagrasses. To accomplish this, the text is organized into five chapters that introduce the marine habitats, consider abiotic and biotic factors, and anthropogenic influences on the communities followed by seven chapters that deal with microalgae, seaweeds, salt marshes, mangroves, seagrasses, and coral reefs. Two appendixes are included; one presents simple field techniques and the other is a summary of seaweed uses.

  16. Integrating multisource imagery and GIS analysis for mapping Bermuda`s benthic habitats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierros, M.K.

    1997-06-01

    Bermuda is a group of isolated oceanic situated in the northwest Atlantic Ocean and surrounded by the Sargasso Sea. Bermuda possesses the northernmost coral reefs and mangroves in the Atlantic Ocean, and because of its high population density, both the terrestrial and marine environments are under intense human pressure. Although a long record of scientific research exists, this study is the first attempt to comprehensively map the area`s benthic habitats, despite the need for such a map for resource assessment and management purposes. Multi-source and multi-date imagery were used for producing the habitat map due to lack of a complete up-to-date image. Classifications were performed with SPOT data, and the results verified from recent aerial photography and current aerial video, along with extensive ground truthing. Stratification of the image into regions prior to classification reduced the confusing effects of varying water depth. Classification accuracy in shallow areas was increased by derivation of a texture pseudo-channel, while bathymetry was used as a classification tool in deeper areas, where local patterns of zonation were well known. Because of seasonal variation in extent of seagrasses, a classification scheme based on density could not be used. Instead, a set of classes based on the seagrass area`s exposure to the open ocean were developed. The resulting habitat map is currently being assessed for accuracy with promising preliminary results, indicating its usefulness as a basis for future resource assessment studies.

  17. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 2: Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  18. Bomb tests attack the food chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruff, T. )

    1990-03-01

    Ciguatera poisoning, the most common type of fish poisoning in the world, has become a major public health problem in some parts of the South Pacific. This area has always been the site of periodic outbreaks, especially after severe storms or natural disasters that damage core reefs. But since World War II it has become evident that military activities and major construction projects that wreak havoc on corals also lead to ciguatera outbreaks. Extraordinarily high rates of ciguatera poisoning have occurred on the small Pacific islands that have been used for nuclear tests and on the islands that host the military infrastructures and activities that accompany the tests. This is true for both the Marshall Islands near Bikini and Eniwetok, where U.S. tests took place, and in French Polynesia, in the area around Moruroa Atoll where the French government continues to test. Ciguatera poisoning has a disastrous effect on people who depend on fishing as a way of life and on fish as the major source of protein. 10 refs.

  19. Structural characteristics and gasification reactivity of chars prepared from K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} mixed HyperCoals and coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atul Sharma; Hiroyuki Kawashima; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi

    2009-04-15

    HyperCoal is a clean coal with mineral matter content <0.05 wt %. Oaky Creek (C = 82%), and Pasir (C = 68%) coals were subjected to solvent extraction method to prepare Oaky Creek HyperCoal, and Pasir HyperCoal. Experiments were carried out to compare the gasification reactivity of HyperCoals and parent raw coals with 20, 40, 50 and 60% K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as a catalyst at 600, 650, 700, and 775{sup o}C with steam. Gasification rates of coals and HyperCoals were strongly influenced by the temperature and catalyst loading. Catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal chars was found to be chemical reaction controlled in the 600-700{sup o}C temperature range for all catalyst loadings. Gasification rates of HyperCoal chars were found to be always higher than parent coals at any given temperature for all catalyst loadings. However, X-ray diffraction results showed that the microstructures of chars prepared from coals and HyperCoals were similar. Results from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy show no significant difference between the chemical compositions of the chars. Significant differences were observed from scanning electron microscopy images, which showed that the chars from HyperCoals had coral-reef like structures whereas dense chars were observed for coals. 26 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Accelerated sea level rise on Yap (Federated States of Micronesia): Cause for concern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stahl, M.S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Army Corps of Engineers, Pacific Ocean Division, participated in the interagency case study of sea level rise for Yap State in the Federated States of Micronesia. The study, on behalf of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, was in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Engineering and environmental analyses indicate that resources within Yap State at risk from a 1.0 meter rise in sea level by the year 2100 are substantial, including coral reefs, sea grass beds, wetlands, native mangrove forests, groundwater, archaeological and cultural resources, and shoreline infrastructure. Severe constraints associated with land ownership patterns have helped prevent the potential for greater impact. Yet these same constraints will likely hinder future decisions regarding retreat, accommodation, or protection strategies. As a result, there are special institutional and cultural challenges that face Yap in developing and implementing appropriate responses to accelerated sea level rise. These are made more difficult with the many uncertainties associated with current predictions regarding the greenhouse effect.

  1. Turmoil at the Top of the World

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turmoil at the Top of the World 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:July 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Turmoil at the Top of the World The Arctic tundra is being drained and dried by the warming climate. July 21, 2016 arctic tundra signature pattern of polygons The Arctic tundra has a signature pattern of polygons due to complex interactions between soil and water-interactions that are being disrupted by the warming climate. "It's exciting but also scary. I

  2. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TURMOIL AT THE TOP OF THE WORLD The Arctic's changing climate is literally turning the tundra upside down. The texture of the summer tundra is biz arre when seen from above. It looks like crocodile skin: a watery expanse of patterned brown and green. This signature landscape is the result of complex interactions between soil and water at high latitude. But those interactions are being disrupted by a rapidly changing climate, and the pattern of the tundra is gradually being inverted-what once was

  3. Marine accident report - grounding of the US Tankship EXXON Valdez on Bligh Reef, Prince William Sound, Near Valdez, Alaska, March 24, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-31

    The report explains the grounding of the U.S. Tankship EXXON VALDEZ near Valdez, Alaska on March 24, 1989. The safety issues discussed in the report are the vessel's navigation watch, the role of human factors, manning standards, the company's drug/alcohol testing and rehabilitation program, drug/alcohol testing, vessel traffic service, and oil spill response.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The Effects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to be caused by enhanced surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat over the moist tundra, compared to those found over the ocean, as air moves inland from the coast. This...

  5. Melting of ice wedges adds to arctic warming

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ice wedges are a particularly cool surface feature in the Arctic tundra. And new research suggests they are melting fast, which is bad news for the ecosystem at the top of the ...

  6. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    These mats, borrowed from the City of Barrow, provided a stable surface strong enough to support a loader and a crane while protecting the fragile, water-logged tundra. Approval ...

  7. C-N-P interactions control climate driven changes in regional patterns of C storage on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yueyang; Rocha, Adrian; Rastetter, Edward; Shaver, Gaius; Mishra, U.; Zhuang, Qianlai; Kwiatkowski, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    As climate warms, changes in the carbon (C) balance of arctic tundra will play an important role in the global C balance. The C balance of tundra is tightly coupled to the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles because soil organic matter is the principal source of plant-available nutrients and determines the spatial variation of vegetation biomass across the North Slope of Alaska. Warming will accelerate these nutrient cycles, which should stimulate plant growth.

  8. Hexavalent chromium is cytotoxic and genotoxic to hawksbill sea turtle cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Sandra S.; Xie, Hong; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Douglas Thompson, W.; and others

    2014-09-01

    Sea turtles are a charismatic and ancient ocean species and can serve as key indicators for ocean ecosystems, including coral reefs and sea grass beds as well as coastal beaches. Genotoxicity studies in the species are absent, limiting our understanding of the impact of environmental toxicants on sea turtles. Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a ubiquitous environmental problem worldwide, and recent studies show it is a global marine pollutant of concern. Thus, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of soluble and particulate Cr(VI) in hawksbill sea turtle cells. Particulate Cr(VI) was both cytotoxic and genotoxic to sea turtle cells. Concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced 108, 79, 54, and 7% relative survival, respectively. Additionally, concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 5 μg/cm{sup 2} lead chromate induced damage in 4, 10, 15, 26, and 36% of cells and caused 4, 11, 17, 30, and 56 chromosome aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. For soluble Cr, concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate induced 84, 69, 46, 25, and 3% relative survival, respectively. Sodium chromate induced 3, 9, 9, 14, 21, and 29% of metaphases with damage, and caused 3, 10, 10, 16, 26, and 39 damaged chromosomes in 100 metaphases at concentrations of 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 μM sodium chromate, respectively. These data suggest that Cr(VI) may be a concern for hawksbill sea turtles and sea turtles in general. - Highlights: • Particulate Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Soluble Cr(VI) is cytotoxic and clastogenic to hawksbill sea turtle cells. • Cr(VI) may be a risk factor for hawksbill sea turtle health.

  9. Contrasting impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, K.A.; Codi, S.

    1996-12-31

    A localised oil spill was observed on the wetland marshes bordering a tidal creek near Cairns, Queensland in January 1994. Pollution and conservation issues are of paramount public concern in this region which boarders World Heritage Areas of coral reefs and coastal habitats. Local residents observed oil being dumped from a truck which was contracted to of oil the surface of the roads in the contiguous sugar cane farm for dust control. During this incident several truckloads of mixed waste oil were dumped onto a short section of road and into the wetlands. The oil contaminated a band of marsh 15-30 m wide along approximately 200 m of road. Impacted marsh included Melaleuca forest on the high side of the road and intertidal mangroves on the seaward side. The Queensland Department of Environment (QDE) initiated an impact assessment and directed the trucking company to clean up impacted areas. The extent of damage to wetlands from oil spills is related to the amount and type of oil spilled and the sensitivity of the habitats oiled. QDE asked the Australian Institute of Marine Sciences to assist with their study on the fate of the oil in this localised spill. The initial levels of petroleum hydrocarbons in surface sediments reached 17% of the dry weight in heavily impacted areas. Thus levels were similar to those reached after the catastrophic oil spill in Panama. Clean up efforts and natural dissipation processes reduced sediment hydrocarbon loads to nonacutely toxic levels in only 1.5 years in the intertidal mangroves. High levels remain in the Melaleuca sediments. We used internal molecular markers to detail hydrocarbon dissipation vs degradation. This study provides a contrast between impacts of localised versus catastrophic oil spills in deep mud coastal habitats.

  10. CX-005248: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida-City-Cape CoralCX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1Date: 02/17/2011Location(s): Cape Coral, FloridaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  11. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. PDF icon Application to export ...

  12. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at

  13. Lesson Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9-12 Rate of Coral Growth http://education.arm.gov Rate of Coral Growth Approximate Time One hour Objective The objective of this activity is to investigate and understand the fact that the growth of coral depends on water depth and the effect of sea level changes on corals. Key Points to Understand * If the greenhouse effect occurs, its effects will be global, both on land and in the sea. * The information given in the following table shows the rate of growth (in millimeters per year) of coral

  14. This study was performed at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the sequence of pipe formation, which was followed ... the salt in the reef carbonates where copious water was available for ... officials to take action." 75 Another ...

  15. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida | Department of Energy Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida PNNL, Florida HERO, and Energy Smart Home Plans helped Ravenwood Homes achieve a HERS 15 with PV or HERS 65 without PV on a home in Florida with SEER 16 AC, concrete block and rigid foam walls,

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-8046" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous...

  17. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Tommy Williams Homes Initial Performance of Two Zero Energy Homes, Gainesville, Florida Building ...

  18. EERE Success Story-How the Weatherization Assistance Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on the path towards making history: becoming the first female weatherization quality control inspectorauditor in ... Program Changed Jasmine's Life Cape Coral Youth Center ...

  19. Lee County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florida Bokeelia, Florida Bonita Springs, Florida Buckingham, Florida Burnt Store Marina, Florida Cape Coral, Florida Captiva, Florida Charleston Park, Florida Cypress Lake,...

  20. C O M P U T E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Systems to be delivered in the next 4-5 years Companion accelerator Node sharing memory with host Coral systems TB Delivered by IBMNvidia AMD APU systems ...

  1. Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    have been mandated to include this vitally important energy efficiency measure. ... Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida ...

  2. Under-detection of endospore-forming Firmicutes in metagenomic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... food and organism-associated environments (ant fungus garden, coral, fish and human gut). ... 303 SpoOA Gpr Color Codes Seawnter Fish slime Soil Mosquito Sputum Lake ...

  3. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, ...

  4. U.S. Department of Energy awards $200 million for next-generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CORAL) initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced a 200 million investment to deliver a next-generation supercomputer, known as Aurora, to the Argonne...

  5. LLNL to deliver next-generation supercomputer | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    national labs (CORAL) to accelerate the development of high performance computing. ... to deploy systems of about 150 petaflops to advance science and ensure national security. ...

  6. Director's Perspective by George Miller | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications Computational Advances in Applied Energy Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Edison Electric ...

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Awards $200 Million for Next- Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Under the joint Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Livermore (CORAL) ... at its Oak Ridge and Lawrence Livermore laboratories. "Few national investments ...

  8. Y

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sequoia 4 WD SUV 5.7L V8 Auto Tier I I B in 5 141317 10913 NA 2016 FFV Toyota Tundra 2WD4WD Pickup 5.7L V8 Auto Tier I I B in 5 151318 11913 NA Model Y ear 2 016: A...

  9. AmeriFlux US-Ivo Ivotuk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ivo Ivotuk. Site Description - This site is 300 km south of Barrow and is located at the foothill of the Brooks Range and is classified as tussock sedge, dwarf-shrub, moss tundra.

  10. AmeriFlux US-Brw Barrow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walt; Zona, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Brw Barrow. Site Description - The local landscape surrounding the Barrow site has a history absent of any disturbances. The terrain was not heavily glaciated during the last period of glaciation. The vegetation is mature in an unmanaged and undisturbed Arctic tundra.

  11. Oil and gas in Jurassic reefal complexes of the west Ukrainian Carpathian foredeep

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izotova, T.S.; Popadyuk, I.V. )

    1993-09-01

    Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian-Tithonian) reef-bearing carbonates are developed throughout the Ukrainian part of the Carpathian foredeep. These occupy an up to 50-km-wide area in which they attain thicknesses of 500-1000 m, occur at depths ranging between 1 and 7 km, and are covered Early Cretaceous to Miocene sediments. Upper Jurassic strata can be differentiated into reef-core, pre-reef, and back-reef facies. Reservoir development occurs in the karstified, crestal parts of reefs (e.g., Kakhanovka and Letnya fields) and also in detrital back-reef carbonates (Rudky and Lopushnya fields). The potential of this oil and gas play is not yet exhausted, particularly in the area of back-reef facies development under the Carpathian thrust sheets. Reservoir prediction is difficult due to insufficient core control and therefore is based on sedimentological log analyses. Different facies types are characterized by consistent well-log parameters, including shale content, primary and secondary carbonate texture, structure of associated lithotypes, etc. Different facies types can be correlated with characteristic log parameters. Nine facies types are recognized according to the scheme of J.L. Wilson. This opens the possibility to construct regional facies maps, to trace in time and space the development of the actual reef belt, and thus to enhance reservoir prediction. Sedimentological log analysis, combined with seismic criteria, proved to be an effect tool in the analysis of carbonate prospects, as evidenced by the discovery of the genetically unique Lopushnya field. Regional paleosedimentological reconstructions of the Upper Jurassic basin form the basis for evaluating the remaining hydrocarbon potential of the back-reef facies domain in the Ukrainian part of the Carpathian foredeep and the adjacent Romanian territory.

  12. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Lilly, Michael R.; Kane, Douglas L.; Miller, D. Dan; Galloway, Braden K.; Hilton, Kristie M.; White, Daniel M.

    2005-09-30

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  13. Water Levels, Barrow, Alaska, NGEE Areas A, B, C and D for 2012, 2013, 2014, Final Version, 20150324

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2015-06-08

    Ice wedge polygonal tundra water levels were measured at a total of 45 locations representing polygon centers and troughs during three summers. Early season water levels, which were still affected by ice and snow, are represented by manual measurements only. Continuous (less than hourly) measurements followed through early fall (around mid-Sep). The data set contains inundation depth (cm), absolute water level and local ground surface elevation (masl).

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rapid ice-wedge melting accelerates permafrost decline March 15, 2016 Widespread Artic phenomenon carries major hydrological, climate implications LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 15, 2016-A new study of permafrost has found that the ice wedges forming the prevalent honeycomb pattern across the tundra appear to be melting rapidly across the Arctic, changing the hydrology of the region and accelerating the release of greenhouse gases with major implications for global warming. While the gradual warming of

  15. Water Levels, Barrow, Alaska, NGEE Areas A, B, C and D for 2012, 2013, 2014, Final Version, 20150324

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    Ice wedge polygonal tundra water levels were measured at a total of 45 locations representing polygon centers and troughs during three summers. Early season water levels, which were still affected by ice and snow, are represented by manual measurements only. Continuous (less than hourly) measurements followed through early fall (around mid-Sep). The data set contains inundation depth (cm), absolute water level and local ground surface elevation (masl).

  16. Ground Water Levels for NGEE Areas A, B, C and D, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2015-06-08

    Ice wedge polygonal tundra water levels were measured at a total of 45 locations representing polygon centers and troughs during three summers. Early season water levels, which were still affected by ice and snow, are represented by manual measurements only. Continuous (less than hourly) measurements followed through early fall (around mid-Sep). The data set contains inundation depth (cm), absolute water level and local ground surface elevation (masl).

