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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Miocene reef corals: A review  

SciTech Connect

Tectonic blockage in the Middle East of westward-flowing Tethys surface circulation during the latest Oligocene led to creation in the earliest Miocene of endemic Mediterranean, Western Atlantic-Caribbean, and Indo-Pacific realms. A great reduction in reef coral diversity from 60-80 Oligocene species to 25-35 early Miocene species occurred in the Western Atlantic-Caribbean and Mediterranean areas accompanied by a decrease in reef growth. A slower and less drastic change apparently occurred in the Indo-Pacific area. Early Miocene reef corals of the Western Atlantic-Caribbean comprise a transition between the cosmopolitan Oligocene fauna and its endemic mid-Miocene to modern counterpart. Although early Miocene reefs were dominated by a Porites-Montastrea assemblage, eastward flow of Pacific circulation brought with it ''exotic'' corals such as Coscinaraea and Pseudocolumnastrea. Also, many cosmopolitan genera persisted from the Oligocene. During the middle to late Miocene, most of the species still living on Holocene reefs evolved. As the Mediterranean basin became more restricted, there was a slow decline in reef corals from 20 - 25 species in the Aquitainian to less than five species in the Messinian. Eustatic lowstand led to the extinction of reef-building corals in the late Messinian. In the Indo-Pacific, Neogene evolution of reef corals was conservative. Excluding the Acroporidae and Seriatoporidae, most Holocene framework species had evolved by the middle Miocene. Interplay between regional tectonics and eustatic sea level changes led to extensive development of middle to late Miocene pinnacle reefs over the southwestern Pacific.

Frost, S.H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Documenting Catastrophic Mortality and Recovery on Coral Reefs in Response to Cold Water: Using Underwater Landscape Mosaics as a Tool for Coral Reef Monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Traditional coral reef monitoring protocols may be underestimating mortality and recovery dynamics on coral reefs. The primary target of these protocols, Scleractinian corals, represents an… (more)

Cantwell, Kasey L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics of coral symbiosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coral Reef Genomics: Developing toolsfor functional genomics of coral symbiosis Jodi SCHWARZ 1 ,symbiosis functional genomics cDNA microarray ABSTRACT

Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Spatial Heterogeneity of Air–Sea Energy Fluxes over a Coral Reef—Heron Reef, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal environment of a coral reef is moderated by complex interactions of air–sea heat and moisture fluxes, local to synoptic-scale weather and reef hydrodynamics. Measurements of air–sea energy fluxes over coral reefs are essential to ...

Mellissa C. MacKellar; Hamish A. McGowan; Stuart R. Phinn

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Degradation and recovery of Caribbean coral reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universidad Central de Venezuela (1977). I. D. Williams, N.Buccoo Reef Trinidad and Tobago Buccoo Reef Venezuela CayoSombrero Reef Venezuela Cayo Sombrero Reef Venezuela Playa

Paredes, Gustavo Adolfo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Holding algae against the light: The overlooked link between photosynthetic performance and algal distribution on coral reefs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??High abundances of benthic algae on coral reefs are a potential threat to coral reef health. The organic carbon produced by these algae is consumed… (more)

Zande, R.M. van der

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wavelet Analysis of Atmospheric Turbulence over a Coral Reef Flat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world’s tropical coral reefs are at risk of severe bleaching episodes and species decline in response to global climate variability. The ecological and economic value of reef ecosystems is enormous, yet very little is known of the physical ...

Andrew Wiebe; Andrew Sturman; Hamish McGowan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Manicina areolata Fleshy Algae Acanthophora spp. Anadyomenespp. Crustose Coralline Algae (CCA) OctoCoral Briareum spp.2006) Indirect effects of algae on coral: algae- mediated,

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Functional connectivity of coral reef fishes in a tropical seascape assessed by compound-specific stable isotope analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ecological integrity of tropical habitats, including mangroves, seagrass beds and coral reefs, is coming under increasing pressure from human activities. Many coral reef fish species are thought to use mangroves and ...

McMahon, Kelton Wells

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Hydrogeology and hydrodynamics of coral reef pore waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wide variety of forces can produce head gradients that drive the flow and advective mixing of internal coral reef pore waters. Oscillatory gradients that produce mixing result from wave and tide action. Sustained gradients result from wave and tide-induced setup and ponding, from currents impinging on the reef structure, from groundwater heads, and from density differenced (temperature or salinity gradients). These gradients and the permeabilities and porosities of reef sediments are such that most macropore environments are dominated by advection rather than diffusion. The various driving forces must be analyzed to determine the individual and combined magnitudes of their effects on a specific reef pore-water system. Pore-water movement controls sediment diagenesis, the exchange of nutrients between sediments and benthos, and coastal/island groundwater resources. Because of the complexity of forcing functions, their interactions with specific local reef environments, experimental studies require careful incorporation of these considerations into their design and interpretation. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Buddemeier, R.W.; Oberdorfer, J.A.

1988-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

Hoey, Jennifer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Mapping coral reefs at reef to reef-system scales, 10s–1000s km2, using object-based image analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coral reef maps at various spatial scales and extents are needed for mapping, monitoring, modelling, and management of these environments. High spatial resolution satellite imagery, pixel <10 m, integrated with field survey data and processed with various ...

Chris Roelfsema, Stuart Phinn, Stacy Jupiter, James Comley, Simon Albert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The semi-automated classification of acoustic imagery for characterizing coral reef ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coral reef habitat maps describe the spatial distribution and abundance of tropical marine resources, making them essential for ecosystem-based approaches to planning and management. Typically, these habitat maps have been created from optical and acoustic ...

B. M. Costa, T. A. Battista

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Thermally Driven Exchanges between a Coral Reef and the Adjoining Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper hydrographic observations made over a fringing coral reef at the northern end of the Gulf of Aqaba near Eilat, Israel, are discussed. These data show exchange flows driven by the onshore–offshore temperature gradients that develop ...

Stephen G. Monismith; Amatzia Genin; Matthew A. Reidenbach; Gitai Yahel; Jeffrey R. Koseff

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Spatial and Temporal Variability of Internal Wave Forcing on a Coral Reef  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deployment of a dense spatial array of temperature sensors on a coral reef in the Florida Keys provided a unique view of the interaction of cool water incursions generated by internal waves with the three-dimensional reef bathymetry. Water ...

J. J. Leichter; G. B. Deane; M. D. Stokes

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coral Reefs (2007) 26:731739 DOI 10.1007/s00338-007-0320-0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conceding that clear experimental evidence was needed to resolve whether energy and nutrients wereXagellate symbioses at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) where he took a faculty position in 1964 in the Xow of energy from corals to Wsh in reef ecosystems. Muscatine also led studies on the nitrogen

17

Historical change in coral reef communities in Caribbean Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coral rubble analyzed for offshore and lagoonal sites. ……Analysis of species proportions, offshore and lagoonal106 Figure 2.5. Offshore sites, Bocas del Toro. Mean

Cramer, Katie Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Review article: Modelling effects of geoengineering options in response to climate change and global warming: Implications for coral reefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change will have serious effects on the planet and on its ecosystems. Currently, mitigation efforts are proving ineffectual in reducing anthropogenic CO"2 emissions. Coral reefs are the most sensitive ecosystems on the planet to climate change, ... Keywords: Aerosols, Afforestation, Albedo, Biochar, Bleaching, CCS, Carbon capture and storage, Caribbean, Coral growth, Downwelling, Ecosystems, El niño, Great Barrier Reef, IPCC, Interdecadal, SST, Satellite, Scleractinian, Small islands, Symbiosis, Tropics, Weather

M. J. C. Crabbe

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Brief communication: Global warming and coral reefs: Modelling the effect of temperature on Acropora palmata colony growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on colony growth of the branching coral Acropora palmata from fringing reefs off Discovery Bay on the north coast of Jamaica have been obtained over the period 2002-2007 using underwater photography and image analysis by both SCUBA and remotely ... Keywords: Climate change, Coral growth, Hadley, Image analysis, ROV, SST, Submersible

M. James C. Crabbe

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Planktivorous fish link coral reef and oceanic food webs : causes and consequences of landscape-scale patterns in fish behavior, diet and growth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coral reefs support an abundance of organisms despite being surrounded by oceanic waters characterized by low nutrient levels. Over more than a century of research,… (more)

Hanson, Katharine Mary Winston

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Proceedings of the American Samoa Coral Reef Fishery Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an inverse relationship between island populations and fish biomass for the outer reef slope habitat. In comparison to the other islands of American Samoa, Tutuila revealed the lowest total fish biomass, the lowest apex predator biomass, and the lowest snapper, grouper and soliderfish biomass. Demography of a target

22

A multi-scale biophysical model to inform regional management of coral reefs in the western Philippines and South China Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The health and functioning of coral reef ecosystems worldwide is in decline, and in the face of increasing anthropogenic stress, the rate of decline of these important ecosystems is set to accelerate. Mitigation strategies at regional scales are costly, ... Keywords: CORSET, Connectivity, Coral reef, Decision support, Ecosystem model, Management, Philippines, Regional scale, South China Sea

J. Melbourne-Thomas; C. R. Johnson; P. M. Aliño; R. C. Geronimo; C. L. Villanoy; G. G. Gurney

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A Climatology of Ocean–Atmosphere Heat Flux Estimates over the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea: Implications for Recent Mass Coral Bleaching Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A regional-scale estimate of the surface heat budget of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea (10°–26°S, 142°–155°E) has been developed for the period 1995–2005 in the hope of understanding the trends of sea surface temperatures and the surface ...

Evan Weller; Manuel Nunez; Gary Meyers; Itsara Masiri

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The reef environment and competitive success in the Corallimorpharia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

over corals on reefs where human disturbances influence the reef environment ..... and Chumbe reefs in 1999 (plus standard error). Table 2 The results of ...

25

Development of an Underwater Vision Sensor for 3D Reef Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperatures of only a few degrees destroyed most of the coral in Okinawa in 1998[1]. Thus, coral reefs

Jenkin, Michael R. M.

26

Photosynthesis and calcification at cellular, organismal and community levels in coral reefs: A review on interactions and control by carbonate chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYNOPSIS. Photosynthesis and calcification in zooxanthellate scleractinian corals and coral reefs are reviewed at several scales: cellular (pathways and transport mechanisms of inorganic carbon and calcium), organismal (interaction between photosynthesis and calcification, effect of light) and ecosystemic (community primary production and calcification, and air-sea CO2 exchanges). The coral host plays a major role in supplying carbon for the photosynthesis by the algal symbionts through a system similar to the carbon-concentrating mechanism described in free living algal cells. The details of carbon supply to the calcification process are almost unknown, but metabolic CO2 seems to be a significant source. Calcium supply for calcification is diffusional through oral layers, and active membrane transport only occurs between the calicoblastic cells and the site of calcification. Photosynthesis and calcification are tightly coupled in zooxanthellate scleractinian corals and coral reef communities. Calcification is, on average, three times higher in light than in darkness. The recent suggestion that calcification is dark-repressed rather than light-enhanced is not supported by the literature.

Jean-pierre Gattuso; Denis Allemand; Michel Frankignoullej

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Joint Mexico-US Secretariat 2007-2009 www.icriforum.org ICRI Ad Hoc Committee on Economics Valuation of Coral Reef  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(2) The Ad Hoc Committee will develop cost estimates and post them on the ICRI Forum for each of the following activities, building on the compilation of references and materials on economic valuation methodologies, manuals and examples of applications/case studies developed by the Committee based on a survey of ICRI members and other experts and now available through the ICRI Forum and at the WRI web site (www.wri.org/project/valuation-caribbean-reefs): a) Expand the current online compilation to include additional examples and case studies of applications of economic evaluation information to public policies and private sector actions. b) Develop an online searchable data base providing summaries of key economic valuation literature with emphasis on coral reefs, utilizing the expertise of UNEP-WCMC and the Coral Reef Economics Community of Practice (Coral CoP) among others, and taking into account the potential fields contained in the annex to these terms of reference. Such a database should integrate existing efforts and avoid duplication. c) Develop a web-based site to access additional literature and references on economic

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Wave Transformation and Wave-Driven Flow across a Steep Coral Reef  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of waves, setup, and wave-driven mean flows were made on a steep coral forereef and its associated lagoonal system on the north shore of Moorea, French Polynesia. Despite the steep and complex geometry of the forereef, and wave ...

Stephen G. Monismith; Liv M. M. Herdman; Soeren Ahmerkamp; James L. Hench

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proxy Records of the Indonesian Low and the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from Stable Isotope Measurements of Indonesian Reef Corals  

SciTech Connect

The Earth`s largest atmospheric convective center is the Indonesian Low. It generates the Australasian monsoon, drives the zonal tropospheric Walker Circulation, and is implicated in the genesis of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term variability of the Indonesian Low is poorly characterized, yet such information is crucial for evaluating whether changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are a possible manifestation of global warming. Stable oxygen isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 18}O) in shallow-water reef coral skeletons track topical convective activity over hundreds of years because the input of isotopically-depleted rainwater dilutes seawater {delta}{sup 18}O. Corals also impose a temperature-dependent fractionation on {delta}{sup 18}O, but where annual rainfall is high and sea surface temperature (SST) variability is low the freshwater flux effect dominates.

Moore, M.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

An integrated empirical and modeling approach to evaluate determinants of community structure and alternate stable states dynamics on tropical reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

herbivory refuge for associate algae. Marine Biology, 157,Paul. 2011. Coral Reef Algae. Pages 241–272 in Z. Dubinskybetween corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of

Muthukrishnan, Ranjan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Climate controls on coral growth in the Caribbean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate predictions of Caribbean coral reef responses to global climate change are currently limited by a lack of knowledge of the dominant environmental controls on coral growth. Corals exhibit significant responses to ...

Bosshart, Sara A. (Sara Allison)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A 10-year climatology of solar radiation for the Great Barrier Reef: implications for recent mass coral bleaching events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 10-year solar radiation climatology is developed for the Great Barrier Reef region using data from the Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (GMS). The method uses a look-up table based on the STREAMER radiative transfer model for a tropical atmosphere. ...

Itsara Masiri; Manuel Nunez; Evan Weller

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Computer modelling and estimation of recruitment patterns of non-branching coral colonies at three sites in the Wakatobi Marine Park, S.E. Sulawesi, Indonesia; implications for coral reef conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied growth and estimated recruitment of massive coral colonies at three sites, Kaledupa, Hoga and Sampela, separated by about 1.5 km in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, S.E. Sulawesi, Indonesia. There was significantly higher species richness ... Keywords: Acropora, Anthropogenic effects, Banjo, Coral growth, Coral mining, Modelling, Sedimentation, Transects, Videophotography, Visibility

M.James C Crabbe; David J Smith

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Planktivorous Fish Link Coral Reef and Oceanic Food Webs: Causes and Consequences of Landscape-Scale Patterns in Fish Behavior, Diet and Growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Morize. 1994. Reef fish communities and fisherySparisoma viride. Journal of Fish Biology Parker, R. P. andof growth in fishes. J. Fish. Res. Board Can. 16:721-745.

Hanson, Katherine Mary W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Seasonal Prediction of Thermal Stress Accumulation for Coral Bleaching in the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass coral bleaching, associated with anomalously warm ocean temperatures over large regions, poses a serious threat to the future health of the world coral reef systems. Seasonal forecasts from coupled ocean–atmosphere models can be a valuable ...

C. M. Spillman; O. Alves; D. A. Hudson

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Plant roots in arctic tundra  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Colleen Iversen, Victoria Sloan, Paddy Sullivan, Eugenie Euskirchen, Dave McGuire, Richard Norby, Anthony Walker, Jeff Warren, Stan Wullschleger,

37

Wave-Driven Circulation of a Coastal Reef–Lagoon System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the circulation of a coral reef system in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, to incident wave forcing was investigated using field data collected during a 10-month experiment. Results from the study revealed that wave forcing was the dominant ...

Ryan J. Lowe; James L. Falter; Stephen G. Monismith; Marlin J. Atkinson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

The Threatened Atlantic Elkhorn Coral, Acropora palmata: Population Dynamics and Their Policy Implications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coral-reef geology: Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.Diadema antillarum in Puerto Rico 20 years after a massJAM), Navassa (NAV), Puerto Rico (PR), and Virgin Gorda (

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The threatened Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata : population dynamics and their policy implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coral-reef geology: Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.Diadema antillarum in Puerto Rico 20 years after a masslocations: Navassa, Puerto Rico, and Virgin Gorda in the

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Degradation and recovery of Caribbean coral reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. , “Isla de Culebra, Puerto Rico Changes in Benthic CoverMarks 2005 Marks 2005 Marks 2005 Panama Panama Puerto RicoPuerto Rico Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Puerto Rico

Paredes, Gustavo Adolfo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Price, 1975; Porter, 1976; Fadallah, 1983) and corallite area has been used as a linear approximation for biomass (and Price, 1975; Porter, 1976; Fadallah, 1983; Edwards and Gates, 2002), but there are no comprehensive comparative data on how biomass

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Kingman reef  

SciTech Connect

This memorandum describes the search for an acceptable test site for surface detonations of nuclear devices. Concern is expressed over possible Tsunami hazards. Kingman Reef is recommended as a designated target area, and it is recommended that Palmyra Island be investigated as to availability.

Gilbert, F. C.

1965-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Imaging coral I: Imaging coral habitats with the SeaBED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SeaBED autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is a new imaging platform designed for high resolution optical and acoustic sensing. This low cost vehicle has been specifically designed for use in waters up to 2000 m to carry out video transects, bathymetric and side-scan sonar surveys. In this paper we detail the systems issues associated with navigation, control, and imaging that led us to our particular hardware and software design choices so as to allow us to operate in shallow, shelf and ocean basin environments. We illustrate the strengths of our design with data obtained during two research cruises associated with mapping coral reefs off Puerto Rico and Bermuda. In both these cases, SeaBED was deployed in extremely challenging terrain associated off the shelf edge and was successful in returning high quality color imagery of deep coral habitats. Key Words. AUV, coral, imaging, habitat. 1.

Hanumant Singh; Roy Armstrong; O Gilbes; Ryan Eustice; Chris Roman; Oscar Pizarro; Juan Torres

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

ORNL DAAC, Arctic Tundra Flux Data, February 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric fluxes in the Arctic tundra are now available on-line. The newly released data set "Arctic Tundra Flux Study in the Kuparuk River Basin (Alaska), 1994-1996" contains...

45

NPP Tundra: Toolik Lake, Alaska [U.S.A.]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toolik Lake, Alaska, 1982 Toolik Lake, Alaska, 1982 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Shaver, G. R. 2001. NPP Tundra: Toolik Lake, Alaska, 1982. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of four contrasting vegetation types was studied during 1982 near Toolik Lake, Alaska, U.S.A. Above-ground biomass and below-ground stem/ rhizome biomass were measured on three occasions during the growing season; for (1) a "tussock" tundra containing graminoids, deciduous shrubs and evergreen shrubs, (2) a "shrub" tundra dominated by deciduous willow shrubs, (3) a "heath" tundra of evergreen shrubs, and (4) a "wet" tundra

46

EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Documents & Publications Privacy - Information Protection Task Force - Charter CHARTER, Price-Anderson Act Task Force REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL...

47

Historical change in coral reef communities in Caribbean Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. 2001) and land-based pollution (Keller and Jacksonto increasing amounts of land-based pollution over the pastto the effects of land-based pollution alone. It is possible

Cramer, Katie Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

things? What is the largest fish you ever caught in a trap?Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with line?Kg? Year? What is the largest fish you ever caught with

Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Historical change in coral reef communities in Caribbean Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of South Alabama, 90 pp. Hockey PAR, Bosman AL. 1986. Man asaffect larger individuals (Hockey and Bosman 1986, de Boerand/or fishing pressure (Hockey and Bosman 1986, de Boer et

Cramer, Katie Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nutrient supply is thought to limit phytoplankton biomass,nutrient supply is thought to limit phytoplankton biomass,

McDole, Tracey Shannon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Phytoplankton Responses to Mass Coral Spawning in the Flower Garden Banks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass coral spawning represents a nutrient input to coral reef systems that for Pacific reefs has been shown to stimulate pelagic and benthic processes. If phytoplankton in the water column over the reef are able to utilize this annual nutrient input, this could potentially alter phytoplankton biomass and community composition, in what is normally a very oligotrophic system. Sampling was performed at East Flower Garden Bank (EFGB), Gulf of Mexico during May, July, and August 2009. The annual coral spawning event occurred there August 11-14, 2009. Samples were collected morning and evening at three depths and analyzed for nutrients, chlorophyll a, accessory pigments, phytoplankton species composition, and carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen (CHN). During spawning, only small changes in nutrient concentrations were detected. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) peaked on the second day of spawning and N:P ratio was highest on 5/28, likely due to particularly phosphate concentration. Chl a biomass was significantly different between sample dates and the biomass increased steadily throughout the spawning period. The contribution of different phytoplankton classes to total chlorophyll a was determined using known pigment algorithms. Prokaryotes were the dominant class across the entire sampling period with 60-80 percent abundance. Trichodesmium spp. was the dominant genus throughout the study and genus specific changes per sample date were seen. On 8/11 and 8/13 two genera contributed the majority of chl a (Trichodesmium spp. and Ceratium spp.; Cylindrotheca spp. and Trichodesmium spp., respectively). Abundance showed variability during spawning with a peak at 11 cells/ml on 8/12. The high abundance of Trichodesmium spp. could indicate N limitation is alleviated at the Flower Garden Banks (FGB). Current literature on coral spawning is limited to studies performed in the Great Barrier Reef, with assessment areas close to a major shoreline. Genera found at EFGB were similar to those found in other reef systems. It cannot be determined if nutrient input increased diversity, as diversity was high prior to spawning as well. Greater increase in available forms of nitrogen would have likely been found several days post major spawning. The FGB were a unique system to study, as they are coral reefs, but are located 200 km offshore. This study provided a snapshot into phytoplankton dynamics as a result of spawning. Changes across the short time scale were seen in biomass and community composition.

Horne, Courtney Leigh

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tundra burning in Alaska: Linkages to climatic change and sea ice retreat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tundra burning in Alaska: Linkages to climatic change and sea ice retreat Feng Sheng Hu,1 Philip E record. Tundra burning is potentially one such component. Here we report paleoecological evidence showing that recent tundra burning is unprecedented in the central Alaskan Arctic within the last 5000 years. Analysis

Hu, Feng Sheng

53

Thriving Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tundra Bushes Fuel Tundra Bushes Fuel Thaw Thriving Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Spread of taller vegetation could exacerbate warming in northern latitudes June 28, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research (BER), Climate Research, Franklin Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 Bonfils-1.jpg Left: Current deciduous shrub distribution. Right: Simulation of bare ground converted to deciduous shrubs. To enlarge, select image. (Celine Bonfils) Carbon-gobbling plants are normally allies in the fight to slow climate change, but in the frozen north, the effects of thriving vegetation may actually push temperatures higher. In a series of climate simulations performed at NERSC, a group of researchers found that the spread of bushes, taller ones especially, could exacerbate warming in northern latitudes by

54

Surface Energy Balance on the Arctic Tundra: Measurements and Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress made in the Land–Atmosphere–Ice Interactions Flux Study over the past 4 yr to fully characterize the biophysical fluxes in the snow-free tundra ecosystem and their relationship to climate and climate change is described. This paper ...

A. H. Lynch; F. S. Chapin III; L. D. Hinzman; W. Wu; E. Lilly; G. Vourlitis; E. Kim

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Coral calcification : insights from inorganic experiments and coral responses to environmental variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanisms involved in the formation of coral skeletons are examined using a laboratory model for coral calcification and the growth of living corals under different environmental conditions. Abiogenic aragonite was ...

Holcomb, Michael (Michael C.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-A Coral Canada US Inc EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc Order authorizing Coral Canada US Inc to export electric energy to Canada. EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc More Documents &...

57

NPP Tundra: Point Barrow, Alaska [U.S.A.]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Point Barrow, Alaska, 1970-1972 Point Barrow, Alaska, 1970-1972 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Tieszen, L. L. 2001. NPP Tundra: Point Barrow, Alaska, 1970-1972. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Productivity of a wet arctic tundra meadow was studied from 1970 to 1972 at Point Barrow, Alaska, U.S.A. Measurements of peak above-ground live biomass and leaf area index were made on 43 permanent plots, 1 m x 10 m, representing the spectrum of undisturbed vegetation. In addition, temporal variation in standing crop was assessed for the 1971 growing season for a sedge meadow only. The study area (71.30 N 156.67 W) is located 3 km inland from the Chukchi

58

Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study  

SciTech Connect

The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Run manager module for CORAL laboratory management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new module, the Run Manager (RM), for Stanford Nanofabrication Facility's Common Object Representation for Advanced Laboratories (CORAL). CORAL is the lab manager with which MIT's Microsystems ...

Klann, Jeffrey G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Lipid biomarkers of coral stress : calibration and exploration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corals are increasingly threatened by warming sea surface temperatures and other anthropogenic changes. The delicate symbiosis between corals and their algal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae) is easily disrupted by thermal ...

Kneeland, Jessie M. (Jessie Mary)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other forms of land-based pollution. Information aboutstrategies to reduce land-based pollution, decrease nutrientin Indonesia: effects of land-based pollution, destructive ?

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

In situ observations of fish associated with coral reefs off Ireland M. Soffker a,n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their mound nests; and how they compare with other native ant species in the landscape. We hope that children-2: Protective Coloring ....................................................................30 Lesson 4 Mound, Sweet Mound ..............................................33 Activity 4-1: Mound of Trouble Matching

Tyler, Charles

63

Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste into Resource Anaerobic biogas tank Anaerobic pondsor tanks can capture biogas resulting from the degradationprocess. Biogas is produced in many countries for cook-

Timothy Duane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

material, creat- ing rich compost that can be used forcrops. Manage Solids Compost: Pig waste and carcasses can bematerials such as mats. Compost Solid waste from the solid

Timothy Duane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The CTD Oceanographic Rendering and Analysis Laboratory (CORAL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CTD (conductivity-temperature-depth) oceanographic Rendering and Analysis Laboratory (CORAL) is a general purpose X Windows/OSF Motif-based computatioal environment for the archiving, browsing, analysis and display of geophysical data. CORAL ...

James J. Simpson; Jeffrey Bloom; Mark Botta

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Mexico. EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC More Documents & Publications EA-212 Coral Power, LLC EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P EA-166 Duke Energy Trading and Marketing, L.L.C...

67

Seasonality in the Surface Energy Balance of Tundra in the Lower Mackenzie River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study details seasonal characteristics in the annual surface energy balance of upland and lowland tundra during the 1998–99 water year (Y2). It contrasts the results with the 1997–98 water year (Y1) and relates the findings to the climatic ...

Wayne R. Rouse; Andrea K. Eaton; Richard M. Petrone; L. Dale Boudreau; Philip Marsh; Timothy J. Griffis

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Remote Sensing of Western-Caribbean Coral Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Western-Caribbean Coral Communities Introduction: Despite the fact that coral. Remote sensing has been suggested as a potential tool for monitoring the spatial extent, health the Spectral Reflectance of Corals In-Situ. GIScience and Remote Sensing. Maeder, J., Narumalani, S., Rundquist

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

69

CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name CVC REEF-Renewable Energy Equity Fund Agency/Company /Organization Australian Greenhouse Office Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Finance Website http://www.cvc.com.au/cvcr/ind Country Australia Australia and New Zealand References REEF[1] Background "The CVC Renewable Energy Equity Fund is a venture capital fund established to increase Australian private investment in renewable energy and enabling technologies through the provision of equity finance. Approximately A$18 million of the available funding is provided under the Australian Greenhouse Office's REEF licence and approximately A$9 million is from private sources. CVC REEF invests in high growth, emerging Australian

70

Black Coral Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coral Capital Coral Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Black Coral Capital Address 55 Union Street, 3rd Floor Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02108 Region Greater Boston Area Product Cleantech private equity Number of employees 1-10 Website [www.blackcoralcapital.com www.blackcoralcapital.com ] Coordinates 42.3615754°, -71.0572318° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3615754,"lon":-71.0572318,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

Site fidelity and depth utilization of nearshore reef fish on offshore San Pedro shelf petroleum platforms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In California, economically important nearshore reef fish inhabit the shallow (platforms. To… (more)

Mireles, Carlos

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Investing in sustainability at Coral World  

SciTech Connect

Now open and operational for several years, Coral World offers a unique environmental model for other tourism-related facilities throughout the Caribbean and beyond. The extensive energy conservation program has yielded a 40 to 50% reduction in energy use and costs. The facility's unique on-site storm water absorption system virtually eliminates silt runoff to the coastal waters. The innovative, highly cost-effective series of renewable energy installations include a photovoltaic-powered restaurant kitchen, solar hot water systems and one of the world's first hydroelectric systems that uses wastewater drainage for turbine source waters. The extensive marine environmental conservation program protects fragile local ecosystems while also protecting the owners' investment in tourism. By investing aggressively in sustainability, Coral World's owners are reaping the benefits not only in reduced operating costs and improved profitability, but also in increased visitor volume and satisfaction.

Jackson, O.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Century-scale Records of Coral Growth and Water Quality from the Mesoamerican Reef Reveal Increasing Anthropogenic Stress and Decreasing Coral Resilience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

like fishing and land-based pollution increase over time,Marine Pollution Bulletin ) Century-scale records of land-Marine Pollution Bulletin) Century-scale records of land-

Carilli, Jessica E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings May 18, 2011 - 4:32pm Addthis Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Reduce the city's energy use by 40 percent over the next 15 years. Engineers able to research more efficient lighting techniques.

75

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the Way to Energy Savings May 18, 2011 - 4:32pm Addthis Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center Cape Coral Youth Center Manager Mark Cagel stands in front of a tamper-proof thermostat at the Austen Youth Center in Cape Coral, Florida. | Photo Courtesy of the Cape Coral Youth Center April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Reduce the city's energy use by 40 percent over the next 15 years. Engineers able to research more efficient lighting techniques.

76

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating and cooling. In the DEMROES project [DEM09], temperature, humidity, wind direction and speed, solar

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peter Fairley. Germany’s green-energy gap. IEEE Spectr. ,societys interest in green energy, green technologies, andand IP-based networks with green energy ini- tiatives, there

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

They provide a way to monitor the current energy usage.addition to monitoring the energy usage, companies provideenable summarizing the energy usage in quarterly or seasonal

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of battery power and solar power, and the solar panelThe production of the solar power is quickly disrupted whenthe irradiance. If the solar power were to be an integral

Shin, Peter Hongsuck

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Feeding on ultraplankton and dissolved organic carbon in coral reefs: from the individual grazer to the community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Review of the U.S. Department of Energy's Inertial Fusion Energy Program Rulon Linford,1) research carried out in contributing pro- grams. These programs include the heavy ion (HI) beam, the high of'' IFE research carried out in contributing programs. These programs include the HI beam, HAPL

Yahel, Gitai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microbial diversity and transcriptome profiling in coral holobionts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.3.1 Diversity and community shifts in coral-associatedBourne and C. B. Munn. Diversity of bacteria associated withS. R. Santos. Genetic diversity of symbiotic dino?agellates

Sunagawa, Shinichi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Geostrophic Pumping, Inflows and Upwelling in Barrier Reefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The communication between shallow and deep oceans via gaps in the separating barrier reefs is examined using a simplified two-layer analytical model. Attention is focused on the flow resulting from a sea-level difference between the ocean and the ...