  17. O:ELECTRICEA-212.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Mexico as a power marketer. Coral does not own or control any electric generating or transmission facilities, nor does it have a

  18. O:ELECTRICEA-213.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. Coral, a limited liability company based in Delaware, does not own or control any electric generating

  19. CX-005807: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Full Activation Scenario Training ExerciseCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 03/29/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

  20. DISCLAIMER

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... These carbonates lie seaward o f the major Sligo and Stuart City (Edwards) reef trends and ... seaward advance o f the Wilcox shelf margin, in the upper Midway and basal Wilcox Groups. ...

  1. NETL Report format template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... when the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground on Bligh Reef in the Prince William Sound (Graham et al., 2012; Peterson et al., 2003; Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Trustee Council, 2006). ...

  2. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MRCSP Phase III Project - Bagley Reef Monitoring MRCSP will be piggy-backing on the EOR operations of Core Energy LLC to examine the CO2 injection and utilization in the...

  3. CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  4. CX-011527: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/30/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  5. Prediction of hydrocarbon-bearing structures based on remote sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnova, I.; Gololobov, Yu.; Rusanova, A. )

    1993-09-01

    The technology we developed is based on the use of remotely sensed data and has proved to be effective for identification of structures that appear promising for oil and gas, in particular, reefs in the hydrocarbon-bearing basin of central Asia (Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan). It implements the [open quotes]geoindication[close quotes] concept, the main idea being that landscape components (geoindicators) and subsurface geological features are correlated and depend on each other. Subsurface features (uplifts, depressions, faults, reefs, and other lithological and structural heterogeneities) cause physical and chemical alterations in overlying rocks up to the land surface; thus, they are reflected in distribution of landscape components and observed on airborne and satellite images as specific patterns. The following identified geoindicators are related to different subsurface geological features: definite formations, anticlines, and reefs (barrier, atoll, and bioherm). The geoindicators are extracted from images either visually or by using computer systems. Specially developed software is applied to analyze geoindicator distribution and calculate their characteristics. In the course of processing, it is possible to distinguish folds from reefs. Distribution of geoindicator characteristics is examined on the well studied reefs, and from the regularities, established promising areas with reefs are revealed. When applying the technology in central Asia, the results were successfully verified by field works, seismic methods, and drilling.

  6. EA-127 SPS Southwestern Public Service Company | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon EA-127-SPS Southwestern Public Service Company More Documents & Publications EA-48-M El Paso Electric Company Ea-48-L El Paso Electric Company EA-212 Coral Power, LLC

  7. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-212-C...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Register Notice Volume 72, No. 118 - Jun. 20, 2007 Application from Coral Power, LLC to export electric energy to Mexico. Federal Register Notice Vol 72 No 118 PDF icon EA-212-C...

  8. Energy-related pollution of semi-tropical and tropical nearshore ecosystems. Annual report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A.; Marcus, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The major components of the nearshore marine ecosystems in the subtropics and tropics (seagrasses, mangroves, and corals) are examined and compound sublethal and lethal effects from extremes in some energy-related effects (temperature, salinity and light) are discussed.

  9. EECBG Success Story: Energy Detectives Help Pennsylvania Town...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Related Articles EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the...

  10. How the Weatherization Assistance Program Changed Jasmine's Life...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Palm Beach County Sees Energy-Smart Economic Growth Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape ...

  11. EA-161-A Duke Energy Indiana, Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electric energy to Canada. EA-161-A Duke Energy Indiana, Inc (1.58 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-286-A Avista Energy Inc EA-286 Avista Energy Inc EA-253-A Coral Canada ...

  12. EA-66-B Citizens Utilities Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy to Canada EA-66-B Citizens Utilities Company (17.09 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-211 DTE Energy Trading, Inc EA-213 Coral Power, LLC EA-209 Cargill-Alliant, LLC

  13. DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy

  14. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading statements made by these authors which require a response by the IntCal working group. Furthermore, we would like to comment on the sample selection criteria, pretreatment methods, and statistical methods utilized by Fairbanks et al. in derivation of their own radiocarbon calibration.

  15. Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Sepik-Ramu area, Ramu basin, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, J.C.; Wilson, J.T. )

    1990-06-01

    Improvements in seismic processing have made new interpretations of the structural and depositional history of the northwestern portion of the Ramu basin possible. Support for a wrench tectonic model for this area is observed in the reprocessed seismic data. Strike-slip movement along major fault zones has allowed compressional forces to be translated laterally and resulted in only minor deformation occurring in the Sepik-Ramu area. The major tectonic event is thought to have occurred during late Miocene-early Pliocene, and not during the middle Miocene, as earlier hypothesized. Consequently, Miocene deposition is postulated to have occurred uninterrupted by periods of erosion. A thick Miocene section is preserved in this region and is postulated to contain slope, reef, and shelf carbonates of early to middle Miocene age. This interpretation has led to the identification of a reef trend over 7 mi wide and at least 42 mi long containing numerous pinnacle reefs. The pinnacle reefs are analogous to those found in the Salawati basin of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The reefs are overlain by deep-water shales, a combination that provides potential reservoirs and seals necessary for the entrapment of hydrocarbons. The presence of oil and gas seeps document the existence of a source. These three factors justify hydrocarbon exploration in this area. The numerous potential drilling targets may lead to the discovery of significant quantities of hydrocarbons.

  16. Secrets of the Soil: Promotion of the Nov. 7 Science at the Theater Event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin

    2011-01-01

    There are billions of microbes in a handful of soil, some of which could hold the key to our climate and energy future. Find out how at Secrets of the Soil, our next Science at the Theater Nov. 7 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. At the event, four Berkeley Lab scientists will reveal how our scientists travel the globe -- to deserts, rainforests, and the Arctic tundra -- to explore the secret world of soil microbes -- and what they mean to you. More info: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  17. Secrets of the Soil: Promotion of the Nov. 7 Science at the Theater Event

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin

    2013-05-29

    There are billions of microbes in a handful of soil, some of which could hold the key to our climate and energy future. Find out how at Secrets of the Soil, our next Science at the Theater Nov. 7 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre. At the event, four Berkeley Lab scientists will reveal how our scientists travel the globe -- to deserts, rainforests, and the Arctic tundra -- to explore the secret world of soil microbes -- and what they mean to you. More info: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  18. L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    life expectancy Tundra in turmoil Quantum computer at Los Alamos Fusion on the cheap L o s A l a m o s S c i e n c e a n d Te c h n o l o g y M a g a z i n e | Ju l y 2 0 1 6 1663 July 2016 A masterpiece of Renaissance architecture and a major attraction for tourists visiting Tuscany, the dome of the Santa Maria del Fiore cathedral in Florence is showing its age. Wide cracks along the Last Judgment frescoes that cover its interior hint at greater damage inside its walls. But with the help of Los

  19. Circulation in Enewetak Atoll lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, M.; Smith, S.V.; Stroup, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Currents at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, were measured on the reef margins, in the channels, and in the lagoon. Lagoon circulation is dominated by wind-driven downwind surface flow and an upwind middepth return flow. This wind-driven flow has the characteristics of an Ekman spiral in an enclosed sea. Lagoon flushing is accomplished primarily by surf-driven water input over the windward (eastern) reefs and southerly drift out the South Channel. Mean water residence time is 1 month, while water entering the northern portion of the atoll takes about 4 months to exit.

  20. O:\ELECTRIC\ORDERS\EA-212-a.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order No. EA-212-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) authorized Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That two-year authorization will expire on August 13, 2001. On June 27, 2001,

  1. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra, and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.

  2. Stronger warming effects on microbial abundances in colder regions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ji; Luo, Yiqi; Xia, Jianyang; Jiang, Lifen; Zhou, Xuhui; Lu, Meng; Liang, Junyi; Shi, Zheng; Shelton, Shelby; Cao, Junji

    2015-12-10

    Soil microbes play critical roles in regulating terrestrial carbon (C) cycle and its feedback to climate change. However, it is still unclear how the soil microbial community and abundance respond to future climate change scenarios. In this meta-analysis, we synthesized the responses of microbial community and abundance to experimental warming from 64 published field studies. Our results showed that warming significantly increased soil microbial abundance by 7.6% on average. When grouped by vegetation or soil types, tundras and histosols had the strongest microbial responses to warming with increased microbial, fungal, and bacterial abundances by 15.0%, 9.5% and 37.0% in tundra,more » and 16.5%, 13.2% and 13.3% in histosols, respectively. We found significant negative relationships of the response ratios of microbial, fungal and bacterial abundances with the mean annual temperature, indicating that warming had stronger effects in colder than warmer regions. Moreover, the response ratios of microbial abundance to warming were positively correlated with those of soil respiration. Our results therefore indicate that the large quantities of C stored in colder regions are likely to be more vulnerable to climate warming than the soil C stored in other warmer regions.« less

  3. The Pleistocene biogeography of eastern North America: A nonmigration scenario for deciduous forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loehle, C.; Iltis, H.

    1998-12-31

    The current reconstruction of the vegetation of eastern North America at the last glacial maximum postulates a very wide zone of tundra and boreal forest south of the ice. This reconstruction requires that the deciduous forest retreated far to the south. The authors believe that this reconstruction is seriously in error. Geologic evidence for glacial activity or tundra is absent from the southern Appalachians. Positive evidence for boreal forest is based on pollen identifications for Picea, Betula, and Pinus, when in reality southern members of these genera have pollen that cannot be distinguished from that of northern members. Further, pollen of typical southern species such as oaks and hickories occurs throughout profiles that past authors had labeled boreal. Pollen evidence for a far southern deciduous forest refuge is lacking. Data on endemics are particularly challenging for the scenario in which deciduous forest migrated to the south and back. The southern Appalachian region is rife with endemics that are often extreme-habitat specialists unable to migrate. The previously glaciated zone is almost completely lacking in endemics. Outlier populations, range boundaries, and absence of certain hybrids all argue against a large boreal zone. The new reconstruction postulates a cold zone no more than 75--100 miles wide south of the ice in the East.

  4. CX-011403: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluating the Potential for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices to Become Artificial Reefs of Fish Aggregating Devices Based on Analysis of Surrogates in Tropical, Subtropical and Temperate United States West Coast and Hawaiian Coastal Waters CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/15/2013 Location(s): California, Hawaii Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  5. Carbonate reservoirs deposited during sea level lowstands, Permian basin: Occurrence, geometry, facies, and origin of porosity of in-situ buildups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J. ); Reid, A.M.; Reid, S.T.

    1990-02-01

    Carbonate reservoirs composed of in-situ reefs and associated facies, mostly deposited basinward of shallow platforms during sea level lowstands, are common in Pennsylvanian rocks in the Permian basin. Specific examples include some Atokan and Strawn fields in the Delaware basin, and Canyon-Cisco fields in the Midland basin. Such reservoirs are conspicuous by their absence in Permian rocks, where lowstand facies are instead siliciclastics and detrital carbonates. In-situ lowstand carbonate reservoirs are represented by phylloid algal reefs (Atokan, Canyon-Cisco), crinoid banks locally with some Chaetetes and phylloid algal reefs (Strawn), and bryozoan-algal boundstone reefs (Canyon-Cisco). These facies are associated with bioclastic and, locally, oolitic sandstones. Lowstand reservoirs are both underlain and overlain by deep-water facies, and field geometries range from equidimensional to slightly elongate, generally parallel to platform margins. Porosity in many fields is due to extensive leaching and karsting accompanying subaerial or shallow subsurface meteoric exposure. Accordingly, porosity predictions are best based on knowledge of reconstructed sea level curves. However, many reservoir pore systems have resulted from deep-burial dissolution accompanying chemical compaction and the migration of fluids out of the basin. Porosity predictions in such cases must rely on knowledge of diagenesis and aspects of basin hydrodynamics.

  6. Computational Advances in Applied Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Advances in Applied Energy Computational Advances in Applied Energy Friedmann-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf (19.92 MB) More Documents & Publications Director's Perspective by George Miller Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Canadian Hydropower Association

  7. EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC - Mexico | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC - Mexico Order authorizing Credit Suisse Energy LLC to export electric energy to Mexico EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC (2.17 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-346 Credit Suisse Energy LLC - Canada EA-212-C Coral Power, LLC EA-341 Photovoltaic Technologies, LLC

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Y How happy i s the man who f i n d s wisdom, The man who gains understanding She i s more precious than corals, and none o f your h e a r t ' s desires can compare w i t h her, ...

  9. Final Technical Report to DOE for the Award DE-SC0004601

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-02-25

    Understanding the responses, adaptations and feedback mechanisms of biological communities to climate change is critical to project future state of earth and climate systems. Although significant amount of knowledge is available on the feedback responses of aboveground communities to climate change, little is known about the responses of belowground microbial communities due to the challenges in analyzing soil microbial community structure. Thus the goal overall goal of this study is to provide system-level, predictive mechanistic understanding of the temperature sensitivity of soil carbon (C) decomposition to climate warming by using cutting-edge integrated metagenomic technologies. Towards this goal, the following four objectives will be pursued: (i) To determine phylogenetic composition and metabolic diversity of microbial communities in the temperate grassland and tundra ecosystems; (ii) To delineate the responses of microbial community structure, functions and activities to climate change in the temperate grassland and tundra ecosystems; (iii) To determine the temperature sensitivity of microbial respiration in soils with different mixtures of labile versus recalcitrant C, and the underlying microbiological basis for temperature sensitivity of these pools; and (iv) To synthesize all experimental data for revealing microbial control of ecosystem carbon processes in responses to climate change. We have achieved our goals for all four proposed objectives. First, we determined the phylogenetic composition and metabolic diversity of microbial communities in the temperate grassland and tundra ecosystems. For this objective, we have developed a novel phasing amplicon sequencing (PAS) approach for MiSeq sequencing of amplicons. This approach has been used for sequencing various phylogenetic and functional genes related to ecosystem functioning. A comprehensive functional gene array (e.g., GeoChip 5.0) has also been developed and used for soil microbial community

  10. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-29

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  11. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  12. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, A. L.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Coon, E. T.; Wilson, C. J.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-04-14

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore » to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  13. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Coon, Ethan T.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. Thus, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth system models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth system models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface–subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurements to achieve the goals of constructing a process-rich model based on plausible parameters and to identify fine-scale controls of ALT in ice-wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze–thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g., troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.

  14. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Coon, Ethan T.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. Thus, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth system models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth system models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface–subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore » to achieve the goals of constructing a process-rich model based on plausible parameters and to identify fine-scale controls of ALT in ice-wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze–thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g., troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  15. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchley, A. L.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Coon, E. T.; Wilson, C. J.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-04-14

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurements to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.

  16. NUCLEAR FORENSICS ANALYSIS CENTER FORENSIC ANALYSIS TO DATA INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T.

    2011-02-07

    The Nuclear Forensics Analysis Center (NFAC) is part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is one of only two USG National Laboratories accredited to perform nuclear forensic analyses to the requirements of ISO 17025. SRNL NFAC is capable of analyzing nuclear and radiological samples from bulk material to ultra-trace samples. NFAC provides analytical support to the FBI's Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), which is located within SRNL. REEF gives the FBI the capability to perform traditional forensics on material that is radiological and/or is contaminated. SRNL is engaged in research and development efforts to improve the USG technical nuclear forensics capabilities. Research includes improving predictive signatures and developing a database containing comparative samples.

  17. Drilling ban yields verdict

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nation, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews a lawsuit which is under appeal by the State of Michigan regarding a takings claim filed over a petroleum exploration site. The dispute arose as a result of a 1987 decision by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources forbidding the property owners from developing the mineral rights leased to Miller Brothers in the Huron/Manistee National Forest. This area is bisected by a trend of Silurian Niagaran reef complexes which has a known production history throughout the State. The dunes area of the national forest has been deemed a wilderness area. As a result of the State's decision, the courts have awarded a sum of 71 million dollars to the developer to cover damages and lost resources. The reserve estimates were taken from adjacent areas which showed that the Niagaran reefs are relatively consistent in their yield.

  18. Jurassic carbonate reservoirs of the Amu Darya Basin, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shein, V.S.; Fortunatova, N.K.; Neilson, J.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Amu Darya Basin is a world class hydrocarbon province. Current reserves estimates are 220 TCF of gas and 800 MMbbl of oil and condensate, 50% of which is reservoired in Late Jurassic carbonates. Exploration opportunities still exist in large parts of the basin which are relatively undrilled. Within the 100-600m thick carbonate sequence, reservoir facies include reefs, shelf grainstones and turbidite fares. The major seal are Kimmeridgian - Tithonian evaporates which are up to 1600m thick in the basin centre. Stratigraphic trapping is common and often enhanced by structural modifications. The reservoirs are in communication with a major gas-prone Early-Middle Jurassic source rock. Oil-prone source rocks are thought to occur in basinal sediments which are coeval with the Late Jurassic reservoirs. Carbonate sedimentation commenced during the Late Jurassic with the development of a ramp complex. This evolved into a rimmed shelf with barrier and pinnacle reefs. Several cycles of relative sea-level change (largely eustatic?) influence the carbonate ramp/shelf systems and effect the distribution of reservoir facies. Numerous empirical observations by VNIGNI scientists on carbonate successions have enabled them to develop mathematically calculated indices for facies and reservoir prediction, which have been applied successfully in the Amu Darya Basin. Reservoir quality in the limestones is strongly controlled by primary facies. Reefs and shelf grainstones display the best reservoir characteristics. Whilst many facies have good total porosity, it is only the reef and grainstone belts where connected porosity (with pore throats greater than 10um) becomes effective. Burial cements are rare. Freshwater solution and cementation has often improved or preserved primary porosity.

  19. Habitat planning, maintenance and management working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM), called {open_quotes}America`s Sea,{close_quotes} is actually a small ocean basin covering over 1.5 million square kilometers. Because of the multiple uses, diversity, and size of the Gulf`s resources, management is shared by a number of governmental agencies including the Minerals Management Service, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission, National Marine Fisheries Service, the US Coast Guard, the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the five Gulf states fisheries agencies. All of these entities share a common goal of achieving optimum sustainable yield to maximize geological, biological, social, and economic benefits from these resources. These entities also share a common theme that the successful management of the northern GOM requires maintenance and enhancement of both the quantity and quality of habitats. A closer look at the GOM shows the sediment to be clearly dominated by vast sand and mud plains. These soft bottom habitats are preferred by many groundfish and shrimp species and, thus, have given rise to large commercial fisheries on these stocks. Hard bottom and reef habitats, on the other hand, are limited to approximately 1.6% of the total area of the Gulf, so that, while there are high demands by commercial and recreational fishermen for reef associated species, the availability of habitat for these stocks is limited. The thousands of oil and gas structures placed in the Gulf have added significant amounts of new hard substrate. The rigs-to-reefs concept was a common sense idea with support from environmental user groups and the petroleum industry for preserving a limited but valuable habitat type. As long as maximizing long-term benefits from the Gulf s resources for the greatest number of users remains the goal, then programs such as Rigs-to-Reefs will remain an important tool for fisheries and habitat managers in the Gulf.

  20. Characteristics and development report for the MC3493 thermal battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, A.R.; Pitre, L.J.

    1981-09-01

    The design intent, product characteristics, and development history of the MC3493 fused-salt, fast-rise, pulse-type thermal battery are described. The MC3493 employs the Fe/Ca/LiCl.KCl/CaCrO/sub 4//Fe electrochemical system. The battery is a right-circular cylinder measuring 19.4 mm in diameter and 34.2 mm in length. The battery was designed to supply reefing-line cutter power for the B83 system.

  1. Subsidence in the craters of nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, D.E.; Swift, R.P.; Bryan, J.B.; Glenn, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The craters from high-yield nuclear tests at the Pacific Proving Ground are very broad and shallow in comparison with the bowl-shaped craters formed in continental rock at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and elsewhere. Attempts to explain the difference in terms of device yield (which was much larger in the Pacific tests than at NTS) have been generally unsatisfactory. We have for the first time successfully modeled the Koa Event, a representative coral-atoll test. On the basis of plausible assumptions about the geology and about the constitutive relations for coral, we have shown that the size and shape of the Koa crater can be accounted for by subsidence and liquefaction phenomena. If future studies confirm these assumptions, it will mean that some scaling formulas based on data from the Pacific will have to be revised to avoid overestimating weapons effects in continental geology. 41 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  2. COVER

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact S heet: Collaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) The C ollaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) i s a j oint p rocurement activity a mong t hree o f t he D epartment o f E nergy's N ational L aboratories launched i n 2 014 to b uild s tate---of---the---art h igh---performance c omputing t echnologies t hat a re e ssential f or supporting U.S. national nuclear security a nd a re k ey t ools u sed f or t echnology advancement a nd s cientific

  3. PACKAGE INCLUDES:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACKAGE INCLUDES: Airfare from Seattle, 4 & 5 Star Hotels, Transfers, Select Meals, Guided Tours and Excursions DAY 01: BANGKOK - ARRIVAL DAY 02: BANGKOK - SIGHTSEEING DAY 03: BANGKOK - FLOATING MARKET DAY 04: BANGKOK - AT LEISURE DAY 05: BANGKOK - CHIANG MAI BY AIR DAY 06: CHIANG MAI - SIGHTSEEING DAY 07: CHIANG MAI - ELEPHANT CAMP DAY 08: CHIANG MAI - PHUKET BY AIR DAY 09: PHUKET - PHI PHI ISLAND BY FERRY DAY 10: PHUKET - AT LEISURE DAY 11: PHUKET - CORAL ISLAND BY SPEEDBOAT DAY 12: PHUKET

  4. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saved by the Bell The bell is about to ring, and these students need to get to Teacher Turtle's class on time! Today, Teacher Turtle is teaching about rising sea temperatures and global warming. She has seen evidence of widespread coral bleaching and more frequent and intense ENSO (El Niño/Southern Oscillation) storm patterns around her home, the Pacific "warm pool."

  5. Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium Air-Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium Air-Batteries Bubbles Help Break Energy Storage Record for Lithium Air-Batteries Foam-base graphene keeps oxygen flowing in batteries that holds promise for electric vehicles January 25, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Using a new approach, the team built a graphene membrane for use in lithium-air batteries, which could, one day, replace conventional batteries in electric vehicles. Resembling coral, this porous graphene material

  6. Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical Engineering;

  7. University Launches Website for FIU Research Sponsored by EM | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Universidad del Turabo (Puerto Rico) 2016 Team roster: Harry Bonilla, Mechanical Engineering; Coral D. Colón, Electrical Engineering; Gabriel Cotto, Mechanical Engineering; Miguel Díaz, Mechanical Engineering; Eduardo Fenollal, Mechanical Engineering; Jorge W. Flores, Mechanical Engineering; Leishla González, Graphic Design (International School of Design and Architecture); Viany González, Industrial Engineering; Rubén I. Maldonado, Mechanical

  8. Dispersion Modeling Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Director's Perspective by George Miller Director's Perspective by George Miller Miller-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf (8.58 MB) More Documents & Publications Computational Advances in Applied Energy Fact Sheet: Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Livermore (CORAL) QER - Comment of Edison Electric Institute (EEI) 2

    Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Plan Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Plan Guide for the Disabled Veterans' Affirmative Action Program (DVAAP) FY16 DVAAP Plan.pdf (30.36 KB)

  9. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization of the peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein light- harvesting complex in Symbiodinium dinoflagellates and comparison of its structure and properties to that in Amphidinium carterae. Significance and Impact With the detailed 3-D structure of the complex, we can now study the molecular factors that contribute to highly efficient light harvesting by the organism and better understand how the organism inhibits coral bleaching. Research Details - Homology modeling, using the identified

  10. Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE-it gets into DOE's system and becomes a budget line item as well

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG March 14, 2013 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO North Convention Center, Coral AB Room Las Vegas, Nevada The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy (IE) will host an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) Meeting & National Indian Energy Policy Conversation on Thursday, March 14, 2013. Target Audience. IE has solicited nominations for new members to ICEIWG-current, new and potential new members

  11. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD

  12. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Patra, Prabir K.; Rödenbeck, Christian; Nemani, Rama; Bi, Jian; Piper, Stephen C.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2016-07-25

    Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear.more » Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena). Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W–63° E), neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50–60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8–11 Tg C yr−2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170–230 Tg C yr−1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by increased fall

  13. Paint Rock and southwest Paint Rock fields, Concho County, Texas: Strawn analogs of modern island carbonate facies of Ambergris Cay, Belize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, A.M.; Mazzullo, S.J.

    1987-02-01

    Lower Strawn (Desmoinesian Goen Limestone) reservoirs at Paint Rock and Southwest Paint Rock fields are a complex of carbonate and associated facies interpreted as having been deposited in various environments on and around large, emergent islands on shallow carbonate shelves. The origin and geometries of the component lithofacies in these fields, and their reservoir diagenetic histories, are similar to those presently accumulating on Ambergris Cay, a linear island complex on the northern shelf of Belize. Paint Rock field originated as a narrow, elongate Chaetetes reef trend that formed the foundation on which the overlying island facies were deposited. As on Ambergris Cay, these reef limestones developed extensive porosity during postdepositional subaerial exposure due to meteoric leaching. In contrast, Southwest Paint Rock field is cored by older island deposits rather than reef limestones. With ensuing stillstand or subsequent sea level rise, beach grainstones were deposited along the windward and leeward margins of the foundation highs in these fields. Tight lagoonal micrites and coals (peat-swamp facies) comprise the inner island facies, and are locally associated with porous supratidal dolomites. These island complexes are transected locally by tidal channels that are filled with nonporous micrites. Repeated sea level fluctuations during the history of these fields resulted in a characteristic cyclic stratigraphy of stacked island facies and reservoirs. The reservoirs in the field are developed in the bedrock or older island cores, as well as in the overlying beach facies and supratidal dolomites. These fields are mappable as linear stratigraphic traps with low-relief closure, and are readily identified by subsurface geologic and facies analyses. Similar shelf island-type fields analogous to these strawn and Holocene Belizean examples are found throughout the Midland basin and Eastern shelf.

  14. Environmental Impact Assessment in the marine environment: A comparison of legal frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerra, Flávia; Grilo, Catarina; Pedroso, Nuno M.; Cabral, Henrique

    2015-11-15

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is a well-established practice in most developed countries, even though its application to projects in the marine environment is at a much earlier stage of development. We use the Portuguese example to address marine EIA legislation since its exclusive economic zone (EEZ) is currently the third largest in the European Union and its EIA legislation does not require various offshore activities with potentially negative environmental impacts to undergo EIA before being licensed. This paper aims to determine whether three types of projects implemented within Portuguese maritime zones – artificial reefs using sunken ships, hydrocarbon prospecting and wave-energy generation – would benefit from application of an appropriately designed EIA. We have conducted a structured review of EIA legal provisions from seven other countries, and considered whether a full EIA was required for each project type. Consequently, 12 Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) have been compared to identify patterns of (dis)similarity across countries and project types. Additionally, we identified key descriptors and predicted impacts for each project type referred to in their EIS. The main conclusion is that ultimately all three projects would benefit from mandatory EIA in Portugal. This paper is relevant for countries with large maritime areas and underdeveloped marine EIA legislation, helping improve international policy-making relating to these three types of marine projects. - Highlights: • EIA is not mandatory for some project types developed in Portuguese maritime zones. • Artificial reefs, oil&gas prospecting and wave-energy licensing differ in 8 countries. • EIA should be mandatory in Portugal for artificial reefs and oil&gas prospecting. • However, an AEInc approach is enough for wave-energy projects in Portugal. • Findings could be extended to other EU countries with extensive maritime zones.

  15. Outlook for third Malaysian LNG plant brighter with big gas find

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-03

    Prospects for a third liquefied natural gas export complex in Malaysia are brighter than ever. A unit of Occidental Petroleum Corp. has drilled its fourth and biggest natural gas strike into a carbonate reef on Block SK-8 off Sarawak, East Malaysia, turning up still more potential reserves for the country's proposed third LNG plant. The find brings to a combined total of 5 tcf of gas in place in the four SK-8 fields for which Oxy has disclosed test results. Well details are given. The LNG project under study would make Malaysia the largest supplier of LNG to the rapidly expanding East Asian market, Oxy said.

  16. A parable of oil and water: Revisiting Prince William Sound, four years after

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeble, J.

    1993-12-31

    On Good Friday, March 24, 1989, the Exxon oil tanker Valdez foundered on Bligh Reef, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaska`s Prince William Sound. To Alaskans, especially fishing people, this was a shocking but not entirely unanticipated event, as there had been several near misses in the twelve years since the opening of oil shipping from Valdez, Alaska. This article revisits Prince William sound to evaluate both the lingering environmental effects and the socio-economic effects of the spill and the huge monetary settlement from the spills.

  17. Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Toelle

    2008-11-30

    This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted

  18. 2nd Else Kröner-Fresenius Symposium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resilience: Adapting Our Way | Department of Energy nd Annual Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change-Leaning into Our Resilience: Adapting Our Way 2nd Annual Tribal Leaders Summit on Climate Change-Leaning into Our Resilience: Adapting Our Way September 14, 2016 8:30AM PDT to September 15, 2016 4:30AM PDT Ferndale, Washington Silver Reef Hotel Casino Spa 4876 Haxton Way Ferndale, WA 98248 The Tulalip Tribes and Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians (ATNI) are hosting a two-day Tribal

  19. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baglin, Coral M.

    2012-10-15

    Nuclear structure and decay data pertaining to all nuclides with mass number A = 92 (As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd) have been compiled and evaluated, and incorporated into the ENSDF data file. All literature available by 15 September 2012 has been considered. This evaluation supersedes the previous publication for this mass chain (Coral M. Baglin, Nuclear Data Sheets 91, 423 (2000) (November 2000 cutoff date)), and subsequent unpublished reevaluations by C.M. Baglin for {sup 92}Kr (January 2004 literature cut-off) and {sup 92}Sr (August 2003 literature cut-off).

  20. Volume Reduction Research and Development Project (VORRP): Utilizing the TRUclean process: (Technical paper), September 2, 1986-September 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sunderland, N.R.

    1987-09-30

    This research was undertaken to determine if the AWC TRUclean process could remove radioactive contamination from differing soil matrices that were submitted by participating sites from around the nation. The TRUclean process removed plutonium from coral derived soil. Interest developed in applying the process to other radioactive contaminants and soil types. Soils from the Nevada Test Site (NTS); Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) in Colorado; FUSRAP site at Hazelwood, Missouri; Monsanto-Mound site in Ohio, and the Ft. Dix site in New Jersey were tested. The TRUclean process was able to effectively decontaminate soils and concentrate the contamination into a substantially smaller volume than the original soil. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Nevada Field Office News News Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 Darwin.Morgan@nnsa.doe.gov Kelly K. Snyder, 702-295-3521 Kelly.Snyder@nnsa.doe.gov HYDE PARK MIDDLE SCHOOL WINS NEVADA SCIENCE BOWL FOR MIDDLE SCHOOLS More than 100 students demonstrate their knowledge Hyde Park Middle School emerged undefeated to claim the championship of the Nevada Science Bowl. Twenty-one teams started the day Saturday morning at the double-elimination tournament held at Henderson International School. After a close contest in the final match, Coral Academy of Science

  2. NERSC-9 Nicholas J. Wright, NERSC-9 Chief Architect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Nicholas J. Wright, NERSC-9 Chief Architect NUG mee=ng March 24, LBNL 3/24/16 NERSC Timeline NRP complete 12.5 MW 2015 2016 2016-18 2020 2021 2024 2028 NERSC-8 Cori Phase II NERSC-8 Cori Phase I CRT 25MW upgrade CRT 35+ MW upgrade NERSC-10 Capable Exascale for broad Science Staff move in NERSC-9 150-300 Petaflops NERSC-11 5-10 Exaflops Edison Move Complete 2 APEX 2020 Current Status * 3 rd joint SC/NNSA procurement * ALer Trinity/NERSC-8 (2016) & CORAL (2018) * RFP draL technical specs

  3. Genomics in a changing arctic: critical questions await the molecular ecologist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Breen, Amy L.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Olson, Matthew S.; Näsholm, Torgny; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Weston, David J.

    2015-04-20

    Molecular ecology is poised to tackle a host of interesting questions in the coming years. Of particular importance to the molecular ecologist are new technologies and analytical approaches that provide opportunities to address questions previously unapproachable.The Arctic provides a unique and rapidly changing environment with a suite of emerging research needs that can be addressed through genetics and genomics. Here we highlight recent research on boreal and tundra ecosystems and put forth a series of questions related to plant and microbial responses to climate change that can benefit from technologies and analytical approaches contained within the molecular ecologist's toolbox. These questions include understanding (i) the mechanisms of plant acquisition and uptake of N in cold soils, (ii) how these processes are mediated by root traits, (iii) the role played by the plant microbiome in cycling C and nutrients within high-latitude ecosystems and (iv) plant adaptation to extreme Arctic climates. We highlight how contributions can be made in these areas through studies that target model and nonmodel organisms and emphasize that the sequencing of the Populus and Salix genomes provides a valuable resource for scientific discoveries related to the plant microbiome and plant adaptation in the Arctic. Moreover, there exists an exciting role to play in model development, including incorporating genetic and evolutionary knowledge into ecosystem and Earth System Models. In this regard, the molecular ecologist provides a valuable perspective on plant genetics as a driver for community biodiversity, and how ecological and evolutionary forces govern community dynamics in a rapidly changing climate.

  4. Leaf respiration (GlobResp) - global trait database supports Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Warren, Jeffrey; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-03-20

    Here we detail how Atkin and his colleagues compiled a global database (GlobResp) that details rates of leaf dark respiration and associated traits from sites that span Arctic tundra to tropical forests. This compilation builds upon earlier research (Reich et al., 1998; Wright et al., 2006) and was supplemented by recent field campaigns and unpublished data.In keeping with other trait databases, GlobResp provides insights on how physiological traits, especially rates of dark respiration, vary as a function of environment and how that variation can be used to inform terrestrial biosphere models and land surface components of Earth System Models. Although an important component of plant and ecosystem carbon (C) budgets (Wythers et al., 2013), respiration has only limited representation in models. Seen through the eyes of a plant scientist, Atkin et al. (2015) give readers a unique perspective on the climatic controls on respiration, thermal acclimation and evolutionary adaptation of dark respiration, and insights into the covariation of respiration with other leaf traits. We find there is ample evidence that once large databases are compiled, like GlobResp, they can reveal new knowledge of plant function and provide a valuable resource for hypothesis testing and model development.

  5. Integrated surface/subsurface permafrost thermal hydrology: Model formulation and proof-of-concept simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Painter, Scott L.; Coon, Ethan T.; Atchley, Adam L.; Berndt, Markus; Garimella, Rao; Moulton, J. David; Svyatskiy, Daniil; Wilson, Cathy J.