Doron Nof; Jason H. Middleton

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. Contract negotiations by our industry partner to gain access to the CO2 supply have been completed and the State of Michigan has issued an order to allow operation of the project. Injection of CO2 is scheduled to begin in February, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in two reefs, the Belle River Mills and Chester 18 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the normalized gamma ray and core permeability and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. An oral presentation was given at the AAPG Eastern Section Meeting and a booth at the same meeting was used to meet one-on-one with operators.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. We began injecting CO2 in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well on May 6, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in three reefs, the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, and Dover 35 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshop, Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, and Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting. A technical paper was submitted to the Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Human and Natural Causes of Variation of Forage Species on Nearshore Rocky Reefs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions between corals and algae on a temperate zonestates with minimal foliose algae and high densities of seaby encrusting coralline algae and have urchin densities as

Levenbach, Stuart

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Charlton 6 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. Contract negotiations by our industry partner to gain access to this CO2 that would otherwise be vented to the atmosphere are near completion. A new method of subsurface characterization, log curve amplitude slicing, is being used to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in two reefs, the Belle River Mills and Chester 18 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester18 fields are being used as typefields because they have excellent log-curve and core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the normalized gamma ray curves is showing trends that may indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding the log curve amplitude slicing technique and a booth at the Midwest PTTC meeting.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Low-Level Trade Winds Over the Western Coral Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the trade wind season, the wind over the western Coral Sea is highly coherent over very long distances (at least 1000 km). At any site, the wind direction changes little with time, while the wind speed varies with period of 7–15 days. The ...

Eric Wolanski

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Coal-Waste Artificial Reef Program (C-WARP): A New Resource Potential for Fishing Reef ABSTRACT-Thefeasibility ofusing solid blocks of waste materialfrom coal:firedpower plantslor underwater (scrubber) sludge from coal-burning power stations. was constructed in the Atlantic Ocean offLong Island. N

89

Coral Health and Disease: A Comparison of Cook's and Opunohu Bays in Mo'orea,French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coral and coralline algae  disease/lesions  in  the and  nutrients.   Many species of algae also carry  disease­assessed for substrate, algae, and coral composition as 

Shea, Alessandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

CORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF COOK’S AND ‘OPUNOHU BAYS IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coral and coralline algae  disease/lesions  in  the and  nutrients.   Many species of algae also carry  disease­assessed for substrate, algae, and coral composition as 

Shea, Alessandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

LCG Persistency Framework (CORAL, COOL, POOL): Status and Outlook  

SciTech Connect

The Persistency Framework consists of three software packages (CORAL, COOL and POOL) addressing the data access requirements of the LHC experiments in different areas. It is the result of the collaboration between the CERN IT Department and the three experiments (ATLAS, CMS and LHCb) that use this software to access their data. POOL is a hybrid technology store for C++ objects, metadata catalogs and collections. CORAL is a relational database abstraction layer with an SQL-free API. COOL provides specific software tools and components for the handling of conditions data. This paper reports on the status and outlook of the project and reviews in detail the usage of each package in the three experiments.

Valassi, A.; /CERN; Clemencic, M.; /CERN; Dykstra, D.; /Fermilab; Frank, M.; /CERN; Front, D.; /Weizmann Inst.; Govi, G.; /Northeastern U.; Kalkhof, A.; /CERN; Loth, A.; /CERN; Nowak, M.; /Brookhaven; Pokorski, W.; /CERN; Salnikov, A.; /SLAC; Schmidt, S.A.; /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys.; Trentadue, R.; /CERN; Wache, M.; /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys.; Xie, Z.; /Princeton U.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

Temperature and vital effect controls on Bamboo coral (Isididae) isotopegeochemistry: A test of the "lines method"  

SciTech Connect

Deep-sea bamboo corals hold promise as long-term climatic archives, yet little information exists linking bamboo coral geochemistry to measured environmental parameters. This study focuses on a suite of 10 bamboo corals collected from the Pacific and Atlantic basins (250-2136 m water depth) to investigate coral longevity, growth rates, and isotopic signatures. Calcite samples for stable isotopes and radiocarbon were collected from the base the corals, where the entire history of growth is recorded. In three of the coral specimens, samples were also taken from an upper branch for comparison. Radiocarbon and growth band width analyses indicate that the skeletal calcite precipitates from ambient dissolved inorganic carbon and that the corals live for 150-300 years, with extension rates of 9-128 {micro}m/yr. A linear relationship between coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C indicates that the isotopic composition is influenced by vital effects ({delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope of 0.17-0.47). As with scleractinian deep-sea corals, the intercept from a linear regression of {delta}{sup 18}O versus {delta}{sup 13}C is a function of temperature, such that a reliable paleotemperature proxy can be obtained, using the 'lines method.' Although the coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope is maintained throughout the coral base ontogeny, the branches and central cores of the bases exhibit {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C values that are shifted far from equilibrium. We find that a reliable intercept value can be derived from the {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C regression of multiple samples distributed throughout one specimen or from multiple samples within individual growth bands.

Hill, T M; Spero, H J; Guilderson, T P; LaVigne, M; Clague, D; Macalello, S; Jang, N

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geochemistry of slow-growing corals : reconstructing sea surface temperature, salinity and the North Atlantic Oscillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 225-year old coral from the south shore of Bermuda (64°W, 320N) provides a record of decadal-to-centennial scale climate variability. The coral was collected live, and sub-annual density bands seen in x-radiographs ...

Goodkin, Nathalie Fairbank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Implementing A Novel Cyclic CO2 Flood In Paleozoic Reefs  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO{sub 2} is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO{sub 2} injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and is presently producing 52 BOPD. The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 21 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO{sub 2} injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO{sub 2} injection volume has reached approximately 1.6 BCF. The CO{sub 2} injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been successfully increased to a stable rate of 73 BOPD. Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling Digital and hard copy data continue to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO2 is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO2 injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and has produced at an average rate of 61 BOPD (Jan-Dec, 2005). The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 29 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO2 injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO2 injection volume has reached approximately 2.18 BCF. The CO2 injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been stabilized at an average rate of 57 BOPD (July-Dec, 2005). Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization was completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves are showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling. Digital and hard copy data have been compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin, including a detailed summary of 20 fields in the vicinity of the demonstration well. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

James R. Wood; W. quinlan; A. Wylie

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Implementing A Novel Cyclic CO2 Flood In Paleozoic Reefs  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO{sub 2} is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO{sub 2} injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and is presently producing 52 BOPD. The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 21 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO{sub 2} injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO{sub 2} injection volume has reached approximately 1.6 BCF. The CO{sub 2} injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been successfully increased to a stable rate of 73 BOPD. Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling Digital and hard copy data continue to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

James R. Wood; W. Quinlan; A. Wylie

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS  

SciTech Connect

Recycled CO2 is being used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 Niagaran pinnacle reef located in Otsego County, Michigan. CO2 injection in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well began on May 6, 2004. A second injection well, the Salling-Hansen 1-35, commenced injection in August 2004. Oil production in the Pomerzynski 5-35 producing well increased from 9 BOPD prior to operations to an average of 165 BOPD in December, 2004 and has produced at an average rate of 61 BOPD (Jan-Dec, 2005). The Salling-Hansen 4-35A also produced during this reporting period an average of 29 BOPD. These increases have occurred as a result of CO2 injection and the production rate appears to be stabilizing. CO2 injection volume has reached approximately 2.18 BCF. The CO2 injection phase of this project has been fully operational since December 2004 and most downhole mechanical issues have been solved and surface facility modifications have been completed. It is anticipated that filling operations will run for another 6-12 months from July 1, 2005. In most other aspects, the demonstration is going well and hydrocarbon production has been stabilized at an average rate of 57 BOPD (July-Dec, 2005). Our industry partners continue to experiment with injection rates and pressures, various downhole and surface facility mechanical configurations, and the huff-n-puff technique to develop best practices for these types of enhanced recovery projects. Subsurface characterization was completed using well log tomography and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, Dover 35, and Dover 36 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves are showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric and pore types of the carbonate reservoir rocks. Accumulated pressure data supports the hypothesis of extreme heterogeneity in the Dover 35. Some intervals now have pressure readings over 2345 psig (April 29, 2005) in the A-1 Carbonate while nearby Niagaran Brown intervals only show 1030 psig (March 7, 2005). This is a pressure differential over 1300 psig and suggests significant vertical barriers in the reef, consistent with the GR tomography modeling. Digital and hard copy data have been compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin, including a detailed summary of 20 fields in the vicinity of the demonstration well. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the reservoir heterogeneity in these Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at two Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshops, a Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, a Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting, and the Eastern American Association of Petroleum Geologist's Annual meeting. In addition, we met with our industry partners several times during the first half of 2005 to communicate and discuss the reservoir characterization and field site aspects of the demonstration project. A technical paper was published in the April 2005 issue of the AAPG Bulletin on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.

James R. Wood; W. quinlan; A. Wylie

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY OF TROPICAL REEF SYSTEMS: ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN THE EXUMA CAYS, BAHAMAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

visitor manage-ment. Pres- ently, the Park has initiated programs to protect the seabed (e.g., installing would include specific objectives to protect corals, seagrass beds or other seabed communities. The cost

Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

99

The role of nursery habitats and climate variability in reef fish fisheries in the Gulf of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rocky systems ( ) and sandy systems ( ), in central (a)boulders [ 1000 cm 3 ] over sandy bottoms), and mangroverocky reefs and southeastern sandy bottoms in front of large

Aburto-Oropeza, Marco Octavio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. C. Ohlmann. 2006. Do oil and gas platforms off Californiaof natural reefs and oil and gas production platforms onof natural reefs and oil and gas production platforms on

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ranking management strategies with complex outcomes: An AHP-fuzzy evaluation of recreational fishing using an integrated agent-based model of a coral reef ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of recreational fishing requires resolving conflicting interests and is thus among the most controversial natural resource related issues. Decision making is difficult because of two main factors: first, there is lack of prediction tools ... Keywords: AHP, Agent-based model, Area closure, Decision support system, Fuzzy evaluation, Multiple criteria decision making, Non-market valuation, Random utility model, Recreational fishing

Lei Gao; Atakelty Hailu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Shift in ENSO Teleconnections Recorded by a Northern Red Sea Coral  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) teleconnections over Europe and the Middle East are evaluated using an oxygen isotope coral time series from the northern Red Sea and various instrumental datasets. A shift in the correlation between the Niño-3 ...

N. Rimbu; G. Lohmann; T. Felis; J. Pätzold

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Lead Concentrations and Isotopes in Corals and Water near Bermuda, 1780-2000 A.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The history of the oceanic anthropogenic lead (Pb) transient in the North Atlantic Ocean for the past 220 yr is documented here from measurements of Pb concentration and isotope ratios from annually-banded corals that grew ...

Kelly, Amy E.

104

Technical Basis and Benchmarking of the Crud Deposition Risk Assessment Model (CORAL)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deposition of boiling water reactor (BWR) system corrosion products (crud) on operating fuel rods has resulted in performance-limiting conditions in a number of plants. To facilitate improved management of any crud-related fuel performance risk, EPRI has developed the Crud DepOsition Risk Assessment ModeL (CORAL). CORAL incorporates a modified version of the Versatile Internals and Component Program for Reactors ...

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton ofa lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton.Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the

Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Underwater 3D Mapping: Experiences and Lessons learned  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Okinawa in 1998[5]. Monitoring the health of coral reefs is a difficult and time consum- ing task

Jenkin, Michael R. M.

107

LITTORAL DRIFT GRADIENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classification of Coasts (see Holocene Coastal Geomorphology). Climate Patterns in the Coastal Zone. Coasts, Coastlines, Shores, and Shorelines. Coral Reefs.

108

The effects of chronic nitrogen fertilization on alpine tundra soil microbial communities: implications for carbon and nitrogen cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that changes in nitrogen (N) availability affect primary productivity in a variety of terrestrial systems, but less is known about the effects of the changing N cycle on soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We used a variety of techniques to examine the effects of chronic N amendments on SOM chemistry and microbial community structure and function in an alpine tundra soil. We collected surface soil (0-5 cm) samples from five control and five long-term N-amended plots established and maintained at the Niwot Ridge Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Samples were bulked by treatment and all analyses were conducted on composite samples. The fungal community shifted in response to N amendments, with a decrease in the relative abundance of basidiomycetes. Bacterial community composition also shifted in the fertilized soil, with increases in the relative abundance of sequences related to the Bacteroidetes and Gemmatimonadetes, and decreases in the relative abundance of the Verrucomicrobia. We did not uncover any bacterial sequences that were closely related to known nitrifiers in either soil, but sequences related to archaeal nitrifiers were found in control soils. The ratio of fungi to bacteria did not change in the N-amended soils, but the ratio of archaea to bacteria dropped from 20% to less than 1% in the N-amended plots. Comparisons of aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds, two broad categories of soil carbon compounds, revealed no between treatment differences. However, G-lignins were found in higher relative abundance in the fertilized soils, while proteins were detected in lower relative abundance. Finally, the activities of two soil enzymes involved in N cycling changed in response to chronic N amendments. These results suggest that chronic N fertilization induces significant shifts in soil carbon dynamics that correspond to shifts in microbial community structure and function.

Nemergut, Diana R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Townsend, Alan R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Taylor, John [University of California, Berkeley; Sattin, Sarah R [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Freeman, Kristen R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Fierer, Noah [Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research; Neff, Jason [University of Colorado, Boulder; Bowman, William D [University of Colorado, Boulder; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Weintraub, Michael N [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Schmidt, Steven K. [University of Colorado

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pleistocene hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia AND Hinterland emergence of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Metamorphism, geochronology, and structure of the uplifted Kisar Atoll, Indonesia and related Banda Arc: surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

Seamons, Kent E.

110

Intra-annual variability of the radiocarbon content of corals from the Galapagos Islands  

SciTech Connect

The authors report AMS [sup 14]C measurements on sub annual samples of coral from the Galapagos Islands that span the period, 1970-1973. Both the major 1972 El Nino/Southern Oscillation event and intra-annual changes in regional upwelling of [sup 14]C-depleted waters associated with alternation of surface-ocean current patterns are evident in the record. These data show that the corals preserve a detailed record of past intra-annual variations of the [sup 14]C content of surface ocean water.

Brown, T.A. (Nuclear Physics Lab. GL-10, Dept of Physics, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) Geophysics Program AK-50, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)); Farwell, G.W.; Schmidt, F.H. (Nuclear Physics Lab. GL-10, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)); Grootes, P.M. (Nuclear Physics Lab. GL-10, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States) Quatenary Isotope Lab. AK-60, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)); Stuiver, M. (Quatenary Isotope Lab. AK-60, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

juvenile rockfishes at offshore platforms and natural reefsrecruitment season at two offshore platforms in the easternrockfishes at offshore petroleum platforms and natural reefs

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

ENSO and Short-Term Variability of the South Equatorial Current Entering the Coral Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical section data extending to 1985 are used to estimate the interannual variability of transport entering the Coral Sea between New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands. Typical magnitudes of this variability are ±5–8 Sv (Sv ? 106 m3 s?1) in ...

William S. Kessler; Sophie Cravatte

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Habitat selection, facilitation, and biotic settlement cues affect distribution and performance of coral recruits in French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from various spe- cies of algae. These biotic cues mayPreferred Corals settled on the cor- alline algae T.prototypum, Neutral coralline algae are Hydrolithon spp. and

Price, Nichole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Surface Water Mixing in the Solomon Sea as Documented by a High-Resolution Coral 14C Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bimonthly coral-based record of the postbomb radiocarbon content of Solomon Sea surface waters is interpreted to reflect mixing of subtropical surface water and that advected in from the east by the equatorial branch of the South Equatorial ...

T. P. Guilderson; D. P. Schrag; M. A. Cane

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

THE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF HAWAIIAN BLACK CORALS (CNIDARIA: ANTHOZOA: HEXACORALLIA: ANTIPATHARIA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

`i, O`ahu, and Kaua`i to map the current distribution and/or appearance of nonindigenous and in sites was surveyed on Hawai`i Island, 13 sites on Kaua`i, 15 sites on Maui, 15 sites on Moloka`i, and 20 and Ka¯ne`ohe Bay September 1974 to late 1976 Philippines Successful Kappa carrageenan Many reef spp

Luther, Douglas S.

116

Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Identification of tire leachate toxicants and a risk assessment of water quality effects using tire reefs in canals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cover is important to aquatic habitat and fisheries often try to improve habitats by addition of natural and artificial material to improve cover diversity and complexity. Habitat-improvement programs range from submerging used Christmas trees to more complex programs. Used automobile tires have been employed in the large scale construction of reefs and fish attractors in marine environments and to a lesser extent in freshwater and have been recognized as a durable, inexpensive and long-lasting material benefiting fishery communities. Recent studies by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation have quantified the importance of tire reefs to enhancing freshwater canal fisheries in the southwestern United States. These studies have demonstrated that fishes and aquatic macroinvertebrates are attracted to these structures, increasing species diversity, densities and biomass where reefs are placed in canals. However, the use of tire reefs in aquatic environments which have relatively small volumes compared to marine or reservoir environments has raised water quality concerns. Effects of tires on water quality have not typically been studied in the past because of the obvious presence of fishes and other aquatic organisms that make use of tire reefs; the implication being that tires are inert and non-toxic. Little information on effects of tires on water quality is in the literature. Stone demonstrated that tire exposure had no detrimental effects on two species of marine fish while results of Kellough's freshwater tests were inconclusive, but suggested that some factor in tire leachate was toxic to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Nozaka et al. found no harmful substances leached from tire material soaked in fresh water. Because there are few data on toxicity associated with tires, this became the focus of our study. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures developed by the EPA were used to evaluate water quality impacted by tires. 17 refs., 4 figs.

Nelson, S.M.; Mueller, G. (Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (United States)); Hemphill, D.C. (Lower Colorado Regional Office, Boulder City, NV (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Reefs and islands of the Chagos Archipelago, Indian Ocean: why it is the world's largest no-take marine protected area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are standard error bars. Figure 6. Change in reef fish species richness across seven countries in the Indian out in 2006 in all atolls (Tamelander et al., 2009) based on standard port survey methods (Hewitt

Purkis, Sam

119

Solar-cooling-system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Cooling System installed in the Frenchman's Reef Resort Hotel Test Site, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, used 956 Sunmaster Corporation evacuated glass tube collector modules which provide an effective solar collector aperture of 13,384 square feet. The system consists of the collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, an Andover Controls Corporation computerized controller, a large solar optimized Carrier Corporation industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat. The system, its operation sequence, and performance are described.

Harber, H.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Drainable evacuated tubular solar cooling system at Frenchman's Reef Hotel  

SciTech Connect

The Frenchman's Reef Hotel in the Virgin Islands operates its own total energy plant which has the capacity to satisfy the entire requirements of the 510-room hotel for electricity, desalinated drinking water and sewage treatment. The solar energy system consists of a 13,384 square foot array of drainable evacuated tube collectors arranged on three wings of the hotel. Solar heated water is supplied to a 200 ton absorption chiller which cools public rooms in the hotel. A programmable microprocessor controller oversees all functions of the solar energy system and monitors and records data which can be subsequently recovered locally or over the telephone, either as hard copy printout or on tape. The construction and startup of the array and system operating results are discussed. System heat losses are assessed. (LEW)

Platt, D.M.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Troposphere–Planetary Boundary Layer Interactions and the Evolution of Ocean Surface Density: Lessons from Red Sea Corals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time series of oxygen isotope (?18O) measurements of a coral from the northern Red Sea (RS) is presented and used as a direct proxy for water surface density ?s. With a relatively constant subsurface density, the generated surface density time ...

Gidon Eshel; Daniel P. Schrag; Brian F. Farrell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Uranium-series and radiocarbon geochronology of deep-sea corals: implications for Southern Ocean ventilation rates and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium-series and radiocarbon geochronology of deep-sea corals: implications for Southern Ocean Received 25 September 2000; accepted 5 September 2001 Abstract We present new uranium apply an improved two-component mixing approach to correct uranium-series dates for contaminant thorium

Lea, David

123

Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes and Coral Growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea as Environmental and Climate Indicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea comprise a sensitive and important region, both oceanographically and climatically. A better understanding of the history of climate and marine environmental conditions in this region provides valuable insight into the processes that affect climate globally. This dissertation furthers our understanding of these factors via investigations of the isotopes of corals and seawater, as well as coral growth. Results improve our understanding of how the isotope and coral growth records from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea reflect recent environmental conditions, enhancing our ability to reconstruct the history of climate in this important region. Analysis of the relationship between salinity and oxygen isotopic composition of seawater from the Texas/Louisiana continental shelf and Flower Garden Banks yield improved understanding of the relative contribution of the fresh water sources into the northern Gulf of Mexico, and also the oxygen isotopic composition of open-ocean seawater in this region. Variations in the growth of long-lived coral cores from the Flower Garden Banks are compared to local and regional climate conditions, particularly winter air temperatures. During the latter half of the twentieth century, a close correlation has existed between slow coral growth and cold wintertime air temperatures along the Gulf Coast, which are due to a meridional orientation of the North American jet stream (associated with the Pacific/North American climate pattern). Existing long coral growth records are too limited to assess this relationship during earlier years. Knowledge of the marine radiocarbon (14C) reservoir age is important for understanding carbon cycling and calibrating the radiocarbon ages of marine samples. Radiocarbon concentrations in corals from the Flower Garden Banks, Veracruz, and the Cariaco Basin are measured and used to determine the surface ocean 14C reservoir ages for the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Results also indicate that the post-nuclear weapons testing Delta 14-C values of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea differ. This difference is attributed to the advection of 14C-depleted surface water from the Southern Hemisphere into the Caribbean Sea. The results reported in this dissertation provide valuable information for understanding the marine environment when using carbonate proxies to study and reconstruct past climate and marine conditions in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.

Wagner, Amy Jo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DARRP -Protecting and restoring natural resources nationwide Protecting and Restoring Natural Resources in Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Kalaeloa) - see case highlights. Coral reef habitat obliter- ated by the M/V Cape Flattery Ship Grounding removed from reefs in Hawaii. Emergency restoration at Kalaeloa (Barbers Point) recementing 2800 dislodged

125

Coral Uptake of Inorganic Phosphorus and Nitrogen Negatively Affected by Simultaneous Changes in Temperature and pH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of ocean acidification and elevated seawater temperature on coral calcification and photosynthesis have been extensively investigated over the last two decades, whereas they are still unknown on nutrient uptake, despite their importance for coral energetics. We therefore studied the separate and combined impacts of increases in temperature and pCO2 on phosphate, ammonium, and nitrate uptake rates by the scleractinian coral S. pistillata. Three experiments were performed, during 10 days i) at three pHT conditions (8.1, 7.8, and 7.5) and normal temperature (26uC), ii) at three temperature conditions (26u, 29uC, and 33uC) and normal pHT (8.1), and iii) at three pHT conditions (8.1, 7.8, and 7.5) and elevated temperature (33uC). After 10 days of incubation, corals had not bleached, as protein, chlorophyll, and zooxanthellae contents were the same in all treatments. However, photosynthetic rates significantly decreased at 33uC, and were further reduced for the pHT 7.5. The photosynthetic efficiency of PSII was only decreased by elevated temperature. Nutrient uptake rates were not affected by a change in pH alone. Conversely, elevated temperature (33uC) alone induced an increase in phosphate uptake but a severe decrease in nitrate and ammonium uptake rates, even leading to a release of nitrogen into seawater. Combination of high temperature (33uC) and low pHT (7.5) resulted in a significant decrease in phosphate and nitrate uptake rates compared to control corals (26uC, pHT = 8.1). These results indicate that both inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus metabolism may be negatively affected by the cumulative effects of ocean warming and

Claire Godinot; Fanny Houlbrèque; Renaud Grover; Christine Ferrier-pagès

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Western Ledge Reef Wreck: The Analysis and Reconstruction of the Late 16th-Century Ship of the Spanish Empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Ledge Reef Wreck, discovered and later excavated in Bermuda between 1989 and 1991, is a prime example of Iberian shipbuilding within a broader Atlantic context. Operating during the late 16th-century, arguably one of the most fascinating periods of Spanish maritime history, the ship epitomizes the culture and technology identified with the celebrated fleets of the Carrera de Indias. By combining the new and previously unavailable data with that of the original reports, this dissertation outlines the structural details of this small utilitarian vessel which plowed the Atlantic Ocean between Spain and the Spanish America. Regarded as one of the better preserved Iberian shipwrecks in the New World, the hull timbers were disassembled and raised to the surface for detailed recording and analysis; the most comprehensive being the study and reconstruction presented in this dissertation. This data not only illustrates the transition from late medieval ship construction founded on the unempirical and intuitive style of local shipwrights to that of the geometrically- and scientific-rooted Renaissance design philosophy, but also to a frame-led assembly sequence. The hull remains and associated cultural material excavated from the site prove to be an important 16th- and 17th-century collection of Spanish and New World origin, which collectively reinforce the notion that the Western Ledge Reef Wreck was on its homebound course when it sunk among treacherous Bermuda reefs sometime between 1560 and 1600.

Bojakowski, Piotr

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Post-fire Tree Establishment Patterns at the Subalpine Forest-Alpine Tundra Ecotone: A Case Study in Mount Rainier National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic changes have induced striking altitudinal and latitudinal vegetation shifts throughout history. These shifts will almost certainly recur in the future; threatening other flora and fauna, and influencing climate feedback loops. Changes in the spatial distribution of vegetation are most conspicuous at physiognomically distinct ecotones, particularly between the subalpine forest and alpine tundra. Traditionally, ecological research has linked abiotic variables with the position of this ecotone (e.g., cold temperatures inhibit tree survival at high elevations). Thus, the prevailing assumption states that this ecotone is in equilibrium or quasi-equilibrium with the surrounding physical environment and that any dynamic shifts express direct linkages with the physical environment. This dissertation employs a landscape ecology approach to examine the abiotic and biotic ecological mechanisms most important in controlling tree establishment at this ecotone. The study site is on the western slopes of Mount Rainier, which was severely burned by a slash fire in 1930. Therefore, a crucial underlying assumption is that the ecological mechanisms controlling tree establishment are similar at disturbed and undisturbed sites. I exploited the use of 1970 CORONA satellite imagery and 2003 aerial photography to map 33 years of changes in arboreal vegetation. I created detailed maps of abiotic variables from a LIDAR-based DEM and biotic variables from classified remotely sensed data. I linked tree establishment patterns with abiotic and biotic variables in a GIS, and analyzed the correlations with standard logistic regression and logistic regression in the hierarchical partitioning framework at multiple spatial resolutions. A biotic factor (proximity to previously existing trees) was found to exert a strong influence on tree establishment patterns; equaling and in most cases exceeding the significance of the abiotic factors. The abiotic setting was more important at restricted spatial extents near the extreme upper limits of the ecotone and when analyzing coarse resolution data, but even in these cases proximity to existing trees remained significant. The strong overall influence of proximity to existing trees on patterns of tree establishment is unequivocal. If the underlying assumption of this dissertation is true, it challenges the long-held ecological assumption that vegetation in mountainous terrain is in equilibrium with and most strongly influenced by the surrounding physical environment.

Stueve, Kirk M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Treating high pressure zones in one trip in Canyon Reef area of Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Canyon Reef area near Snyder, Texas, Chevron U.S.A. Inc. is employing ratchet operated, packer type retrievable bridge plugs which have allowed operators to test, treat, or squeeze high pressure zones over a 35-day period on a single trip of the workstring. More zones could have been treated if necessary. The bridge plug was moved and set 31 times while treating the zones. Elapsed time is shown in days starting with T-date being the day tools were first run in for the treatment. The job was run with an average treating pressure of 1,000 psi, and a differential pressure of 2,500 psi that alternated from above the bridge plug to below and back each time the plug was moved to a new zone. The bridge plug used for the job seals by the action of a patented ratcheting mechanism which requires relatively light weight to set. Design of the ratchet enables the sealing elements to hold a seal against the casing wall while the hold-down slips are being set.

Cooley, G.; Mccowen, D.; Fore, M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record  

SciTech Connect

To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

130

Solar-cooling-system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Cooling System installed in the Frenchman's Reef Resort Hotel Test Site, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, used 956 Sunmaster Corporation evacuated glass tube collector modules which provide an effective solar collector aperture of 13,384 square feet. The system consists of the collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, an Andover Controls Corporation computerized controller, a large solar optimized Carrier Corporation industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat. The system, its operation sequence, and performance are described.

Harber, H.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Defense of a multi functional territory against interspecific intruders by the damselfish Stegastes nigricans (Pisces, Pomacentridae)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and diversity of reef algae.  Science 220: 511­513.  interactions among corals, algae  and herbivorous fish in Stegastes  nigricans  is  an  algae  farmer  that  defends 

Hamb, Alexandra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Determining Bottom Reflectance and Water Optical Properties Using Unmanned Underwater Vehicles under Clear or Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) with hyperspectral optical sensors that measure downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance was deployed over sandy bottoms, sea grass patches, and coral reefs near Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, during the ...

David C. English; Kendall L. Carder

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Lake Chicago  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

basin covered by shallow seas that divided North America from the Arctic Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico. Evidences of that are the coral reefs in quarries such as those at Stoney...

134

Herzig, P.M., Humphris, S.E., Miller, D.J., and Zierenberg, R.A. (Eds.), 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a c t The abundance and behaviour of fish on and around coral reefs at Twin Mounds and Giant Mounds, carbonate mounds located on the continental shelf off Ireland (600­1100 m), were studied using two Remotely to the occurrence of reefs in waters rich in zooplankton (benefiting zooplanktivorous fish) at sites with increased

135

Natural Environment Research Council Annual Report and Accounts 2009-10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the recovery of corals on Caribbean reefs, PLoS ONE, 2010. Controlling fishing helps reefs recover Peak oil in conventional oil production before 2030 appears likely and there is significant risk of a peak before 2020 for a near-term peak in global oil production, UKERC, 2009. Why do fish live on the edge? A team at the newly

Edinburgh, University of

136

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Plans 1. Atlantic Red Drum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Plans 1. Atlantic Red Drum 2. Shrimp 3. Stone Crab 4. Coral, Coral Reef, and Live/Hard Bottom Habitats (with SAFMC) Key Gulf of Mexico Commercial Species Commercially-important species and species groups in the Gulf of Mexico include: blue crab, stone crab

137

Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low-energy radiation. Nine results exceeded the JA soil screening guideline for distributed contamination of 13.5 pCi/g for total TRUs, ranging from 13.7 to 125.9 pCi/g. Because of these results, the goal of showing with 95% confidence that 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to 13.5 pCi/g-TRU activity cannot be met. The value of 13.5 pCi/g represents the 88th percentile rather than the 95th percentile in a nonparametric one-sided upper 90% confidence limit. Therefore, at the 95% confidence level, 88% of the clean pile is projected to be below the 13.5-pCi/g goal. The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual recommends use of a nonparametric statistical ''Sign Test'' to demonstrate compliance with release criteria for TRU. Although this survey was not designed to use the sign test, the data herein would demonstrate that the median (50%) of the clean storage pile is below the l3.5-pCi/g derived concentration guideline level. In other words, with the caveat that additional investigation of elevated concentrations was not performed, the data pass the sign test at the 13.5-pCi/g level. Additionally, the lateral extent of the pile was gridded, and 10% of the grid blocks was scanned with field instruments for the detection of low-energy radiation coupled to ratemeter/scalers to screen for the presence of hot particles. No hot particles were detected in the top 1 cm of the grid blocks surveyed.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 194--205  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The benthic communities of the deep insular shelf at the Hind Bank marine conservation district (MCD), an important spawning aggregation site for groupers, were studied with the Seabed autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) at depths between 32 and 54 m. Four digital phototransects provided data on benthic species composition and abundance of the insular shelf off St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Within the western side of the MCD, well-developed coral reefs with 43% mean living coral cover were found. The Montastrea annularis complex was dominant at all four sites between 33 and 47 m, the depth range where reefs were present. Maximum coral cover found was 70% at depths of 38--40 m. Quantitative determinations of sessile benthic populations, as well as the presence of motile megabenthic invertebrates and algae were obtained. The Seabed AUV provided new quantitative and descriptive information of a unique coral reef habitat found within this deeper insular shelf area.