    2016-08-11

    The need to understand potential climate impacts and feedbacks in Arctic regions has prompted recent interest in modeling of permafrost dynamics in a warming climate. A new fine-scale integrated surface/subsurface thermal hydrology modeling capability is described and demonstrated in proof-of-concept simulations. The new modeling capability combines a surface energy balance model with recently developed three-dimensional subsurface thermal hydrology models and new models for nonisothermal surface water flows and snow distribution in the microtopography. Surface water flows are modeled using the diffusion wave equation extended to include energy transport and phase change of ponded water. Variation of snow depth in themore » microtopography, physically the result of wind scour, is also modeled heuristically with a diffusion wave equation. The multiple surface and subsurface processes are implemented by leveraging highly parallel community software. Fully integrated thermal hydrology simulations on the tilted open book catchment, an important test case for integrated surface/subsurface flow modeling, are presented. Fine-scale 100-year projections of the integrated permafrost thermal hydrological system on an ice wedge polygon at Barrow Alaska in a warming climate are also presented. Finally, these simulations demonstrate the feasibility of microtopography-resolving, process-rich simulations as a tool to help understand possible future evolution of the carbon-rich Arctic tundra in a warming climate.« less

  6. Global warming and climate change - predictive models for temperate and tropical regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malini, B.H.

    1997-12-31

    Based on the assumption of 4{degree}C increase of global temperature by the turn of 21st century due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases an attempt is made to study the possible variations in different climatic regimes. The predictive climatic water balance model for Hokkaido island of Japan (a temperate zone) indicates the possible occurrence of water deficit for two to three months, which is a unknown phenomenon in this region at present. Similarly, India which represents tropical region also will experience much drier climates with increased water deficit conditions. As a consequence, the thermal region of Hokkaido which at present is mostly Tundra and Micro thermal will change into a Meso thermal category. Similarly, the moisture regime which at present supports per humid (A2, A3 and A4) and Humid (B4) climates can support A1, B4, B3, B2 and B1 climates indicating a shift towards drier side of the climatic spectrum. Further, the predictive modes of both the regions have indicated increased evapotranspiration rates. Although there is not much of change in the overall thermal characteristics of the Indian region the moisture regime indicates a clear shift towards the aridity in the country.

  7. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, Tullis C; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna

    2014-11-07

    Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

  8. Amchitka, Alaska Site Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-15

    Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and heavily vegetated drainages. The central portion of the island has higher elevations and fewer lakes. The westernmost 3 miles of the island contains a windswept rocky plateau with sparse vegetation.

  9. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-03-18

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  10. Possible differences in biological availability of isotopes of plutonium: Report of a workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercher, J.R.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a workshop conducted on the apparent different bioavailability of isotopes {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu. There is a substantial body of evidence that {sup 238}Pu as commonly found in the environment is more biologically available than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Trinity Site, Nevada Test Site from nonnuclear and nuclear events, Rocky Flats, Enewetak and Bikini, and the arctic tundra support this conclusion and indicate that the bioavailability of {sup 238}Pu is more than an order of magnitude greater than that of {sup 239}Pu. Plant and soil studies from controlled environments and from Savannah River indicate no isotopic difference in availability of Pu to plants; whereas studies at the Trinity Site do suggest a difference. While it is possible that these observations can be explained by problems in the experimental procedure and analytical techniques, this possibility is remote given the ubiquitous nature of the observations. Studies of solubility of Pu in the stomach contents of cattle grazing at the Nevada Test Site and from fish from Bikini Atoll both found that {sup 238}Pu was more soluble than {sup 239}Pu. Studies of the Los Alamos effluent stream indicate that as particle size decreases, the content of {sup 238}Pu relative to {sup 239}Pu increases.

  11. Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcguire, David; Kicklighter, David W.; Gurney, Kevin R; Burnside, Todd; Melillo, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

  12. AmeriFlux US-An2 Anaktuvuk River Moderate Burn

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hobbie, John [Marine Biological Laboratory; Rocha, Adrian [Marine Biological Laboratory; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-An2 Anaktuvuk River Moderate Burn. Site Description - The Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska started on July 16, 2007 by lightning. It continued until the end of September when nearby lakes had already frozen over and burned >256,000 acres, creating a mosaic of patches that differed in burn severity. The Anaktuvuk River Severe Burn, Moderate Burn, and Unburned sites are 40 km to the west of the nearest road and were selected in late May 2008 to determine the effects of the fire on carbon, water, and energy exchanges during the growing season. Because the fire had burned through September of the previous year, initial deployment of flux towers occurred prior to any significant vegetative regrowth, and our sampling campaign captured the full growing season in 2008. The Moderate Burn site consisted of a large area with small patches of completely and partially burned tundra intermixed across the landscape.

  13. AmeriFlux US-An3 Anaktuvuk River Unburned

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hobbie, John [Marine Biological Laboratory; Rocha, Adrian [Marine Biological Laboratory; Shaver, Gaius [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-An3 Anaktuvuk River Unburned. Site Description - The Anaktuvuk River fire on the North Slope of Alaska started on July 16, 2007 by lightning. It continued until the end of September when nearby lakes had already frozen over and burned >256,000 acres, creating a mosaic of patches that differed in burn severity. The Anaktuvuk River Severe Burn, Moderate Burn, and Unburned sites are 40 km to the west of the nearest road and were selected in late May 2008 to determine the effects of the fire on carbon, water, and energy exchanges during the growing season. Because the fire had burned through September of the previous year, initial deployment of flux towers occurred prior to any significant vegetative regrowth, and our sampling campaign captured the full growing season in 2008. The Unburned site was located in a large area of tundra that was unaffected by the fire.

  14. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  15. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  16. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  17. Petroleum potential of the Amu Dar`ya Province, Western Uzbekistan and Eastern Turkmenistan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The Amu Dar`ya gas-oil province coincides with a Mesozoic and Cenozoic sag basin that developed on an intermontane depression filled largely by Permian-Triassic redbeds and volcanics. The stratigraphic section of the basin is divided into two parts by an extensive evaporite deposit of Kimmeridgian age. The section below the evaporite consists of Lower-Middle Jurassic clastic rocks overlain by reef-bearing carbonate rocks of Callovian and Oxfordian age. The upper Jurassic and Cretaceous-Paleogene section consists largely of clastic rocks. Structurally the province is a mosaic of highs and lows controlled by basement faults. The Kimmeridgian evaporite is a regional seal for numerous pools in the Callovian-Oxfordian carbonate rocks. In the border areas of the province where the evaporite is not present, the hydrocarbons have migrated farther upward to collect in Lower Cretaceous traps. Prospects for further discovery are excellent in most parts of the province, but are particularly favorable in carbonate reef buildups in the southeastern part of the province. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Quaternary depositional history of Providenciales and West Caicos, Turks and Caicos Islands, British West Indies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, B.W.; Glenister, B.F.; Ressmeyer, P.F.; Prezbindowski, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    The Turks and Caicos Islands represent the SE limit of emergent portions of the Bahamian Platform. Providenciales and West Caicos are low-lying islands, composed of Quaternary marine and eolian carbonates, that lie near the NW margin of the Caicos Bank. Highest elevations of marine skeletal-peletal grainstones on Providenciales are 6m above present s.l.; reefs associated with marine grainstones on West Caicos are 3-4m above s.l., and allowing for growth in several meters water depth support interpretation of maximum s.l. as +6m. Marine sediments are dated as approximately 50,000 C14 Years B.P. This suggests correlation with the mid-Wisconsin s.l. maximum and implies tectonic instability. Eolian dunes achieve an elevation of 48 m on Providenciales, where they are differentiated into five systems based on geomorphology and grain composition. Oolites, now generated exclusively in the narrow swash-zone, predominate on the Bank side whereas coated pellets and skeletal grains characterize calcarenites formed in the seaward reef tract. Fall in s.l. to the late Wisconsin minimum (17,000 years, perhaps -120m) generated successively lower arcs of dunes as carbonate productivity decreased, and resulted in subaerial diagenesis as the entire Bank emerged. Spectacular karst formation during the late Wisconsin as well as earlier s.l. lows provided conduits that allow restricted marine faunas to flourish in inland lakes and sink holes.

  19. Macrofossils of Bakken Formation (Devonian and Mississippian), Williston Basin, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thrasher, L.; Holland, F.D. Jr.

    1983-08-01

    Results of this study of the macrofossils of the Bakken Formation in North Dakota have reinforced the suggestion, based on previous paleontological work in Saskatchewan, that the Bakken is of both Devonian and Mississippian age, rather than being entirely of Lower Mississippian age as originally considered. Increased drilling and coring activity in the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin has provided the opportunity for acquiring a larger fauna that was previously available. Based on lithologic character, the Bakken has been divided into three informal members. These consist of a calcareous siltstone unit between two lithologically similar units of carbonaceous shale. These black shales contain similar faunas distinct from that of the middle member. The black shales contain inarticulate brachiopods, conchostracans, and rare cephalopods and fish remains as well as more abundant conodonts, ostracods, and palynomorphs. The middle siltstone unit contains a more abundant and diverse fauna consisting of inarticulate and articulate brachiopods together with corals, gastropods, cephalopods, ostracods, echinoderm remains, and trace fossils. This is the first report of cephalopods, conchostracans, ostracods, corals, trace fossils, and some of the brachiopods in the Bakken, although all, except the gastropods, have been reported from stratigraphic equivalents (Exshaw Formation of south-central Montana, the Leatham Formation of northeastern Utah, and the middle member of the Pilot Shale in western Utah and eastern Nevada).

  20. Operation Hardtack. Project 3. 2. Response of earth-confined flexible-arch structures in high-overpressure regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeDoux, J.C.; Rush, P.J.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine structural responses and failure criteria of earth-confined corrugated-steel flexible arches subjected to high overpressure blast loading from nuclear detonations. A flexible arch is considered as an arch structure whose ultimate supporting capacity is dependent upon confinement within a surrounding earth configuration. A collateral objective was to determine the radiation-shielding effectiveness of such structures with a minimum cover of five feet of coral sand. Because the soil and ground-water conditions at Eniwetok did not permit the placing of the steel arches below natural-grade level, the structures were confined within massive non-drag sensitive earthwork configurations of coral sand. Empirical determinations were made of the responses of (1) three earth-confined prefabricated corrugated-steel flexible arches when subjected to relatively long-duration blast loadings from a megaton range detonation; and (2) one similar earth-confined flexible-arch when subjected to relatively short-duration blast loadings from a kiloton-range detonation.

  1. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research and education center for Michigan, implemented through the Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, David A.; Harrison, William B.

    2014-01-28

    P50 probability range for all formations using DOE-NETL, 2010, storage resource estimation methodology). Incremental oil production resulting from successful implementation of CO2/EOR for the highest potential Middle Paleozoic reef reservoirs (Silurian, Northern Niagaran Reef trend) in Michigan is estimated at 130 to over 200 MMBO (22-33 Mm3). In addition, between 200 and 400 Mmt of CO2 could be sequestered in the course of successful deployment of CO2/EOR in the northern reef trend’s largest depleted (primary production) oil fields (those that have produced in excess of 500,000 BO; 80,000 m3of oil). • Effecting technology transfer to members of industry and governmental agencies by establishing an Internet Website at which all data, reports and results are accessible; publishing results in relevant journals; conducting technology transfer workshops as part of our role as the Michigan Center of the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council or any successor organization.

  2. Genomics in a changing arctic: critical questions await the molecular ecologist

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Breen, Amy L.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Olson, Matthew S.; Näsholm, Torgny; Ganeteg, Ulrika; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Weston, David J.

    2015-04-20

    Molecular ecology is poised to tackle a host of interesting questions in the coming years. Of particular importance to the molecular ecologist are new technologies and analytical approaches that provide opportunities to address questions previously unapproachable.The Arctic provides a unique and rapidly changing environment with a suite of emerging research needs that can be addressed through genetics and genomics. Here we highlight recent research on boreal and tundra ecosystems and put forth a series of questions related to plant and microbial responses to climate change that can benefit from technologies and analytical approaches contained within the molecular ecologist's toolbox. Thesemore » questions include understanding (i) the mechanisms of plant acquisition and uptake of N in cold soils, (ii) how these processes are mediated by root traits, (iii) the role played by the plant microbiome in cycling C and nutrients within high-latitude ecosystems and (iv) plant adaptation to extreme Arctic climates. We highlight how contributions can be made in these areas through studies that target model and nonmodel organisms and emphasize that the sequencing of the Populus and Salix genomes provides a valuable resource for scientific discoveries related to the plant microbiome and plant adaptation in the Arctic. Moreover, there exists an exciting role to play in model development, including incorporating genetic and evolutionary knowledge into ecosystem and Earth System Models. In this regard, the molecular ecologist provides a valuable perspective on plant genetics as a driver for community biodiversity, and how ecological and evolutionary forces govern community dynamics in a rapidly changing climate.« less

  3. Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, Walter C

    2002-08-15

    This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

  4. The sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to climatic change: A simulation of the middle Holocene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    A process-based ecosystem model, DEMETER, is used to simulate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to changes in climate. In this study, DEMETER is applied to the two following climatic regimes: (1) the modern observed climate and (2) a simulated mid-Holocene climate (6000 years before present). The mid-Holocene climate is simulated using the GENESIS global climate model, where shifts in the Earth`s orbital parameters result in warmer northern continents and enhanced monsoons in Asia, North Africa, and North America. DEMETER simulates large differences between modern and mid-Holocene vegetation cover: (1) mid-Holocene boreal forests extend farther poleward than present in much of Europe, Asia, and North America, and (2) mid-Holocene North African grasslands extend substantially farther north than present. The simulated patterns of mid-Holocene vegetation are consistent with many features of the paleobotanical record. Simulated mid-Holocene global net primary productivity is approximately 3% larger than present, largely due to the increase of boreal forest and tropical grasslands relative to tundra and desert. Global vegetation carbon is higher at 6 kyr B.P. compared to present by roughly the same amount (4%). Mid-Holocene global litter carbon is larger than present by 10%, while global soil carbon is approximately 1% less. Despite the regional changes in productivity and carbon storage the simulated total carbon storage potential of the terrestrial biosphere (not including changes in peat) does not change significantly between the two simulations. 53 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Extended abstracts for an international conference on the development of the North and problems of recultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, K.R.

    1994-12-31

    Ecological problems in many regions on Earth are the result of increasing technological pressure on the environment. These problems concern many of us and cause mankind to unite in order to search for means to protect the environment. Scientists, especially are responsible for the protection of the biosphere. The objective of this conference was to discuss the results of studies on the present condition of the environment in the Far North where the industrial pressure is increasing. The participants of this conference also offered and suggested various necessary measures for the protection of the region and restoration of its disturbed sites. The specific structural characteristics of the environment of the Far North, tundra and northern taiga, cause its fragility and vulnerability to anthropogenic impact. The destruction of the thin, weak layer of soil and vegetation cover changes the thermal balance and thus causes the development of erosion process, which in their turn increase the zone of the direct technogenous destruction. Self restoration processes in this harsh climate usually are slow. The preservation of the ecological integrity in the Far North is essential for the stability of the biosphere of the planet. The specifics of the natural conditions must be taken into account so that man will be able to develop the means of intensive agro-technology that can speed up the process of restoration of the biocenosis in the damaged areas. The extended abstracts of the conference reports that constitute this volume contain both theoretical discussions of problems of recultivation as well as accounts of experimental studies and applied explorations.

  6. Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Grammer

    2006-09-30

    This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point

  7. Histopathologic lesions in sea otters exposed to crude oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscomb, T.P.; Harris, R.K.; Moeller, R.B.; Pletcher, J.M.; Haebler, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    On 24 March 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska. In the months following the spill, over 1,000 sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from oil spill-affected areas are known to have died. The purpose of the study is to identify and describe histopathologic lesions associated with crude oil exposure in sea otters and to discuss possible pathogeneses of the lesions. Materials available included tissues from oil-contaminated and uncontaminated otters that died in rehabilitation centers following the oil spill and tissues from otters that were found dead in the oil spill-affected area with external oil present. Tissues from apparently normal sea otters from an area not contaminated by crude oil, were also examined.

  8. S. 1461: Oil Tanker Navigation Safety Act of 1989. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, August 1, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This bill would enhance the navigation safety of oil tankers. Title I, Provisions applicable to nationally licensed personnel, explains provisions relating to motor vehicle driving records of vessel personnel; dangerous drugs and other grounds for suspension or revocation; alcohol testing and alcohol rehabilitation; prohibition on service; vessel traffic services; oil tanker construction and size; oil spill contingency plans and approval; international inventory of equipment and contractors; national council on oil spill technology research and development; oil spill disaster assistance; impact on other laws; penalties; and a report on user fees. Title II, Provisions applicable with respect to Alaska pilotage at Port of Valdez, includes explanations of Bligh reef light; Prince William Sound VTS; oil spill recovery institute; and the Trans-Alaska pipeline liability fund. Title III, Provisions applicable to Mississippi River radio communications on Mississippi River, is also included.

  9. The Kirki episode: Detailed biomarker analysis provides some surprises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, T.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I.

    1996-12-31

    On Sunday 21st July 1991 the oil tanker Kirki caught fire when its bow broke off in heavy seas just 40 km off the Western Australian coastline near Jurien, approximately 200 km north of Perth. The tanker was carrying 80,000 tonnes of Murban light crude oil from the Middle East. Over the next three days approximately 10,000 tonnes of this oil was released into the marine environment, the heavy seas rapidly spreading the oil slick to a thin sheen. There was extensive media coverage of this event and it was widely considered that the spill posed a serious environmental threat to reef systems, recreational beaches and the local rock lobster fishery. This report describes results of analysis performed on several of the samples.

  10. In the wake of the Exxon Valdez

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, A.

    1990-01-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez went aground on Bligh Reef in Prince William Sound, Alaska, releasing more than ten million gallons of oil. This book begins with a dramatic, minute-by-minute account of the wreck itself and the woefully ineffective oil spill response plans. It explores the reactions and interactions of the oil industry and government officials. It includes interviews of Exxon executives, state and federal decision-makers, environmental scientists, and Native villagers. Drawing on these exclusive accounts plus the myriad public documents generated by the disaster, a compelling account of an environmental crisis beyond control and its devastating toll on Alaska's people, wildlife, and landscape is presented.

  11. Lithostratigraphy and environmental considerations of Cenomanian-Early Turonian shelf carbonates (Rumaila and Mishrif Formations) of Mesopotamian basin, middle and southern Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwani, G.H.M.; Aqrawi, A.A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Rumaila and Mishrif Formations form the major part of the Cenomanian early Turonian deposits of middle and southern Iraq. The Rumaila Formation consists of lithographic chalky limestone at the lower part and marly limestone and marl at the upper part. The formation represents deep off-shelf deposits, whereas the overlying Mishrif Formation is composed of various types of shallow-shelf carbonates such as rudist-bearing patchy reefs and lagoonal and off-shelf limestones. An environmental model is suggested to delineate the stratigraphic relationships between the above mentioned two formations and to correlate them with their equivalents in central Iraq (i.e., Mahilban, Fahad, and Maotsi Formations). The gradational contact between the two formations and the intertonguing with their equivalents are considered to be the most important stratigraphic phenomena.

  12. The natural history of Enewetak Atoll: Volume 1, The ecosystem: Environments, biotas, and processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaney, D.M.; Reese, E.S.; Burch, B.L.; Helfrich, P.

    1987-01-01

    The two volumes of The Natural History of Enewetak Atoll summarize research done at the Mid-Pacific Research Laboratory from 1954 to 1984 under the auspices of the Department of Energy. The history of the laboratory and the reasons for its support by the United States Department of Energy are described in Chapter 1 of Volume 1. Volume 1 provides a synthesis of the research carried out under the subject headings of the respective chapters. Certain of the chapters, e.g., those on geology, subtidal and intertidal environments and ecology, and those on reef processes and trophic relationships, summarize a great diversity of research carried out by many scientists for many years. In contrast, the chapters on meteorology and oceanography summarize research carried out under one integrated program involving fewer scientists working over a shorter period. Individual chapters are processed separately for the data base.

  13. Potential impact of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) on fisheries. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, E.P.; Hoss, D.E.; Matsumoto, W.M.; Peters, D.S.; Seki, M.P.

    1986-06-01

    The commercial development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) operations will involve some environmental perturbations for which there is no precedent experience. The pumping of very large volumes of warm surface water and cold deep water and its subsequent discharge will result in the impingement, entrainment, and redistribution of biota. Additional stresses to biota will be caused by biocide usage and temperature depressions. However, the artificial upwelling of nutrients associated with the pumping of cold deep water, and the artificial reef created by an OTEC plant may have positive effects on the local environment. Although more detailed information is needed to assess the net effect of an OTEC operation on fisheries, certain assumptions and calculations are made, supporting the conclusion that the potential risk to fisheries is not signnificant enough to deter the early development of OTEC. It will be necessary to monitor a commercial-scale plant in order to remove many of the remaining uncertainties.

  14. The Amphimedon queenslandica genome and the evolution of animal complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Mansi; Simakov, Oleg; Chapman, Jarrod; Fahey, Bryony; Gauthier, Marie E.A.; Mitros, Therese; Richards, Gemma S.; Conaco, Cecilia; Dacre, Michael; Hellsten, Uffe; Larroux, Claire; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Stanke, Mario; Adamska, Maja; Darling, Aaron; Degnan, Sandie M.; Oakley, Todd H.; Plachetzki, David C.; Zhai, Yufeng; Adamski, Marcin; Calcino, Andrew; Cummins, Scott F.; Goodstein, David M.; Harris, Christina; Jackson, Daniel J.; Leys, Sally P.; Shu, Shengqiang; Woodcroft, Ben J.; Vervoort, Michel; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Manning, Gerard; Degnan, Bernard M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2010-07-01

    Sponges are an ancient group of animals that diverged from other metazoans over 600 million years ago. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Amphimedon queenslandica, a demosponge from the Great Barrier Reef, and show that it is remarkably similar to other animal genomes in content, structure and organization. Comparative analysis enabled by the sponge sequence reveals genomic events linked to the origin and early evolution of animals, including the appearance, expansion, and diversification of pan-metazoan transcription factor, signaling pathway, and structural genes. This diverse 'toolkit' of genes correlates with critical aspects of all metazoan body plans, and comprises cell cycle control and growth, development, somatic and germ cell specification, cell adhesion, innate immunity, and allorecognition. Notably, many of the genes associated with the emergence of animals are also implicated in cancer, which arises from defects in basic processes associated with metazoan multicellularity.

  15. Stratigraphic analysis of 3-D and 2-D seismic data to delineate porous carbonate debris flow in permian strata along the northwestern margin of the Midlan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacht, J.A.; Brooks, L.; Messa, F.

    1995-12-31

    Carbonate debris flow are very important plays in Leonard strata along the northwestern margin of the Midland Basin. Delineation of these strata, however, is difficult and detailed stratigraphic analysis of both 2D and 3D seismic data is important in reducing risk. Porous debris flows are best developed during lowstand time. When sea-level falls to a point at or below the shelf margin, sand to boulder-sized clasts created by reef-front erosion are funneled through slope gullies onto the base of the slope. Large debris flows exhibit well-defined mounds which downlap onto the sequence boundary. Many of these flows, however, are too thin to exhibit discrete reflections. 3D seismic data are used to define subtle changes in amplitude and frequency which suggest presence of porous strata. Along the northwest shelf, porous debris flows exhibit lower amplitude (dim spots) and lower frequency than surrounding strata. They are commonly developed immediately downdip of major slump scars.

  16. Future global environmental changes: Comparison with past and present rates of change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, K.L. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Quantification of past and present rates of vegetation change provides a yardstick for the evaluation of future rates of change. Holocene and post-settlement rates of vegetation change were measured at Channel Islands and Capitol Reef National Parks, and at Indiana Dunes and Pictured Rocks National Lakeshores, using various paleoecological proxy data. Vegetation changes were quantified using several multivariate ordination techniques. Comparison of past vegetation changes due to climatic shifts, plant succession, and plant migration, with ongoing changes due to grazing, logging, exotic species invasions, and modified fire regimes, demonstrates that plant communities are presently suffering rates of change which are unprecedented in their severity for the Last 5000 years. The climatic warming projected for the next 50 years will exacerbate these ongoing changes, but win only be one of many variables operating in the unplanned experimental redesign our natural ecosystems.

  17. Petroleum prospects for offshore sedimentary basins in the eastern Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruns, T.R.; Vedder, J.G. )

    1990-06-01

    Intra-arc basins in the Buka-Bougainville region of Papua New Guinea and in the Solomon Islands contain thick sedimentary sequences that may be prospective for petroleum. The Queen Emma basin, between Bougainville and New Ireland, contains as much as 8 km of deformed Oligocene and younger strata. The Central Solomons Trough, which underlies New Georgia Sound, is a composite intra-arc basin that contains late Oligocene and younger strata as much as 7 km thick. Farther east, beneath Indispensable Strait, the down-faulted Indispensable basin locally contains as much as 5.4 km of Miocene( ) and younger strata, and the offshore part of Mbokokimbo basin off eastern Guadalcanal includes 6 km or more of late Miocene and younger strata. All of these basins have some of the attributes necessary to generate and trap petroleum. Structural and stratigraphic traps are common, including faulted anticlines, sedimentary wedges, and carbonate reefs and reef-derived deposits on submarine ridges and along the basin margins. The thickness of the basin deposits ensures that some strata are buried deeply enough to be within the thermal regime required for hydrocarbon generation. However, little source or reservoir rock information is available because of the lack of detailed surface and subsurface stratigraphy. Moreover, much of the basin sediment is likely to consist of volcaniclastic material, derived from uplifted volcanogenic rocks surrounding the basins, and may be poor in source and reservoir rocks. Until additional stratigraphic information is available, analysis of the petroleum potential of these basins is a matter of conjecture.

  18. Regional geology of Georges Bank basin - OCS Sale 42 drilling results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    High, L.R. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Industry bid aggressively in OCS Sale 42, spending $816 million. Eight wildcats were drilled in 1981-82 to test 5 major plays. All wells were dry; no potential reservoir or source rocks were found. The tectonic-stratigraphic framework of the Georges Bank basin is that of an Atlantic-type plate margin. Two major unconformities divide the section into prerift, synrift, and postrift sequences. The prerift sequence consists of Paleozoic metasediments in basement fault blocks. Synrift sediments consist of Newark Group equivalents: the Argo Salt and the Iroquoi Formation. The postrift sequence consists of Mohican red beds overlain by progradational wedges, with the carbonate Abenaki Formation at the base. The objective in 4 of the 8 wildcats was the Iroquois Formation. Mobil 312-1 and Shell 357-1 were drilled into a seismic anomaly interpreted to be a reef. This structure was found to be a complex carbonate mound. Exxon 975-1 was drilled on a seismic amplitude anomaly variously interpreted to be the result of salt, coal, or porous carbonates. This anomaly proved to be caused by a salt bed. The objective in Shell 410-1R was carbonate banks over a basement horst block. No significant zones of porosity were found. The remaining 4 wildcats were drilled on Abenaki prospects. Mobil 273-1, Tenneco 187-1d, and Conoco 145-1 were drilled for possible carbonate banks over a salt structure. Only thin oolitic grainstone intervals were found. Exxon 133-1 was based on a seismic anomaly interpreted to be a patch reef. This feature was found to be a volcanic cone.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Coraliomargarita akajimensis type strain (04OKA010-24T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Abt, Birte; Brambilla, Evelyne; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Desphande, Shweta; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Held, Brittany; Brettin, Thomas; Tapia, Roxanne; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Gö ker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-06-25

    Coraliomargarita akajimensis Yoon et al. 2007 the type species of the genus Coraliomargarita. C. akajimensis is an obligately aerobic, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile, spherical bacterium which was isolated from seawater surrounding the hard coral Galaxea fascicularis. C. akajimensis organism is of special interest because of its phylogenetic position in a genomically purely studied area in the bacterial diversity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Puniceicoccaceae. The 3,750,771 bp long genome with its 3,137 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  1. Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

    2013-06-04

    Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  3. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31

    , and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System

  4. Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

  5. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 2. inventories of transuranium elements in surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Robison, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    This is the second of three reports on Bikini sediment studies, which discusses the concentrations and inventories of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in sediments from the lagoon. Surface sediment samples were collected from 87 locations over the entire lagoon at Bikini Atoll during 1979. The collections were made to map the distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred in the composition of the sediment as a result of the testing program. Present inventories for {sup 241}Am and {sup 239+240}Pu in the surface 2 cm of sediment are estimated to be 14 and 17 TBq, respectively. These values are estimated to represent only 14% of the total inventory in the sediment column. Sediment inventories of {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are changing only slowly with time through chemical- physical processes that continuously mobilize small amounts of the transuranics to the water column. The lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with deposits logoonward of the eastern reef.

  6. Geology of north-central Delaware basin, Eddy and Lea Counties, New Mexico: its hydrocarbon potential, focusing on 12 townships centered on WIPP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheeseman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site is located within the Carlsbad potash mining area, southeastern New Mexico, about 20 mi east of Carlsbad. Structurally, the WIPP site is located in the north-central part of the Delaware basin, which yields hydrocarbon production from the following: the Ordovician Ellenburger; the Pennsylvanian Morrow (gas), Atoka (oil and gas), and Strawn (reef oil) intervals; the Wolfcamp (gas) and Bone Spring (oil) formations of lowermost Permian; the Permian Yates (800-3500 ft deep), Queen, and Seven Rivers Formations; and the Delaware Mountain Group (4700-5200 ft deep). Structure contour maps demonstrate favorable Bone Spring conditions north of the WIPP site and the centrally located Delaware targets, as well as important Morrow development in the southern part. Five prospects are explored, and two are especially promising. Five anticlinal trends in this 12-township area bear field names as a result of production: Big Eddy, South Salt Lake, Cabin Lake, Los Medanos, and Sand Dunes. The Department of Energy's WIPP project is a planned repository for nuclear waste; despite centering on a deep dry hole, it occurs just northeast of productive Morrow formation. Whereas the successful tests seem concentrated on the structural highs, significant wells produce offtrend; the WIPP site lies in a syncline.

  7. The petroleum geologic characteristics of Sichuan basin, central China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, Li De )

    1991-03-01

    Sichuan basin is the main gas producer of China. It covers an area of 230,000 km{sup 2}. The evolution of this basin since Meso-Cenozoic was influenced by both trans-Eurasia Tethys tectonism from the west and the circum-Pacific tectonism from the east. So it has dual characteristics, compressional and tensional. The northward-moving Indian Plate resulted in a series of thrust fault zones along the Longmenshan western margin of Sichuan basin. Jurassic oil pools and Triassic, Permian, Carboniferous, and Sinian gas pools are present, where a series of box-like anticlines, comblike anticlines, and gentle slope dome anticlines, and gentle slope dome anticline, carbonate reef buildups are the main trap types. Significant role of fractures and caves of carbonate reservoir formations in Sichuan basin affects the production capacity of gas/oil wells and abundances of gas/oil reserves. Three-dimensional seismic methods are used to predict the unconformities and the paleokarst and fracture zones. Acidizing treatments were used for well completions.

  8. Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  9. CAMEO-Valdez: A user's perspective. [Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, T.J.

    1990-01-11

    On the morning of March 24, 1989, the tanker EXXON VALDEZ ran aground on Bligh Reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound. The vessel was carrying over 53 million gallons of North Slope crude oil of which almost 11 million gallons were spilled in the water. The immediately impacted area included most of the western part of the Sound, but eventually, the area expanded to include parts of Seward, Homer, and Kodiak. This event constituted the worst oil spill in the history of this country, and was identified as a 'spill of national significance.' A major response to clean up the oil by EXXON, which was closely monitored by Federal and State agencies and various interest groups, was necessary. Early in the response it was obvious to the Federal On-Scene Coordinator (FOSC) that a computer-aided management system was necessary to monitor the progress of the spill clean-up operations. This paper will describe CAMEO (Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations) - Valdez, developed for the FOSC by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration acting in its role as the Scientific Support Coordinator (SSC). A discussion of how CAMEO was used and an evaluation of its effectiveness will also be presented.

  10. Oceans '86 conference record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    These five volumes represent the proceedings of the Oceans '86 Conference Washington, DC, 23-25 September 1986. Volume 1 includes papers on Underwater Photography and Sensing; Marine Recreation; Diving; CTACTS (Charleston Tactical Aircrew Combat Training System); Offshore and Coastal Structures; Underwater Welding, Burning and Cutting; Advances in Ocean Mapping; Ocean Energy; Biofouling and Corrosion; Moorings, Cables and Connections; Marine Minerals; Remote Sensing and Satellites; and Acoustics Analysis. Volume 2 covers Data Base Management; Modeling and Simulation; Ocean Current Simulation; Instrumentation; Artificial Reefs and Fisheries; US Status and Trends; Education and Technology Transfer; Economic Potential and Coastal Zone Management; and Water Quality. Volume 3 includes papers on National and Regional Monitoring Strategies; New Techniques and Strategies for Monitoring; Indicator Parameters/Organisms; Historical Data; Crystal Cube for Coastal and Estuarine Degradation; and the Monitoring Gap. Volume 4 covers the Organotin Symposium - Chemistry; Toxicity Studies; and Environmental Monitoring and Modeling. Volume 5 includes papers on Advances in Oceanography; Applied Oceanography; Unmanned Vehicles and ROV's; Manned Vehicles; and Oceanographic Ships.

  11. Benthic foraminifera of Puerto Rican mangrove-lagoon systems: Potential for paleoenvironmental interpretations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culver, S.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Recent foraminiferal assemblages from four traverses across mangrove-lagoonal environments off Puerto Rico exhibit patterns of distribution that should be useful in paleoenvironmental interpretations. Variations in sediment substrate type, abundance and distribution of marine vegetation, and degree of exposure to wave and current activity appear to be important factors related to foraminiferal distributions and abundances. Cluster analysis of foraminiferal abundance data distinguishes four major assemblages. Other generally recognizable trends in foraminiferal assemblages include: offshore increase in species diversity; offshore increase in percent miliolids while percent rotaliids remain more or less constant; small peaks in percent textulariids immediately adjacent to mangrove growth; almost 100% agglutinated assemblages in fully mangrove environments; offshore increase in foraminiferal number except in areas of abundant Halimeda plate production where numbers of foraminifera are diluted; restriction of high abundances of Fissurina, Nonionella, Fursenkoina and Helenina to lagoons behind mangrove islands; restrictions of high abundances of Rosalina, Cibicides, Discorbis, Spiroloculina, Cyclogyra, Quinqueloculina, Amphistegina, Peneroplis and Archaias to lagoons seaward of mangrove islands. These trends provide a micropaleontological link between a potential petroleum source, mangrove swamps, and the potential petroleum reservoir, reef rocks.