Characterizing The Deep; Roy A. Armstrong A; Hanumant Singh B; Juan Torres A; Richard S. Nemeth C; Ali Can B; Chris Roman B; Ryan Eustice B; Lauren Riggs D; Graciela Garcia-moliner A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

School of Renewable Natural Resources Spring 2013 RNR Seminars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:30; coffee and cookies at 11:20) Jan. 23 Mr. Austin Humphries Biology Department, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa "Eat my weeds: herbivores and coral reefs in east Africa" Notes: Austin graduated Energy Technology Company Houston, Texas "Water Reuse for Wildlife" April 24 Dr. Michele Reba Research

140

O P I N I O N Changing the way we think about global change research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratory, chlorophyll fluorescence, coral reefs, experimental ecosystem science, global change, stable that the imbalance of metabolism led to an alarming O2 deficit and the project was doomed, so far as sustainable? How does covariance of key parameters, such as the projected more rapid increase in night vs. day

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

22302239 Nucleic Acids Research, 2008, Vol. 36, No. 7 Published online 19 February 2008 doi:10.1093/nar/gkn038  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 84% for superkingdom to 61% for order. Moreover, the power of the method for studying://www-ab.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/ software/readsim/. The 454 reads of three `real' microbial samples--a coral reef sample, a solar saltern; Dinsdale et al., submitted for publica- tion). The solar saltern sample was collected from the solar

Kelley, Scott

142

Challenges and Opportunities of Remote Sensing in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Challenges and Opportunities of Remote Sensing in Caribbean Coastal Waters Fernando Gilbes-Santaella, Ph.D. Associate Professor Geological and Environmental Remote Sensing Laboratory Department of this presentation Discuss the potential and limitations for remote sensing of ocean color and coral reefs monitoring

Gilbes, Fernando

143

II I I II I I I I I The Real Message  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

venture capital! For those who don't already know, Biosphere 2 is a futuristic glass and steel "greenhouse ocean complete with coral reef. Biosphere 2 re- ceives energy as sunlight and as electricity (from Gods fashioned of stainless steel salvaged from the Los Alamos atomic bomb project

Avise, John

144

Short Communication Securing ocean benefits for society in the face of climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Honolulu, HI 96822, United States m Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, Chauvin, LA 70344, United statement Recent disasters such as the tsunami in Japan, the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and Hurricane Sandy communities. Coastal habitats ­ such as seagrasses, kelp forests, coral reefs, mangroves, wetlands, and dunes

Talley, Lynne D.

145

Sensor-based Behavior Control for an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we evaluate a set of core functions that allow an underwater robot to perform surveillance under operator control. Specifically, we are interested in behaviors that facilitate the monitoring of organisms on a coral reef, and we present ... Keywords: Underwater robotics, adaptive gait control, computer vision, swimming robots, symbolic languages, visual human-robot interaction, visual servoing

Junaed Sattar; Philippe Giguère; Gregory Dudek

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Underwater 3D Mapping: Experiences and Lessons learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides details on the development of a tool to aid in 3D coral reef mapping designed to be operated by a single diver and later integrated into an autonomous robot. We discuss issues that influence the deployment and development of underwater ...

Andrew Hogue; Andrew German; James Zacher; Michael Jenkin

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Facies development and porosity relationships in Dundee Limestone of Gladwin County, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian of the Michigan basin was a time of transgressive seas and extensive carbonate deposition, including coral and stromatoporoid buildups. Deposited during the Middle Devonian, the Dundee Limestone represents deposition in subtidal, intertidal, and restricted environments. The Buckeye oil field, located in south-central Gladwin County, is a combined stratigraphic and structural carbonate trap that produces from a series of intertonguing patch reefs, fringing sand bodies, and intertidal island fenestral zones. The major reef-building organisms include stromatoporoids, corals, calcareous algae, brachiopods, and crinoids, with the stromatoporoids providing the major framework. The patch-reef facies is composed of massive stromatoporoid boundstones that contain primary intraparticle porosity. The fringing grainstone sands are composed of coarse crinoid and brachiopod skeletal debris that have interparticle porosity. The intertidal island zone found in the North Buckeye field is represented by a pelletal packstone that has abundant fenestral porosity.

Montgomery, E.L.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 13720 of 28,905 results. 11 - 13720 of 28,905 results. Download OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides http://energy.gov/management/downloads/opam-policy-acquisition-guides-24 Download Chapter 34- Major Systems Acquisition http://energy.gov/management/downloads/chapter-34-major-systems-acquisition Download "GRID 2030" A NATIONAL VISION FOR ELECTRICITY'S SECOND 100 YEARS http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/grid-2030-national-vision-electricity-s-second-100-years Download EO 13089-- Coral Reef Protection http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eo-13089-coral-reef-protection Download Protocol, Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents- July 2013 Protocol for the Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/protocol-development-and-maintenance-criteria-and-review-approach

149

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 26 / Administration of William J. Clinton, 2000 We intend to establish ecological reserves in the most fragile areas to keep them off- limits to fishing, drilling, and other damaging uses. I'm also directing the EPA to strength- en water quality standards all along our coasts and provide stronger protections for the most vulnerable ocean waters, to reduce pollution of beaches, coasts, and oceans. Second, I'm announcing today our com- mitment to permanently protect coral reefs of the northwest Hawaiian Islands. If you've ever been there, you know why we should. These eight islands are not, all of them, so well-known, but they stretch over 1,200 miles. They shelter more than 60 percent of America's coral reefs. They're home to plants and animals found nowhere else on Earth

150

The ecology of coral-microbe interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

my memories of all the electrocutions it took to get thisbe true, as long as electrocutions sustained while filteringjob is somehow also full of electrocutions, animal attacks,

Marhaver, Kristen Laura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

CORAL: solving complex constraints for symbolic pathfinder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symbolic execution is a powerful automated technique for generating test cases. Its goal is to achieve high coverage of software. One major obstacle in adopting the technique in practice is its inability to handle complex mathematical constraints. To ...

Matheus Souza; Mateus Borges; Marcelo d'Amorim; Corina S. P?s?reanu

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Coral Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Utility Id 4410 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE Activity Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA...

153

Characterization of Habitat for Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on the locations for feeding, reproductions, and resting, are essential to effectively protect sea turtle populations and implement conservation efforts. This type of ecological information is critically important for hawksbill turtle conservation in Los Roques Archipelago National Park (LRANP) where turtles have been declining in spite of habitat protection efforts. The goal of this research was to produce a benthic habitat map of LRANP employing in situ visual surveys, remote sensing and geographic information system techniques, and to spatially characterize sea turtle occupancy and patterns of usage by habitat type. Between June and August of 2008, turtle behavior and habitat use were recorded during 159 h of observation, comprising 46 sighting events (n = 20 juveniles, n = 26 female adults). Observed activities were grouped into 4 categories: foraging, resting, swimming, and reproductive behavior. The benthic habitat at each turtle sighting was recorded as one of three categories: coral reef, sand or marine vegetation. Results suggest that the population of turtles within LRANP is comprised primarily of female adults and juvenile individuals and that coral reef is the most important habitat for this species. The most important foraging area in the atoll is a coral patch reef that connects Dos Mosquises Sur and Dos Mosquises Norte. The data in this thesis have been made available in digital and map form to the managers of LRANP for management purposes.

Hunt, Luciana E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fish Bulletin 146. Man-Made Reef Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of oil drilling platforms offshore from Santa Barbara,and around offshore drilling platforms (Carlisle, Turner andDuring our surveys of offshore drilling platforms near Santa

Turner, Charles H; Ebert, Earl E; Given, Robert R

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Records of cosmogenic radionuclides Be-10, Al-26 and Cl-36 in corals: First studies on coral erosion rates and potential of dating very old corals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of selected cosmogenic radionuclides by muons: 2. Capture ofRecords of cosmogenic radionuclides 10 Be, 26 Al and 36 Clal. (1994). Cosmogenic radionuclides Table 3. Measured 9 Be

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Records of cosmogenic radionuclides Be-10, Al-26 and Cl-36 in corals: First studies on coral erosion rates and potential of dating very old corals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Marine Sciences, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez,00680, Puerto Rico (Received June 17, 2005; accepted infrom Barbados and Puerto Rico. The concentration levels of

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Collection of High Energy Yielding Strains of Saline Microalgae from the Hawaiian Islands: Final Technical Report, Year 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microalgae were collected from 48 locations in the Hawaiian Islands in 1985. The sites were an aquaculture tank; a coral reef; bays; a geothermal steam vent; Hawaiian fish ponds; a Hawaiian salt punawai (well); the ocean; river mouths; saline lakes; saline pools; saline ponds; a saline swamp; and the ponds, drainage ditches and sumps of commercial shrimp farms. From 4,800 isolations, 100 of the most productive clones were selected to be maintained by periodic transfer to sterile medium. Five clones were tested for growth rate and production in a full-spectrum-transmitting solarium.

York, R. H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coral Springs, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

192°, -80.2706044° 192°, -80.2706044° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.271192,"lon":-80.2706044,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

159

Coral Terrace, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.7459338°, -80.3044957° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7459338,"lon":-80.3044957,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

Coral Gables, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gables, Florida: Energy Resources Gables, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.72149°, -80.2683838° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.72149,"lon":-80.2683838,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The White Stuff: Marine Lab Team Seeks to Understand Coral ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)--working ... Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries ... up to 90 percent of its energy. ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPONGES IN MESOPHOTIC CORAL ECOSYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLICIES FOR ACHIEVING ENERGY JUSTICE IN SOCIETY: BEST PRACTICES FOR APPLYING SOLAR ENERGY FOR APPLYING SOLAR ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES TO LOW-INCOME HOUSING Final Report A Renewable Energy Applications.0 State Solar Energy Assistance Programs................................................. 21 5.1 Case

Gilbes, Fernando

163

3. THREATS TO CORAL SPECIES 3.1 Human Population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the planet and the level of human consumption of natural resources, both of which are increasing in most per capita resource demands are directly responsible for escalating atmospheric CO2 buildup carbonate skeletons, increased energy for storms, and the potential of increased input and resuspension

164

Vegetation and Topographic Control of Wind-Blown Snow Distributions in Distributed and Aggregated Simulations for an Arctic Tundra Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A finescale model of blowing snow is used to simulate the characteristics of snow cover in a low-Arctic catchment with moderate topography and partial shrub cover. The influence of changing shrub characteristics is investigated by performing a ...

Richard Essery; John Pomeroy

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Stealthy slugs and communicating corals: polyp withdrawal by an aggregating soft coral in response to injured neighbors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cambridge University Press, New York. © 2006 NRC CanadaSyst. Ecol. 29: 981– © 2006 NRC Canada Goddard Goddard,December 2005. Published on the NRC Research Press Web site

Goddard, JHR

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

ZOOPLANKTON OF THE FRINGING REEF: SUBSTRATE PREFERENCE OF DEMERSAL ZOOPLANKTON, NON DEMERSAL ZOOPLANKTON IN THE FRINGING REEF ENVIRONMENT, AND THE EFFECTS OF THE LUNAR CYCLE ON ZOOPLANKTON ABUNDANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I attached a 400 ml collection jar using a hose clamp. II transferred the contents of the tow’s collection jar intoanother jar. In order to prevent contamination I then

kobervig, carolyn p

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of the Daily Cycle Comparison of the Daily Cycle of Lower-Tropospheric Winds Over the Open Ocean and Those Above a Small Island L. M. Hartten and W. M. Angevine Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aeronomy Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Nauru99 Intensive Operational Period (IOP) took place from June 16, 1999, (Day 167) to July 15, 1999, (Day 196) on and near the Republic of Nauru (0.5° S, 166.9° E). Nauru is a small (4 km by 6 km) island surrounded by a reef that is exposed at low tide (Figure 1). A narrow coastal belt encircles a sparsely vegetated 30 to 60 m high plateau comprised of coral pinnacles and phosphate-bearing rock. Figure 1. The Republic of Nauru. The 915-MHz profiler was located at "P"; the Atmospheric Radiation

168

In search of an oasis: Opportunity in the Middle East  

SciTech Connect

Across the Middle East, people contend with heat, dust, lack of rainfall, and a harsh geography. In this century, industrial development, political upheaval, and war have left a legacy of environmental and health problems. Scarce arable land is being lost to desertification. Fresh water is diverted, misused, and polluted with hazardous wastes, sewage, and agricultural and other chemicals. Coastal zones are polluted with oil, threatening pristine coral reefs, wild fowl, and fishing areas. Unprecedented urbanization and migration of traditionally rural peoples and resettlement of political refugees and foreign workers strain city services. Yet there is reason for optimism in the Middle East. Peace in the region is in sight, bringing an opportunity to stop the rapid environmental decline. Technology is available to assess the degradation, and the impact of environmental conditions on human health can be quantified.

VanderMeer, D.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

Oechel, W.C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, which is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, and is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. Depending on the nature, rate, and magnitude of global environmental change, the arctic may have a positive or negative feedback on global change. Results from the DOE- funded research efforts of 1990 and 1991 indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Measurements made in the Barrow, Alaska region during 1992 support these results. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. There are obvious potential errors in scaling plot level measurements to landscape, mesoscale, and global spatial scales. In light of the results from the recent DOE-funded research, and the remaining uncertainties regarding the change in arctic ecosystem function due to high latitude warming, a revised set of research goals is proposed for the 1993--94 year. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long- term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales.

Oechel, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evolution of Life on Pacific Islands and Reefs: Past, Present, and Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Asano Bussan Co., Ltd. of Tokyo; Question ofPhilippine independence not to be discussed under any, and Kauai, in immediate future [13 Jan. 1942]; Authorization for Emergency Projects, signed by Walter C for Philippine Island Relief; 1943 . 093 Endorsements to corres re: U.S . policy which considers Penrhyn Island

Mathis, Wayne N.

172

The Conservation and Ecology of Cryptobenthic Fishes on Rocky Reefs in the Gulf of California, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to center of distribution (COD); b) mean abundance per sitespecies by mean distance to COD; c) mean abundance per sitespecies by mean distance to COD; d) individual records of

Galland, Grantly Russell

173

Predictability of reef fish recruitment in a highly variable nursery habitat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climate forcing of European herring and sardine populations.1988. Fluctuations in the herring and pilchard ?sheries ofmany commercial species, such as herring, sardine, mackerel,

Aburto-Oropeza, Octavio; Sala, Enric; Paredes, Gustavo; Mendoza, Abraham; Ballesteros, Enric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Structure and composition of organic reefs and carbonate mud mounds: concepts and categories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their large numbers and biomass. Their depredation on defoliating insects benefits trees (Karhu & Neuvonen; Mabelis, 2007; Dekoninck et al., 2010). The domed nest mounds of red wood ants are conspicu- ous; some can: Formicidae) nest mounds over an extensive area: Trialing a novel method KERRY M. BORKIN1 , RON W. SUMMERS2

Riding, Robert

175

Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

Harber, H.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Conservation and Ecology of Cryptobenthic Fishes on Rocky Reefs in the Gulf of California, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gulf of California, Mexico .bloom in the Gulf of California, Mexico. BioInvasion Recordsblenny in the Gulf of California, Mexico. Bulletin of the

Galland, Grantly Russell

177

Expulsion of Symbiotic Algae during Feeding by the Green Hydra – a Mechanism for Regulating Symbiont Density?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Algal-cnidarian symbiosis is one of the main factors contributing to the success of cnidarians, and is crucial for the maintenance of coral reefs. While loss of the symbionts (such as in coral bleaching) may cause the death of the cnidarian host, over-proliferation of the algae may also harm the host. Thus, there is a need for the host to regulate the population density of its symbionts. In the green hydra, Chlorohydra viridissima, the density of symbiotic algae may be controlled through host modulation of the algal cell cycle. Alternatively, Chlorohydra may actively expel their endosymbionts, although this phenomenon has only been observed under experimentally contrived stress conditions. Principal Findings: We show, using light and electron microscopy, that Chlorohydra actively expel endosymbiotic algal cells during predatory feeding on Artemia. This expulsion occurs as part of the apocrine mode of secretion from the endodermal digestive cells, but may also occur via an independent exocytotic mechanism. Significance: Our results demonstrate, for the first time, active expulsion of endosymbiotic algae from cnidarians under natural conditions. We suggest this phenomenon may represent a mechanism whereby cnidarians can expel excess symbiotic algae when an alternative form of nutrition is available in the form of prey.

Yelena Fishman; Eliahu Zlotkin; Daniel Sher

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Jellyfish and Their Kin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jellyfish and Their Kin Jellyfish and Their Kin Nature Bulletin No. 278-A October 14, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation JELLYFISH AND THEIR KIN The creatures that live in the sea are entirely different from those in fresh water. An inlander, a "landlubber", is fascinated by them. It is a thrilling experience to find one's first starfish, or a flower-like sea anemone. Among the strangest of marine animals are the jellyfish, which are not fish at all but relatives of the sea anemones and of the many kinds of coral that form rock-like skeletons and slowly build such enormous structures as coral reefs and coral atolls. There are many, many kinds of jellyfish. Some are tiny; others are as large as half a grapefruit; a few rare ones are as large as a bushel basket and have been known to be seven feet in diameter. Some are transparent; others are brown, pink, blue or white; and some are phosphorescent. The common kinds are shaped like a bell or like an umbrella, with a fringe around the edge, and some of them have numerous long streamers that trail behind. The mouth and stomach are where the handle of an umbrella would be. The animal slowly swims by contracting the bell or half closing the umbrella, thus forcing it forward, and then leisurely expanding it. Ocean bathers avoid the big ones because their tentacles, used to paralyze smaller marine animals, cause a painful sting.

179

Surface Energy Balance of the Western and Central Canadian Subarctic: Variations in the Energy Balance among Five Major Terrain Types  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the surface energy balance of 10 sites in the western and central Canadian subarctic is examined. Each research site is classified into one of five terrain types (lake, wetland, shrub tundra, upland tundra, and coniferous forest) ...

Andrea K. Eaton; Wayne R. Rouse; Peter M. Lafleur; Philip Marsh; Peter D. Blanken

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Soil physicochemical characteristics from Low-Centered Polygon in Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The dataset includes detailed characterization of soil physico-chemical properties from Arctic Tundra ice-wedge polygon features

Taniya Roy Chowdhury; Elizabeth Herndon; David Graham; Baohua Gu; Liyuan Liang

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Soil physicochemical characteristics from Low-Centered Polygon in Barrow, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dataset includes detailed characterization of soil physico-chemical properties from Arctic Tundra ice-wedge polygon features

Taniya Roy Chowdhury; Elizabeth Herndon; David Graham; Baohua Gu; Liyuan Liang

2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shelf, especially along the Aleutian Islands, and pursue benthic fish, rays, skates, and cephalopods

183

Precious Coral Fisheries of Hawaii and the U.S. Pacific Islands Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ing 11.14 inches at the Oahu Forest National Wildlife Refuge, 8.71 inches at Hanalei on Kauai, and 7 suppressed in the western and central Pacific, and enhanced over Indonesia, Ma- laysia and the Philippines Indonesia, Ma- laysia and the Philippines. Normally, positive SOI values in excess of +1.0 are associated

184

Precious Coral Fisheries of Hawaii and the U.S. Pacific Islands Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,India,Kenya,LesserSunda Islands,Malaysia,NewCaledonia,New Guinea,Nicaragua,Philippines,Samoa. Solomon.Trop.Bot.Gard.(740137-001)from seedcollectedfromcultivatedplantson Kauai,parentplantfromMoorea,French Polynesia Andaman,MalukuIslands,MascareneIslands, NewCaledonia,NewGuinea,NicobarIslands, Philippines,RyukyuIslands,Seychelles, Sri

185

The Porcupine Bank Canyon coral mounds: oceanographic and topographic steering of deep-water carbonate mound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing proximity to S. invicta mounds, suggesting that mealybugs benefit as well. Mutual benefits derived benefit from association with S. invicta. We found that mealybug occurrence increases sig- nificantly colony. While it appears clear that S. invicta benefits from association with these mealybugs, whether

Mazzini, Adriano

186

The Threatened Atlantic Elkhorn Coral, Acropora palmata: Population Dynamics and Their Policy Implications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the years 2030 and 2100. 125! ixthe foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100),in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

The threatened Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata : population dynamics and their policy implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the years 2030 and 2100. 125! ixthe foreseeable future (until 2030) and beyond (until 2100),in population size by 2030. The most striking difference we

Vardi, Tali

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

OSIRIS TEM CHEAT SHEET First log on with Coral, using the terminal out by the SEM.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control, Gatan Digital Micrograph, TEM Imagaing & Analysis (TIA), and the Flucam viewer. You could start the correct amount of time between each one. Launching of the software is complete when the Flucam viewer is the "Esprit" x-ray controller. #12;LOADING Line up the pin (the one near the end of the rod) with the line

Haller, Gary L.

189

Biodiversity and connectivity in peripheral populations of corals of the South and Eastern Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fortaleza Belize Panama Puerto Rico Bermuda São Tomé b-Panamá, Belize and Puerto Rico) and the North Atlantic (Belize, Panamá and Puerto Rico), one site in the North

Nunes, Flávia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Multidecadal Trends in Instrumental SST and Coral Proxy Sr/Ca Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical ship observations of sea surface temperature (SST) from 1850 to present were used to compute linear 40-yr trends for all 5° latitude by 5° longitude grid cells with sufficient data. Trends from throughout the twentieth century were ...

Robert B. Scott; Christina L. Holland; Terrence M. Quinn

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

4, 23292384, 2007 Greenhouse gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BGD 4, 2329­2384, 2007 Greenhouse gas balance of NE Siberian tundra M. K. van der Molen et al The seasonal cycle of the greenhouse gas balance of a continental tundra site in the Indigirka lowlands, NE, 2329­2384, 2007 Greenhouse gas balance of NE Siberian tundra M. K. van der Molen et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

192

A Framework For Designing A Network Of Marine Protected Areas In The Abrolhos Bank, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Abrolhos Reef Region, Brazil. Proceedings of the Eightunique Abrolhos Reef Formation (Brazil): need for specificof the Abrolhos Area, Brazil. Proceedings of the Colloquium

Mazzillo, Fernanda

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

8.0 BIBLIOGRAPHY Burghardt, J. 2003. "Capitol Reef National Park (Utah): Rainy Day and Duchess Uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uranium Mines--Site Characterization (September 2002)." Preliminary results presented at U.S. Department-based, Watershed Strategy to Support Effective Remediation of Abandoned Mine Lands: Fourth International Conference://www.esri.com Ferderer, D.A. 1996. National Overview of Abandoned Mine Land Sites Utilizing the Minerals Availability

194

The Modification of Bottom Boundary Layer Turbulence and Mixing by Internal Waves Shoaling on a Barrier Reef  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from an observational study of stratified, turbulent flow in the bottom boundary layer on the outer southeast Florida shelf. Measurements of momentum and heat fluxes were made using an array of acoustic Doppler velocimeters ...

Kristen A. Davis; Stephen G. Monismith

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The role of nursery habitats and climate variability in reef fish fisheries in the Gulf of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MJ, Power M (2002) Climatic influence on a marine fishMJ, Power M (2002) Climatic influence on a marine fishMJ, Power M (2002) Climatic influence on a marine fish

Aburto-Oropeza, Marco Octavio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Marine Communities of North Sea Offshore Platforms, and the Use of Stable Isotopes to Explore Artificial Reef Food Webs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Stable isotope methods offer a powerful means of investigating trophic interactions, allowing assessment of the relative importance of multiple nutrient sources to biological assemblages, as… (more)

Guerin, Andrew James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ravenwood Homes achieved a HERS score of 15 on its high- Ravenwood Homes achieved a HERS score of 15 on its high- performance home with design assistance from a Building America research team including Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Energy Smart Home Plans, LLC, and Florida HERO. The home which is located in southwestern Florida, was completed in 2011 and includes a 6 KW rooftop photovoltaic system; without the PV, the home achieves a HERS rating of 65. Ceilings that provide a continuous air barrier can be a key energy-saving feature of a home. In this home the builder installed the ceiling drywall as one continuous layer then installed duct chases in dropped ceilings beneath this drywall so that ducts were installed in conditioned space with an unbroken air barrier above. Interior walls were also attached to

198

Long-Term Reduction in 137Cs Concentration in Food Crops on Coral Atolls Resulting from Potassium Treatment  

SciTech Connect

Bikini Island was contaminated March 1, 1954 by the Bravo detonation (U.S nuclear test series, Castle) at Bikini Atoll. About 90% of the estimated dose from nuclear fallout to potential island residents is from cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) transferred from soil to plants that are consumed by residents. Thus, radioecology research efforts have been focused on removing {sup 137}Cs from soil and/or reducing its uptake into vegetation. Most effective was addition of potassium (K) to soil that reduces {sup 137}Cs concentration in fruits to 3-5% of pretreatment concentrations. Initial observations indicated this low concentration continued for some time after K was last applied. Long-term studies were designed to evaluate this persistence in more detail because it is very important to provide assurance to returning populations that {sup 137}Cs concentrations in food (and, therefore, radiation dose) will remain low for extended periods, even if K is not applied annually or biennially. Potassium applied at 300, 660, 1260, and 1970 kg ha{sup -1} lead to a {sup 137}Cs concentration in drinking coconut meat that is 34, 22, 10, and about 4 % of original concentration, respectively. Concentration of {sup 137}Cs remains low 8 to 10 y after K is last applied. An explanation for this unexpected result is discussed.

Robison, W; Stone, E; Hamilton, T; Conrado, C

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) mapping reveals coral mound distribution, morphology, and oceanography in deep water of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applicable to the seabed, water column and ocean surface of the high seas. Though few in number and rarely spaces (i.e. the seabed, water column, ocean surface, and even the air column above ­ which contrasts fisheries and other biological resources, seabed biodiversity and resources? (Young) If not, what

Alvarez, Pedro J.

200

Offshore Oil and Gas Platforms as Stepping Stones for Expansion of Coral Communities: A Molecular Genetic Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is one of the most productive oil and gas exploration areas in the world, currently containing approximately 3,800 offshore… (more)

Atchison, Amy D

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Constraining circulation changes through the last deglaciation with deep-sea coral radiocarbon and sedimentary ²³¹Pa/²³?Th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radioactive isotopes can be used in paleoceanography both for dating samples and as tracers of ocean processes. Here I use radiocarbon and uranium series isotopes to investigate the ocean's role in climate change over the ...

Burke, Andrea, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Arctic Ecologies: The Politics and Poetics of Northern Literary Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I once used the acronym ANWR to name the place “Arcticof the Brooks Range, that “ANWR was just more wet tundra and

Athens, Allison Katherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

NETL: News Release - Drilling of U.S.'s First Hydrate Well Underway...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

elevated a dozen feet above the frozen tundra on specially designed steel legs. Based on platforms similar to those used offshore, the Arctic Platform is compact and modular,...

204

Oil and gas exploration and development in Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent oil and gas exploration activity has been widespread throughout Arizona. Development drilling has continued in the Dineh-bi-keyah and Teec-nos-Pos fields in the northeastern corner, and exploratory drilling continues to test potential Paleozoic reservoirs elsewhere on the plateau. Several shallow wells north of the Grand Canyon encountered shows and limited recoveries of oil from Permian and Triassic rocks. The greatest activity has occurred along the Overthrust trend from northwestern to southeastern Arizona. Several million acres were leased and eight exploratory wells drilled along this trend. None were discoveries, but the presence of a Laramide thrust fault in the vicinity of Tombstone was established. The other tests have neither proved nor disproved the concept of the Overthrust belt in southern Arizona. Recent discoveries in the nonmarine Tertiary and marine Paleozoic of southern Nevada have stimulated interest in the oil potential of similar rocks and structures in the Basin and Range province of Arizona, which are coincident with the Overthrust trend. Reported gas discoveries by Pemex in Miocene marine sediments of the Gulf of California have stimulated leasing in the Yuma area, where one uncompleted well is reported to be a potential producer. The Pedregosa basin of extreme southeastern Arizona remains an area of great interest to explorationists because of the presence of a 25,000-ft (7600-m) sequence of Paleozoic marine sediments similar to those of the Permian basin, and Cretaceous marine rocks, including coral-rudist reefs, similar to those that produce in Texas and Mexico.

Nations, D.; Doss, A.K.; Ubarra, R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Data collection, storage, and retrieval with an underwater sensor network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel platform for underwater sensor networks to be used for long-term monitoring of coral reefs and fisheries. The sensor network consists of static and mobile underwater sensor nodes. The nodes communicate point-to-point using a novel high-speed optical communication system integrated into the TinyOS stack, and they broadcast using an acoustic protocol integrated in the TinyOS stack. The nodes have a variety of sensing capabilities, including cameras, water temperature, and pressure. The mobile nodes can locate and hover above the static nodes for data muling, and they can perform network maintenance functions such as deployment, relocation, and recovery. In this paper we describe the hardware and software architecture of this underwater sensor network. We then describe the optical and acoustic networking protocols and present experimental networking and data collected in a pool, in rivers, and in the ocean. Finally, we describe our experiments with mobility for data muling in this network.

I. Vasilescu; K. Kotay; D. Rus; M. Dunbabin; P. Corke

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effects of Nontropical Forest Cover on Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The albedo of a forest with snow on the ground is much less than that of snow-covered low vegetation such as tundra. As a result, simulation of the Northern Hemisphere climate, when fully forested south of a suitably chosen taiga/tundra boundary (...

J. Otterman; M-D. Chou; A. Arking

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Simulating Future Changes in Arctic and Subarctic Vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arctic is a sensitive system undergoing dramatic changes related to recent warming trends. Vegetation dynamics—increases in the quantity of green vegetation and a northward migration of trees into the arctic tundra—are a component of ... Keywords: Arctic, biogeography, boreal forest, climate change, forest migration, shrub encroachment, subarctic, tundra, vegetation dynamics models

Howard E. Epstein; Jed O. Kaplan; Heike Lischke; Qin Yu

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

John Harte's Publications: 2000-2013 J. Harte, J. Kitzes, E. Newman, and A. Rominger, "Taxon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, "Carbon Cycle Uncertainty Increases Climate Change Risks and Mitigation Challenges",Journal of Climate 25. Elmendorf and 46 other authors, including J. Harte, "Plot-scale evidence of tundra vegetation change authors, including J. Harte, "Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation

Kammen, Daniel M.

209

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Resident Fish Prior to Decommissioning. ” Marine ScienceConsequences of alternative decommissioning options to reefand implications for decommissioning policy. MMS OCS Study

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Effects of Coastal Circulation on the Distributional Patterns of Pelagic Juvenile Fishes and Otolith Chemistry, and on the Timing of Juvenile Reef Fish Settlement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the central California coast. Fish Bull 89:523-533and abundance of pelagic juvenile fish in the Santa BarbaraWashburn. 2003. Linking Early Fish Growth and Transport to

Nishimoto, Mary M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI (Chester 2 reef) Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Subtask 1.7 SOPO Subtask 1.7 - Collect dipole sonic data from a new lateral well in Chester 2 reef...