  12. The Oil Pollution Act of 1990: Legislation in the wake of a crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grumbles, B.H.; Manley, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The pattern is nothing new. Congress, like any other institution, needs nudging-sometimes gentle, sometimes jolting-before it responds. An environmental crisis prompts a congressional reaction, sometimes an overreaction. The discovery of contamination at Love Canal prompted enactment of Superfund; the disaster at Bhopal, India, led to the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act; and the collision of the Exxon Valdez brought about the enactment of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. For better or for worse, the pattern of environmental crisis and legislative response remains. March 24, 1989, marked the beginning of a new age in federal and state oil spill law. After the Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh reef and spewed 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound, Alaska congressional debate on comprehensive federal legislation would never be the same. The stalemate that characterized previous congressional efforts seemed to disappear overnight. Major differences between the two chambers were either eliminated or reduced, and only 4 major issues had to be negotiated: international protocols; technical requirements relating to double hulls; cargo owner liability; state and private industry roles in oil spill contingency planning, response and cleanup efforts. This article discusses the legal manuvering and major provisions of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990.

  13. New venture opportunities in Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, M.C.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Some parts of Bolivia are at a semi-mature level of exploration. Other large regions are underdrilled; some have not been drilled at all, for example the Altiplano (early discouragement) and Northern Bolivia (remoteness, unresolved stratigraphy and, in the Northern Subandes, structural complexity). Now that more geological data are becoming available and new contracts, favorable to overseas investors, have been formulated, an exploration renewal is underway, backed by the major and many leading independent companies. Half the former and current producing fields are located in the Southern Subandes-an area where until very recently no seismic exploration had been carried out. Modern seismic techniques allied to fold-thrust models applied successfully elsewhere by overseas companies are expected to yield a stream of new fields and deep pool discoveries in this region. Conditions are also favorable for production enhancement using horizontal drilling. In the adjacent Foothills, Boomerang and Chaco fields, the relationships between trap development and migration are being understood. Improved knowledge of potential reservoir distribution (particularly Silurian reefs and Cretaceous non-marine sands) will improve drilling success in these areas. Of the higher risk areas, the Altiplano is relatively accessible and straddles potential export routes but has escaped serious exploration until now, despite the presence of seeps and large structures. Northern Bolivia is one of the least explored segments of the Subandean chain but numerous seeps and recent discoveries demonstrate hydrocarbon availability.

  14. Petroleum geology of Azov-Black Sea region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukin, A.; Trofimenko, G.

    1995-08-01

    The main features of tectonics, stratigraphy, paleogeography, lithology, hydrogeology, geothermics and hydrocarbon-bearingness of Azov-Black Sea Region are characterized on the basis of present-day data. Among the most prospective petroliferous complexes one ought to mention: Paleozoic (S - D - C{sub 1}) of Near-Dobrudga foredeep, Triassic - Jurassic of the Black Sea (shelf and continental slope); Lower Cretaceous of the various parts of the Region; Upper Cretaceous of the Black Sea shelf; Paleocene-Eocene of Azov Sea. In addition certain prospects are connected with Precambrian and Paleozoic basements within conjunction zone between Eastern-Europe platform and Scythian plate. Geodynamic evolution of the Region is considered with determination of tension and compression stages and characteristic of the main regularities of diapirs, mud volcanos, swells, horsts and grabens distribution. There determined the most interesting types of hydrocarbon traps connected with various tectonic forms, river and deltaic channels, bars, conturites, carbonate reefs, etc. Paleogeothermic and paleogeodynamic reconstructions allow to determine the main phases of oil and gas accumulation. The most prospective oil-gas-bearing zones and areas are mapped.

  15. Unfolding the high energy electron flux from CRRES fluxmeter measurements. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKellar, B.D.

    1996-12-01

    The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) was launched on 25 July 1990 to collect measurements in the earth`s radiation belts. One instrument, the High Energy Electron Fluxmeter (HEEF), measured the flux of electrons in 10 channels with energies between 1 MeV and 10 MeV. The channel sensitivities, Ri(E), have been calibrated and partially re-calibrated. The authors explore the errors introduced in unfolding the electron flux spectrum from the channel measurements and the propagation and growth of calibration and measurement errors. Using numerical experimentation, they fold the responses with known spectra to obtain simulated measurements, add random measurement and calibration errors, and unfold the spectra as 10-bin histograms which are compared with histograms of the original spectra. The authors observe that the shape (of the response functions) is the major factor in the growth of error in unfolding and in determining which type of error dominates the unfolding process. They conclude that successful unfolding of the electron flux is critically dependent upon the shape of the response functions. The re-calibration of the REEF must be accurately completed if reliable unfolds of the high energy electron flux are to be obtained.

  16. Basaltic island sand provenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsaglia, K.M. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Hawaiian Islands are an ideal location to study basaltic sand provenance in that they are a series of progressively older basaltic shield volcanoes with arid to humid microclimates. Sixty-two sand samples were collected from beaches on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kauai and petrographically analyzed. The major sand components are calcareous bioclasts, volcanic lithic fragments, and monomineralic grains of dense minerals and plagioclase. Proportions of these components vary from island to island, with bioclastic end members being more prevalent on older islands exhibiting well-developed fringing reef systems and volcanic end members more prevalent on younger, volcanically active islands. Climatic variations across the island of Hawaii are reflected in the percentage of weathered detritus, which is greater on the wetter, northern side of the island. The groundmass of glassy, basaltic lithics is predominantly black tachylite, with lesser brown sideromelane; microlitic and lathwork textures are more common than holohyaline vitric textures. Other common basaltic volcanic lithic fragments are holocrystalline aggregates of silt-sized pyroxene or olivine, opaque minerals and plagioclase. Sands derived from alkalic lavas are texturally and compositionally indistinguishable from sands derived from tholeiitic lavas. Although Hawaiian basaltic sands overlap in composition with magmatic arc-derived sands in terms of their relative QFL, QmPK and LmLvLs percentages, they are dissimilar in that they lack felsic components and are more enriched in lathwork volcanic lithic fragments, holocrystalline volcanic lithic fragments, and dense minerals.

  17. Deep-water density current deposits of Delaware Mountain Group (Permian), Delaware basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harms, J.C.; Williamson, C.R.

    1988-03-01

    The Guadalupian Delaware Mountain Group is a 1000-1600-m (3281-5250-ft) thick section of siltstone and sandstone deposited in a deep-water density-stratified basin surrounded by carbonate banks or reefs and broad shallow evaporite-clastic shelves. The most prevalent style of basinal deposition was suspension settling of silt. Laminated siltstone beds are laterally extensive and cover basin-floor topographic irregularities and flat-floored channels as much as 30 m (99 ft) deep and 1 km or more wide. Channels can be observed in outcrop at the basin margin and can be inferred from closely spaced wells in the basin. The channels are straight to slightly sinuous, trend at high angles to the basin margin, and extend at least 70 km (43 mi) into the basin. Sandstone beds, confined to channels, form numerous stratigraphic traps. Hydrocarbon sealing beds are provided by laminated organic siltstone, which laterally can form the erosional margin where channels are cut into siltstone beds. Thick beds of very fine-grained sandstones fill the channels. These sandstones contain abundant large and small-scale traction-current-produced stratification. These sandy channel deposits generally lack texturally graded sedimentation units and show no regular vertical sequence of stratification types or bed thickness. Exploration predictions based on submarine fan models formed by turbidity currents would anticipate very different proximal-distal changes in sandstone geometry and facies. 16 figures.

  18. Preservation of high primary porosity in Paleozoic crinoidal and bioclastic grainstones: Mississippian and Permian subsurface examples from western Canada and Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eby, D.E. ); Kirkby, K.C. )

    1991-03-01

    Limestone reservoirs with anomalously high porosity and permeability exist in several Paleozoic basinal settings in western North America. They are commonly either crinoidal or bioclastic grainstones that escaped the varied diagenetic environments that most carbonate shelves and slopes experience during sea-level fluctuations. Thus, these diagenetically 'conservative' settings can preserve most of the primary depositional porosity in calcarenites because of sedimentation and burial within normal marine basinal waters. These excellent reservoirs are often encased in deep marine, highly organic shales which may serve as both source rock and seal. Several subsurface examples of remarkable primary porosity occur within Mississippian Waulsortian buildups of western Canada and north-center Texas. Buildups within the Pekisko Formation of Alberta, for instance, contain abundant flanking crinoidal/bryozoan grainstones with up to 25% primary porosity and 10 d permeability. Muddy core facies with productive flank and capping calcarenites are up to 300 ft (90 m) thick and 600-1,200 ft (182-364 m) in diameter. The Bowar 'reef complex' in the Chappel Formation of Stephens County, Texas (2.6 MMBO to date) is similar in many respects to the Canadian buildups. Diagenetic 'conservatism' has also promoted excellent reservoir quality within the outer slope to basinal lower Permian bioclastic grain-flow deposit ('Wolfcamp detrital') plays of the eastern Midland basin where significant diagenesis was arrested after basinal deposition. Interpretations of these examples based upon core and outcrop control provide analogs for future exploration and exploitation in highly porous basinal carbonate reservoirs.

  19. Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

    2009-03-29

    Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

  20. Marine04 Marine radiocarbon age calibration, 26 ? 0 ka BP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughen, K; Baille, M; Bard, E; Beck, J; Bertrand, C; Blackwell, P; Buck, C; Burr, G; Cutler, K; Damon, P; Edwards, R; Fairbanks, R; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T; Kromer, B; McCormac, F; Manning, S; Bronk-Ramsey, C; Reimer, P; Reimer, R; Remmele, S; Southon, J; Stuiver, M; Talamo, S; Taylor, F; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C

    2004-11-01

    New radiocarbon calibration curves, IntCal04 and Marine04, have been constructed and internationally ratified to replace the terrestrial and marine components of IntCal98. The new calibration datasets extend an additional 2000 years, from 0-26 ka cal BP (Before Present, 0 cal BP = AD 1950), and provide much higher resolution, greater precision and more detailed structure than IntCal98. For the Marine04 curve, dendrochronologically dated tree-ring samples, converted with a box-diffusion model to marine mixed-layer ages, cover the period from 0-10.5 ka cal BP. Beyond 10.5 ka cal BP, high-resolution marine data become available from foraminifera in varved sediments and U/Th-dated corals. The marine records are corrected with site-specific {sup 14}C reservoir age information to provide a single global marine mixed-layer calibration from 10.5-26.0 ka cal BP. A substantial enhancement relative to IntCal98 is the introduction of a random walk model, which takes into account the uncertainty in both the calendar age and the radiocarbon age to calculate the underlying calibration curve. The marine datasets and calibration curve for marine samples from the surface mixed layer (Marine04) are discussed here. The tree-ring datasets, sources of uncertainty, and regional offsets are presented in detail in a companion paper by Reimer et al.

  1. Tectonic controls on carbonate platform evolution in southern Papua New Guinea: Passive margin to foreland basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigram, C.J., Davies, P.J.; Feary, D.A.; Symonds, P.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The middle Oligocene collision of the northern margin of the Australian craton with a complex subduction system resulted in emplacement of a thrust mass and formation of a foreland basin that extended from the Coral Sea to the Indian Ocean. The distribution of carbonate-platform facies in southwestern Papua New Guinea reflects the transition from an Eocene passive margin setting to the early stages of foreland basin evolution. The initial basin configuration, with terrigenous sedimentation confined to the proximal foredeep, allowed carbonate deposition in the shallow environment adjacent to the peripheral forebulge. Subsequent southward migration of the basin resulted in a rapid increase in the area and thickness of carbonate-platform deposition. When the proximal foredeep became filled by detritus shed from the emerging orogen, clastic sediments buried the platform and terminated carbonate deposition. The history of the southern Papua New Guinea carbonate platform illustrates the paradox of carbonate deposition within the foreland basin, whereby basin configuration initially encourages thick and extensive carbonate deposition but inevitably leads to terrigenous inundation and the demise of the carbonate platform.

  2. Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

  3. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering text and exhibits: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Dry Gas Zone in the Elk Hills field is comprised of fourteen separate productive horizons deposited in the MYA Group of the San Joaquin Formation of Pliocene Age. Eighty-six separate Reservoir Units have been identified within the interval over an area roughly ten miles long and four miles wide. One basal Tulare sand, the Tulare B, was also included in the geologic study. Five earlier studies have been made of the Dry Gas Zone; each is referenced in the Appendix of this report. Most of these studies were geologic in nature, and none provided in-depth reservoir analyses. This report is made up of ten (10) separate volumes which include: engineering text and exhibits (white dot); engineering data (black dot); geologic text and tables (green dot); structure and isochore maps (light blue dot); structural cross sections (dark blue dot); stratigraphic cross sections (brown dot); geologic data sheets -book 1 (yellow dot); geologic data sheets - book 2 (orange dot); geologic data sheets - book 3 (red dot); and geologic data sheets - book 4 (pink or coral dot). Basic production, injection, pressure, and other assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy engineering staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made at independent verification.

  4. Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

  5. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for

  6. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 1. Diagnostic neutron experiments, Section 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, E.H.

    1985-09-01

    The effects of radiation on the passage of an electromagnetic wave along a cable are too complicated to predict accurately from theory alone. Also, near the bomb, the intensity during the shot is so high that the results of laboratory measurements must be extrapolated by too many orders of magnitude to be applied with much confidence to the test conditions. Therefore, a number of cables were installed near the bomb for the sole purpose of study the radiation effects, both to help correct the data obtained in the present tests and to help predict shielding requirements in future tests. The two types of effects looked for were (1) a simple attenuation of a voltage across the line due to the shunt conductance set up when Compton-recoil electrons from the gamma rays ionize the gas between the inner and outer conductors; and (2) an induced signal due to the Compton electrons being knocked out of the inner and outer conductors in unequal amounts. On the basis of the results, a discussion is given of the adequacy of the coral shielding actually used to protect the horizontal cable runs.

  7. Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

    1998-05-01

    The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

  8. Platelets to rings: Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate on Zn-Al layered double hydroxide morphology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yilmaz, Ceren; Unal, Ugur; Yagci Acar, Havva

    2012-03-15

    In the current study, influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the crystallization of Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated. Depending on the SDS concentration coral-like and for the first time ring-like morphologies were obtained in a urea-hydrolysis method. It was revealed that the surfactant level in the starting solution plays an important role in the morphology. Concentration of surfactant equal to or above the anion exchange capacity of the LDH is influential in creating different morphologies. Another important parameter was the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the surfactant. Surfactant concentrations well above CMC value resulted in ring-like structures. The crystallization mechanism was discussed. - Graphical abstract: Dependence of ZnAl LDH Morphology on SDS concentration. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-situ intercalation of SDS in ZnAl LDH was achieved via urea hydrolysis method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Morphology of ZnAl LDH intercalated with SDS depended on the SDS concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ring like morphology for SDS intercalated ZnAl LDH was obtained for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Growth mechanism was discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Template assisted growth of ZnAl LDH was proposed.

  9. Basin development, petrology, and paleogeography - Early Permian carbonates, northwestern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, K.L.; Isaacson, P.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Early Permian carbonate rocks of the Yaurichambi Formation in northwestern Bolivia demonstrate in-situ, low-paleolatitude development within a complexly interbedded sequence punctuated by siliciclastics apparently derived from a western source. The Yaurichambi Formation (Copacabana Group) occurs above a regional caliche surface that caps Upper Carboniferous quartzarenites. Lower beds of the formation are characterized by interbedded carbonate and quartz-rich lithologies. This interval is gradationally overlain by a shallowing-upward, carbonate-dominated sequence. Mud-rich wackestones and packstones grade upward to bioclastic packstones and grainstones. Common allochems in bioclastic-rich lithologies include echinoderms, brachiopods, fenestrate bryozoans, intraclasts, and less common corals. Uppermost beds contain abundant siliciclastic interbeds. Where exposed, this carbonate sequence is terminated by the Tiquina Sandstone. Permian rocks were deposited in a northwest-southeast-oriented basin. Siliciclastic flooding from the western and southwestern margin of the basin dominated throughout the Carboniferous and occurred intermittently during the Permian, with apparent shallowing to the south. A low-latitude paleogeographic setting for these rocks is indicated by the carbonate lithologies dominating the Lower Permian sequence. Sedimentary and diagenetic features diagnostic of semi-arid warm-water deposition include penecontemporaneous dolomites, fenestral fabric, and calcretes. Furthermore, the faunas are similar to those found in equivalent strata of the Permian basin area of west Texas, indicating that deposition occurred at relatively low latitudes.

  10. Paleoclimatology: Second clock supports orbital pacing of the ice ages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerr, R.A.

    1997-05-02

    For a while, it looked as if a water-filled crack in the Nevada desert might doom the accepted explanation of the ice ages. Twenty years ago, the so-called astronomical theory had carried the day. Oceanographers had found evidence implying that the march of ice ages over the last million years was paced by the cyclical stretching and squeezing of Earth`s orbit around the sun, which would have altered the way sunlight fell on the planet`s surface. But in 1988, researchers scuba diving in Nevada`s Devils Hole came up with a climate record--captured in carbonate deposits in the crack-that seemed to contradict this chronology. This article discusses the findings and the puzzles that still remain. The records of sea-level change in Barbados coral appear to be right and the astronomical theory is on solid ground using a new clock based on the radioactive decay of uranium-235 to protactinium-231. However, the Devils Hole record also seems to be correct.

  11. Chemical comparison of weathered spilled oil and Exxon/Valdez hold oil from an occupational health standpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griest, W.H.; Ho, Chen-h.; Guerin, M.R.; Tyndall, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon/Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef located off the coast of Alaska, and 11 million gallons of Northslope Alaska crude oil were spilled into Prince William Sound. More than 11,000 workers and uncounted volunteers participated in the clean up operation. The exposure of cleanup workers to spilled oil over several months of cleanup operations suggests the need for an assessment of any unusual occupational health hazards. To address this issue, weathered spilled oil and hold oil were subjected to biodirected chemical fractionation and target chemical analyses. Potential inhalation, ingestion, and dermal contact hazards were investigated. The characterization methods of the DOE/Office of Health and Environmental Research Synthetic Fuels Program were applied to samples related to the spill to permit inter-comparability with that data base. Two oil spills were obtained for characterization. Exxon/Valdez hold oil collected directly from the hold of the tanker was provided by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Also provided was a 75-days old weathered spilled oil sampled on June 6, 1989, from a skimmer collecting oil washed off of Knight Island. Because 40 wt % of the weathered oil consisted of non-oil materials such as sand, entrapped water, and leaves, an oil fraction was prepared by suspending the oil benzene/chloroform drying with anhydrous magnesium sulfate, filtering, and removing the solvent by rotary evaporation. The tests conducted here suggest that there is no unusual human health hazard associated with the weathered Exxon/Valdez spilled oil in the context of other petroleum crude oils. Clearly, the volatile organics in the freshly spilled oil present a potential inhalation hazard, but such a threat is considerably mitigated by weathering. The polar neutral chemical class fraction increases notably during weathering, but does not appear to represent an increased genotoxic hazard. 20 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  12. Bakken and other Devonian-Mississippian petroleum source rocks, northern Rocky Mtns.-Williston basin: Depositional and burial history and maturity estimations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The three-member Devonian-Mississippian Bakken-Exshaw organic-rich shaly facies is widely distributed in the northern U.S. and southern Canadian Cordillera. Equivalent facies are also present as far south as Utah and Nevada. Paleogeographically, these rocks thin markedly or pinchout to the west approximately along the Devonian-Mississippian carbonate reef-mound belt of the Cordilleran shelf margin. Although these rocks reach maximum organic richness approximately at the Devonian-Carboniferous transition, similar but somewhat less organic-rich Bakken-like beds are also present in underlying Upper Devonian and overlying Lower Carboniferous carbonate depositional cycles. At least ten cycles are identified in the underlying Duperow and Jefferson Formations, characterized by basal organic-rich Bakken-like shale or shaly carbonate that grades upward into carbonate mound or reefal beds, overlain by evaporite or solution breccia. Cycles in the overlying Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Formations, as many as 10-12 in number, are similar except that the carbonates are composed of algal-oolith, crinoid, or mixed skeletal beds, and end-cycle evaporitic units are less prevalent in the lower cycles. These dark shaly beds are the most important source of hydrocarbon reserves in Montana and the Williston basin. Maximum net thickness of the Devonian-Mississippian organic-rich facies is in the Williston basin. However, variable thicknesses of these potential source rocks is present in parts of Montana as far west as the thrust belt. Burial history studies suggest that in some areas these rocks are probably thermally immature. However, in much of the area original burial depths are sufficient for them to reach the thermally mature stage, and therefore are of importance to further exploration efforts in the Devonian-Mississippian Madison-Duperow-Jefferson Formations.

  13. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Sydow, M. (Pennzoil, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  14. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore » new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for

  15. Definition and interpretation of Holocene shorelines in the south Atlantic coastal zone, southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finkl, C.W. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    There is a wide variety of contemporary shorelines in southeastern Florida. Distinctive types range from rocky platforms, tidal flats, mangroves and marshes, to sand and gravel beaches. Because the natural sequence of shorelines in the urban coastal corridor from Miami to Palm Beach is partly obscured by dredge and fill operations initiated in the early 1920's, some coastal segments are subject to re-interpretation. Analysis of early aerial photographs, old coastal charts and bore log data indicates a much more complicated sequence of Recent coastlines than is generally appreciated. Before development, much of the coastal zone contained complicated networks of fresh-water marshes and lakes with lagoons, bays, and sounds lying behind extensively developed spits. The larger spits prograded southward (downdrift) forming long coastwise sounds that eventually led into fresh-water marshes such as Lake Mabel (now Port Everglades). When new inlets were cut to link the ICW with the sea, the spits were beheaded to form what are now called barrier islands. After subsequent inlet stabilization with inadequate sand bypassing, some spits became welded to the shore and others eroded away. Extension of boundaries marking the back sides of barriers landward into the marshes, to the position of the ICW, is not only an erroneous definition of barrier island width but dangerous for emergency (storm surge) planning because the barriers were never this wide. Beach ridge plains, ridge and swale topography, dune-covered limestone ridges, and some fossil reefs such as Key Biscayne have in addition been mistakenly identified as barrier islands.

  16. University of Washington`s radioecological studies in the Marshall Islands, 1946-1977

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, L.R.; Seymour, A.H.; Nevissi, A.E.

    1997-07-01

    Since 1946, personnel from the School of Fisheries, University of Washington, have studied the effects of nuclear detonations and the ensuing radioactivity on the marine and terrestrial environments throughout the Central Pacific. A collection of reports and publications about these activities plus a collection of several thousand samples from these periods are kept at the School of Fisheries. General findings from the surveys show that (1) fission products were prevalent in organisms of the terrestrial environment whereas activation products were prevalent in marine organisms; (2) the best biological indicators of fallout radionuclides by environments were (a) terrestrial-coconuts, land crabs; (b) reef-algae, invertebrates; and (c) marine-plankton, fish. Studies of plutonium and americium in Bikini Atoll showed that during 1971-1977 the highest concentrations of {sup 241}Am, 2.85 Bq g-{close_quote} (77 pCi g{sup -1}) and {sup 239,240}Pu, 4.44 Bq g{sup -1} (120 pCi g{sup -1}), in surface sediments were found in the northwest part of the lagoon. The concentrations in the bomb craters were substantially lower than these values. Concentrations of soluble and particulate plutonium and americium in surface and deep water samples showed distributions similar to the sediment samples. That is, the highest concentration of these radionuclides in the water column were at locations with highest sediment concentration. Continuous circulation of water in the lagoon and exchange of water with open ocean resulted in removal of 111 G Bq y{sup -1} (3 Ci y{sup -1}) {sup 241}Am and 222 G Bq y{sup -1} (6 Ci y{sup -1}) {sup 239,240}Pu into the North Equatorial Current. A summary of the surveys, findings, and the historical role of the Laboratory in radioecological studies of the Marshall Islands are presented. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Anatomy of success in oil and gas exploration in Pakistan, 1915--94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quadri, V.N.; Quadri, S.M.G.J.

    1996-05-13

    Pakistan, flanked by Iran, Afghanistan, China, and India, is the size of Texas and Louisiana combined. The Indus and Baluchistan basins cover 80% of Pakistan`s total area. The country also has 230,000 sq km of marine Exclusive Economic Zone. The law regarding E and P activity was promulgated in 1986, replacing the previous Petroleum (Production) Rules of 1949. As a result of the new Petroleum Policy implemented in March 1994 and streamlining of the bid review and award process, acreage leased including reconnaissance during 1994 was 355,541 sq km onshore and 120,640 sq km offshore, with the number of operating groups also a record high of 46. Although complex and disturbed as a result of collision tectonics, Pakistan`s geology is as fascinating as the surface geomorphology, from the complex compressional thrusted to the relatively simple extensional rifted, salt related to transform fault associated, the reefs, too, all impressive traps for petroleum, at times almost textbook examples. However, domestic oil production at yearend 1994 was about 53,251 b/d of oil and 1.7 bcfd of gas. Oil and gas have been found in the Potwar/Upper Indus basin and Lower Indus basin, and mainly gas with one gas/condensate discovery in the Sulaiman/Middle Indus basin. This article attempts to present brief case history outlines of typical, significant oil and gas discoveries of Pakistan 1915--94 with respect to the two main productive basins, their source and reservoir sequences, in order to determine the anatomy of success in exploration in Pakistan.

  18. Strike variability of carbonate platform margin stratal architecture and cycle stacking patterns: Outcrop and seismic examples from lower Permian depositional sequences of the Permian Basin, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitchen, W.M.

    1996-12-31

    Strike variability in stratal architecture, cycle stacking patterns and facies differentiation within sequences exemplifies the potential for differential stratigraphic response of platforms to eustasy. Variability exists within base-level cycles of several scales within a compound stratigraphic hierarchy, though the causes may vary among different scales. Cross-sections from outcrops in the Sierra Diablo document the framework and stacking pattern of 3rd-order sequences (HFS), including: two progradational middle Wolfcampian HFS (mW1-2), one backstepped upper Wolfcampian HFS (uW1), one progradational lower Leonardin HFS (L1), aggradational middle (L2) and upper Leonardian HFS (L3), three progradatic upper Leonardian HFS (L4-6), and two backstepped, aggradational upper Leonardian HFS (L7-8). Seismic lines from the northern Delaware and Midland Basins and San Simon Channel area document the regional consistency of 3rd-order sequence stacking patterns (a response to eustasy), but show variability related to local subsidence, antecedent topography (owing to deeper structures and platform margin erosion), windward vs. leeward facing, and siliciclastic sediment supply. Sequences L2 and L3 appear to exhibit the greatest variability in stacking pattern. Strike variability in 4th/5th-order cycle stacking patterns within 3rd-order sequences as studied in outcrop is greatest in sequences L2 and L3, in which headland-bight margin trends are developed on a lateral scale of 1-2 miles. Aggrational to backstepping reef-margin facies with steep ({le}35{degrees}) foreslopes developed along headlands. Mudstones abut these margin facies abruptly along headlands and may contain megabreccias at the toe-of-slope. More gently sloping (10-15{degrees}) {open_quotes}ramp{close_quotes} margin strata composed of fusulinid packstones characterize bights.

  19. Geologic evolution of the Late Permian Capitan shelf margin, northern Delaware basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G.A. )

    1991-03-01

    A two-phase model, based on outcrop and subsurface data rimming the northern half of the Delaware basin, characterizes the evolution of the late Guadalupian Capitan shelf margin, a margin that prograded up to 19 km basinward while an interval of over 700 m accumulated. Phase 1, during Seven Rivers shelf (early Capitan) deposition, accounts for 70-80% of the total progradation, over 50% of the total aggradation, and corresponds with shelf facies devoid of siliciclastics, emplacement of abundant carbonate debris on the slope and basin margin, and deposition of 50-70% of the Bell Canyon siliciclastic interval in the basin. The clastics bypassed the growing Capitan margin and were equally important to that of the allochthonous carbonate debris in filling accommodation space to facilitate progradation of the margin. The second phase, during Yates-Tansill (middle-upper Capitan) time, was dominated by aggradation, steepening of the shelf margin, deepening of the basin, and deposition of abundant siliciclastics on the shelf. This model differs from previous reconstructions that show uniform growth of the Capitan reef, and it contradicts the long-standing dogma of reciprocal sedimentation. This two-phase growth model adds insight into deposition of the two principle Guadalupian reservoir facies that account for nearly 50% of the Permian basin in-place oil reserves. Offlapping sheets of inner shelf carbonates (e.g., San Andres Formation, McElroy field) relate to periods of shelf progradation whereas widespread sheets of shelf clastics (e.g., Yates Formation, N. Ward Estes field) reflect periods of shelf aggradation. The model should be useful in evaluating the evolution of other shelves, particularly mixed shelves.

  20. Strike variability of carbonate platform margin stratal architecture and cycle stacking patterns: Outcrop and seismic examples from lower Permian depositional sequences of the Permian Basin, U. S. A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitchen, W.M. )

    1996-01-01

    Strike variability in stratal architecture, cycle stacking patterns and facies differentiation within sequences exemplifies the potential for differential stratigraphic response of platforms to eustasy. Variability exists within base-level cycles of several scales within a compound stratigraphic hierarchy, though the causes may vary among different scales. Cross-sections from outcrops in the Sierra Diablo document the framework and stacking pattern of 3rd-order sequences (HFS), including: two progradational middle Wolfcampian HFS (mW1-2), one backstepped upper Wolfcampian HFS (uW1), one progradational lower Leonardin HFS (L1), aggradational middle (L2) and upper Leonardian HFS (L3), three progradatic upper Leonardian HFS (L4-6), and two backstepped, aggradational upper Leonardian HFS (L7-8). Seismic lines from the northern Delaware and Midland Basins and San Simon Channel area document the regional consistency of 3rd-order sequence stacking patterns (a response to eustasy), but show variability related to local subsidence, antecedent topography (owing to deeper structures and platform margin erosion), windward vs. leeward facing, and siliciclastic sediment supply. Sequences L2 and L3 appear to exhibit the greatest variability in stacking pattern. Strike variability in 4th/5th-order cycle stacking patterns within 3rd-order sequences as studied in outcrop is greatest in sequences L2 and L3, in which headland-bight margin trends are developed on a lateral scale of 1-2 miles. Aggrational to backstepping reef-margin facies with steep ([le]35[degrees]) foreslopes developed along headlands. Mudstones abut these margin facies abruptly along headlands and may contain megabreccias at the toe-of-slope. More gently sloping (10-15[degrees]) [open quotes]ramp[close quotes] margin strata composed of fusulinid packstones characterize bights.

  1. Late Permian to mid-Cretaceous carbonate platform along the passive margin of the southeastern Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derin, B.; Garfunkel, Z.

    1988-08-01

    Starting from the Late Permian and throughout most of the Mesozoic, up to 5 km of shallow-water carbonates formed in a subsiding belt along the northern fringe of the Arabo-African continent, passing inland into thinner and clastic-rich sections. This sedimentation pattern was established in the Late Permian and evolved in several distinct stages that depended on global oscillations of sea level and local tectonic events. In Middle Triassic to early Liassic times, several pulses of faulting and magmatism, interpreted as rifting, occurred along the subsiding belt of carbonate deposition and produced a passive continental margin. Tectonic activity ended by the Roarcian, and since then a rather uniform shallow-water carbonate shelf formed. It was delimited by shoals of high-energy sediments and fringing reefs, inland of which low-energy carbonate muds and sometimes dolomite accumulated. By the Late Jurassic a more than 1.5 km-high continental slope developed, separating the shallow-water domain from a starved deep-water basin. In latest Jurassic and earliest Cretaceous time the activity of an intraplate hot spot caused extensive magmatism, uplifting, and erosion. The eroded material formed a thick sediment body in front of the continental slope. Since late Valanginian time, renewed regional subsidence and a rise in sea level led to a new phase of carbonate deposition over a wide shallow-water shelf. This was fringed by an accentuated continental slope covered by a basinward-thinning wedge-shaped apron of calciclastic sediments. This region was terminated by Senonian and later deformation related to plate collision in the Alpine orogenic belt.

  2. Dolomitization of coeval shelf and fore-shelf carbonates, Lower Permian, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Qiuchang, Ye )

    1991-03-01

    Coeval shelf and fore-shelf carbonates in Lower Permian (Leonardian) rocks in the Midland basin are pervasively dolomitized. Shelf strata consist of a regional mosaic of shelf margin reef, lagoon, and peritidal facies associated with contemporaneous evaporite deposition; fore-shelf facies consist of resedimented shelf margin deposits. Numerous relative sea-level fluctuations that resulted in the formation of Type 1 and 2 unconformities are recognized throughout this section. Mean stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of the shelf strate suggest that dolomitization occurred essentially syndepositionally, likely by interaction with normal marine( ) and hypersaline fluids. In fore-shelf strata petrographic evidence, in combination with paleotemperature estimates from isotopic data and the burial depth-temperature history of these rocks, suggest relatively early (late Permian) dolomitization in rock-dominated systems. Three possible modes of dolomitization could have affected these fore-shelf beds: (1) dolomitization by reflux of normal-marine and/or hypersaline fluids during sea level highstands or lowstands; (2) dolomitization by mixed meteoric-marine fluids during lowstands; and (3) replacement by calcic dolomites via reaction with circulating marine fluids during deposition and early, shallow burial without organic matter influences. The latter mode of origin, however, is favored for most of the rocks examined on the basis of the slightly positive carbon isotopic compositions, Sr versus MgCO{sub 3} compositions (mean Sr 61 ppm, mean MgCO{sub 3} 49.5), and low Mn contents (mean 61 ppm) of the dolomites, although later burial recrystallization is indicated by their relatively depleted isotopic compositions.