212

Links between coastal circulation and pollutant dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. C. Ohlmann, 2004, Do oil and gas platforms off Californiaof natural reefs and oil and gas production platforms onof natural reefs and oil and gas production platforms on

Beckenbach, Edwin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

ESM 254 Course Syllabus COASTAL MARINE ECOSYSTEM PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lecture ­ Wetland mitigation and restoration in southern CA - Dr Thursday Discussion - Rigs to reefs: should decommissioned POCS oil platforms be used as reefs? Papers: (1) Kaiser MJ. 2006. The Louisiana artificial

California at Santa Barbara, University of

214

Microbial community composition and biogeochemical processes in cold-water coral carbonate mounds in the Gulf of Cadiz, on the Moroccan margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bait Compared to an Individual Mound Treatment Engler 19 Evaluation of AllectusTM and Talstar Formulations and Diatomaceous Earth as Individual Mound Treatments for Red Imported Fire Ants Engler, Drees, Nester 32 Preliminary Assessment of 80% Spinosad (Entrust®) as an Individual Mound Drench Treatment

Gilli, Adrian

215

Neogene carbonate exploration play concepts for Northern New Guinea: New iteration from field work and seismic stratigraphy along the Northern New Guinea Fault Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent field reconnaissance, petrography, nanno and foraminifera age determinations, and seismic stratigraphy of the Sepik and Piore subbasins of northern New Guinea reveal the existence of an extensive, tectonically unstable, Miocene-Pliocene carbonate shelf system. These findings represent the first recorded evidence of northern Papuan limestones coeval in age to those of the hydrocarbon productive Salawati Basin of Irian Jaya. Moreover, these observations also demonstrate the significance of episodic activities of the northern New Guinea fault zone upon the changes in carbonate sedimentation and diagenesis. During the Neogene, algal biosparites to foraminiferal biomicrites defined the clean portion of a mixed clastic-carbonate shelf system of the northern New Guinea basin, which began at the central New Guinea cordillera and deepened northward. This shelf was interrupted by coral-coralline algal boundstone fringing- to patch-reef buildups with associated skeletal grainstones. Clean carbonates were spatially and temporally restricted to basement blocks, which episodically underwent uplift while terrigenous dilutes carbonates were more common in adjacently subsiding basement block bathymetric lows. These tectonic expressions were caused by the spatially transient nature of constraining bends of the evolving north New Guinea faults. As shown by seismic stratigraphy, by the late Miocene to the early Pliocene the uplift of the Bewani-Torricelli Mountains sagittally divided the shelf of the northern New Guinea basin into the Ramu-Sepik and the Piore basins. Continued regional sinistral transpression between the Pacific and the New Guinea leading edge of the Indo-Australian plates led to the reverse tilting of the Piore basin, the shallowing of the former distal shelf with concomitant extensive biolithite development (e.g., on subsiding volcanic islands) eventual uplifting of the Oenake Range, and en echelon faulting of the Bewani-Torricelli Mountains.

Pigott, J.D.; Geiger, C. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Wire Bonder: Kulicke and Soffa Model 4526  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wire Bonder: Kulicke and Soffa Model 4526. Description: CORAL Name: Wire Bonder. Needs Description. Scientific Opportunities / Applications: ...

2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Summer 2012 College of liberal arts Summer 2012 contentS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Culley, S. G. Mendis, and K. Perera (2005), Coral poaching worsens tsunami destruction in Sri Lanka, Eos

Janssen, Michel

218

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER microscopic plants and animals that form the basis of the oceanic food web the surface, corals and other deepwater OIL AND HUMAN USE Wellhead CORALS · Coral surveys · Tissue collections · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment sampling AQUATIC VEGETATION

219

Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs  

SciTech Connect

The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

220

Quantum Monte Carlo Computations of Phase Stability, Equations of State,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tundra Bushes Add Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Tundra Bushes Add Fuel to Northern Thaw Bonfils-1.jpg Why it Matters: Simulations at NERSC are the first to investigate long-term climate effects of shrub expansion into the tundra. The spread of taller vegetation could exacerbate warming in northern latitudes. Key Challenges: Capturing biogeochemical processes, additional ecosystem types for Arctic vegetation, and an individual-based dynamical vegetation model to study ecosystem feedbacks that might include release of greenhouse gases and changes in surface albedo. These studies provide a detailed understanding of how gravitational instability, rock heterogeneity, brine salinity, and other conditions affect the mechanism of CO2 storage and the volume of CO2 that can be stored.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effects of Spatial Aggregation of Initial Conditions and Forcing Data on Modeling Snowmelt Using a Land Surface Scheme  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small-scale topography and snow redistribution have important effects on snow-cover heterogeneity and the timing, rate, and duration of spring snowmelt in mountain tundra environments. However, land surface schemes (LSSs) are usually applied as a ...

Pablo F. Dornes; John W. Pomeroy; Alain Pietroniro; Diana L. Verseghy

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Seasonal Snow Cover Classification System for Local to Global Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new classification system for seasonal snow covers is proposed. It has six classes (tundra, taiga, alpine, maritime, prairie, and ephemeral, each class defined by a unique ensemble of textural and stratigraphic characteristics including the ...

Matthew Sturm; Jon Holmgren; Glen E. Liston

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pennsylvanian Carbonate Reef Pennsylvanian Carbonate Reef Pennsylvanian Carbonate Reef Pennsylvanian Carbonate Reef Pennsylvanian Carbonate Reef Pennsylvanian Carbonate Reef CO CO CO 2 2 2 Sequestration, West Texas Sequestration, West Texas Sequestration, West Texas DOE Southwest Partnership Pilot at SACROC and Claytonville oil field sites Comparison & contrast between a 30 year old and a new injection site Bureau of Economic Geology Acknowledgements Acknowledgements Acknowledgements Special Acknowledgement to Industry Sponsor Kinder Morgan Authors; Mark H. Holtz, Vanessa Núñez López, Rebecca C. Smith The University of Texas, Austin Bureau of Economic Geology Subsurface Site Characterization Work Flow Delineate Reservoir Architecture Delineate Reservoir Architecture Ascertain Regional Geological Setting Ascertain Regional Geological Setting Determine Fluid & Rock-fluid Properties

224

1894 (190|249|416|440)(\\s|\\-)million(\\s|\\-)miles? 1894 700 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 687 2020 Paris 2021 Great Barrier Reef 2022 Greenwich 2023 Africa 2025 Astrodome 2026 776 BC 2027 1994 2028 anacondas 2028 reticulated ...

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Energy efficiency programs and policies in the industrial sector in industrialized countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23. Wisconsin – Focus on Energy website: http://pageId =4 24. International Energy Agency (IEA) documents:index.html 16. Renewable Energy Equity Fund (REEF) website:

Galitsky, Christina; Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Temporal Variation in Fish Communities off Santa Cruz Island, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blacksmith, Chromis punctipinnis, a planktivorous reef fish.U.S. Fish Bull Brooks AJ, Schmitt RJ, Holbrook SJ.2002. Declines in regional fish populations: have species

Graves, Michelle R.; Larson, Ralph J.; Alevizon, William S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Taiwan - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Taiwan claims sovereignty over the same key areas in the South China Sea as China, including the Spratly Islands, Pratas Island, Paracal Islands, and Scarborough Reef.

228

Experiments with Underwater Robot Localization and Tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. S. Feder, “Autonomous underwater vehicle navigation,” MITfor an autonomous underwater reef monitoring robot,” intechniques applied to an underwater vehicle,” in Proceedings

Corke, Peter; Detwiler, Carrick; Dunbabin, Matthew; Hamilton, Michael; Rus, Daniela; Vasilescu, Iuliu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reproductive Potential of the Protogynous Teleost, California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher) at Nine Populations across Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fishes on a southern California artificial reef. Bull MarFIGURES FIGURE Page 1. California sheephead collection sites2. Size frequency of California sheephead at nine southern

Loke, Kerri

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The Ecology and Evolution of Soritid Foraminifera with Symbiodinium Dinoflagellates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of symbiotic dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium.corals and their symbiotic algae. Pages 96-113 Life andfor changing symbiotic algae in juvenile tridacnids. Journal

Fay, Scott Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Table 3. Top Five Retailers of Electricity, with End Use Sectors...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"2. Sierra Pacific Power Co","Investor-Owned",7548312,2188375,2877253,2482684,"-" "3. Colorado River Comm of Nevada","Public",1669538,"-",991813,677725,"-" "4. Coral Power...

232

NanoFab Tool: 4Wave Ion Milling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 4Wave Ion Milling System. CORAL Name: Ion Mill. Location: Building 215 (NanoFab Clean Room Bay A106). Description: ...

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

233

Self-Assessment Testimonials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... City Manager, City of Coral Springs, Florida, 2007 Baldrige Award recipient “The economic environment is difficult for Cargill Corn Milling, as it is ...

2012-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Case Study: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc., Cape Coral, Florida PNNL, Florida HERO, and Energy Smart Home Plans helped Ravenwood Homes achieve a HERS 15...

235

Nuclear Data Sheets for 225Fr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for CORAL M. BAGLIN Nuclear Science Division LawrenceCA 94720, USA Abstract: Nuclear structure data pertaining tofor (Y. A. Akovali, Nuclear Data Sheets 60 , 617 (1990),

Baglin, Coral M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Bathymetry, water optical properties, and benthic classiWcation of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

acquisition of reXectance signatures of the benthic commu- nity end members ..... jected surface area of hard corals, macrophytes, seagrasses, turf algae, sand ...

237

Natural Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was designed to help local governments and coastal communities of the Coral Triangle (Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Solomon Islands, Timor-Leste, and Papua New Guinea) identify...

238

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

Schell, D.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This proposal requests funding for the completion of our current ecological studies at the MS-117 research site at Toolik Lake, Alaska. We have been using a mix of stable and radioisotope techniques to assess the fluxes of carbon and nitrogen within the ecosystem and the implications for long-term carbon storage or loss from the tundra. Several tentative conclusions have emerged from our study including: Tundra in the foothills is no longer accumulating carbon. Surficial radiocarbon abundances show little or no accumulation since 1000--2500 yrs BP. Coastal plain tundra is still accumulating carbon, but the rate of accumulation has dropped in the last few thousand years. Carbon export from watersheds in the Kuparuk and Imnavait Creek drainages are in excess of that expected from estimated primary productivity; and Nitrogen isotope abundances vary between species of plants and along hydrologic gradients.

Schell, D.M.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Mapping Population onto Priority Conservation Areas Draft report for WWF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zones. The same trend is observed in the Mekong (p Karoo (p is significant only in Coastal East Africa / Namib Karoo and the Mesoamerican Reef. Rural areas in the Congo / Namib Karoo and the Mesoamerican Reef ecoregions show significant urban-rural differences in unmet need

Lopez-Carr, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their arrival pattern among adjacent and distant reefs (or larval connectivity net- work) is not known. More) and currents (physics) on their arrival pattern among adjacent and distant reefs is not known. Moreover modeling approach to explore the relative influence of physical (i.e. eddy perturbation, diffusion

Paris-Limouzy, Claire B.

242

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Bridging gaps in the molecular phylogeny of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 10,000 kg were harvested annually from the black coral beds off Maui and Kauai. During the late 70's from the Philippines and Tonga (Harper, 1988). These sources have filled the demand for low quality in the FMP (Grigg, 1988).For black coral, the combined MSY for beds off Maui and Kauai is 6,250 kg/yr (Grigg

243

The Ecological and Socio-Economic Impacts of Invasive Alien Species on Island Ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as 10,000 kg were harvested annually from the black coral beds off Maui and Kauai. During the late 70's from the Philippines and Tonga (Harper, 1988). These sources have filled the demand for low quality in the FMP (Grigg, 1988).For black coral, the combined MSY for beds off Maui and Kauai is 6,250 kg/yr (Grigg

Meyerson, Laura A.

244

Peter D. Vize Deepwater broadcast spawning by Montastraea cavernosa, Montastraea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Atmospheric Administration, Washington, DC, pp 21­26 Bright TJ (1991) First direct sighting of star coral time windows once per year. In shallow water corals, annual water temperature cycles set the month spawning events were within the same temporal windows as shallower conspecifics. These data indicate

Vize, Peter D.

245

Effects of Contemporary Winter Seismic Exploration on Low Arctic Plant Communities and Permafrost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Todd.Kemper@gov.ab.ca Abstract We studied effects of oil and gas exploration, using the most recentEffects of Contemporary Winter Seismic Exploration on Low Arctic Plant Communities and Permafrost J seismic exploration technologies, on tundra plant communities and soils in four vegetation types

Macdonald, Ellen

246

John Harte's Publications: 2000-2011 J. Harte, Maximum Entropy and Ecology: A Theory of Abundance, Distribution, and Energetics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and J. Harte, "Invasion of non-native grasses causes a drop in soil carbon storage in California. Harte, "Global assessment of experimental climate warming on tundra vegetation: heterogeneity over space. Torn, and J. Harte, "Linking soil organic matter dynamics and erosion- induced terrestrial carbon

Kammen, Daniel M.

247

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) will be used by the FBI, under the direct oversight of SRNL, for forensic examination of radiologically contaminated evidence. The REEF consists of five (5) wet chemistry lab modules, two (2) evidence storage rooms, other miscellaneous storage rooms for lab equipment, several offices and personnel corridors. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US Date: 2012.03.30 13:33:12 -04'00' 03/23/2012

248

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zama, Alberta Zama, Alberta CO 2 -rich gas in a pinnacle reef structure - Results will help to determine the best practices to support sequestration in these unique geologic structures as well as further our understanding of the effects of H 2 S on tertiary oil recovery and CO 2 sequestration. Pinnacle Setting Pinnacle Setting Zama Pinnacle Reef Zama Pinnacle Reef Injection of acid gas stream from nearby gas-processing plant. * 60% CO 2 * 40% H 2 S Approximately 200,000 tonnes of CO 2 will be injected during demo period. Zama Scales of Examination Zama Scales of Examination * Reservoir scale - Zama F Pool and immediately underlying and overlying confining units: Lower Keg River Fm limestone and Muskeg Fm anhydrite. * Local scale - Zama F Pool and a few adjacent pinnacle reefs.

249

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef Authors: Brian Toelle, Chaoqing Yang (speaker), and Tracee Imai, Schlumberger Ltd. Venue: Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists 2007 Annual Meeting, Lexington, KY, September 16–18, 2007 (http://www.uky.edu/KGS/esaapg07/ [external site]). Abstract: The Northern Silurian Reef trend of the Michigan Basin was developed within the stratigraphic unit historically referred to as the Niagaran Brown. Within the past few years this unit was renamed the Guelph Formation. Over 700 reefs make up this trend, with some of these being over 300 acres in size and having produced more than 5 million barrels of oil. Estimates of the total amount of hydrocarbons produced for the entire trend have been reported to be as much as nearly a half a billion barrels. The U.S. Department of Energy has funded a study of an ongoing enhanced oil recovery project being conducted on a reef within this trend and entailing CO2 injection. The Charlton 30/31 reef, located in Otsego County, MI, like many other reefs in the play, was discovered and developed during the 1970s and 1980s. This field has completed its primary production phase, during which six wells produced 2.6 million of the field’s estimated 7 million barrels of oil in place. This reservoir is characterized as a low-porosity, low-permeability limestone matrix with irregular dolomitized intervals providing a secondary network of higher porosity and permeability, which controls fluid flow throughout the reservoir. The estimated average porosity in this reef is just slightly over 6 percent. As part of this study, the reservoir attributes identified at the Charlton 30/31 reef were extended to the entire Northern Reef Trend in order to determine its CO2 sequestration capacity. Additionally, the potential oil recovery has been estimated.

250

National Marine Fisheries Service -1st Quarter 2012 Table A. Summary of Stock Status for FSSI Stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Drum Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico Red drum - Gulf of Mexico No Undefined Unknown NA N/A not estimated 1.5 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Black grouper - Gulf of Mexico* No No No NA N/A 1.40 4 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Gag - Gulf of Mexico Yes Yes NA Reduce

251

National Marine Fisheries Service -3rd Quarter 2012 Update Table A. Summary of Stock Status for FSSI Stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Drum Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico Red drum - Gulf of Mexico No Undefined Unknown NA N/A not estimated 1.5 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Black grouper - Gulf of Mexico * No No No NA N/A 1.40 4 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Gag - Gulf of Mexico Yes Yes NA Reduce

252

National Marine Fisheries Service -2nd Quarter 2012 Table A. Summary of Stock Status for FSSI Stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 GMFMC Red Drum Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico Red drum - Gulf of Mexico No Undefined Unknown NA N/A not estimated 1.5 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Black grouper - Gulf of Mexico * No No No NA N/A 1.4 4 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Gag - Gulf of Mexico Yes Yes NA Reduce

253

National Marine Fisheries Service -2011 Status of U.S. Fisheries Table A. Summary of Stock Status for FSSI Stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 GMFMC Red Drum Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico Red drum - Gulf of Mexico No Undefined Unknown NA N/A not estimated 1.5 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Black grouper - Gulf of Mexico* No No No NA N/A 1.40 4 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Gag - Gulf of Mexico * Yes Yes NA Reduce

254

National Marine Fisheries Service -4th Quarter 2011 Table A. Summary of Stock Status for FSSI Stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Drum Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico Red drum - Gulf of Mexico No Undefined Unknown NA N/A not estimated 1.5 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Black grouper - Gulf of Mexico* No No No NA N/A 1.40 4 GMFMC Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico Gag - Gulf of Mexico * Yes Yes NA Reduce

255

O:ELECTRICEA-213.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. Coral, a limited liability company based in Delaware, does not own or control any electric generating or transmission facilities, nor does it have a franchised service area. Coral proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export this energy on its own behalf to Canada. The energy to be exported would be delivered to Canada over the international electric transmission

256

O:ELECTRICEA-212.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Mexico as a power marketer. Coral does not own or control any electric generating or transmission facilities, nor does it have a franchised service area. Coral proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export this energy on its own behalf to Mexico. The energy to be exported would be delivered to Mexico over the international electric transmission

257

O:\ELECTRIC\ORDERS\EA-212-a.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order No. EA-212-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On June 9, 1999, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) authorized Coral Power, L.L.C. (Coral) to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That two-year authorization will expire on August 13, 2001. On June 27, 2001, Coral filed an application with FE for renewal of this export authority. The electric energy that Coral proposes to export will be surplus energy purchased from electric utilities and Federal power marketing agencies in the United States and will be delivered to

258

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SEPT03NV 1. Nevada Power Co Investor-Owned 2. Sierra Pacific Power Co 3. Colorado River Comm of Nevada Public 4. Coral Power LLC Other Provider 5. Wells Rural Electric Co

259

Behavior of Turbulence Statistics in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity variances in the convective boundary layer are examined using data derived in PBL experiments over land (Minnesota) and ocean (the Coral Sea) supported by data from the Kansas study of the surface boundary layer. In the freely convective ...

B. B. Hicks

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Projected Tasman Sea extremes in sea surface temperature through the 21st Century  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean climate extremes have received little treatment in the literature, aside from coastal sea level and temperatures affecting coral bleaching. Further, it is notable that extremes, e.g., temperature and precipitation, are typically not well ...

Eric C. J. Oliver; Simon J. Wotherspoon; Matt A. Chamberlain; Neil J. Holbrook

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Observations of Record Cold Cloud-Top Temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Hilda (1990)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis is made of the development of a region of cold cloud-top temperatures in Tropical Cyclone Hilda (1990) in the Coral Sea off eastern Australia. Observed temperatures of approximately 173 K (?100°C) from two independent ...

Elizabeth E. Ebert; Greg J. Holland

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Testing the Fidelity of Methods Used in Proxy-Based Reconstructions of Past Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two widely used statistical approaches to reconstructing past climate histories from climate “proxy” data such as tree rings, corals, and ice cores are investigated using synthetic “pseudoproxy” data derived from a simulation of forced climate ...

Michael E. Mann; Scott Rutherford; Eugene Wahl; Caspar Ammann

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Crude Existence: The Politics of Oil in Northern Angola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9500 on Alaska North Slope Crude Oil in Prince William Soundand Dispersed Egyptian Crude Oil on Red Sea Coral Larvae.1. The Price of Angolan Crude Oil 2. Fuel Shortages, Subsidy

Reed, Kristin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Centennial-scale elemental and isotopic variability in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The marine geochemistry of the North Atlantic Ocean varies on decadal to centennial time scales, a consequence of natural and anthropogenic forcing. Surface corals provide a useful geochemical archive to quantify past mixed ...

Reuer, Matthew K. (Matthew Kindt), 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

JULY 2007 VOL. 20, NO. 3 Osteoblasts...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and early 70's, as much as 10,000 kg were harvested annually 54 from the black coral beds off Maui and Kauai ability of inexpensive black coral from the Philippines and Tonga (Harper, 1988). These sources have~.NECKERI . : ~~~ FRENCH ').:J .. ," · FRIGATE / 'J"o"NIHOA SHOALS REFUGIA co: KAUAI MAKAPUU NIIH~ :4})AHo/BED I:loo KAU

Mathis, Wayne N.

266

Who wants to terminate the game? The role of vested interests and metaplayers in the ATOLLGAME experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low coral islands are heavily dependent on groundwater for freshwater supplies. The declaration by the government of Kiribati of water reserves over privately owned land has led to conflicts, illegal settlements, and vandalism. Also, the water consumption ... Keywords: ATOLLGAME, Pacific, Tarawa, companion modeling, contamination, coral islands, dialogue, entrenched agendas, freshwater reserves, groundwater, multi-agent system, participation, pollution, poverty alleviation, role-playing game, staged process, sustainable development, water demand, water management, water management strategies, water reserves

Anne Dray; Pascal Perez; Christophe Le Page; Patrick D'Aquino; Ian White

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

Hinzman, Larry D. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Lilly, Michael R. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); Kane, Douglas L. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Miller, D. Dan (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Galloway, Braden K. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center); Hilton, Kristie M. (Geo-Watersheds Scientific); White, Daniel M. (University of Alaska Fairbanks, Water and Environmental Research Center)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Herzig, P.M., Humphris, S.E., Miller, D.J., and Zierenberg, R.A. (Eds.), 1998 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 158  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 10.1 0.1 m2 Alaskan tundra Fox (1985) Pocket gopher mound 10.2 8.9 0.5 m2 old field (Minnesota, USA mound 2.1 1.5 1 m2 Florida (USA) sandhill forest Kaczor and Hartnett (1990) Ant mound 7.8 5.0 n.a. Paspalum vaginautm grassland, spring Lewis et al. (1991) Ant mound 7.3 4.5 n.a. Paspalum vaginatum

269

DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy features to the public.

Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Sepik-Ramu area, Ramu basin, Papua New Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements in seismic processing have made new interpretations of the structural and depositional history of the northwestern portion of the Ramu basin possible. Support for a wrench tectonic model for this area is observed in the reprocessed seismic data. Strike-slip movement along major fault zones has allowed compressional forces to be translated laterally and resulted in only minor deformation occurring in the Sepik-Ramu area. The major tectonic event is thought to have occurred during late Miocene-early Pliocene, and not during the middle Miocene, as earlier hypothesized. Consequently, Miocene deposition is postulated to have occurred uninterrupted by periods of erosion. A thick Miocene section is preserved in this region and is postulated to contain slope, reef, and shelf carbonates of early to middle Miocene age. This interpretation has led to the identification of a reef trend over 7 mi wide and at least 42 mi long containing numerous pinnacle reefs. The pinnacle reefs are analogous to those found in the Salawati basin of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The reefs are overlain by deep-water shales, a combination that provides potential reservoirs and seals necessary for the entrapment of hydrocarbons. The presence of oil and gas seeps document the existence of a source. These three factors justify hydrocarbon exploration in this area. The numerous potential drilling targets may lead to the discovery of significant quantities of hydrocarbons.

Donaldson, J.C.; Wilson, J.T. (Anderman/Smith Operating Co., Denver, CO (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Base Operation of Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Base Operation of Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Perform baseline activities in the Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) located in 773-A, F-Wing main floor. Baseline activities include non-radiological training, radiological training, laboratory instrument preventive maintenance, laboratory instrument calibration, and repackaging of previously examined evidence. Note: baseline activities were previously covered in TC A 2007 096, rev. 1. See attached NONA and EEC. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

272

Microsoft Word - ThisWeek05.06.13.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Regional Partner Initiates Large-Scale CO 2 Injection into Depleted Pinnacle Reef On April 23, members of the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) began injecting CO 2 at a rate of 1,050 metric tons per day into Dover 33, a mature, closed reservoir in the Niagaran Reef Complex of northern Michigan. The reservoir is in the late stages of CO 2 -enhanced oil recovery being conducted by industry partner Core Energy LLC (Traverse City, Mich.). This large-scale carbon-storage effort is designed to advance understanding of injectivity, improve capacity estimates, and determine the feasibility of utilizing and storing CO 2 in geological formations, particularly carbonate pinnacle reefs. Knowledge gained will lead to a better understanding of how sequestration technologies can best be applied on a regional basis for

273

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PCOR Partnership Phase II PCOR Partnership Phase II PCOR Partnership Phase II * Contracts! * Planning... * Contracts! Zama, Alberta Zama, Alberta CO 2 -rich gas in a pinnacle reef structure - Results will help to determine the best practices to support sequestration in these unique geologic structures as well as further our understanding of the effects of H 2 S on tertiary oil recovery and CO 2 sequestration. Pinnacle Setting Pinnacle Setting Zama Pinnacle Reef Zama Pinnacle Reef Injection of acid gas stream from nearby gas-processing plant. * 60% CO 2 * 40% H 2 S Approximately 200,000 tonnes of CO 2 will be injected during demo period. Zama Scales of Examination Zama Scales of Examination * Reservoir scale - Zama F Pool and immediately underlying and overlying confining units: Lower Keg River Fm limestone and Muskeg Fm anhydrite.

274

CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) will be used by the FBI, under the direct oversight of Savannah River National Laboratory for forensic examination of radiologically contaminated evidence. The REEF consists of five (5) wet chemistry lab modules, two (2) evidence storage rooms, other miscellaneous storage rooms for lab equipment, several offices and personnel corridors. CX-008373.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007667: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010132: Categorical Exclusion Determination

275

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste (DOE/EIS-0200) (6/30/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 125 / Wednesday, June 30, 2004 / Notices Washington, DC 20585-0350 (FAX 202- 287-5736). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Mintz (Program Office) 202-586- 9506 or Michael Skinker (Program Attorney) 202-586-2793. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. 824a(e)). On May 24, 2004, the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) received an application from Coral to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for a period of five years. Coral is owned by subsidiaries of Shell Oil Company and InterGen, N.V., with its principal place of business in Houston, Texas. Coral

277

Change in Pacific nitrogen content tied to climate change  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 For immediate release: 12/15/2013 | NR-13-12-04 High Resolution Image Living and fossilized coral are gathered from dives in the Hawaiian Islands. A Lawrence Livermore scientist and collaborators have studied coral to determine that a long-term shift in nitrogen content in the Pacific Ocean has occurred as a result of climate change. Image courtesy of NOAA Hawaii Undersea Research Laboratory. Change in Pacific nitrogen content tied to climate change Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Using deep sea corals gathered near the Hawaiian Islands, a Lawrence Livermore scientist, in collaboration with UC Santa Cruz colleagues, has determined that a long-term shift in nitrogen content in the Pacific Ocean has occurred as a result of climate change.

278

Sandia National Labs: Materials Science and Engineering Center: Research &  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accomplishments Accomplishments Patents AWARDS recent awards Most recent award Awards recent awards 2009 R&D 100 award winners: R&D Magazine announced the winners of the R&D 100 Awards Monday, which included five Sandia teams. The awards salute the 100 most technologically significant products introduced into the marketplace over the past year, according to the magazine's website. The Sandia submissions chosen this year, with the principal points of contact, are: John Shelnutt (1815): NanoCoral Dendritic Platinum Nanostructures - NanoCoral(tm) dendritic platinum nanostructures, an innovative nanotechnology for producing platinum catalysts. NanoCoral(tm) dendritic platinum nanostructures. This innovative nanotechnology for producing platinum catalysts offers unique control over

279

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FL-City-Cape Coral FL-City-Cape Coral Location: City Cape Coral FL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Energy efficiency and conservation strategy program management and associated engineering work; 2) energy and greenhouse gas baseline study and reporting system; 3-6) conduct various energy productivity studies to accomplish energy program management; 7) implement wastewater infiltration reduction measures; 8) HVAC efficiency improvements at City Hall (controls, variable frequency drives, direct digital controls, direct exchange air conditioning system, electrical engineering monitoring, etc.); 9) HVAC efficiency improvements at the Emergency Operations Center (install direct digital controls, reduce design of exhaust and ventilation air flow rates, install demand control ventilation, etc.); and 10) install advanced

280

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crosswell seismic surveys were conducted at two fields in northern Michigan. One of these, Springdale, included two monitor wells that are located external to the reef, and the other, Coldspring, employed two production wells within the reef. The Springdale wells extended to much greater depths than the reef, and imaging was conducted from above and from beneath the reef. The resulting seismic images provide the best views of pinnacle Niagaran reefs obtained to date. The tops of the reservoirs can be clearly distinguished, and their lateral extent or dipping edges can be observed along the profile. Reflecting events internal to the reef are evident; some of them are fairly continuous across the reef and others are discontinuous. Inversion of the seismic data indicates which events represent zones of higher porosity and which are lower porosity or even anhydrite plugged. The full stacked image includes angles that are beyond critical for many of the interfaces, and some reflections are visible only for a small range of angles, presumably near their critical angle. Stacking these angles in provides an opportunity for these events to be seen on the stacked image, where otherwise they would have been unrecognized. For inversion, however, the complexity associated with phase changes beyond critical can lead to poor results, and elastic inversion of partial angle stacks may be best conducted with restrictions to angles less than critical. Strong apparent attenuation of signals occurs when seismic ray paths pass through the upper part of the Springdale reservoir; this may be due to intrinsic attenuation and/or scattering of events due to the locally strongly varying gas saturation and extremely low fluid pressures. Signal-to-noise limitations become evident far from the source well in the Coldspring study, probably because the raw data were strongly affected by tube-wave noise generated by flow through the perforation of the receiver well. The seismic images obtained, and interpretations of them, as assisted by Amplitude-versus-Angle studies and accompanying inversion, provide additional insight into the internal geometry of these two reefs and provide data that should be useful for reservoir management.

Wayne Pennington; Mohamed Ibrahim; Roger Turpening; Sean Trisch; Josh Richardson; Carol Asiala; Walid Mabrouk

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Product Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Ballardvale Street Suite Massachusetts Ballardvale Street Suite A260 Wilmington Massachusetts Venture capital firm investing in early stage clean technology enterprises http www ventures com Greater Boston Area Advent International Advent International State Street Boston Massachusetts Global private equity firm http www adventinternational com Greater Boston Area Battery Ventures Battery Ventures Winter Street Suite Waltham Massachusetts Venture Capital http www battery com Greater Boston Area Black Coral Capital Black Coral Capital Union Street rd Floor Boston Massachusetts Cleantech private equity http www blackcoralcapital com Greater Boston Area Commons Capital Commons Capital Washington Street th floor Brookline Massachusetts Early stage venture capital fund http www commonscapital

282

Biotic prognostications: Global warming and biological diversity  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the impacts of the greenhouse effect on biological diversity and on natural ecosystems. Included are chapters which include the following topics: government attitudes to climate change problems; general conclusions and deficiencies of general circulation models; impacts of past climate changes on global biota; effects of climate on vegetation, soils, wildlife diversity, animal physiology, ecology, behavior, migration, and parasites and diseases; arctic mariene ecosystems and coasta marine zones; tropical forests; arctic tundra; western North American forests, etc.; indirect linkages and snyergisms among climate change, biodiversity, geosphere, and anthropogenic stresses.

Peters, R.L.; Lovejoy, T.E. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Power Performance Testing Progress in the DOE/EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), tests are conducted to characterize the power performance of individual wind turbines at each wind project. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions, from arid to arctic. Initial results and experiences of the testing were reported the WindPower 2000 conference. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing and new results from the past year.

Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Randall, G.; McCoy, T; Vandenbosche, J. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC)

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Final Environmental Assessment 93: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1193: Final Environmental Assessment Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site, DOE/EA-1193 (February 1997) More Documents & Publications

285

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Journal of Marine Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Philippines, Samoa, and the Hawaiian Islands (Kami 1973). In the Hawaiian Islands it occurs in significant, Hawaii, and 25 specimens from Kauai. 706 #12;SHAKLEE and SAMOLLOW: GENETIC VARIATION IN A DEEPWATER scored. 'Including 25 fish from Kauai. 'Consisting of fish from Maro Reef, French Frigate Shoals

Baum, Julia K.

286

C H A P T E R F O U R Ecological Interactions and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site. In most cases, evaluating abundance by volume or biomass allows more ecologically meaningful dominate the biomass and species representation in benthic marine communities to the point that referring abundance in terms of both number of individuals and biomass at various Caribbean and Great Barrier Reefs

Ronquist, Fredrik

287

Mapping Population onto Priority Conservation Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas and (in every case except Mesoamerican Reef and Namib-Karoo) are higher in areas within aggregated. Rural areas in Namib-Karoo have the highest total fertility rates (mean rate of 6.2). Areas inside / Namib Karoo (p

Lopez-Carr, David

288

INTEGRATED PEST Partners with Nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structure and composition of organic reefs and carbonate mud mounds: concepts and categories Robert high relief. Carbonate Mud Mounds: carbonate mud-dominated deposits with topographic relief and few or no stromatolites, thrombolites or in place skeletons. Low Relief Carbonate Mud Mounds are typically thin. High

Behmer, Spencer T.

289

Shaping Space: Built Space, Landscape, and Cosmology in Four Regions Ben A. Nelson, Stephen H. Lekson, Ivan Sprajc, and Kenneth E. Sassaman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mound are left in place to continue to function as an artificial reef. Navigation aids are added, are then put in place. Alternative 4: NO REMOVAL (LEAVE-IN-PLACE) A platform and its surrounding shell mound that the project must benefit living marine resources, habitat, and user groups; that disposal or use

290

Modeling shallow marine carbonate depositional systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological Process Models (GPMs) have been used in the past to simulate the distinctive stratigraphies formed in carbonate sediments, and to explore the interaction of controls that produce heterogeneity. Previous GPMs have only indirectly included the ... Keywords: Carbonate, Geological process model, Numerical modeling, Reef, Supersaturation

Jon Hill; Daniel Tetzlaff; Andrew Curtis; Rachel Wood

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A rock mechanics perspective on the effects of hard rock workings in close proximity to overlying coal seams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mining in the Coalfields has been ongoing for many years, however prior to the discovery of coal, Gold was being mined in the form of the Kimberley Reef. Today it is the coal that has our interest and is the primary mineral being extracted from the ground. ... Keywords: mining, pillars, rock mechanics, slabbing, stress

K. Naidoo; C. Dekker

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

120 60 0 60 120 180 30 3090150 90 150  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caribbean Sea Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Alaska Labrador Sea Chukchi Sea Banda Sea Arafura Sea Timor Sea Luzon Strait Gulf of Bothnia Persian Gulf Gulf of Oman Sea of Azov Gulf of Tonkin Gulf of Thailand Drake Passage Ross Sea Bellingshausen Sea Amundsen Sea Great Australian Bight Great Barrier Reef Gulf

293

Temporal and Spatial Variability in Juvenile Red Snapper Otolith Elemental Signatures in the Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Northern Gulf of Mexico WILLIAM F. PATTERSON III* Department of Biology, University of West Florida, 11000 of the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) to determine if otolith elemental signatures could be employed as natural important reef fishes in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Significant bycatch mortality caused by shrimp

Chen, Zhongxing

294

Underwater robots require adequate guidance and control to perform useful tasks. Visual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Underwater robots require adequate guidance and control to perform useful tasks. Visual trained by reinforcement learn- ing our aim is to enable an underwater robot to hold station on a reef technologies for underwater exploration and obser- vation. Our objectives are to enable underwater robots

295

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harbor Branch researcher on top of bottom life ahead of oil spill By Ed Killer Saturday, June 12 like if touched by an underwater plume of oil. No doubt, much of it would be gone forever. Reed inhabiting the reefs, Reed hoped the oil would not be swept around the tip of Florida and onto the fragile

Belogay, Eugene A.

296

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 14680 of 26,764 results. 71 - 14680 of 26,764 results. Download EA-147-A Aquila Marketing Corporation http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-147-aquila-marketing-corporation Download EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-212-coral-power-llc Download EA-261 UBS AG, London Branch http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-261-ubs-ag-london-branch Download EA-212 Coral Power, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-212-coral-power-llc-0 Download EA-239 Aroostook Valley Electric Company http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-239-aroostook-valley-electric-company Download EA-193 Energy Atlantic, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-193-energy-atlantic-llc Download EA-176-A Sempra Energy Trading Corporation http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-176-sempra-energy-trading-corporation Download EA-167-A PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P

297

Status and conservation of shearwaters of the North Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tropi- cal Systems (ARTS). Kauai ARTS Workshop, Septem- ber 1996. Pages workshop report series 99, Philippines, Porites lobata, 1859}1980 PaK tzold J (1986) Temperature and CO2 changes in the tropical surface waters of the Philippines during the past 120 years: record in the stable isotopes of hermatypic corals

298

SEPTEMBER 1998 523K O D A M A A N D B U S I N G E R 1998 American Meteorological Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Tropi- cal Systems (ARTS). Kauai ARTS Workshop, Septem- ber 1996. Pages workshop report series 99, Philippines, Porites lobata, 1859}1980 PaK tzold J (1986) Temperature and CO2 changes in the tropical surface waters of the Philippines during the past 120 years: record in the stable isotopes of hermatypic corals

Businger, Steven

299

A CATALOGUE OF THE SHORE FISHES COLLECTED BY THE STEAMER ALBATROSS ABOUT THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS IN 1902.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knudsen, a wealthy planter of the island of Kauai who was much interested in natural history, and Mr. R. U, Kauai; "in coral sand just above high-water mark;" Henshaw. Hawaiian Islands (Dana, as O. urnillii, 272 to 304 fathoms, stations 4089, 4096; vicinity of Kauai Island, 283 to 309 fathoms, station 4130

300

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER Oil in the open water may a ect the health of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL IN THE OPEN WATER Oil in the open water may a ect the health of microscopic plants and animals. Far beneath the surface, corals and other deepwater communities might also be a ected. OIL AND HUMAN AND SEDIMENTS · Water quality surveys · Transect surveys to detect submerged oil · Oil plume modeling · Sediment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

February2009 University of Hawaii`I at Mnoa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the economy is in a down turn. Unfortunately, that means budgets are tight so corners are being cut and belts white span where the surf makes lines and the lines are blank. On the sand, hermit crabs, broken coral there is no rock or green. The empty sand above and below the waves is the space the tides mark for the moon

302

Research article Thermoregulatory brood transport in the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL The Porcupine Bank Canyon coral mounds: oceanographic and topographic steering of deep-water carbonate mound development and associated phosphatic deposition A. Mazzini & A. Akhmetzhanov & X. Monteys of Ireland) and which accommodates a large field of giant carbonate mounds was investigated during two

Tschinkel, Walter R.

303

Ecology, 83(9), 2002, pp. 24252438 2002 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with good compli- ance by international fleets even in remote areas such as the Darwin Mounds, a coral 2004 Darwin Mounds EU (UK) 2004 Azores, Madeira, EU (Spain/Portugal) 2004 Canary Islands Reykjanes Rockall Bank NEAFC/EU (UK) 2007 W Rockall Mounds NEAFC 2007 Logachev Mounds NEAFC/EU (Eire) 2007 NW

Helms, Ken

304

Cimbebasia 16: 143-175, 2000 143 Architecture and morphogenesis in the mound of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial community composition and biogeochemical processes in cold-water coral carbonate mounds carbonate mound gradient gel-electrophoresis seafloor biosphere microbial community structure sulfate of Bacteria and Archaea in a cluster of carbonate mounds located in the Gulf of Cadiz on the Moroccan margin

Turner, Scott

305

25th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 25 -28 June 2007, Miami, FL AIAA 2007-4442  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 25 - 28 June 2007, Miami, FL AIAA 2007-4442 Copyright , Diego Saer3 and Ge-Cheng Zha4 University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124 A flying wing personal and Aerospace Engineering A #12;25th AIAA Applied Aerodynamics Conference 25 - 28 June 2007, Miami, FL AIAA 2007

Zha, Gecheng

306

ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE November 2000University of Miami, Virginia Key Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE November 2000University of Miami, Virginia Key. Maybe it was because everyone had been carbo-loading with pizza and beverage or maybe it was the festive. The University of Miami hosted the 3rd symposium at Coral Gables in 1977. Top row (left to right): Iliana Baums

Miami, University of

307

December 2011 Inside this issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cristobalite) found in diatomaceous shale geologic formations. Drs. Matt Durham and Coral Armstrong or autogenous vaccine production. Release of these isolates to the labor- atory of your choice requires a CDFA information on the time needed for vaccine production since these times may vary between firms. Please contact

Hammock, Bruce D.

308

Oxygen and sulfur isotope geochemistry revealing a significant crustal signature in the genesis of the post-collisional granitoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inclusions, (2) coral tissue (3) the HYC stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag deposit and (4) petroleum source-rocks-Pb-Ag deposit and (4) petroleum source-rocks and kerogens. Australian Synchrotron Grant. Professional Societies and dinosteranes in oils and source-rocks from East Sirte Basin (Libya). Applied Geochemistry 26: 1694

Arehart, Greg B.

309

Pimmel A., and Claypool, G. ODP Technical Note 30  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inclusions, (2) coral tissue (3) the HYC stratiform sediment-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag deposit and (4) petroleum source-rocks-Pb-Ag deposit and (4) petroleum source-rocks and kerogens. Australian Synchrotron Grant. Professional Societies and dinosteranes in oils and source-rocks from East Sirte Basin (Libya). Applied Geochemistry 26: 1694

310

Phoenix from the Ashes? Repetitive Mass Mortality and the Biogeology of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

massive" means that corals were usually less than 10 cm in diameter. Values are means and standard are means and standard deviation of percentages. Employed tests were one-way ANOVA with Student Acropora removed, fauna check-list in Riegl, 1999); changes in the western area were not recorded because

311

Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

NUCLEAR FORENSICS ANALYSIS CENTER FORENSIC ANALYSIS TO DATA INTERPRETATION  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Forensics Analysis Center (NFAC) is part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is one of only two USG National Laboratories accredited to perform nuclear forensic analyses to the requirements of ISO 17025. SRNL NFAC is capable of analyzing nuclear and radiological samples from bulk material to ultra-trace samples. NFAC provides analytical support to the FBI's Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), which is located within SRNL. REEF gives the FBI the capability to perform traditional forensics on material that is radiological and/or is contaminated. SRNL is engaged in research and development efforts to improve the USG technical nuclear forensics capabilities. Research includes improving predictive signatures and developing a database containing comparative samples.

Nichols, T.

2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

U n i v e r s i t y of H a w a i ` i -W e s t O ` a h u The West Press  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sites within the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (Hawaii, Kauai, Cross Seamount, and Pearl/5, 3/7 or cont. 4 294 Kauai 08-Oct-09 20-Aug-10 159° 53.383" W 21° 57.224" N 700 1/4 or cont. 2 294 the prevailing ones at Hawaii, Kauai, Pearl and Hermes Reef, and Saipan. Ms FM pulses were most often encountered

Olsen, Stephen L.

314

CX-005248: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

48: Categorical Exclusion Determination 48: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005248: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Cape Coral CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 02/17/2011 Location(s): Cape Coral, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Energy efficiency and conservation strategy program management and associated engineering work; 2) energy and greenhouse gas baseline study and reporting system; 3-6) conduct various energy productivity studies to accomplish energy program management; 7) implement wastewater infiltration reduction measures; 8) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) efficiency improvements at City Hall (controls, variable frequency drives, direct digital controls, direct exchange air conditioning system, electrical

315

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 13320 of 28,905 results. 11 - 13320 of 28,905 results. Download EA-213 Coral Power, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-213-coral-power-llc Download EA-148-A Aquila Marketing Corporation http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-148-aquila-marketing-corporation Download 2011-05-19 Project Dashboard.xls http://energy.gov/management/downloads/2011-05-19-project-dashboardxls Download Audit Report: IG-0481 The Decontamination and Decommissioning Contract at the East Tennessee Technology Park http://energy.gov/ig/downloads/audit-report-ig-0481 Download DOE-STD-3011-2002 Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents Superceding DOE-STD-3011-94 (November 1994) This Standard provides a Department of Energy (DOE) approved methodology for preparing a Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) document.

316

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 3570 of 26,777 results. 61 - 3570 of 26,777 results. Download EA-213 Coral Power, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-213-coral-power-llc Download EA-209 Cargill-Alliant, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-209-cargill-alliant-llc Download EA-171-A Powerex http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-171-powerex-0 Download EA-249 Exelon Generation Company LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-249-exelon-generation-company-llc-0 Download Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, September 2007 Welcome to the 52nd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. This issue highlights the start of two major DOE EISs and features several guest-written articles. http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/lessons-learned-quarterly-report-september-2007 Download EIS-0434: Notice of Cancellation of an Environmental Impact

317

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 20990 of 28,905 results. 81 - 20990 of 28,905 results. Download EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-212-coral-power-llc Download EA-97-B Portland General Electric Company http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-97-b-portland-general-electric-company Download Department of Energy Reply to Congressman James P. Moran http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/department-energy-reply-congressman-james-p-moran Download EA-167 PG&E Energy Trading-Power, L.P http://energy.gov/oe/downloads/ea-167-pge-energy-trading-power-lp-0 Download EIS-0285-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Transmission System Vegetation Management Program http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0285-sa-05-supplement-analysis Download Procedures for Departing Employees http://energy.gov/cio/downloads/procedures-departing-employees

318

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI.  

SciTech Connect

In this reporting period two main accomplishments stand out. The Springdale task is in play in the northern Michigan Basin and the geochemical survey work over the Springdale prospect continued to progress. We still need to characterize the play in terms of the type of trap (basal reef diagenetic (?)) and its relation to the well documented pinnacle reef play. Also, we have become aware that Capac Field in the southern reef trend (Figure 1) is a possible analog to Springdale and so will be looking more closely at the literature on that field, particularly the work by Bowers (1987). Future work is directed toward further defining the Springdale project via more wells and examination and characterization of well cuttings. One to two more geochemical surveys are planned, one this spring and a final one in early fall. Based on current oil prices and Springdale production as of January 2005, an ROI, (defined as Total liquids revenue, $5.45m/DOE support, $1.45m) better than 3.75. This does not include gas revenues, which have not yet been calculated.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Two Nineteenth Century Trade Routes in the Eastern Himalayas: the Bhutanese trade with Tibet and Bengal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that found vent from this place were borax, drugs, ponies, brass utensils and incense sticks. Apart from these domestic goods, a variety of foreign goods were available in Lhasa because of her excellent linkages with two major countries in Asia, viz... character. China provided it with tea, silk, carpet and porcelain articles, and Mongolia supplied it leather, saddlery, sheep and horses. Rice, sugar, musk and tobacco came from Bhutan and Sikkim, and broadcloth, indigo, brass-works, coral, pearls, sugar...

Sarkar, Ratna; Ray, Indrajit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Characterization studies of actinide contamination on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results that indicates that plutonium and americium contamination of Johnson Atoll soil and sludge from the cleanup plant settling pond is dispersed. The {sup 241}Am/{sup 239}Pu ratio was essentially identical for all analyzed material. Except for one ``hot particle,`` no discrete Pu particles were located in untreated coral soil by SEM even though our sample contained both {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu activity measurable by gammaray spectrometry. Alpha particle spectrometry analysis of sequentially filtered sludge showed small that activity is associated with particles as 0.4 {mu}m in diameter. Thin section analysis revealed that the ``hot particle`` was a fragment of stainless steel with a layer of oxidized Pu, U, and other metals deposited on the outside. This Pu-containing layer was covered with a layer of coral soil that formed on the oxidized Pu/U phase during the process of weathering on JA. Analyses of all samples except the ``hot particle`` with SEM or TEM coupled with EDS did not reveal the presence of any distinct Pu phases, despite measurable activity in these samples. Together, these findings are consistent with the Pu and Am being highly dispersed throughout the contaminated soil and sludge. Direct evidence for association of Pu with coral was observed in the thin section of the ``hot particle.`` A possible mechanism for the dispersal of contamination is that weathering of fragments from the aborted missile leads to complexation of Pu with calcium carbonate followed by adsorption onto the coral soil surface. This process has not led to measurable fractionation of Am from its Pu parent.

Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.; Brown, N.R.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Gong, Meiling

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

amchitka.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of of Amchitka, Alaska, Site Site Description and History Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and

322

The Gentians  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gentians Gentians Nature Bulletin No. 536-A September 21, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GENTIANS There is a famous group of plants, the Gentians, which includes some of the most beautiful and, nowadays, the rarest of all wildflowers. They are widely distributed, from the tropics to the tundras near the Arctic Circle, but are most abundant in the northern hemisphere. Several kinds, with exquisite blossoms of heavenly blue, occur only in alpine meadows of the Rockies, the Alps, and other high mountain ranges. Many species exist only in lowlands or in very moist ground, but a few are native in dry places. Some like a limestone soil: others cannot endure it. Some are tall and many are dwarfs.

323

EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93: Finding of No Significant Impact 93: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1193: Finding of No Significant Impact Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site The United States Department of Energy has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultural resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Finding of No Significant Impact for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site, DOE/EA-1193 (February 1997) More Documents & Publications

324

Sandia National Laboratories: News: Publications: Lab News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 10, 2012 August 10, 2012 Hard data from a hard place: Science on Alaska's North Slope Mark Ivey Mark Ivey (6913) points to an X-band precipitation radar on the roof of the Barrow Arctic Research Center in Barrow, Alaska. View large image. by Neal Singer Mark Ivey (6913) and I are standing on the tundra at an outpost of science at the northernmost point of the North American continent. We are five miles northeast of Barrow, an Alaskan village unreachable by roads, 320 miles north of the Arctic Circle, and one mile south of the Arctic Ocean. It is late spring, the ice breaking up and the snow melting around us, and Mark - manager for Sandia of DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) climate research facility at Barrow - is waiting with me for the automated release of a weather balloon in about two minutes, at 9:31 a.m.

325

News Releases | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska Soil Research Alaska Soil Research BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Alaska Soil Research Project Aiming to Improve Understanding of Global Climate November 26, 2012 A research team being led by Julie Jastrow, an ecologist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, recently traveled to the North Slope of Alaska as part of a soil research project that aims to ultimately help improve and validate global climate models. Using jackhammer to dig a sampling pit in frozen soil After removing the seasonally thawed soil active layer in coastal plain tundra near Prudhoe Bay, members of the Argonne research team use a jackhammer to dig through frozen soil, creating a soil pit from which different soil layers can be viewed and sampled.

326

DOE/EA-1193: Environmental Assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Artic Ocean Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site (February 1997)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY u. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT - The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM/CART), North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. The purpose of the ARM/CART program is to collect and analyze atmospheric data for the development and validation of global climate change models. The program involves construction of several small facilities and operation of sensing equipment. The EA analyzes the impacts on land use, tundra, air quality, cultura.l resources, socioeconomics, and wildlife. Separate studies (summarized in the EA) were also conducted to ensure that the operation of the facilities would not

327

NPP Estimation for Grasslands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NPP for Grasslands NPP for Grasslands Introduction The Oak Ridge DAAC Net Primary Production (NPP) Database includes field measurements from grassland study sites worldwide. The following brief review and discussion is intended to explain the complexity of NPP estimates derived from grassland measurements. There is no single answer to the question, "What is the productivity of the ecosystem at study site A?"; rather there may be range of estimates of NPP, depending upon what data were actually collected and how these data are processed. Although some of these methods for determining NPP for grasslands may be applicable to other vegetation types (e.g., semi-deserts, tundra, or some crops), methods for forests, in particular, are significantly different. Nevertheless, it should be possible to answer the question, "Is this modelled value of NPP reasonable for this ecosystem type at this location?"

328

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO{sub 2} increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

Schell, D.M.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Carbon and nitrogen isotope studies in an arctic aquatic ecosystem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phase II studies of the R4D Program on stream and watershed ecology reflect the accomplishments and accumulation of baseline information obtained during the past studies. Although our rough estimates indicate that nitrogen inputs to the watershed ba lance losses, the carbon fluxes suggest that they are not in equilibrium and that there is a net loss of carbon from the tundra ecosystem through respiration and transport out of the watershed via the stream system. Radiocarbon profiles of soil sections coupled with mass transport calculations revealed that peat accumulation has essentially ceased in the R4D watershed and appears to be in ablative loss. Thus the carbon flux measurements provide validation tests for the PLANTGRO and GAS-HYDRO models of the PHASE II studies. These findings are also important in the context of global CO[sub 2] increases from positive feedback mechanisms in peatlands associated with climatic warming in the subarctic regions.

Schell, D.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Schefferville, Canada, 1974 Data Citation Cite this data set as follows: Rencz, A. N., and A. N. D. Auclair. 2001. NPP Boreal Forest: Schefferville, Canada, 1974. Data set. Available on-line [http://www.daac.ornl.gov] from Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Description Biomass and nutrient content of a boreal ecosystem (subarctic lichen woodland) was determined at Schefferville, Canada, during the 1974 growing season. The main objective was to describe a "typical" lichen woodland, a vegetation type found in the transitional zone between boreal forest and tundra on well-drained, nutrient-poor podzolic soils. Such areas are occupied sparsely by black spruce trees (Picea mariana) with low growth

331

amchitka.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amchitka, Amchitka, Alaska, Site Site Description and History Amchitka Island is near the western end of the Aleutian Island chain and is the largest island in the Rat Island Group that is located about 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, and 870 miles east of the Kamchatka Peninsula in eastern Russia. The island is 42 miles long and 1 to 4 miles wide, with an area of approximately 74,240 acres. Elevations range from sea level to more than 1,100 feet above sea level. The coastline is rugged; sea cliffs and grassy slopes surround nearly the entire island. Vegetation on the island is low-growing, meadow-like tundra grasses at lower elevations. No trees grow on Amchitka. The lowest elevations are on the eastern third of the island and are characterized by numerous shallow lakes and heavily vegetated drainages. The central portion of the island has higher elevations and fewer lakes.

332

Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions Bodman Statement On Senate Approval of ANWR Provisions March 16, 2005 - 10:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman released the following statement today regarding Senate approval of ANWR provisions in the budget resolution: "The Senate's vote today to clear the way for environmentally responsible oil and gas exploration in a small portion of ANWR is a victory for American consumers, America's economy and America's energy security. "Alaska's frozen tundra has the potential to yield billions of barrels of domestically produced oil. Not only could these resources have a meaningful impact on our dependence on imported sources of oil; this means American jobs producing American oil for Americans.

333

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the South Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO 2 Storage Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Conventional

335

HigHligHts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"MRCSP Begins Field Tests in Michigan." The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) has begun a large-scale CO 2 field project. The project is designed to inject and monitor at least 1 million metric tons of CO 2 into a series of oil fields that are in different stages of their production life cycles. The CO 2 will be injected into the geologic structures known as the northern Niagaran pinnacle reef trend. From Battelle News Release on July 9, 2013. Announcements DOE's NETL Releases Revised Editions of Best Practice Manuals (BPMs). The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) released revised editions of the following Best

336

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Highest- of the Highest- Priority Geologic Formations for CO 2 Storage in Wyoming Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strand- plain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef.

337

A South Efate Dictionary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nen ip ?ur ki faatfar. The reef has many calcium rocks. faat ftak n. bottom stones of an oven. faat ni uum n. top stones of an oven. Nafet faat ni uum rumiel malen ruftin. The top stones are red when they are heated. 2) n. vatu, money. Ale ipan sor... ifiif. The grain (meat) of the wood is twisted. Np ?aun ifiif. His head spins (he is drunk, dizzy). Ag p ?afiif ki string. Kineu kafo palus. You roll up the line, I'll paddle the canoe. Tukfiif ki naniu su po slatir pelpel pak esum ?. Let us tie up...

Thieberger, Nicholas

338

Energy and water development appropriations for fiscal year 1985. Part 3. Hearings before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session on H. R. 5653  

SciTech Connect

Part 3 of the hearings on appropriations bill H.R. 5633 contains two days of testimony by nondepartmental witnesses. The first witness was Governor Babbitt of Arizona, who gave an update on the Central Arizona Project and noted the progress of the Granite Reef aqueduct. Other witnesses described projects for flood control, navigation, beach preservation, and projects in a number of states, the Colorado and Mississippi River valleys, and elsewhere. State officials and members of Congress, along with expert witnesses and supporting consultants presented the testimony over the two-day hearing. Background material and the statements and testimony of witnesses appear in chronological order.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

This project, 'Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations', investigated the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This primarily involved the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) in an attempt to observe and map the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through a carbonate reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, were used for this purpose. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects, such as Weyborne. This study was conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in the northern Michigan Basin, which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that completed its primary production in 1997 and was scheduled for enhanced oil recovery using injected CO{sub 2}. Prior to injection an initial 'Base' 3D survey was obtained over the field and was then processed and interpreted. CO{sub 2} injection within the main portion of the reef was conducted intermittently during 13 months starting in August 2005. During this time, 29,000 tons of CO{sub 2} was injected into the Guelph formation, historically known as the Niagaran Brown formation. By September 2006, the reservoir pressure within the reef had risen to approximately 2000 lbs and oil and water production from the one producing well within the field had increased significantly. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution, a critical aspect of reservoir characterization and simulation, proved to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple 3D seismic surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model was developed based on seismic attributes obtained from the base 3D seismic survey and available well data. This simulation predicted that the CO{sub 2} injected into the reef would remain in the northern portion of the field. Two new wells, the State Charlton 4-30 and the Larsen 3-31, were drilled into the field in 2006 and 2008 respectively and supported this assessment. A second (or 'Monitor') 3D seismic survey was acquired during September 2007 over most of the field and duplicated the first (Base) survey, as much as possible. However, as the simulation and new well data available at that time indicated that the CO{sub 2} was concentrated in the northern portion of the field, the second seismic survey was not acquired over the extreme southern end of the area covered by the original (or Base) 3D survey. Basic processing was performed on the second 3D seismic survey and, finally, 4D processing methods were applied to both the Base and the Monitor surveys. In addition to this 3D data, a shear wave seismic data set was obtained at the same time. Interpretation of the 4D seismic data indicated that a significant amplitude change, not attributable to differences in acquisition or processing, existed at the locations within the reef predicted by the reservoir simulation. The reservoir simulation was based on the porosity distribution obtained from seismic attributes from the Base 3D survey. Using this validated reservoir simulation the location of oil within the reef at the time the Monitor survey was obtained and recommendations made for the drilling of additional EOR wells. The economic impact of this project has been estimated in terms of both enhanced oil recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. In the northern Michigan Basin alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. Potentially there is over 1 billion bbls of oil (original oil in place minus primary recovery) remains in the reefs in Michigan, much of which could be more efficiently mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

Brian Toelle

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Technology's role in Alberta's Golden Spike miscible project  

SciTech Connect

A gravity-controlled gas-driven miscible bank is expected to recover 95% of the 320 million bbl of oil-in- place in Golden Spike, a Devonian pinnacle reef reservoir. Field application required both advanced technology to demonstrate feasibility, and an economic solution to the problem of obtaining the vast quantities of LPG required. The miscible bank is generated by stripping LPG from the reservoir oil which is cycled through surface facilities and returned to the reservoir. Technology's part included studies to resolve bank placement, size and composition, and to overcome plugging problems encountered in injecting the stripped crude.

Larson, V.C.; Peterson, R.B.; Lacey, J.W.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Outlook for third Malaysian LNG plant brighter with big gas find  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prospects for a third liquefied natural gas export complex in Malaysia are brighter than ever. A unit of Occidental Petroleum Corp. has drilled its fourth and biggest natural gas strike into a carbonate reef on Block SK-8 off Sarawak, East Malaysia, turning up still more potential reserves for the country's proposed third LNG plant. The find brings to a combined total of 5 tcf of gas in place in the four SK-8 fields for which Oxy has disclosed test results. Well details are given. The LNG project under study would make Malaysia the largest supplier of LNG to the rapidly expanding East Asian market, Oxy said.

Not Available

1993-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

342

AN EXPERIMENT ON DEHASIDDHI WITH MERCURY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The author experimented with the dehasiddhi using mercury. The interesting experiment is narrated in this article. The land of Bharath is the only place which developed the science dealing with the metal remedies for holistic health during the Vedic period when people in other parts of the world continued to use potions and witchcraft to cure diseases of the body. This science in Vedic language is termed rasa sastra. It uses metals such as iron, copper, silver, gold mercury, elements such as iron, copper, silver, gold mercury, elements such as sulphur, mica and other materials such as shells, pearls corals jewels, salts, etc in a purified and processed form for internal

M. P Alexander

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Intermediate Depths of the Atlantic Ocean: AAIW delta^13C Variability During the Younger Dryas and Lithoherms in the Straits of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transect of cores ranging from 798 m to 1585 m water depth in the South Atlantic Ocean document the relative intermediate water mass nutrient geometry and stable isotopic variability of AAIW during the Younger Dryas cooling event. The data reveal concurrent delta^13 C and delta^18 O excursions of 0.59 ppt and 0.37 ppt within the core of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) centered at 11,381 calendar years before present based on radiometric age control. A portion of the delta^1 3C variability (0.22 ppt) can be explained by a shift in thermodynamic equilibrium concurrent with a drop in temperature of 1.8°C at the locus of AAIW formation. The remaining 0.37 ppt increase in delta^13 C most likely resulted from increased wind velocities, and a greater coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere at the locus of AAIW formation (increased efficiency of the thermodynamic process). Deepwater coral mounds are aggregates of corals, other organisms, their skeletal remains, and sediments that occur on the seafloor of the world’s oceans. In the Straits of Florida, these features have been referred to as lithoherms. We use digital, side-scan sonar data collected from the submarine NR-1 from an 10.9 km^2 area at ~650 m water depth to characterize quantitatively aspects of the morphology of 216. Their lengths, widths, heights, areas, orientations and concentration on the seafloor have been determined. Analysis indicates that the outlines of relatively small to medium sized lithoherms can be effectively described with a piriform function. This shape is less applicable to the largest lithoherms because they are aggregates of smaller lithoherms. Nearly all of the lithoherms studied have axes parallel to the northward flowing Florida Current, and the heads of 80 percent of these features face into the current. The shape and orientation of the lithoherms, and evidence of megaripples and scouring in the sonar data suggest that these features are formed by a unidirectional current. Following an extensive investigation of over 200 lithoherms via side-scan sonar imagery and direct observation, we have developed a qualitative model for the formation of the lithoherm type of deep-water coral mounds in the Straits of Florida. Lithoherm formation can be characterized by four main stages of development: nucleating, juvenile, mature singular, and fused. Fused lithoherms can form via transverse and/or longitudinal accretion, however, transverse accretion at the head of the mound is likely the most efficient mechanism. A comparison of lithoherm spatial relationship to local bathymetry agrees with previous observations of deep-water coral mound formations along the levied margins of density flow scour channels.

Brookshire, Brian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD participants believe that the platform concept could have far-reaching applications in the Arctic as a drilling and production platform, as originally intended, and as a possible staging area. The overall objective of this project was to document various potential applications, locations, and conceptual designs for the inland platform serving oil and gas operations on the Alaska North Slope. The University of Alaska Fairbanks assisted the HARC/TerraPlatforms team with the characterization of potential resource areas, geotechnical conditions associated with continuous permafrost terrain, and the potential end-user evaluation process. The team discussed the various potential applications with industry, governmental agencies, and environmental organizations. The benefits and concerns associated with industry's use of the technology were identified. In this discussion process, meetings were held with five operating companies (22 people), including asset team leaders, drilling managers, HSE managers, and production and completion managers. Three other operating companies and two service companies were contacted by phone to discuss the project. A questionnaire was distributed and responses were provided, which will be included in the report. Meetings were also held with State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources officials and U.S. Bureau of Land Management regulators. The companies met with included ConcoPhillips, Chevron, Pioneer Natural Resources, Fairweather E&P, BP America, and the Alaska Oil and Gas Association.

Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs DE-FC26-04NT15508 Project Goal The project goal is to provide a methodology that will allow operators of oil reservoirs in carbonate reefs to better image the interior structure of those reservoirs and to identify those areas that contain the most oil remaining after initial production. Performers Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI Z-Seis Inc., Houston, TX Results This study provides a significant step forward in reservoir characterization by demonstrating that crosswell seismic imaging can be used over considerable distances to better define features within a reservoir and by showing that pre-stack characteristics of reflection events can be used to reduce ambiguity in determination of lithology and fluid content. Crosswell seismic imaging of the two reefs has provided data that is well beyond any that a reservoir engineer or development geologist has previously had for improved characterization and production.

346

Gas sales starting from Indiana`s fractured New Albany shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas issued 138 drilling permits from Dec. 1, 1994, through July 31, 1996, in 17 counties in a growing play for gas in Devonian New Albany shale in southern Indiana. The permits are active in the form of locations, drilling wells, wells in the completion process, and wells producing gas in the dewatering stage. Geologically in southwestern Indiana the New Albany shale exploration play is found in three provinces. These are the Wabash platform, the Terre Haute reef bank, and the Vincennes basin. Exploration permits issued on each of these geologic provinces are as follows: Wabash platform 103, Terra Haute reef bank 33, and Vincennes basin two. The authors feel that the quantity and effectiveness of communication of fracturing in the shale will control gas production and water production. A rule of thumb in a desorption reservoir is that the more water a shale well makes in the beginning the more gas it will make when dewatered.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. [Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Geologists, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Comparison of the Effects of Petroleum Substances on the Settlement of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Galveston Bay, Texas, the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, is found throughout the bay both intertidal along mudflats and subtidal where their self-built reefs extend vertically deeper. The eastern oyster is an important ecological and economical resource and as such has led to studies regarding their community structure to permit effective creation of artificially built reefs and restoration of existing ones. The presence of the oil and gas industry coupled with increased oyster mortality led to investigations to determine the effects of petroleum substances on the setting, growth, and mortality of the eastern oyster. Many of those studies indicated increased settlement and increased growth of oysters on substrate coated with oil. A field conducted experiment was used to assess the settlement of oyster larvae on cleaned oyster shells coated with two different types of petroleum substances (mineral oil and motor oil), comparing viscosities, in a shallow bayou in Galveston, Texas, where the eastern oyster dominates the intertidal zone. Oyster shells were used as cultch material and divided into three groups; a non-treated control group, mineral oil treated group, and a motor oil treated group. Nekton assemblages, distributions of the ivory barnacle, Balanus eberneus, and Dermo disease infection were assessed. Settlement of oyster larvae occurred in all three groups with no significant difference of preference; algae and sediment present on the shells coupled with the presence of predators most likely caused reduced numbers of spat settlement. Species richness was equal among the groups but varied in evenness of individual species.

Alsept, Karen Sue

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations  

SciTech Connect

The ''Application of Time-Lapse Seismic Monitoring for the Control and Optimization of CO{sub 2} Enhanced Oil Recovery Operations'' project is investigating the potential for monitoring CO{sub 2} floods in carbonate reservoirs through the use of standard p-wave seismic data. This project will involve the use of 4D seismic (time lapse seismic) to try to observe the movement of the injected CO{sub 2} through the reservoir. The differences between certain seismic attributes, such as amplitude, will be used to detect and map the movement of CO{sub 2} within the reservoir. This technique has recently been shown to be effective in CO{sub 2} monitoring in EOR projects such as Weyborne. The project is being conducted in the Charlton 30/31 field in northern Michigan Basin which is a Silurian pinnacle reef that has completed its primary production. This field is now undergoing enhanced oil recovery using CO{sub 2}. The CO{sub 2} flood was initiated the end of 2005 when the injection of small amounts of CO{sub 2} begin in the A1 Carbonate. This injection was conducted for 2 months before being temporarily halted in order for pressure measurements to be conducted. The determination of the reservoir's porosity distribution is proving to be a significant portion of this project. In order to relate the differences observed between the seismic attributes seen on the multiple surveys and the actual location of the CO{sub 2}, a predictive reservoir simulation model had to be developed. From this model, an accurate determination of porosity within the carbonate reservoir must be obtained. For this certain seismic attributes have been investigated. The study reservoirs in the Charlton 30/31 field range from 50 to 400 acres in size. The relatively small area to image makes 3-D seismic data acquisition reasonably cost effective. Permeability and porosity vary considerably throughout the reef, thus it is essential to perform significant reservoir characterization and modeling prior to implementing a CO{sub 2} flood to maximize recovery efficiency. Should this project prove successful, the same technique could be applied across a large spectrum of the industry. In Michigan alone, the Niagaran reef play is comprised of over 700 Niagaran reefs with reservoirs already depleted by primary production. These reservoirs range in thickness from 200 to 400 ft and are at depths of 2000 to 5000 ft. Approximately 113 of these Niagaran oil fields have produced over 1 million bbls each and the total cumulative production is in excess of 300 million bbls and 1.4 Tcf. There could potentially be over 1 billion bbls of oil remaining in reefs in Michigan much of which could be mobilized utilizing techniques similar to those employed in this study.

Brian E. Toelle

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 20220 of 26,764 results. 11 - 20220 of 26,764 results. Download CX-005307: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Miramar CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): Miramar, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005307-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005248: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Cape Coral CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 02/17/2011 Location(s): Cape Coral, Florida Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005248-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005277: Categorical Exclusion Determination Minnesota-County-Ramsey CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 02/17/2011 Location(s): Ramsey County, Minnesota

350

Operation Redwing. Project 2. 52. Neutron-induced soil radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples were exposed to neutron radiation from Shot Cherokee to help establish the importance of neutron-induced residual gamma radiation. After exposure and recovery, the samples had no detectable activity because the slant range to the nearest sample was nearly 3.5 miles, due to an error in bomb drop. After this failure, an experiment was designed in the field for Shot Yuma in order that induced-activity data could be obtained for a soil other than Nevada Test Site soil. Samples of sodium, manganese, and coral sand from Site Sally were exposed above and below the surface at a slant range of 120 yards. The difference between the effects of pure fission and fission-fusion neutron spectra on induced activity in soil was not measured, since the soil samples on Shot Cehrokee were not activated. However, a method for predicting neutron-induced gamma-radiation intensities was tested for coral soil on Shot Yuma. Predicted values were within + or - 50% of induced dose rates inferred from field measurements.

Cowan, M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

15 Blog Posts to Get You Ready for Winter Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 Blog Posts to Get You Ready for Winter Savings 15 Blog Posts to Get You Ready for Winter Savings 15 Blog Posts to Get You Ready for Winter Savings October 13, 2009 - 1:25pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL On Saturday, I woke up to three inches of snow on the ground. THREE INCHES! On October 10th! Despite having grown up in what one of my college roommates lovingly referred to as the "TUNDRA!" (a.k.a, Wisconsin, and yes, she spoke this word in horrified all-caps), I am opposed to winter. I mean, I get that winter should not go away. Climate change is bad. And things like skiing, ice skating, snow forts, and hot chocolate do make winter a bit more bearable. But it's just so... cold. And icy. And dark. Unfortunately, hibernation isn't really an option, and-in addition to extra doses of whining from yours truly-all of those cold, dark days can

352

Lichens  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lichens Lichens Nature Bulletin No. 131 November 15, 1947 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation LICHENS When winter comes with its fogs, rains, and melting snow, the lichens flourish. In the country we find them on the bark of trees, boulders and patches of barren earth, but rarely in cities because they are very sensitive to poisonous gases in the smoky air. In Iceland and Greenland, and the vast tundras of the arctics, they are the dominant forms of plant life. A lichen is the partnership of a colorless plant and a green one: a fungus and an alga. The two exchange food materials. Fungus has remarkable power to absorb and store moisture. The alga, using that water, and using carbon dioxide from the air, manufactures food. The fungus absorbs the excess food and produces an acid which eats into the earth or wood or rock upon which it grows, anchoring it firmly in place.

353

The Musk Ox  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Musk Ox Musk Ox Nature Bulletin No. 740 January 25, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist THE MUSK OX Why are bones of the arctic musk ox found here in Illinois? The evidence shows that these remains date back to the Ice Age when mile- deep ice sheets covered Canada and large parts of the United States, Europe and Asia. At that time the musk ox was one of the few hardy animals that thrived along the edges of these ice sheets. Then, for thousands of years, as the climate warmed and the glaciers melted, the musk oxen followed the retreating glaciers northward. Today, they survive only on the bleak tundras of Alaska, northern Canada and the coast of Greenland . The musk ox looks somewhat like a small, unusually shaggy buffalo. It is built and upholstered for life in the most rugged climate on earth, where blizzards howl and temperatures 50 degrees below zero are common. Adult bulls weigh 500 pounds or more but appear heavier because of their thick padding of hair and wool. Cows are smaller. The dark brown to black hair -- two feet or longer on the neck, chest, sides and hind quarters -- hangs like an ankle-length skirt. The horns of both sexes are sharp, vicious weapons.

354

Power Performance Testing Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program, Global Energy Concepts (GEC) is engaged in planning and conducting power performance tests for wind turbines in Searsburg, Vermont; Glenmore, Wisconsin; Algona, Iowa; Springview, Nebraska; Kotzebue, Alaska; and Big Spring, Texas. The turbines under investigation include a 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS, a 600-kW Tacke 600e, two 750-kW Zond Z-50s, a 66-kW AOC 15/50, a 660-kW Vestas V-47, and a 1.65-MW Vestas V-66. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions from arid to arctic. Because one goal of this testing program is to gain experience with the new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-12 standard, all of the measurements are being performed in accordance with this new standard. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing at each site, the methodologies employed, test results available, and lessons learned from the application of the IEC standard. Any sources of uncertainty are discussed, and attention is given to the relative importance of each aspect of the IEC standard in terms of its contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty.

VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

355

Is the northern high latitude land-based CO2 sink weakening?  

SciTech Connect

Studies indicate that, historically, terrestrial ecosystems of the northern high latitude region may have been responsible for up to 60% of the global net land-based sink for atmospheric CO2. However, these regions have recently experienced remarkable modification of the major driving forces of the carbon cycle, including surface air temperature warming that is significantly greater than the global average and associated increases in the frequency and severity of disturbances. Whether arctic tundra and boreal forest ecosystems will continue to sequester atmospheric CO2 in the face of these dramatic changes is unknown. Here we show the results of model simulations that estimate a 41 Tg C yr-1 sink in the boreal land regions from 1997 to 2006, which represents a 73% reduction in the strength of the sink estimated for previous decades in the late 20th Century. Our results suggest that CO2 uptake by the region in previous decades may not be as strong as previously estimated. The recent decline in sink strength is the combined result of 1) weakening sinks due to warming-induced increases in soil organic matter decomposition and 2) strengthening sources from pyrogenic CO2 emissions as a result of the substantial area of boreal forest burned in wildfires across the region in recent years. Such changes create positive feedbacks to the climate system that accelerate global warming, putting further pressure on emission reductions to achieve atmospheric stabilization targets.

Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The; Gurney, Kevin R [Arizona State University; Burnside, Todd [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

DECEMBER 2006 LISTON AND ELDER 1259 A Distributed Snow-Evolution Modeling System (SnowModel)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SnowModel is a spatially distributed snow-evolution modeling system designed for application in landscapes, climates, and conditions where snow occurs. It is an aggregation of four submodels: MicroMet defines meteorological forcing conditions, EnBal calculates surface energy exchanges, SnowPack simulates snow depth and water-equivalent evolution, and SnowTran-3D accounts for snow redistribution by wind. Since each of these submodels was originally developed and tested for nonforested conditions, details describing modifications made to the submodels for forested areas are provided. SnowModel was created to run on grid increments of 1 to 200 m and temporal increments of 10 min to 1 day. It can also be applied using much larger grid increments, if the inherent loss in high-resolution (subgrid) information is acceptable. Simulated processes include snow accumulation; blowing-snow redistribution and sublimation; forest canopy interception, unloading, and sublimation; snow-density evolution; and snowpack melt. Conceptually, SnowModel includes the first-order physics required to simulate snow evolution within each of the global snow classes (i.e., ice, tundra, taiga, alpine/mountain, prairie, maritime, and ephemeral). The required model inputs are 1) temporally varying fields of precipitation, wind speed and direction, air temperature, and relative humidity obtained from meteorological stations and/or an atmospheric model located

Glen E. Liston; Kelly Elder

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution Within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs Authors: Sean P. Trisch, Wayne D. Pennington, and Roger Turpening, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI. Venue: Seismological Society of America’s annual meeting in Waikaloa, Kona, HI., April 11–13, 2007 Abstract: Imaging of the Earth’s crust is increasingly being accomplished through the use of borehole-based sensors. Experience gained in recent crosswell seismic surveys may assist endeavors to image the near-borehole environment near plate boundaries or other places of scientific interest. A high-resolution crosswell seismic data set was collected over a Silurian (Niagaran) reef in Michigan’s Lower Peninsula. The survey was optimized for both reflection imaging purposes and the gathering of a wide range of incidence angles. The reflection image was intended to aid in interpretation of the reef structure at a level of detail never before possible with seismic methods. The survey was also conducted to maximize data available for study of the dependence of amplitudes with angle-of-incidence. Prestack angle data were processed to half-degree intervals and utilized for enhanced interpretation of the seismic image through partial stacks and through amplitude variation with angle (AVA) analyses. Frequencies as high as 3,000 Hz (the limit of the source sweep) were recorded, with a predominant signal at about 2,000 Hz; the well separation was 600 m, and the target reef is at 1,400–1,525 m depth. Many of the interfaces present within the area have small reflection amplitudes at narrow angles that increase substantially near the critical angle. Analyses were performed on various interfaces in the seismic section to compare with Zoeppritz-equation solutions, using rock data acquired through an extensive library of seismic and well logging data available for the area. These models were then compared with the actual AVA character acquired at the interface and matched as closely as possible. Through this analysis and match process, various rock property estimates were inferred or refined.

358

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strand- plain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef.

359

HigHligHts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"MRCSP Begins Field Tests in Michigan." "MRCSP Begins Field Tests in Michigan." The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) has begun a large-scale CO 2 field project. The project is designed to inject and monitor at least 1 million metric tons of CO 2 into a series of oil fields that are in different stages of their production life cycles. The CO 2 will be injected into the geologic structures known as the northern Niagaran pinnacle reef trend. From Battelle News Release on July 9, 2013. Announcements DOE's NETL Releases Revised Editions of Best Practice Manuals (BPMs). The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) released revised editions of the following Best Practice Manuals (BPMs): "Public

360

Microsoft PowerPoint - RCSmyth_SACROC_Water(Smyth).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/08 3/08 Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration SACROC EOR and Sequestration Demonstration DE- FC26-05NT42591 Rebecca C. Smyth October 23, 2008 Albuquerque, New Mexico SACROC - Scurry Area Canyon Reef Operators Committee unitized oilfield 10/23/08 SACROC Previous CO 2 Injection * 3 TCF (150 million metric tons (MMt)) CO 2 injected for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since 1972 by multiple operators * 1.5 TCF (75 MMt) CO 2 recovered as of October 1, 2008 * SWP researchers are among first to test if this CO 2 is trapped in reservoir zones or if it has leaked into overlying strata * Previous CO 2 injection history provides opportunity for (1) larger scale, inside vs. outside SACROC, and (2) longer time frame soil and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO Gulf of Mexico Miocene CO 2 Site Characterization Mega Transect Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO 2 emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires adequate geologic formations capable of (1) storing large volumes of CO 2 , (2) receiving injected CO 2 at efficient and economic rates, and (3) retaining CO 2 safely over extended periods. Research efforts are currently focused on conventional and unconventional storage formations within depositional environments such as: deltaic, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Conventional storage types are porous permeable clastic or carbonate rocks that have

362

Why sequence Halorespiring Firmicutes?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Halorespiring Firmicutes? Halorespiring Firmicutes? Considered the oldest multicellular animals, marine sponges are found in many tropical reef ecosystems. Unable to move from their positions on the seafloor, marine sponges can filter 24,000 liters of seawater per kilogram of sponge daily and as much as 60 percent of their biomass can be composed of microorganisms, many of which are being studied for a number of medical applications. Among the microorganisms found in sponges are halorespiring bacteria. These bacteria play a key role in breaking down halogenated pollutants in anaerobic ecosystems such as subsurface soils and marine sediments. Halorespiring bacteria also play an as-yet poorly understood role in the global carbon cycle. Researchers are interested in learning more about the relationships between

363

What's InsIde? Announcements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 2013 July 2013 hIghlIghts "MRCSP Begins Field Tests in Michigan" The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle, announced the beginning of a large-scale carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection in Michigan's Northern Reef Trend. The project is designed to inject and monitor at least 1 million metric tons of CO 2 into a series of oil fields that are in different stages of their production life cycles. The first test in the series will inject up to 500,000 metric tons of CO 2 into an oil field that has undergone primary production and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) for several years and is now near the end of its productive life. During the

364

CX-005807: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5807: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5807: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005807: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Full Activation Scenario Training Exercise CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/29/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Training of Hazardous Evidence Analysis Team (HEAT) members will take place in F wing of 773-A. HEAT team members from Latent Print, Deoxyribonucleic acid, Photography, Trace Evidence, Document Analysis, and Evidence Control units will perform tasks in all rooms located in this wing. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005807.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005109: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004839: Categorical Exclusion Determination

365

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 27, 2012 March 27, 2012 CX-008371: Categorical Exclusion Determination Non-Acid Elution (NAE) of Cesium From Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 27, 2012 CX-008370: Categorical Exclusion Determination Operation of Tube Furnace for Synthesis of Hydrogen Storage Materials CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/27/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 23, 2012 CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 22, 2012 CX-008374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

366

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 26, 2012 March 26, 2012 CX-009929: Categorical Exclusion Determination South Louisiana Enhanced Oil Recovery/Sequestration Research and Development Project CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B3.1, B3.6 Date: 03/26/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory March 23, 2012 CX-008373: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Evidence Examinations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office March 19, 2012 CX-008807: Categorical Exclusion Determination Direct Application of TiBor Coatings Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.11 Date: 03/19/2012 Location(s): Tennessee Offices(s): Y-12 Site Office March 19, 2012 CX-008375: Categorical Exclusion Determination

367

SWP.SACROC.factsheet919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M i d l a n d B a s i n Claytonville Pennsylvanian reef reservoirs Modified from Galloway, et al. (1983) SACROC LYNN G ARZA KENT STONEW ALL DA W SON TERRY HASKELL KNO X BO RDEN SCURRY FISHER JO NES T AYLO R NO LAN M ITCHELL HO W ARD MARTIN CO KE 0 20 mi 0 30 km QAd4569x Figure 1. Regional Location Map. FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William O'Dowd NETL William.ODowd@NETL.DOE.GOV Principal Investigator Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name

368

Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Public Lands (Texas) on Public Lands (Texas) Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands that may be leased include: (1) islands, saltwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits; (2) the portion of the Gulf of Mexico within the jurisdiction of the state; (3) all unsold surveyed and

369

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30, 2011 30, 2011 CX-005540: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wave Energy Technology-New Zealand Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 03/30/2011 Location(s): Portland, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 29, 2011 CX-005807: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Full Activation Scenario Training Exercise CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/29/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office March 28, 2011 CX-005850: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tank 50 Formulation Treatability Study CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/28/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

370

Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect

This topical report covers the year 2 of the subject 3-year grant, evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin (Ordovician Trenton-Black River Formations; Silurian Niagara Group; and the Devonian Dundee Formation). The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs has been the major focus of our efforts in Phase II/Year 2. Fields have been prioritized based upon the availability of rock data for interpretation of depositional environments, fracture density and distribution as well as thin section, geochemical, and petrophysical analyses. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in the 3 studied intervals (based upon initial fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. For the Niagaran (Silurian), a comprehensive high resolution sequence stratigraphic framework has been developed for a pinnacle reef in the northern reef trend where we had 100% core coverage throughout the reef section. Major findings to date are that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, have direct links to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that results will be exportable throughout the basin. Ten petrophysically significant facies have been described in the northern reef trend, providing significantly more resolution than the standard 4-6 that are used most often in the basin (e.g. Gill, 1977). Initial petrophysical characterization (sonic velocity analysis under confining pressures) shows a clear pattern that is dependent upon facies and resulting pore architecture. Primary facies is a key factor in the ultimate diagenetic modification of the rock and the resulting pore architecture. Facies with good porosity and permeability clearly show relatively slow velocity values as would be expected, and low porosity and permeability samples exhibit fast sonic velocity values, again as expected. What is significant is that some facies that have high porosity values, either measured directly or from wireline logs, also have very fast sonic velocity values. This is due to these facies having a pore architecture characterized by more localized pores (vugs, molds or fractures) that are not in communication.

G. Michael Grammer

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Myanmar production meets first-gas targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite scheduling complications caused by annual monsoons, the Yadana project to bring offshore Myanmar gas ashore and into neighboring Thailand has met it first-gas target of July 1, 1998. The Yadana field is a dry-gas reservoir in the reef upper Birman limestone formation t 1,260 m and a pressure of 174 bara (approximately 2,500 psi). It extends nearly 7 km (west to east) and 10 km (south to north). The water-saturated reservoir gas contains mostly methane mixed with CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}. No production of condensate is anticipated. The Yadana field contains certified gas reserves of 5.7 tcf, calculated on the basis of 2D and 3D seismic data-acquisition campaigns and of seven appraisal wells. The paper discusses early interest, development sequences, offshore platforms, the gas-export pipeline, safety, environmental steps, and schedule constraints.

Lepage, A. [Total Myanmar Exploration and Production, Singapore (Singapore)

1998-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Kirki episode: Detailed biomarker analysis provides some surprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On Sunday 21st July 1991 the oil tanker Kirki caught fire when its bow broke off in heavy seas just 40 km off the Western Australian coastline near Jurien, approximately 200 km north of Perth. The tanker was carrying 80,000 tonnes of Murban light crude oil from the Middle East. Over the next three days approximately 10,000 tonnes of this oil was released into the marine environment, the heavy seas rapidly spreading the oil slick to a thin sheen. There was extensive media coverage of this event and it was widely considered that the spill posed a serious environmental threat to reef systems, recreational beaches and the local rock lobster fishery. This report describes results of analysis performed on several of the samples.

Currie, T.J.; Alexander, R.; Kagi, R.I. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth (Australia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

SRNL - News Room  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FBI, Savannah River National Laboratory, Put Science to Work to Protect the Nation FBI, Savannah River National Laboratory, Put Science to Work to Protect the Nation ( PDF button Download printer-friendly, PDF version) AIKEN, S.C. (June 3, 2010) - The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) today announced the opening of a major expansion of the FBI's facilities for the forensic examination of radiological material and associated evidence. The FBI's newly expanded Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF), located at the Savannah River National Laboratory near Aiken, South Carolina, provides a major enhancement in the FBI's ability to protect the nation from crimes involving radiological material and bring to justice those who would use these materials to harm the nation's citizens.

374

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Permian Basin Permian Basin Project Overview DE- FC26-05NT42591 October 6, 2008 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Rebecca C. Smyth, Bureau of Economic Geology, Gulf Coast Carbon Center, Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin, presenter Brian McPherson, New Mexico Tech and University of Utah, Project PI Acknowledgements * Many thanks to the U.S. Department of Energy and NETL for supporting this project * We also express gratitude to our many industry partners, who have committed a great deal of time, funding, and other general support for these projects * The work presented today is co-authored by all partners in the Southwest Partnership (SWP) 10/6/08 Scurry Area Canyon Reef Operators Committee (SACROC) unitized oil field SACROC - eastern edge Permian Basin

375

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) Minerals on Public Lands (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Program Info State Texas Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Texas General Land Office Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of Mexico within the state's jurisdiction, unsold surveyed public school land, rivers and channels that belong to the state, and land sold with a reservation of minerals to the state are subject to prospect by any person for those minerals which are

376

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 6730 of 28,905 results. 21 - 6730 of 28,905 results. Download CX-005807: Categorical Exclusion Determination Radiological Evidence Examination Facility (REEF) Full Activation Scenario Training Exercise CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 03/29/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005807-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fire Department Personnel to Perform Annual Flush of Hydrants and Prove Curb Valves CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 03/29/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005813-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005822: Categorical Exclusion Determination

377

Thomas P. Guilderson, 2011 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Thomas P. Guilderson, 2011 Thomas P. Guilderson, 2011 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-9395 E: lawrence.award@science.doe.gov 2000's Thomas P. Guilderson, 2011 Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Biological and Environmental Sciences: For ground-breaking radiocarbon measurements of corals, advancements in understanding the paleo-history of ocean currents and ocean processes revealing past climate variability, and the elucidation of how physical and biogeochemical oceanic processes affect

378

Keep in mind, that with formality, often comes more of a standing presence of a committee within DOE-it gets into DOE's system and becomes a budget line item as well  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP INDIAN COUNTRY ENERGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE WORKING GROUP ICEIWG March 14, 2013 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO North Convention Center, Coral AB Room Las Vegas, Nevada The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy (IE) will host an Indian Country Energy and Infrastructure Working Group (ICEIWG) Meeting & National Indian Energy Policy Conversation on Thursday, March 14, 2013. Target Audience. IE has solicited nominations for new members to ICEIWG-current, new and potential new members are encouraged to attend. Invited guests include tribal leaders as well as representatives from intertribal organizations, all of whom are encouraged to attend the morning ICEIWG business meeting. Immediately following from 11am-2pm will be a National Indian Energy Policy Conversation for Tribal Leaders, which will

379

Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Humid Climates Humid Climates Guides and Case Studies for Hot-Humid Climates Map of the Hot and Humid Climate Zone of the United States. This zone covers eastern Texas through Florida and reaches up to mid-Georgia it also includes Puerto Rico and Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America program has developed a series of best practices and case studies to help builders improve whole-house energy performance in buildings found in hot-humid climates. Best Practice Guides New Construction Case Studies Improvements to Existing Homes Case Studies Best Practice Guides 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Humid Climates - Volume 15 New Construction Case Studies Florida Project: Ravenwood Homes and Energy Smart Home Plans, Inc. - Cape Coral Builder: Ravenwood Homes

380

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Codes & Standards Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes & Standards Analysis Codes & Standards Analysis Project Summary Full Title: Codes & Standards Analysis Project ID: 180 Principal Investigator: Michael Swain Brief Description: Conducts a building safety analysis for the California Fuel Cell Partnership including an assessment of safety issues related to garaged vehicles. Keywords: transportation; safety; hydrogen sensor; codes and standards Purpose To conduct a building safety analysis for the California Fuel Cell Partnership including an assessment of safety issues related to garaged vehicles. Performer Principal Investigator: Michael Swain Organization: University of Miami Address: McArthur Engineering Building, Room 224, P.O. Box 248294 Coral Gables, FL 33124 Telephone: 305-284-3321 Email: mswain@eng.miami.edu Project Description

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

382

Event Speakers List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tina Kaarsberg Acting Director United States Department of Energy Tina Kaarsberg Acting Director United States Department of Energy Jérôme Kaempf Zakya H. Kafafi Head of Organic Optoelectronics Section Naval Research Laboratory Ed Kahn Managing Principal Olga Kalantzi City of Berkeley Laurence S. Kalkstein Research Professor, and Director University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL Malick Kane Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Matthew Allan Kane Convey, Inc. Saket Karajgikar Applications Engineer Future Facilities, Ltd. William E. Kastenberg Professor and Chair UC Berkeley Randy Katz Professor UC Berkeley Alex Katzman Business Development Enervee Myron Katzoff Ben Kaun Senior Project Engineer Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Ben Kearns VP of Technology Stem Noel Keen Computer Science Engineer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

383

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 2970 of 28,905 results. 61 - 2970 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tribal Energy Program-Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (Selawik) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/15/2011 Location(s): Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006882-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006883: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tribal Energy Program-Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 09/15/2011 Location(s): Anaktuvuk Pass, Alaska, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006883-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005248: Categorical Exclusion Determination Florida-City-Cape Coral

384

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PENNEL PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE FOUR EYES TRACY MOUNTAIN COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK ROCKY HILL

385

Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BUFFALO BUFFALO PENNEL LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON BELL STATE LINE BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR HEART S STADIUM HILINE ASH MARY LAKE ILO GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY BULLY SHORT PINE HILLS W CABIN CREEK GASLIGHT CUPTON DEVILS PASS LITTLE MISSOURI LITTLE BEAVER COOKS PEAK LITTLE BEAVER E CORAL CREEK BEAVER CREEK MORGAN DRAW WATERHOLE CREEK DEER CREEK GRASSY BUTTE CROOKED CREEK CINNAMON CREEK HORSE CREEK KILLDEER SQUARE BUTTE GRAND RIVER RIDER ROCKY RIDGE TRACY MOUNTAIN FOUR EYES COYOTE CREEK HAY DRAW SAND CREEK

386

Computer language evaluation for MFTF SCDS  

SciTech Connect

The computer languages available for the systems and application implementation on the Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) were surveyed and evaluated. Four language processors, CAL (Common Assembly Language), Extended FORTRAN, CORAL 66, and Sequential Pascal (SPASCAL, a subset of Concurrent Pascal (CPASCAL)) are commercially available for the Interdata 7/32 and 8/32 computers that constitute the SCDS. Of these, the Sequential Pascal available from Kansas State University appears best for the job in terms of minimizing the implementation time, debugging time, and maintenance time. This improvement in programming productivity is due to the availability of a high-level, block-structured language that includes many compile-time and run-time checks to detect errors. In addition, the advanced data-types in language allow easy description of the program variables. 1 table.

Anderson, R.E.; McGoldrick, P.R.; Wyman, R.H.

1979-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective  

SciTech Connect

We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Final Technical Report: Response of Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems to Elevated Atmospheric CO2 and Associated Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

This research incorporated an integrated hierarchical approach in space, time, and levels of biological/ecological organization to help understand and predict ecosystem response to elevated CO{sub 2} and concomitant environmental change. The research utilized a number of different approaches, and collaboration of both PER and non-PER investigators to arrive at a comprehensive, integrative understanding. Central to the work were the CO{sub 2}-controlled, ambient Lit, Temperature controlled (CO{sub 2}LT) null-balance chambers originally developed in the arctic tundra, which were re-engineered for the chaparral with treatment CO{sub 2} concentrations of from 250 to 750 ppm CO{sub 2} in 100 ppm increments, replicated twice to allow for a regression analysis. Each chamber was 2 meters on a side and 2 meters tall, which were installed over an individual shrub reprouting after a fire. This manipulation allowed study of the response of native chaparral to varying levels of CO{sub 2}, while regenerating from an experimental burn. Results from these highly-controlled manipulations were compared against Free Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment (FACE) manipulations, in an area adjacent to the CO{sub 2}LT null balance greenhouses. These relatively short-term results (5-7 years) were compared to long-term results from Mediterranean-type ecosystems (MTEs) surrounding natural CO{sub 2} springs in northern Italy, near Laiatico, Italy. The springs lack the controlled experimental rigor of our CO{sub 2}LT and FACE manipulation, but provide invaluable validation of our long-term predictions.

Oechel, Walter C

2002-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

Spitler, A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Description, calibration and sensitivity analysis of the local ecosystem submodel of a global model of carbon and nitrogen cycling and the water balance in the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a geographically-distributed ecosystem model for the carbon, nitrogen, and water dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere TERRA. The local ecosystem model of TERRA consists of coupled, modified versions of TEM and DAYTRANS. The ecosystem model in each grid cell calculates water fluxes of evaporation, transpiration, and runoff; carbon fluxes of gross primary productivity, litterfall, and plant and soil respiration; and nitrogen fluxes of vegetation uptake, litterfall, mineralization, immobilization, and system loss. The state variables are soil water content; carbon in live vegetation; carbon in soil; nitrogen in live vegetation; organic nitrogen in soil and fitter; available inorganic nitrogen aggregating nitrites, nitrates, and ammonia; and a variable for allocation. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics are calibrated to specific sites in 17 vegetation types. Eight parameters are determined during calibration for each of the 17 vegetation types. At calibration, the annual average values of carbon in vegetation C, show site differences that derive from the vegetation-type specific parameters and intersite variation in climate and soils. From calibration, we recover the average C{sub v} of forests, woodlands, savannas, grasslands, shrublands, and tundra that were used to develop the model initially. The timing of the phases of the annual variation is driven by temperature and light in the high latitude and moist temperate zones. The dry temperate zones are driven by temperature, precipitation, and light. In the tropics, precipitation is the key variable in annual variation. The seasonal responses are even more clearly demonstrated in net primary production and show the same controlling factors.

Kercher, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Parallel Computing for Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial ecosystems are a primary component of research on global environmental change. Observational and modeling research on terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, however, has lagged behind their counterparts for oceanic and atmospheric systems, largely because the unique challenges associated with the tremendous diversity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems. There are 8 major types of terrestrial ecosystem: tropical rain forest, savannas, deserts, temperate grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, tundra, and chaparral. The carbon cycle is an important mechanism in the coupling of terrestrial ecosystems with climate through biological fluxes of CO{sub 2}. The influence of terrestrial ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} can be modeled via several means at different timescales. Important processes include plant dynamics, change in land use, as well as ecosystem biogeography. Over the past several decades, many terrestrial ecosystem models (see the 'Model developments' section) have been developed to understand the interactions between terrestrial carbon storage and CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere, as well as the consequences of these interactions. Early TECMs generally adapted simple box-flow exchange models, in which photosynthetic CO{sub 2} uptake and respiratory CO{sub 2} release are simulated in an empirical manner with a small number of vegetation and soil carbon pools. Demands on kinds and amount of information required from global TECMs have grown. Recently, along with the rapid development of parallel computing, spatially explicit TECMs with detailed process based representations of carbon dynamics become attractive, because those models can readily incorporate a variety of additional ecosystem processes (such as dispersal, establishment, growth, mortality etc.) and environmental factors (such as landscape position, pest populations, disturbances, resource manipulations, etc.), and provide information to frame policy options for climate change impact analysis.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Berry, Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The feeding biomechanics of juvenile red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Juvenile red snapper are attracted to structure and settle onto low profile reefs, which serve as nursery grounds. Little is known about their life history during this time. However, recent studies from a shell bank in the NW Gulf of Mexico have shown higher growth rates for juveniles located on mud habitats adjacent to low profile reefs, perhaps due to varied prey availability and abundance. To further investigate the habitat needs of juvenile red snapper, individuals were collected from a low profile shell ridge (on-ridge) and adjacent mud areas (off-ridge) on Freeport Rocks, TX, and divided into three size classes (?3.9 cm SL, 4.0-5.9 cm SL, ?6 cm SL). Feeding morphology and kinematics were characterized and compared among size classes and between the two habitats. A dynamic jaw lever model was used to make predictions about feeding mechanics, and kinematic profiles obtained from high-speed videos of prey capture events validated the model’s predictive ability. Model output suggested an ontogenetic shift in feeding morphology from a juvenile feeding mode (more suction) to an adult feeding mode (more biting). Stomach contents revealed a concomitant shift in prey composition that coincided with the ontogenetic shift in feeding mode. The model also predicted that on-ridge juveniles would have faster jaw closing velocities compared to off-ridge juveniles, which had slower, stronger jaws. Analysis of prey capture events indicated that on-ridge juveniles demonstrated greater velocities and larger displacements of the jaws than off-ridge juveniles. Shape analysis was used to further investigate habitat effects on morphology. Off-ridge juveniles differed from on-ridge in possessing a deeper head and body. Results from model simulations, kinematic profiles, personal observations, and shape analysis all complement the conclusion that on-ridge juveniles exhibited more suction feeding behavior, whereas off-ridge juveniles used more biting behavior. Stomach contents demonstrated an early switch to piscivory in off-ridge juveniles compared to on-ridge juveniles, which may account for higher off-ridge growth rates. Habitat disparity, perhaps available prey composition, generated variations in juvenile feeding mechanics and consequently feeding behavior. This disparity may ultimately affect the growth rates and recruitment success of juvenile red snapper from different habitats.

Case, Janelle Elaine

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Sonar imaging of bay bottom sediments and anthropogenic impacts in Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of surface sediment distribution in Galveston Bay is important because it allows us to better understand how the bay works and how human activities impact the bay and its ecosystems. In this project, six areas of bay bottom were surveyed using acoustic techniques to make maps of bay bottom types and to investigate the types and extent of anthropogenic impacts. A total of 31 km2 was surveyed in six areas, one in Bolivar Roads (6.1 km2), one near Redfish Bar (3.1 km2), two in East Bay (12 km2), one southeast of the Clear Lake entrance (5.3 km2), and one in Trinity Bay (4.3 km2). Sidescan sonars (100 kHz and 600 kHz) were used to image the bay bottom, and a chirp sonar (2-12 kHz) was used to image subsurface sediment layers and bottom topography. In the side-scan records, objects as small as a few meters in extent were visible, whereas the chirp sonar records show a vertical resolution of a few tens of centimeters. The sidescan images display strong backscatter in some areas due to coarse sediments in addition to weak backscatter in areas of fine sediment. The bay bottom was classified using three levels of sonar backscatter ranging from high to low. Areas of differing sonar backscatter intensity were sampled with cores and grab-samples. High backscatter corresponded to coarse shell debris and oyster reefs, medium backscatter corresponded to a sand-silt-shell mixture, and low backscatter corresponded to silty loam. Chirp sonar records were classified as one of nine different bottom reflection types based on changes in amplitude and stratigraphy. Parallel, layered sediments are seen filling the bay valley and resting atop a sharp contact at which the acoustic signal fades out. Along the flanks of the valley fill the acoustic response revealed an absent or weakly laminated stratigraphy, whereas areas of high oyster productivity produced mounds, strong surface returns, and strong, shallow subsurface reflectors surrounding current oyster reefs. Anthropogenic features imaged with the sonar included sediment disruptions, such as the ship channels, dredge holes, gouges, and trawl marks, as well as debris, such as submerged boats, pipes, and unidentified objects.

Maddox, Donald Shea

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The facies, environments of deposition and cyclicity of the Yates Formation, North Ward-Estes field, Ward County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Yates Formation is part of the Artesia Group, a sequence of interbedded carbonates, clastics and evaporates that was deposited across the back-reef shelves of the Permian basin in Late Permian (Upper Guadalupian) time. The Artesia Group is the shelfal equivalent of the shelf-marginal Capitan and Goat Seep Reefs and deep-basinal Delaware Mountain Group. This study is based on the description of seven cores and twenty-two well logs from North Ward-Estes field along the western margin of the Central Basin Platform. The Yates Formation consists of sub-arkosic sandstones and siltstones and dolomitic mudstones and wackestones. It has sharp contacts with the carbonates of the underlying Seven Rivers Formation and evaporite-rich beds of the underlying Tansill Formation. Five facies are distinguished in the Yates Formation and its bounding surfaces on the basis of their lithologies and stratification. Three elastic facies (Facies 1, 2, and 3) were deposited in fluvial, deltaic, eolian and sabkha environments. One carbonates facies (Facies 4) was deposited in a shallow subtidal environments and one evaporate facies (Facies 5) was deposited in a sabkha environment. The stratigraphy of the Yates Formation was determined by the correlation of cores and well log data strike and dip profiles through the field. Two sequences and ten to twelve parasequences are recognized within the Yates Formation. Each sequence consists of basal lowstand incised valley fill (IVF), which is overlain by a Transgressive Systems Tract (TST') and Highstand Systems Tract (HST). The two sequences which have slightly wavy sheet geometries in the strike direction and thin in the landward direction, marking two long-term cycles of relative sea level fall and subsequent rise in the field area.Reservoir properties of the Yates Formation were determined by the use of core plug data for porosity and permeability measurements. This physical data, along with measured data from well logs, was then correlated to identify the quality, lateral extent and continuity of the elastic reservoirs in this formation. Facies 1 is identified as the best reservoir rock and Facies 3 is identified as the poorest. Facies 2 has intermediate quality.

Johnson, Ronnie Delane

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Estimating Bacteria Emissions from Inversion of Atmospheric Transport: Sensitivity to Modelled Particle Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

Model-simulated transport of atmospheric trace components can be combined with observed concentrations to obtain estimates of ground-based sources using various inversion techniques. These approaches have been applied in the past primarily to obtain source estimates for long-lived trace gases such as CO2. We consider the application of similar techniques to source estimation for atmospheric aerosols, by using as a case study the estimation of bacteria emissions from different ecosystem regions in the global atmospheric chemistry and climate model ECHAM5/MESSy-Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC). Simulated particle concentrations in the tropopause region and at high latitudes, as well as transport of particles to tundra and land ice regions are shown to be highly sensitive to scavenging in mixed-phase clouds, which is poorly characterized in most global climate models. This may be a critical uncertainty in correctly simulating the transport of aerosol particles to the Arctic. Source estimation via Monte Carlo Markov Chain is applied to a suite of sensitivity simulations and the global mean emissions are estimated. We present an analysis of the partitioning of uncertainties in the global mean emissions that are attributable to particle size, CCN activity, the ice nucleation scavenging ratios for mixed-phase and cold clouds, and measurement error. Uncertainty due to CCN activity or to a 1 um error in particle size is typically between 10% and 40% of the uncertainty due to data uncertainty, as measured by the 5%-ile to 95%-ile range of the Monte Carlo ensemble. Uncertainty attributable to the ice nucleation scavenging ratio in mized-phase clouds is as high as 10% to 20% of the data uncertainty. Taken together, the four model 20 parameters examined contribute about half as much to the uncertainty in the estimated emissions as do the measurements. This was a surprisingly large contribution from model uncertainty in light of the substantial data uncertainty, which ranges from 81% to 870% for each of ten ecosystems for this case study. The effects of these and other model parameters in contributing to the uncertainties in the transport of atmospheric aerosol particles should be treated explicitly and systematically in both forward and inverse modelling studies.

Burrows, Susannah M.; Rayner, Perter; Butler, T.; Lawrence, M.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

396

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists planning hydrate exploration and development projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this and other project reports. This Topical Report contains details describing logging operations.

Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models and to research teams for developing future gas-hydrate projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and has been documented by the project team. This Topical Report documents drilling and coring operations and other daily activities.

Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

399

Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya  

SciTech Connect

The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. (National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Control instrumentation for wellheads and mud-kill systems. [Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the instrumentation and control systems used on the wellheads and mud-kill systems at the Mobil Oil Arun natural gas field, situated onshore in the province of Aceh, North Sumatra, Indonesia. The reservoir is a carbonate reef containing an estimated 15 Tcf (0.42 X 10/sup 12/ m/sup 3/) gas at approximately 7,000 psig (48 263 kPa) and 360/sup 0/F (182/sup 0/C). The wellstream from the field is separated into natural gas, condensate liquid, and water. The gas and condensate are then shipped through separate pipelines to the Arun liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility at Lho' Seumawe, about 40 mi (25 km) away on the northeastern coast of Sumatra. After liquefaction the LNG is shipped by tanker to Japan. The field was discovered in 1971 and became operational in 1977. The LNG delivery contract complied with the Japanese calls for regular delivery; thus continuity of supply to the LNG plant was of paramount importance for meeting transportation and supply schedules. Two actual blowouts in the Arun field have provided valuable experience in evaluating both equipment and systems in terms of design, reliability, and application for this type of field service. This paper concentrates on the design and installation of the control systems associated with the wellhead and mud-kill systems and highlights the problems encountered during the past five years.

Giles, A.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Could a nearby supernova explosion have caused a mass extinction?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the possibility that a nearby supernova explosion could have caused one or more of the mass extinctions identified by palaeontologists. We discuss the likely rate of such events in the light of the recent identification of Geminga as a supernova remnant less than 100 pc away and the discovery of a millisecond pulsar about 150 pc away, and observations of SN 1987A. The fluxes of $\\gamma$ radiation and charged cosmic rays on the Earth are estimated, and their effects on the Earth's ozone layer discussed. A supernova explosion of the order of 10 pc away could be expected every few hundred million years, and could destroy the ozone layer for hundreds of years, letting in potentially lethal solar ultraviolet radiation. In addition to effects on land ecology, this could entail mass destruction of plankton and reef communities, with disastrous consequences for marine life as well. A supernova extinction should be distinguishable from a meteorite impact such as the one that presumably killed the dinosaurs.

John Ellis; David N. Schramm

1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

Digital field trip to the Central Nevada Thrust Belt  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Nevada Thrust Belt is still in its infancy. However, this thrust belt contains all the elements necessary for hydrocarbon accumulations: thick, organically-rich shales; reefs, regional unconformities, karst surfaces, porous sandstones, and extensive and pervasive fractures; anticlines tens of miles long by miles wide; thrust faults that juxtapose potential source and reservoir rocks; and oil seeps. Along a fairway from Las Vegas to Elko, for example, thick Mississippian shales contain 4-6% total organic carbon and are oil-prone and thermally mature. This presentation from a laptop computer and LCD projector is a multimedia version of our October 12-14, 1995 field trip to document the hydrocarbon potential of the thrust belt in Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties. Outcrop images were recorded by a digital camera that has a resolution equivalent to a 14 inch computer screen; these images were then downloaded to the computer. All of the images were processed digitally on location to enhance picture quality and color contrast. Many were annotated on location with our observations, measurements, and interpretations. These field annotations are supplemented in this presentation by laboratory analyses. The presentation includes full-color, annotated outcrop images, sounds, and animations. The results show the viability of the new, inexpensive digital cameras to geologic field work in which a multimedia report, ready for presentation to management, can be generated in the field.

Chamberlain, A.K. (Cedar Strat Corp., Hiko, NV (United States)); Hook, S.C. (Texaco E P Technology Department, Houston, TX (United States)); Frost, K.R. (Texaco Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental programs for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental research effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program has the goal of providing documented information on the effect of proposed operations on the ocean and the effect of oceanic conditions on the plant. The associated environment program consists of archival studies in potential areas serial oceanographic cruises to sites or regions of interest, studies from various fixed platforms at sites, and compilation of such information for appropriate legal compliance and permit requirements and for use in progressive design of OTEC plants. Site/regions investigated are south of Mobile and west of Tampa, Gulf of Mexico; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; St. Croix, Virgin Islands; Kahe Point, Oahu and Keahole Point, Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands; and off the Brazilian south Equatorial Coast. Four classes of environmental concerns identified are: redistribution of oceanic properties (ocean water mixing, impingement/entrainment etc.); chemical pollution (biocides, working fluid leaks, etc.); structural effects (artificial reef, aggregation, nesting/migration, etc.); socio-legal-economic (worker safety, enviromaritime law, etc.).

Wilde, P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Commercial/industrial applications spur solar development  

SciTech Connect

Several large commercial buildings with solar systems are examined. The first building mentioned is the La Quinta Motor Inn located in Dallas, Texas. The system supplies approximately 90% of the hot water for the rooms and laundry. The largest solar cooling system is located in Frenchman's Reef, the Holiday Inn, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. The system was funded by a 75% grant from the Energy Research and Development Administration. In Decatur, Alabama, construction has begun on a solar heating system that will be used at a large soybean oil extraction facility. The project is also sponsored in part by ERDA. The solar panels will be used to air dry the soy beans. The largest solar-powered irrigation system is located in Gila River Ranch southwest of Phoenix, Arizona. The system includes a 50-hp pump capable of delivering up to 10,000 gallons of irrigation water per minute. It operates with 5,500 ft/sup 2/ of parabolic tracking collectors.

Comstock, W.S.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

Fracturing significantly increases light oil production rates at South Belridge making this an economically successful technique for exploitation of the Reef Ridge reservoir. No fracturing mechanics problems were encountered in any of the treatments. The loosely consolidated formations behaved mechanically much like brittle, elastic rocks. Net oil and gross production is typified by initial high rates and an early rapid decline. The major cause of this early rapid decline is the transient flow effect. This behavior is typical of low permeability oil and gas production. Fractures are vertical, as shown by gamma ray and temperature logs run following several treatments. The fractures grow slightly out of the perforated intervals (10 to 15 feet). Loss of fracture conductivity due to fines migration, scale deposition, and/or fracture healing (imbedment) is not a serious problem. Oil viscosity can vary as much as ten-fold. Some wells produce significant amounts of gas--100 to 200 MCFPD initially. The formation is primarily diatomaceous earth which is very fine particle size siliceous material composed of whole or fragmented diatom tests (skeletons). There is no evidence that clay swelling or dispersion is a problem. Field and laboratory data support this conclusion. Aqueous fracturing fluids were successfully used which confirmed laboratory tests on cores.

Strubhar, M.K.; Medin, W.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocene arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of [approx]139[degrees]E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.

Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V. (VIEPS, Melbourne (Australia) SAEFUDIN Ijep, GRDC (India))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Uranium favorability of the San Rafael Swell area, east-central Utah  

SciTech Connect

The San Rafael Swell project area in east-central Utah is approximately 3,000 sq mi and includes the San Rafael Swell anticline and the northern part of the Waterpocket Fold monocline at Capitol Reef. Rocks in the area are predominantly sedimentary rocks of Pennsylvanian through Cretaceous age. Important deposits of uranium in the project area are restricted to two formations, the Chinle (Triassic) and Morrison (Jurassic) Formations. A third formation, the White Rim Sandstone (Permian), was also studied because of reported exploration activity. The White Rim Sandstone is considered generally unfavorable on the basis of lithologic characteristics, distance from a possible source of uranium, lack of apparent mineralization, and the scarcity of anomalies on gamma-ray logs or in rock, water, and stream-sediment samples. The lower Chinle from the Moss Back Member down to the base of the formation is favorable because it is a known producer. New areas for exploration are all subsurface. Both Salt Wash and Brushy Basin Members of the Morrison Formation are favorable. The Salt Wash Member is favorable because it is a known producer. The Brushy Basin Member is favorable as a low-grade resource.

Mickle, D G; Jones, C A; Gallagher, G L; Young, P; Dubyk, W S

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI  

SciTech Connect

One of the principal objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, microbial samples were collected from the Trusty Steed prospect area in Grand Traverse County, Michigan. The samples were analyzed using the Microbial Oil Surveying Technique (MOST) technique and revealed only a local (1-point) anomaly. A decision to resample over that point is pending, but drilling has been postponed for the time being. The main news this reporting period is that in the Bear Lake area, northwest Michigan, Federated Oil & Gas Properties' Charlich-Fauble 2-9HD horizontal lateral, has cumulative production of more than 72,000 barrels of oil and is still producing 50 to 75 bopd from a Silurian Niagaran reef reservoir eighteen months after the well was completed. Surface geochemical surveys conducted in the demonstration area were consistent with production results although the ultimate decision to drill was based on interpretation of conventional subsurface and 2D seismic data. The surface geochemical techniques employed were Solid Phase MicroExtraction (SPME) and MOST. The geochemical results have been submitted to World Oil for publication. New geochemical surveys are planned for November in the Springdale quadrangle in Manistee County, Michigan. These surveys will concentrate on sampling over the trace of the proposed horizontal wells rather than a broad grid survey.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Separation Of Uranium And Plutonium Isotopes For Measurement By Multi Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) isotopes in coral soils, contaminated by nuclear weapons testing in the northern Marshall Islands, were isolated by ion-exchange chromatography and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The soil samples were spiked with {sup 233}U and {sup 242}Pu tracers, dissolved in minerals acids, and U and Pu isotopes isolated and purified on commercially available ion-exchange columns. The ion-exchange technique employed a TEVA{reg_sign} column coupled to a UTEVA{reg_sign} column. U and Pu isotope fractions were then further isolated using separate elution schemes, and the purified fractions containing U and Pu isotopes analyzed sequentially using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MCICP-MS). High precision measurements of {sup 234}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 238}U/{sup 235}U, {sup 236}U/{sup 235}U, and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu in soil samples were attained using the described methodology and instrumentation, and provide a basis for conducting more detailed assessments of the behavior and transfer of uranium and plutonium in the environment.

Martinelli, R E; Hamilton, T F; Williams, R W; Kehl, S R

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

Swimming Pool Granuloma, Fish Tank Granuloma,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mycobacteriosis is a chronic or acute, systemic, granulomatous disease that occurs in aquarium and culture food fish, particularly those reared under intensive conditions. Mycobacteriosis results from infection by several species of Mycobacterium, aerobic, Gram-positive, pleomorphic rods which are members of the order Actinomycetales and family Mycobacteriaceae. Mycobacteria are widespread in the environment, particularly in aquatic reservoirs. The two most important species causing mycobacteriosis in fish and humans are Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium fortuitum. Other species known to cause mycobacterial disease in fish include M. chelonei, M neoaurum, M simiae, and M scrofulaceum. Mycobacterium marinum was first recognized in 1926 from the liver, spleen and kidney of tropical coral fish kept in the Philadelphia Aquarium. M. marinum can grow prolifically within fibroblast, epithelial cells and macrophages. In the past, human outbreaks of M. marinum were sporadic and most commonly assoicated with contaminated swimming pools. Chlorination practices used today have greatly minimized to frequency of outbreaks from these sources. In the last decade, a small but

Fish Tuberculosis; Fish Handler’s Disease; Fish Handler’s Nodules

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fifteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This collection contains 173 abstracts from presented papers and poster sessions. The five sessions of the conference were on the subjects of: (1) Thermal, Chemical, and Biological Processing, (2) Applied Biological Research, (3) Bioprocessing Research (4), Process Economics and Commercialization, and (5) Environmental Biotechnology. Examples of specific topics in the first session include the kinetics of ripening cheese, microbial liquefaction of lignite, and wheat as a feedstock for fuel ethanol. Typical topics in the second session were synergism studies of bacterial and fungal celluloses, conversion of inulin from jerusalem artichokes to sorbitol and ethanol by saccharomyces cerevisiae, and microbial conversion of high rank coals to methane. The third session entertained topics such as hydrodynamic modeling of a liquid fluidized bed bioreactor for coal biosolubilization, aqueous biphasic systems for biological particle partitioning, and arabinose utilization by xylose-fermenting yeast and fungi. The fourth session included such topics as silage processing of forage biomass to alcohol fuels, economics of molasses to ethanol in India, and production of lactic acid from renewable resources. the final session contained papers on such subjects as bioluminescent detection of contaminants in soils, characterization of petroleum contaminated soils in coral atolls in the south Pacific, and landfill management for methane generation and emission control.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The investigation of die-pressing and sintering behavior of ITP CP-Ti and Ti-6Al-4V powders  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigated the die-pressing and sintering behavior of the low-cost CP-Ti and Ti-6Al- 4V powders made by the Armstrong Process . The Armstrong powders have an irregular coral like, dendritic morphology, with a dendrite size of approximately 2-5 m. As-received as well as milled powders were uniaxially pressed at designated pressures up to 690 MPa to form disk samples with different aspect ratios. In the studied pressure range, an empirical powder compaction equation was applied to linearize the green density pressure relationship, and powder compaction parameters were obtained. The Armstrong Ti-64 powder exhibited a significantly higher sinterability than the CP-Ti powder. This was explained to be due to the higher diffusivity of V at the sintering temperature. The Ti-64 samples with a green density of 71.0% increased to 99.6% after sintering at 1300oC for 1 hour. An ex-situ technique was used to track the powder morphology change before and after sintering.

Chen, Wei [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Clark, Michael B [ORNL; Nunn, Stephen D [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Blue, Craig A [ORNL; Williams, James C [Ohio State University; Fuller, Brian [International Titanium Powder; Akhtar, Kamal [International Titanium Powder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Terms of Reference Low Profile Groundline Workshops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large whales can be seriously injured or killed by entanglement in fishing gear used in the water off the eastern United States. Entanglement can involve floating rope or lines used to connect pots/traps along the ocean bottom (i.e. groundline). One modification to reduce entanglement in groundline is to lower the profile of groundline to the ocean bottom through the use of sinking/neutrally buoyant line. An alternative gear modification that has been suggested is lowering the profile of groundline to a specified height above the ocean bottom in certain rock, coral or wreck areas where sinking/neutrally buoyant line has been reported to be operationally infeasible. NMFS and others are presently researching “low profile ” groundline issues. Further information is needed on various aspects including what is know about prey distribution, as well as large whale distribution and behaviour, to help assist in discussions regarding “low profile ” groundline. Further specifics are needed on areas and circumstances that make the use of sinking/neutrally buoyant groundline not operationally feasible. Research updates and suggestions on the methods for reducing the profile of groundline are also needed. NMFS has stated previously that considerations for “low profile ” line

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)  

SciTech Connect

There is an ongoing disagreement regarding the aging of the shortfin mako due to a difference of interpretation in the periodic deposition of vertebral growth band pairs, especially for the larger size classes. Using analysis of length-month information, tagging data, and length-frequency analysis, concluded that two band pairs were formed in the vertebral centrum every year (biannual band-pair interpretation). Cailliet et al. (1983), however, presented growth parameters based on the common assumption that one band pair forms annually (annual band-pair interpretation). Therefore, growth rates obtained by Pratt & Casey (1983) were twice that of Cailliet et al. (1983) and could lead to age discrepancies of about 15 years for maximum estimated ages on the order of 30 from the annual band-pair interpretation. Serious consequences in the population dynamics could occur for this species if inputs are based on an invalid age interpretation. The latest Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Highly Migratory Species (HMS), for example, adopted the biannual band pair deposition hypothesis because it apparently fit the observed growth patterns best (Pacific Fishery Management Council 2003). However, the ongoing uncertainty about the aging of the shortfin mako was acknowledged and it was recommended that an endeavor to resolve this issue be made. Since 1983, five additional studies on the age and growth of the shortfin mako have been conducted (Chan 2001, Campana et al. 2002, Hsu 2003, Ribot-Carballal et al. 2005, Bishop et al. 2006). Using Marginal Increment Ratio (MIR), Hsu (2003) indicated the formation of annual translucent bands from July to September in western North Pacific Ocean shortfin makos. Using Marginal Increment Analysis (MIA) Ribot-Carballal et al. (2005) supported the annual band-pair interpretation for 109 shortfin makos collected in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Although the study provided support for annual band-pair deposition, no statistical test was performed and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for otoliths, bivalves and corals. In the same study by Campana et al. (2002), a single vertebra fro

Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

416

Application of coiled-tubing-drilling technology on a deep underpressured gas reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper-Mississippian Elkton formation is a dolomitized shallow-water carbonate consisting of dense limestones and porous dolomites. The Elkton was deposited in an open-shelf environment as crinoid grainstones, coral packstones, and lime muds. Deposition of impermeable shales and siltstones of the Lower Cretaceous created the lateral and updip seals. Reservoir thickness can be up to 20 m, with porosities reaching 20% and averaging 10%. The reservoir gas contains approximately 0.5% hydrogen sulfide. Well 11-18 was to be completed in the Harmatten Elkton pool. The pool went on production in 1967 at an initial pressure of 23,500 kPa. At the current pressure of 16,800 kPa, the remaining reserves are underpressured at 6.5 kPa/m, and underbalanced horizontal drilling was selected as the most suitable technique for exploiting remaining reserves. Coiled-tubing (CT) technology was selected to ensure continuous underbalanced conditions and maintain proper well control while drilling. The paper describes the equipment, CT drilling summary, and drilling issues.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Independent verification of plutonium decontamination on Johnston Atoll (1992--1996)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Field Command, Defense Special Weapons Agency (FCDSWA) (formerly FCDNA) contracted Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section (ETS) to conduct an independent verification (IV) of the Johnston Atoll (JA) Plutonium Decontamination Project by an interagency agreement with the US Department of Energy in 1992. The main island is contaminated with the transuranic elements plutonium and americium, and soil decontamination activities have been ongoing since 1984. FCDSWA has selected a remedy that employs a system of sorting contaminated particles from the coral/soil matrix, allowing uncontaminated soil to be reused. The objective of IV is to evaluate the effectiveness of remedial action. The IV contractor`s task is to determine whether the remedial action contractor has effectively reduced contamination to levels within established criteria and whether the supporting documentation describing the remedial action is adequate. ORNL conducted four interrelated tasks from 1992 through 1996 to accomplish the IV mission. This document is a compilation and summary of those activities, in addition to a comprehensive review of the history of the project.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Wilson, J.E.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Egidi, P.V.; Coleman, R.L.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes  

SciTech Connect

This project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to address environmental research questions specifically related to Alaska?s oil and gas natural resources development. The focus of this project was on the environmental issues associated with allocation of water resources for construction of ice roads and ice pads. Earlier NETL projects showed that oil and gas exploration activities in the U.S. Arctic require large amounts of water for ice road and ice pad construction. Traditionally, lakes have been the source of freshwater for this purpose. The distinctive hydrological regime of northern lakes, caused by the presence of ice cover and permafrost, exerts influence on lake water availability in winter. Lakes are covered with ice from October to June, and there is often no water recharge of lakes until snowmelt in early June. After snowmelt, water volumes in the lakes decrease throughout the summer, when water loss due to evaporation is considerably greater than water gained from rainfall. This balance switches in August, when air temperature drops, evaporation decreases, and rain (or snow) is more likely to occur. Some of the summer surface storage deficit in the active layer and surface water bodies (lakes, ponds, wetlands) is recharged during this time. However, if the surface storage deficit is not replenished (for example, precipitation in the fall is low and near?surface soils are dry), lake recharge is directly affected, and water availability for the following winter is reduced. In this study, we used snow fences to augment fresh water supplies in shallow arctic lakes despite unfavorable natural conditions. We implemented snow?control practices to enhance snowdrift accumulation (greater snow water equivalent), which led to increased meltwater production and an extended melting season that resulted in lake recharge despite low precipitation during the years of the experiment. For three years (2009, 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the ?baseline? conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake?s hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift?generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open?water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21?29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS) for Water Resources Planning and Management." The results

Stuefer, Svetlana

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Integrated reservoir study of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is the development of a reservoir characterization of the Appleton Oil Field, Escambia County, Alabama, using petrophysical data, reservoir performance data and reservoir simulation. Appleton Field is comprised of two producing zones, the "Smackover" and the "Reef," which, as the names imply, are presumed to be separate and distinct geological sequences. In particular, the previous work of several authors delineated a marked difference in these zones based on the quality of the reservoir rocks and their productivity. In one particular study of the Appleton Field, the authors utilized only two wells in their analysis. In contrast, our study involves the use of all five producing wells in the field. The data available for these five wells confirms the differences in reservoir quality between the "Smackover" and the "Reef" producing intervals, although such differences vary from well to well. In this study we also provide a detailed description of Appleton Field using production data analysis and reservoir simulation, both of which reveal possible untapped oil reserves. The volumes of oil in place obtained from our analyses exceed those reported in literature for this field. However, the previous literature noted specifically a possible underestimation of the reported oil in place and the use of infill drilling to exploit these untapped resources The original oil in place (OOIP) using production data was estimated to be 78.8 million STB, which exceeds the reported value of 3.8 million STB by more than a factor of 20. An average recovery factor of 3.4 percent (using production to date) was calculated using the estimated ultimate recovery (or EUR) technique. This result is much lower than the 68 percent reported in literature. The history matched reservoir simulation model utilized an oil-in-place of 11.84 million STB and we obtained a recovery factor of 23 percent (using production to date). We recognize this extremely large variation in computed in-place volume, and it is our contention that an aquifer system is providing this "extra" energy (hence, extra volume). The energy from the aquifer appears to be provided in the form of fluid expansion and water influx (i.e., the production data show no clear "water influx" signal). Based on the variation of OOIP computed from our analysis, we have estimated a lower limit of 5 million STB and an upper limit of 30 million STB OOIP, and we believe that the true OOIP lies somewhere in between (most likely on the order of 20 million STB of oil). Resolution of this issue will require additional data. In particular, we require pressure data to calibrate the simulation, as well as the well performance analysis. We would also like to have a modern fluid sample (oil) made available for a complete PVT analysis.

Chijuka, Ekene F

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: Carbon Storage - Small-Scale Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Scale Field Tests Small-Scale Field Tests Carbon Storage Small-Scale Field Tests The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting a number of small-scale field tests (injection of less than 500,000 million metric tons of CO2 per year) to explore various geologic CO2 storage opportunities within the United States and portions of Canada. DOE's small-scale field test efforts are designed to demonstrate that regional reservoirs have the capability to store thousands of years of CO2 emissions and provide the basis for larger volume, commercial-scale CO2 tests. The field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The data gathered during these small-scale tests provides valuable information regarding specific formations that have historically not been evaluated for the purpose of CO2 storage. The Carbon Storage Program strategy includes an established set of field test objectives applicable to the small-scale projects:

422

Results of the first two seasons of underwater surveys at Episkopi Bay and Akrotiri, Cyprus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the summers of 2003 and 2004, a small team of graduate students initiated an underwater archaeological survey off the coast of Cyprus as part of the University of Cincinnati excavations at Episkopi-Bamboula. With the support of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology (INA) at Texas A&M University and RPM Nautical Foundation, the project explored the seabed south and west of the Akrotiri Peninsula at Episkopi Bay. The overall aim of this ongoing diachronic survey is to determine the extent and nature of maritime contacts at Episkopi-Bamboula and its Greco-Roman successor, Kourion, from the Bronze Age through the Byzantine period. Efforts during these first two seasons concentrated on simple visual inspection of several promising areas near dangerous cliffs, offshore rocks and shallow reefs, as well as potential harbors and anchorages. The team recorded substantial pottery and anchor assemblages at Dreamer?s Bay, Cape Zevgari, and Avdimou Bay, including at least three shipwreck sites. Throughout the area, amphoras and anchors attest to varying levels of maritime activity over the past three millennia.The underwater material record reveals a modest level of Classical trade, followed by a respectable increase during the Hellenistic era. While very little material thus far can be attributed to the earlier Imperial centuries, the greatest quantities in terms of both individual sherds and coherent assemblages speaks strongly to intense trade during the Late Roman (Early Byzantine) period, from the fourth through the seventh century. Not surprisingly, this rapid floruit in maritime trade parallels the expansion of settlement throughout the island, including its eventual collapse in the middle of the seventh century.

Leidwanger, Justin Ryan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Dolomitization and dedolomitization models in a fractured reservoir, Reed City oil field, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production in the Michigan basin is essentially from pinnacle reefs or fractured reservoirs. The epigenetically formed porous dolomite reservoir rock is intimately related to the shear faults (channelways for rising high Mg/Ca ratio fluids) and to the resulting shear folds, the latter showing dolomite/calcite ratios increasing generally from outer closure to the fold axes. The Reed City field (anticline) of western Michigan represents a dramatic exception to this picture with the dolomite/calcite ratio increasing from outer closure to maximum part way up the limbs then decreasing to the axis. This lowest zone is the only unit not dedolomitized, a fact perhaps commensurate with its low stratigraphic position at the bottom of (and apparently beyond the reach of) the descending high-calcium, low-magnesium waters what brought about the dedolomitization. The dedolomitization model would call for a shallow water to exposed oxidizing environment, possible with the position of this area astride the West Michigan Barrier that separates a lagoonal facies from a more open sea facies to the east. Thus, waters with a high Ca/Mg ratio passed down the same shear faults that earlier were channelways for the rising high Mg/Ca ratio waters. On the bases of isopach, structure and dolomite/calcite (Isodol) maps, one can piece together a reasonably chronological sequence of pre-Dundee shear faulting and folding, post-Traverse upward migration of dolomitizing fluids, upward migration of hydrocarbons along the shear faults, downward-moving dedolomitizing fluids, and a later episode of faulting (especially shear cross-faults).

Carlton, R.R.; Prouty, C.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Influence and evolution: the development of the batten lug sail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With its ease of reefing, subtle control, and unmatched ability to generate thrust effectively in both severe and minimal weather, the Chinese batten lug is perhaps one of the most sophisticated sails in history. However, its development remains unclear, as its relatively sudden appearance in the iconographic record as a mature technology, and its seeming lack of affinity to other Chinese sails, gives no indication of a regional evolution. An analysis of the batten lug suggests that it likely descended from some simpler sail. As it is separated from the most rudimentary square rig by several key features, the batten lug's development probably occurred in an incremental, or stepwise, fashion. But, no intermediate form representing such progression of the batten lug has yet been discovered in China, or even in the greater Pacific basin. An examination of iconographic evidence from India and the western reaches of the Roman Empire, however, suggests that sails bearing battens or possessing lug morphology existed in these regions prior to the emergence of the batten lug in China. The question therefore arises whether it is possible that these sails were ancestral to, or in some way influenced the development of, the more sophisticated Chinese sail. In an attempt to answer this question, this thesis considers the significance of diffusion as a mechanism for the dispersal of ideas, both today and in antiquity. It also presents a review of the numerous artifacts and textual accounts that suggest commercial and cultural exchange occurred between the Roman Empire, India and China during the Imperial and early Medieval periods. As a result of these evaluations, it seems possible, and even probable, that the technologies of these regions influenced each other. Considering this possibility, the likely evolution of the batten lug, and the distribution of potentially ancestral forms, this thesis concludes that the development of the batten lug in China may indeed have been influenced or inspired by the sails of India and the western Roman Empire.

Kane, Timothy Joseph

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Permian Basin, strata of Leonardian age typically consist of interbedded carbonates and siliciclastics interpreted to be turbidite deposits. Happy Spraberry Field produces from a 100-foot thick carbonate section in the Lower Clear Fork Formation (Lower Leonardian) on the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. Reservoir facies include oolitic- to-skeletal grainstones and packstones, rudstones and in situ Tubiphytes bindstones. Depositional environments vary from open marine reefs to shallow marine oolitic shoal mounds. Best reservoir rocks are found in the oolitic-skeletal packstones. Diagenesis occurred in several phases and includes (1) micritization, (2) stabilization of skeletal fragments, (3) recrystallization of lime mud, (4) intense and selective dissolution, (5) precipitation of four different stages of calcite cement, (6) mechanical compaction, (7) late formation of anhydrite and (8) saddle dolomite and (9) replacement by chalcedony. Oomoldic porosity is the dominant pore type in oolitic grainstones and packstones. Incomplete dissolution of some ooids left ring-shaped structures that indicate ooids were originally bi-mineralic. Bacterial sulfate reduction is suggested by the presence of (1) dissolved anhydrite, (2) saddle dolomite, (3) late-stage coarse-calcite cement and (4) small clusters of pyrite. Diagenetic overprinting on depositional porosity is clearly evident in all reservoir facies and is especially important in the less-cemented parts of the oolitic grainstones where partially-dissolved ooids were subjected to mechanical compaction resulting in "eggshell" remnants. Pore filling by late anhydrite is most extensive in zones where dissolution and compaction were intense. Finally, a porosity-permeability model was constructed to present variations in oolitic packstone- rudstone-bindstone reservoir rocks. The poroperm model could not be applied to oolitic grainstone intervals because no consistent trends in the spatial distribution of porosity and permeability were identified. Routine core analysis did not produce any reliable value of water saturation (Sw). An attempt to take advantage of wireline log data indicates that the saturation exponent (n) may be variable in this reservoir.

Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Facies, depositional environments, and reservoir properties of the Shattuck sandstone, Mesa Queen Field and surrounding areas, southeastern New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Guadalupian age Queen Formation was deposited in back-reef environments on a carbonate platform of the Northwest Shelf (Permian Basin, New Mexico, USA) during a lowstand of sea level. At Mesa Queen Field, the Shattuck Sandstone is a sheet-like sand body that averages 30 ft (9.1 m) in thickness. The Shattuck Sandstone includes deposits of four major siliciclastic environments: (1) fluvial sandflats, (2) eolian sand sheets, (3) inland sabkhas, and (4) marine-reworked eolian sands. Fluvial sandflat deposits are further subdivided into sheetflood, wadi plain, and river-mouth deposits. Dolomites, evaporites, and siliciclastics that formed in adjacent coastal sabkha and lagoonal environments bound the Shattuck Sandstone from above and below. The Shattuck Sandstone is moderately- to well-sorted, very fine-grained subarkose, with a mean grain size of 98 ?m (3.55?). Eolian sand sheet, wadi plain, and marine-reworked eolian facies comprise the productive reservoir intervals. Reservoir quality reflects intragranular and intergranular secondary porosity formed by partial dissolution of labile feldspar grains, and pore-filling anhydrite and dolomite cements. Vertical successions and regional facies patterns support previous interpretations that these deposits formed during a sea-level lowstand and early stages of the subsequent transgression. Facies patterns across the shelf indicate fluvial sandflats prograded over coastal and continental sabkhas, and eolian sand deposition became more common during sea-level fall and lowstand. During subsequent transgression, eolian sediments in the upper portion of the Shattuck Sandstone were reworked as coastal and lagoon environments became reestablished on the inner carbonate platform.

Haight, Jared

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tracing early breccia pipe studies, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico: A study of the documentation available and decision-making during the early years of WIPP  

SciTech Connect

Breccia pipes in southeastern New Mexico are local dissolution-collapse features that formed over the Capitan reef more than 500,000 years ago. During early site studies for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the threat to isolation by these features was undetermined. Geophysical techniques, drilling, and field mapping were used beginning in 1976 to study breccia pipes. None were found at the WIPP site, and they are considered unlikely to be a significant threat even if undetected. WIPP documents related to breccia pipe studies were assembled, inspected, and analyzed, partly to present a history of these studies. The main objective is to assess how well the record reflects the purposes, results, and conclusions of the studies from concept to decision-making. The main record source was the Sandia WIPP Central File (SWCF). Early records (about 1975 to 1977) are very limited, however, about details of objectives and plans predating any investigation. Drilling programs from about 1977 were covered by a broadly standardized statement of work, field operations plan, drilling history, and basic data report. Generally standardized procedures for peer, management, and quality assurance review were developed during this time. Agencies such as the USGS conducted projects according to internal standards. Records of detailed actions for individual programs may not be available, though a variety of such records were found in the SWCF. A complete written record cannot be reconstructed. With persistence, a professional geologist can follow individual programs, relate data to objectives (even if implied), and determine how conclusions were used in decision-making. 83 refs.

Power, D.W. [HC 12, Anthony, TX (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Oil and gas developments in New York in 1981  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, there were 646 wells completed in New York. This figure is partly estimated. In existing fields, 107 oil and 450 gas wells were completed. The results of exploratory drilling included 12 new gas field discoveries, 4 new gas pool discoveries, 3 deeper pool discoveries, 1 shallower pool discovery, and 36 extensions to existing gas fields. Two Medina Sandstone discoveries were made in Allegany County, Nine Devonian black shale wells were completed in western New York. An Onondaga reef discovery was made in Cattaraugus County. Three Trenton Limestone discoveries were made in central New York. Arco completed a dry hole in eastern New York near the Eastern Overthrust area. A significant oil discovery from the Bass islands zone below the Onondaga Limestone was made in eastern Chautauqua County. Thirty-five extensions to Medina Sandstone gas fields were completed in 1981. There was also 1 extension to the Houghton, Marcellus black shale gas field. In all, 8 Devonian black shale discoveries, 8 Silurian Medina Sandstone discoveries, and 3 Ordovician Trenton Limestone discoveries were made in New York during 1981. Oil production in 1981 was 848,969 bbl and gas production amounted to 19,000 mmcf. The price for New York stripper crude was $38.00/bbl on January 1, 1981, and ended the year at $35.00/bbl. Wellhead gas prices ranged up to $3.18/mcf. Drilling for Medina Sandstone gas production and Devonian black shale gas production will continue. However, it is expected that overall drilling will decline due to a softening in crude oil prices and an oversupply of gas. Federal government approval of leasing and drilling for gas in Lake Erie has still not been forthcoming.

Van Tyne, A.M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A dose assessment for a U.S. nuclear test site -- Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. Here the authors provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 and strontium-90 to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The estimated maximum annual effective dose is 4.4 mSv y{sup {minus}1} when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 10 cSv, 14 cSv, and 16 cSv, respectively. An analysis of interindividual variability in 0- to 30-y expected integral dose indicates that 95% of Bikini residents would have expected doses within a factor of 3.4 above and 4.8 below the population-average value. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {+-}35% of its expected value. The authors have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to less than 10% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

An updated dose assessment for a U.S. Nuclear Test Site - Bikini Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On March 1, 1954, a nuclear weapon test, code-named BRAVO, conducted at Bikini Atoll in the northern Marshall Islands contaminated the major residence island. There has been a continuing effort since 1977 to refine dose assessments for resettlement options at Bikini Atoll. Here we provide a radiological dose assessment for the main residence island, Bikini, using extensive radionuclide concentration data derived from analysis of food crops, ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, animals, air, and soil collected at Bikini Island as part of our continuing research and monitoring program that began in 1975. The unique composition of coral soil greatly alters the relative contribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) to the total estimated dose relative to expectations based on North American and European soils. Without counter measures, cesium-137 produces 96% of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake from the soil to terrestrial food crops but also from external gamma exposure. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1999. The estimated maximum annual effective dose for current island conditions is 4.0 mSv when imported foods, which are now an established part of the diet, are available. The corresponding 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 9.1 cSv, 13 cSv, and 15 cSv, respectively. A corresponding uncertainty analysis showed that after about 5 y of residence, the 95% confidence limits on population-average dose would be {plus_minus}35% of its expected value. We have evaluated various countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs in food crops. Treatment with potassium reduces the uptake of {sup 137}Cs into food crops, and therefore the ingestion dose, to about 5% of pretreatment levels and has essentially no negative environmental consequences.

Robison, W.L.; Bogen, K.T.; Conrado, C.L.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

432

Prehistoric jewelry of the NAN Ranch Ruin (LA15049), Grant County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jewelry from the NAN Ranch Ruin (A.D. 600/650-1140), southwestern New Mexico, is analyzed with the following research goals: to describe the physical properties of the jewelry, to provide a contextual analysis in the form of mortuary and spatial patterning, and to interpret the social and ceremonial roles that jewelry played for the Mimbres at the NAN Ruin. Comparative data are provided, when available, from additional sites in the Mimbres Valley and the greater Southwest. The jewelry from the NAN Ruin is of two main material types, marine shell and stone. The most common jewelry types made from these materials are beads, pendants, and bracelets. In total, 1,970 individual pieces of marine shell jewelry, both whole and fragmentary, were recovered from the site. These materials include unidentified white shell, unidentified shell, Glycymeris, Nassarius, Pecten, Haliotis, Spondylus, Olivella, Conus, Coral, Strombus, Turritella, Architectonicidae, and Columbella. The majority of the marine shell originated in the Gulf of California. Shell jewelry was likely imported into the NAN Ranch Ruin from the Hohokam, who controlled the trade of marine shell throughout the region. In total, 10, 185 individual items of stone jewelry and materials, whole and fragmentary, were present at the NAN Ruin. These materials include talc, kaolinite, turquoise, galena, unidentified stone, quartz, slate, malachite, hematite, limestone, pumice, rhyolite, copper, jadeite, and basalt. All of these materials were available locally or within a short distance from the Mimbres Valley. A little over a quarter of the mortuary population (28.1%) at the NAN Ranch Ruin was associated with jewelry. Based on the application of two statistical tests, binomial distribution and factor analysis, there is no strong evidence that the presence of jewelry in the mortuary record is indicative of particular social categories, lineage affiliations, or vertical social stratification. The association of jewelry with specific architectural features, as well as cached deposits, indicate that jewelry was included in non-mortuary ceremonial contexts. Ethnographic data supports this archaeological inference.

Parks-Barrett, Maria Shannon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Seasonal isotope and trace-metal profiles of serially-sampled Conus gastropods: proxies for paleoenvironmental change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We test the fidelity of shallow-water gastropod skeletons as multi-proxy archives of seasonal paleo-environmental change by performing isotopic and trace-metal analyses on specimens of Conus ermineus from the Gulf of Mexico. Four adult specimens were collected from Stetson Bank in the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary during the summer of 2002. Shell samples were milled along axes of growth to produce time-series profiles spanning up to eight years. We corrected the profiles for growth rate effects and compared the tuned results with in situ temperature and salinity records at the reef surface and temperature profiles from nearby surface buoys. Examination of sample densities in ?18O cycles shows that shell growth is faster during summers and slower during winters. Tuning the profiles versus time yields ?18O values that co-vary closely with seasonal temperatures to a high degree of coherency (R2 = 0.84). The ?13C profiles show cyclic variation modified by ontogenetic decreases in ?13C. These ontogenetic trends are attributable to decreasing metabolic efficiency, while seasonal cycles reflect hydrographic changes in the gastropodsÂ? habitat. Salinity and ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon show a strong correlation at Stetson Bank (R2 = 0.80), and early summer shell ?13C minima coincide with local salinity minima during times of peak river discharge. The terminations of these ?13C minima occur during annual upcoast reversals of shelf currents in this area. These effects are augmented by summer stratification and productivity minima that further decrease seawater ?13C. Sr/Ca ratios increase through ontogeny, most likely due to decreasing metabolic efficiency. However, seasonal variations in Sr/Ca profiles show strong similarity with ?18O profiles, confirming the temperature dependence of Sr/Ca and minimal influence of salinity on shell ?18O at Stetson Bank. The results of this study show that tuned ?18O and Sr/Ca profiles can be used to reconstruct seasonal paleotemperatures. Carbon isotope profiles and environmental data also demonstrate the utility of Conus ?13C as a proxy for freshwater flux and shelf circulation.

Gentry, David Keith

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Lithologic characteristics, depositional environments and geometries of reservoir and nonreservoir facies in the Queen Formation (Guadalupian, Permian) of Moose and Virey Fields, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Queen Formation is a member of the Artesia Group, which is a sequence of intermingling carbonates, classics and evaporates that were deposited during Guadalupian (Permian) time across the Northwest Shelf, Central Basin Platform, and Midland Basin of the Permian Basin, west Texas and southeastern New Mexico. In Moose and Virey Fields, the Queen is the main producing formation and consists entirely of intercepted back-reef shelf elastics and evaporates which were deposited in a variety of continental desert and marginal marine settings. The Queen desert was a broad and generally low-relief surface transected by warm temperatures, semi-arid climate, scarce vegetation, and alternating periods of dryness and intense storm-induced flashflooding. Sedimentation within the Queen desert took place in six separate depositional environments. The elastics of Moose and Virey Fields were deposited in proximal fluvial sandflat and fluvial-dominated sabra environments, and along the edge of a shallow hypersaline lagoon. The anhydrides (formerly gypsum) were precipitated subaqueously on the floor of and in the subsurface beneath a broad and shallow, hypersaline lagoon which was characterized by poor circulation and restriction from the normal marine environment. Some halides formed subaqueously in a large, but very shallow, isolated inland saliva situated in the topographic lows of the desert sabkha. Other halides formed in an ephemeral and sometimes desiccated salt-pan environment which was subjected to alternating 'wet' and 'dry' conditions. It is believed that the progression of depositional environments across the study area was in part controlled by fourth- and fifth-order relative sea level fluctuations during a major third-order marine regression. Two large subsurface structural collapse features with at least 200 feet of vertical relief are located in the central portions of Moose and Virey Fields. The collapse of the Queen Formation in these areas was induced by the post-depositional and post-burial dissolution of the halides primarily of the underlying Grayburg Formation, and to a lesser extent of the Queen Formation. It apparently occurred as a series of minor collapse events which first began in Post-oueen Guadalupian time, during deposition of the lower Seven Rivers Formation, and finally ended in the Ochoan during deposition of the Rustler Anhydrite.

Aller, Gregory Shane

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Assessing Morphometric and Otolith Measurements of Red Snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, to Characterize a Recreational Headboat Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico's Exclusive Economic Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a highly targeted species, red snapper have been overfished since the 1970’s. Inadequate monitoring and reporting of discard rates impedes regulatory measures which are in place to allow red snapper populations to reach a healthy, sustainable level. This study documented the relationship between morphometric measurements and otolith analysis of red snapper caught from a recreational headboat fishing exclusively in the GOM’s EEZ of the upper Texas coast. The collected data of this research show that of the 594 red snapper caught within the sample group, 76% of the fish were discarded; analysis of the lengths of these discarded fish show that 15.5% were of regulation size (16 inches) or larger, clear evidence that high-grading is occurring. The effort for the total amount of red snapper caught by each individual angler within the sample group was measured to determine on average, approximately two red snapper were caught per person, per hour. The size distribution ranged from 16 to 32 inches with a mean total length of 21.32 inches for retained fish while discarded fish ranged from 5.5 to 22.5 inches with a mean of 14.23. Weight distribution ranged from 1.5 to 18.5 pounds with a mean of 5.81 pounds for retained fish and 0.20 to 6 pounds with a mean of 1.57 pounds for discarded fish. Age distribution ranged from 3 to 14 years of age; red snapper can live over 50 years, however relatively none (2.42%) older than 10 years were present in the sample, demonstrating a highly truncated population. Because fecundancy increases with age in females, longevity extends reproduction potential for red snapper. Management of reef fishes, and red snapper in particular, are difficult due to variances in growth rates and habitat use, complex population structure, and increasing reproduction levels with maturity. Recommendations for management include implementing an educational outreach program, reducing effort and discard rates, lowing rates of exploitation, and creating a marine reserve. Future research should address the entire Texas coast population of for-hire vessels (charter and headboats) to obtain data on discard rates and age distribution of red snapper.

Carrillo, Nicole Amber

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Venting and Rapid Recompression Increase Survival and Improve Recovery for Red Snapper with Barotrauma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, are the most economically important reef fish in the Gulf of Mexico. Population assessments that began in the mid-1980’s found red snapper to be severely overfished and lead to extensive regulations and harvest restrictions. As a result of these regulations many fish that are captured must be released and are known as regulatory discards. Red snapper live deep in the water column and when captured and rapidly brought to the surface they often suffer pressure-related injuries collectively known as barotrauma. These injuries include a distended abdomen and stomach eversion from the buccal cavity. High mortality of discards due to barotrauma injuries impedes recovery of the fishery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two techniques designed to minimize barotrauma-related mortality: venting and rapid recompression. In laboratory experiments using hyperbaric chambers, I assessed sublethal effects of barotrauma and subsequent survival rates of red snapper after single and multiple simulated capture events from pressures corresponding to 30 and 60 m. I evaluated the use of rapid recompression and venting to increase survival and improve recovery indices, including the ability to evade a simulated predator. A condition index of impairment, the barotrauma reflex (BtR) score, was used to assess sublethal external barotrauma injuries, reflex responses, and behavioral responses. Greater capture depths resulted in higher BtR scores (more impairment). Non-vented fish had higher BtR scores than vented fish after both single and multiple decompression events. All fish in vented treatments from 30 and 60 m depths had 100% survival after a single capture event. Non-vented fish had 67% survival after decompression from 30 m and 17% survival from 60 m. Behaviorally, non-vented fish showed greater difficulty achieving an upright orientation upon release and less ability to evade a simulated predator than vented fish. Rapid recompression also greatly improved survival compared to surface-released fish with 96% of all rapidly recompressed fish surviving. These results clearly show that venting or rapid recompression can be effective tools for alleviating barotrauma symptoms, improving predator evasion after a catch-and-release event, and increasing survival. Fisheries managers should encourage the use of either of these two techniques to aid in the recovery of this important fishery.

Drumhiller, Karen L

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Design and history matching of a waterflood/miscible CO? flood model of a mature field: the Wellman Unit, West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wellman Unit is located in Terry County, West Texas. It is a Wolfcamp massive limestone reef. The reservoir is considered geologically unique due to the double cone-shape structure with a maximum closure of 825 feet above the OWOC. Three stages of depletion occurred over 50 years of production: 1) Primary depletion under a combination of solution gas drive and bottom water drive 2) Secondary recovery was initiated in 1979 via water injection into the flank of the reservoir and 3) CO? miscible injection was implemented in three wells on top of the structure in 1983. In this research, production and reservoir data was revised and integrated to develop a full field, 3-D, black oil simulation model. The primary objective was to reproduce via history matching, the historical performance of the reservoir under primary, secondary and tertiary stages of depletion. A secondary objective was developing a calibrated model that can be used to evaluate, design and plan future reservoir management decisions. To accomplish this task, a reservoir model was built that honors the structural configuration of the reservoir. A flexible grid system comprised of 16,767 grid blocks was built based on corner point - non orthogonal geometry. During the matching process, parameters were ranked according to uncertainty. The most uncertain parameter was the transmissibility and physical size of the under-lying aquifer system. Finally, the pseudo-miscible option based on the Todd and Longstaff theory was implemented as a modification to model behavior of the CO? miscible flood. The results can be summarized by the following: 1) History matching the primary depletion stage was satisfactory. 2) Extensive aquifer tuning was required to maintain sufficient reservoir pressure for CO? injection and match the field data during the waterflooding phase. 3) A complete pressure match was achieved through primary depletion, waterflooding and CO? injection, however the match on liquid production rate was compromised in order to tune the final pressure match from 1986-1995. The results of this work provide a foundation for future research into this hydraulically complicated reservoir. Once the complete calibrated model has been built, the simulation can be used to forecast future operations like blow-down or gas storage.

Rojas Barile, Jose Humberto

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Reservoir compaction of the Belridge Diatomite and surface subsidence, south Belridge field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Surface subsidence due to reservoir compaction during production has been observed in many large oil fields. Subsidence is most obvious in coastal and offshore fields where inundation by the sea occurs. Well-known examples are Wilmington field in California and Ekofisk field in the North Sea. In South Belridge field, the Belridge Diatomite member of the late Miocene Reef Ridge Shale has proven prone to compaction during production. The reservoir, a high-porosity, low-permeability, highly compressive rock composed largely of diatomite and mudstone, is about 1,000 ft thick and lies at an average depth of 1,600 ft. Within the Belridge Diatomite, reservoir compaction due to withdrawal of oil and water in Sec. 12, T28S, R20E, MDB and M, was noticed after casing failures in producing wells began occurring and tension cracks, enlarged by hydrocompaction after a heavy rainstorm were observed. Surface subsidence in Sec. 12 has been monitored since April 1987, through the surveying of benchmark monuments. The average annualized subsidence rate during 1987 was {minus}1.86 ft/yr, {minus}0.92 ft/yr during 1988, and {minus}0.65 ft/yr during 1989; the estimated peak subsidence rate reached {minus}7.50 ft/yr in July 1985, after 1.5 yrs of production from the Belridge Diatomite reservoir. Since production from the Belridge Diatomite reservoir commenced in February 1984, the surface of the 160-ac producing area has subsided about 12.5 ft. This equates to an estimated reservoir compaction of 30 ft in the Belridge Diatomite and an average loss of reservoir porosity of 2.4% from 55.2 to 52.8%. Injection of water for reservoir pressure maintenance in the Belridge diatomite began in June 1987, and has been effective in mitigating subsidence to current rates and repressurizing the reservoir to near-initial pressure. An added benefit of water injection has been improved recovery of oil from the Belridge Diatomite by waterflood.

Bowersox, J.R.; Shore, R.A. (Mission Resources, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Reducing Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Using Accelerated Limestone Weathering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following earlier descriptions, the use and impacts of accelerated weathering of limestone AWL; reaction: CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O + CaCO{sub 3} {yields} Ca{sup 2+} + 2(HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) as a CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration method is further explored. Since ready access to the ocean is likely an essential requirement for AWL, it is shown that significant limestone resources are relatively close to a majority of CO{sub 2}-emitting power plants along the coastal US. Furthermore, waste fines, representing more than 20% of current US crushed limestone production (>10{sup 9} tonnes/yr), could be used in many instances as an inexpensive or free source of AWL carbonate. With limestone transportation to coastal sites then as the dominant cost variable, CO{sub 2} sequestration (plus capture) costs of $3-$4/tonne are achievable in certain locations. While there is vastly more limestone and water on earth than that required for AWL to capture and sequester all fossil fuel CO{sub 2} production, the transportation cost of bringing limestone, seawater, and waste CO{sub 2} into contact likely limits the method's applicability to perhaps 10-20% of US point-source emissions. Using a bench-scale laboratory reactor, it is shown that CO{sub 2} sequestration rates of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -5} moles/sec per m{sup 2} of limestone surface area are readily achievable using seawater. This translates into reaction densities as high as 2 x 10{sup -2} tonnes CO{sub 2} m{sup -3}day{sup -1}, highly dependent on limestone particle size, solution turbulence and flow, and CO{sub 2} concentration. Modeling of AWL end-solution disposal in the ocean shows significantly reduced effects on ocean pH and carbonate chemistry relative to those caused by direct CO{sub 2} disposal into the atmosphere or ocean. In fact the increase in ocean Ca{sup 2+} and bicarbonate offered by AWL should significantly enhance the growth of corals and other marine calcifiers whose health is currently being threatened by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} invasion and pH reduction in the ocean.

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tundra coral reefs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigations into the reproductive performance and larval rearing of the Brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, using closed recirculating systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of unilateral eyestalk ablation, diets and sex ratios were evaluated on two wild populations of Farfantepenaeus aztecus in a closed recirculating maturation system. Ovarian development and spawning frequencies of ablated females in both studies were higher than the non-ablated females. Replacement of bloodworms in maturation diet with enriched adult Artemia sp. had no negative effect on the number of eggs spawned and resulted in increased hatch and survival rates from Nauplius I to Zoea I. Life span of ablated females fed enriched Artemia sp. was longer than ablated females fed bloodworms. Replacement of the expensive bloodworm diet component with adult enriched Artemia sp. is possible without negative impact on female reproductive performance. Reducing male to female ratio from 2:1 to 1:1 resulted in a 1.25% decrease in spawning activities of ablated females. The life cycle of pond-raised F1 generation F. aztecus also was completed in the closed recirculating system using unilateral eyestalk ablation as previously described. This study found diets that contained an enriched adult Artemia sp. component performed superior (i.e. hatch rate, nauplii and zoea production) to a diet containing bloodworms. Six consecutive larval rearing trials evaluated changes in select water quality indicators and their effect on growth, survival, and stress tolerance of F. aztecus postlarvae cultured in artificial seawater under closed recirculating and flow-through conditions. The closed recirculating larval rearing system successfully produced five-day-old postlarvae (PL) from Zoea I (Z1) with similar dry weights, lengths and stress resistance to PL produced under standard water exchange practices. The trickling biofilters were found to be a limiting component of this system. A submerged coral biofilter was added to the system and effectively processed culture water for re-use. Addition of the submerged biofilter resulted in improved survival rates in Trials 4, 5 and 6. These studies demonstrate maturation and larval rearing of F. aztecus is feasible in closed recirculating systems. Implementation of these systems in hatcheries bolsters biosecurity while reducing the environmental impact of hatchery effluent. Recirculating and re-use systems are therefore essential in the further development of sustainable