  3. Shelf margin bioherms and associated facies in the Lower Permian Hueco Group (Late Wolfcampian), Hueco Mountains, West Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahlman, G.P.; Tasker, D.R.; St. John, J.W.; Werle, K.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Late Wolfcampian phylloid algal/Tubiphytes biohermal complexes are exposed in three erosional oilers lying about 3 miles west of and parallel to the main Hueco Mountains in far West Texas. The biohermal complexes are located paleogeographically along the shelf margin between the Diablo Platform and Orogrande Basin. Based on fusulinids the shelf margin buildups correlate with well-bedded shelf carbonates of the type Hueco Group in the main Hueco Mountains. The phylloid algal/Tubiphytes shelf margin bioherms contain an upward shallowing facies succession, which, in ascending order, consists of: (1) phylloid algal wackestone-bafflestone, (2) phylloid algal-fusulinid bafflestone-packstone, and (3) Tubiphytes boundstone and Tubiphytes-fusulinid-phylloid algal packstone-grainstone. The crest of the southernmost outlier has a different type of bioherm that consists of nodular boundstones composed of calcisponges, encrusting bryozoans and laminar red algae. The shelf margin complexes prograded over slope facies of dark-gray cherty limestones, which generally lack skeletal fossils, but contain common ichnofossils in upper slope beds. Overlapping tongues and channels of lithoclastic-skeletal packstones and grainstones extend seaward from the phylloid algal/Tubiphytes bioherms into the dark-gray slope facies. Proximal backreef facies consist of mainly skeletal-peloidal packstones and wackestones. The Hueco Mountains outlier exposures are important because: (1) they confirm a Late Wolfcampian shelf margin with distinct topographic relief in the southern Orogrande Basin, and (2) they provide an easily accessible field laboratory where Wolfcampian shelf-to-basin facies relationships and shelf margin bioherms can be studied. Wolfcampian bioherms represent a significant stage in the evolutionary history of Late Paleozoic reef communities and form important petroleum reservoirs in the adjacent Permian Basin.

  4. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We present new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying δ13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and δ18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (δ18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on δ13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a

  5. Temporal and spatial variability of ooid sand shoals: Comparison of Mississippian of Kentucky and Quaternary of Bahamas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (USA))

    1989-08-01

    An examination of the lithology and topography of Andros Island, Bahamas, reveals it is a Pleistocene ooid sand shoal. A comparison with Joulters Cays (a modern ooid sand shoal directly to the north) shows that much of the original depositional topography is preserved through at least one cycle of sea level highstand and lowstand. Both the Pleistocene and the Holocene ooid sand bodies are a few kilometers to tens of kilometers wide. The total vertical relief of a single episode of Quaternary ooid sand deposition is more than 10 m and includes accumulation in tidal channels, shallow flat areas, and eolian dunes. Today, much of Andros Island is within 2 m of present sea level and is the site of a belt several kilometers wide consisting of muddy tidal flat sediments overlying an exposure surface. The site of ooid sand deposition and shoal complex formation is not continuous along shorelines, especially windward margins, but shifts abruptly along the margins of platforms as a result of minor fluctuations of sea level. Thus, it should be expected that ooid sand shoals (ancient and modern) should be in direct lateral and vertical contact with lagoons, tidal flats, and reefs. The Mississippian Slade Formation contains many of the features of Quaternary ooid sand accumulation: abrupt vertical and lateral gradations between oolitic grainstones, packstones, and lime mudstones, vertical relief of individual oolitic sedimentary packages up to 30 m (perhaps with eolian dunes) and numerous exposure surfaces of varying intensities. These characteristics suggest that this formation represents a time of rapid fluctuations of relative sea level and abrupt shifts in the sites of ooid sand shoal complexes.

  6. An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

    1995-10-01

    On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

  7. Eocene chert resources of Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carman, G.J.; St John, V.P.

    1986-05-01

    The Eocene Port Moresby beds consist of chert, siliceous argillite, and calcarenite in a 3000-m sequence. A northwest grain and severe topography at outcrop reflect 50/sup 0/-80/sup 0/ structural dips, northeastward-inclined, low-angle thrust faults, and high-angle reverse faults. Within the fault slices, symmetrical folds plunge toward the northwest, and syntaphral folds occur intermittently. The cherts are comprised of biogenic silica and rarer spherulitic, fibrous chalcedony in massive nodular concretions up to 2 m in diameter and as competent, repetitive, 10 to 30-cm thick beds. The calcarenites are richly nummulitic, partly silicified, and contain chert nodules. Radiolaria, planktonic foraminifera, and sponge spicules predominate over reworked fauna in the cherts. Microlaminations and sparse pyrite endorse the interpretation of sheltered, possibly deep, and rapid deposition in a reducing environment. Chert and cherty limestone crop out again, 200 km northwest at Hell's Gate, Saw Mountains. Oil and gas seeps in the intervening Lakekamu-Moresby Embayment were first recorded 75 years ago, and seismic interpretation confirms the presence of buried thrust folds. Gas and Oil fluorescence was recorded in four vintage wells, but none have tested the Eocene. Like the Monterey Formation, fractured radiolarian cherts have potential as a resource in terms of both reservoir and source. Moresby chert deposition is possibly related to opening of the Coral Sea. The chert diagenesis and thermal maturation were probably influenced by Paleogene overthrusting of oceanic crust 100 km east, Neogene uplift of the Mesozoic metamorphics in the 4000-m Owen Stanley Range, and consequential southwesterly detachment folding of the Tertiary section.

  8. Energy efficiency at the University of Miami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1996-07-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: ``To make UM one of the most energy efficient universities in the nation by the year 2000``. In order for the University to meet this goal the authors knew they would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past, each plant had excess capacity. At that time they also had identified about 600 tons of old falling-apart air conditioning equipment. The Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. In early 1991 Florida Power and Light offered a new CILC rate with criteria that the chilled water plants met. It allowed them to produce air conditioning at 5.8 cents a kWh, compared to 7.5 cents a kWh, at the buildings. This, added to the reality of not having to maintain or replace the old systems, made this the number 1 priority project. They were convinced that this could give them a competitive edge over other institutions because it insured that they could produce air conditioning at the least cost per square foot.

  9. Energy conservation at The University of Miami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, V.; Anzoategui, F.

    1995-06-01

    The University of Miami (UM) has embarked on a very important and worthwhile mission: {open_quotes}To make UM one of the most energy efficient Universities in the Nation by the year 2000.{close_quotes} In order for the University to meet this goal we knew we would need to take advantage of all the available technologies and address the freon issues. In June 1990 the Coral Gables Campus had five chilled Water Production Plants, each representing small independent systems serving from four to ten buildings. Because of energy conservation measures of the past (i.e. elimination, reheat, first generation lighting retrofits, and some diversity), each plant had excess capacity. At that time we also had identified about 600 tons of old falling apart air conditioning equipment. Our Capital Construction Program was beginning design efforts for a new Music Recital Hall and an addition to the Law Library. With all this considered it made sense to develop a common chilled water loop to connect these plants and provide a vehicle to capitalize on available capacity. As this concept took shape it became evident that a master chilled water loop encircling the entire campus would address the next 20 years of campus development. This 20 year plan would require various phases of development. Phase I would connect three chilled water production plants and enable us to supply chilled water to seven existing facilities with approximately 600 tons of old inefficient air conditioning equipment and supply chilled water to the new Law and Music facilities, (approximately 400 tons) without buying any additional chillers.

  10. An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

    2001-05-01

    Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

  11. Introduction: Enewetak Atoll and the PEACE program. [Pacific Enewetak Atoll Crater Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, T.W.; Wardlaw, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    An extensive study was made from June 1984 through August 1985 of the surface and subsurface configurations of two large nuclear craters on the northern side of Enewetak Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands. These craters, KOA and OAK, resulted from the near-surface detonation of two high-yield thermonuclear devices in 1958, when the atoll was part of the Pacific Proving Grounds. This multidisciplinary study was designed to produce a broad well-documented geologic, geophysical, and materials-properties data base for use in answering critical questions concerning craters formed by high-yield bursts. The study was part of a larger research initiative by the US Department of Defense to better understand high-yield, strategic-scale nuclear bursts and how Pacific Proving Grounds craters relate to the basing and targeting of nuclear-weapon systems and related national defense issues. The data gathered during the study of the Enewetak craters are applicable to many scientific topics well beyond cratering mechanics and other related strategic concerns of the US DOD. These scientific topics include the geologic evolution of the Pacific Basin, the biologic and geologic history of a coral atoll, the fluctuation of sea level in response to glaciation and deglaciation, the diagenetic history of carbonate rocks in relation to sea-level changes and the differing substrate-water geochemistries thus produced, the speciation and migration of marine biotas, and the biostratigraphic succession of biotas through time and the calibration of these events with an absolute isotopic time scale, to name a few.

  12. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon

  13. Time-lapse VSP data processing for monitoring CO2 injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie; Rutledge, James; Cheng, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    As a part of the effort of the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration supported by U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory, two sets of time-lapse VSPs were acquired and processed in oil fields undergoing CO{sub 2} injection. One set of VSPs was acquired at the Aneth oil field in Utah, the other set at the Scurry Area Canyon Reef Operators Committee (SACROC) field in West Texas. One baseline and two repeat VSP surveys were conducted from 2007 to 2009 at the Aneth oil field in Utah for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection. The aim of the time-lapse VSP surveys is to study the combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO{sub 2} sequestration in collaboration with Resolute Natural Resources, Inc. VSP data were acquired using a cemented geophone string with 60 levels at depth from 805 m to 1704 m, and CO{sub 2} is injected into a horizontal well nearby within the reservoir at depth approximately from 1730 m to 1780 m. For each VSP survey, the data were acquired for one zero-offset source location and seven offset source locations (Figure 1). The baseline VSP survey was conducted before the CO{sub 2} injection. More than ten thousand tons of CO{sub 2} was injected between each of the two repeat VSP surveys. There are three horizontal injection wells, all originating from the same vertical well. One is drilled towards Southeast, directly towards the monitoring well (Figure 2), and the other two towards Northwest, directly away from the monitoring well. The injection is into the top portion of the Desert Creek formation, just beneath the Gothic shale, which acts as the reservoir seal. The initial baseline acquisition was done in October 2007; subsequent time-lapse acquisitions were conducted in July 2008, and January 2009. The acquisition geometry is shown in Figure 1. Shot point 1 is the zero-offset source location, Shot points 2 to 8 are the seven offset VSPs, arranged in a quarter circle on the Northwest side of the

  14. Sediment studies at Bikini Atoll part 3. Inventories of some long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides associated with lagoon surface sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noshkin, V.E.

    1997-12-01

    Surface sediment samples were collected during 1979 from 87 locations in the lagoon at Bikini Atoll. The collections were made to better define the concentrations and distribution of long-lived radionuclides associated with the bottom material and to show what modifications occurred to the composition of the surface sediment from the nuclear testing program conducted by the United States at the Atoll between 1946 and 1958. This is the last of three reports on Bikini sediment studies. In this report, we discuss the concentrations and inventories of the residual long-lived gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediments from the lagoon. The gamma-emitting radionuclides detected most frequently in sediments collected in 1979, in addition to Americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) (discussed in the second report of this series), included Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), Bismuth-207 ({sup 207}Bi), Europium-155 ({sup 155}Eu), and Cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Other man-made, gamma-emitting radionuclides such as Europium-152,154 ({sup 152,154}Eu), Antimony-125 ({sup 125}Sb), and Rhodium-101,102m ({sup 101,102m}Rh) were occasionally measured above detection limits in sediments near test site locations. The mean inventories for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 207}Ei, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 60}Co in the surface 4 cm of the lagoon sediment to be 1.7, 0.56, 7.76, and 0.74 TBq, respectively. By June 1997, radioactive decay would reduce these values to 1.1, 0.38, 0.62, and 0.07 TBq, respectively. Some additional loss results from a combination of different processes that continuously mobilize and return some amount of the radionuclides to the water column. The water and dissolved constituents are removed from the lagoon through channels and exchange with the surface waters of the north equatorial Pacific Ocean. Highest levels of these radionuclides are found in surface deposits lagoonward of the Bravo Crater. Lowest concentrations and inventories are associated with sediment lagoonward of the eastern reef. The quantities in

  15. Overview of the design, construction, and operation of interstate liquid petroleum pipelines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pharris, T. C.; Kolpa, R. L.

    2008-01-31

    The U.S. liquid petroleum pipeline industry is large, diverse, and vital to the nation's economy. Comprised of approximately 200,000 miles of pipe in all fifty states, liquid petroleum pipelines carried more than 40 million barrels per day, or 4 trillion barrel-miles, of crude oil and refined products during 2001. That represents about 17% of all freight transported in the United States, yet the cost of doing so amounted to only 2% of the nation's freight bill. Approximately 66% of domestic petroleum transport (by ton-mile) occurs by pipeline, with marine movements accounting for 28% and rail and truck transport making up the balance. In 2004, the movement of crude petroleum by domestic federally regulated pipelines amounted to 599.6 billion tonmiles, while that of petroleum products amounted to 315.9 billion ton-miles (AOPL 2006). As an illustration of the low cost of pipeline transportation, the cost to move a barrel of gasoline from Houston, Texas, to New York Harbor is only 3 cents per gallon, which is a small fraction of the cost of gasoline to consumers. Pipelines may be small or large, up to 48 inches in diameter. Nearly all of the mainline pipe is buried, but other pipeline components such as pump stations are above ground. Some lines are as short as a mile, while others may extend 1,000 miles or more. Some are very simple, connecting a single source to a single destination, while others are very complex, having many sources, destinations, and interconnections. Many pipelines cross one or more state boundaries (interstate), while some are located within a single state (intrastate), and still others operate on the Outer Continental Shelf and may or may not extend into one or more states. U.S. pipelines are located in coastal plains, deserts, Arctic tundra, mountains, and more than a mile beneath the water's surface of the Gulf of Mexico (Rabinow 2004; AOPL 2006). The network of crude oil pipelines in the United States is extensive. There are approximately 55

  16. Concentration of Beryllium (Be) and Depleted Uranium (DU) in Marine Fauna and Sediment Samples from Illeginni and Boggerik Islands at Kwajalein Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R; Lindman, T R

    2005-02-24

    )), one was 17 ppb, one was 0.14 parts per million (ppm), and one was 0.48 ppm. These extremely low concentrations of an insoluble form of Be again indicate no impact on marine life or human health at Illeginni as a result of the missile flight test program. Concentration of Fe in marine fauna muscle tissue is much higher at Illeginni Island than at Boggerik Island (control site) as a result of legacy iron piers, dump sites for iron metal along the island, and scrap iron randomly distributed along extensive portions of the reef line as part of programs conducted in the 1960's through 1980's that were not part of the recent flight test program.

  17. Assessing Reservoir Depositional Environments to Develop and Quantify Improvements in CO2 Storage Efficiency. A Reservoir Simulation Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okwen, Roland; Frailey, Scott; Leetaru, Hannes; Moulton, Sandy

    2014-09-30

    The storage potential and fluid movement within formations are dependent on the unique hydraulic characteristics of their respective depositional environments. Storage efficiency (E) quantifies the potential for storage in a geologic depositional environment and is used to assess basinal or regional CO2 storage resources. Current estimates of storage resources are calculated using common E ranges by lithology and not by depositional environment. The objectives of this project are to quantify E ranges and identify E enhancement strategies for different depositional environments via reservoir simulation studies. The depositional environments considered include deltaic, shelf clastic, shelf carbonate, fluvial deltaic, strandplain, reef, fluvial and alluvial, and turbidite. Strategies considered for enhancing E include CO2 injection via vertical, horizontal, and deviated wells, selective completions, water production, and multi-well injection. Conceptual geologic and geocellular models of the depositional environments were developed based on data from Illinois Basin oil fields and gas storage sites. The geologic and geocellular models were generalized for use in other US sedimentary basins. An important aspect of this work is the development of conceptual geologic and geocellular models that reflect the uniqueness of each depositional environment. Different injection well completions methods were simulated to investigate methods of enhancing E in the presence of geologic heterogeneity specific to a depositional environment. Modeling scenarios included horizontal wells (length, orientation, and inclination), selective and dynamic completions, water production, and multiwell injection. A Geologic Storage Efficiency Calculator (GSECalc) was developed to calculate E from reservoir simulation output. Estimated E values were normalized to diminish their dependency on fluid relative permeability. Classifying depositional environments according to

  18. ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

    2001-04-01

    Among the accomplishments of this past reporting period are obtaining a complete landgrid for the State of Michigan and the digital processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We can now extract lineations from the DEMs automatically using machine algorithms. One tentative result that may be very significant is that we may be seeing manifestations of buried structures in the DEM data. We are looking at a set of extracted lineations in the northern lower peninsula that appear to follow the trend of the pinnacle reefs (Silurian) which had relief approaching 300 feet but are now buried to greater than 3000 feet. We have also extracted the dolomite alteration data from all fields and can show that this is mainly confined to the basin center. It may be related to the paleo-rift suggested by the paleomagnetic and gravity data. As reported last time, the acquisition of a 3D seismic dataset over Stoney Point Field from Marathon Oil Company, is complete and attention is being devoted to incorporating the data into the project database and utilizing it. The surface lineation study is focusing on Stoney Point Field using the high-resolution DEM data and plotting of subsurface formation top data for the main reservoir, the Trenton (Ordovician) Formation. The fault pattern at Stoney Point is well documented by Marathon and we are looking for any manifestations on the surface. The main project database is now about as complete as it will be for this project. The main goals have been met, although the scanning of the paper records will have to continue beyond the scheduled end of the project due to the sheer number of records and the increased donations of data from companies as word spread of the project. One of the unanticipated benefits of the project has been the cooperation of gas and oil companies that are or were active in the Michigan Basin in donating material to the project. Both Michigan Tech and Western Michigan continue to receive donations at an

  19. Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

    2008-05-19

    Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age

  20. Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

    2006-01-17

    The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental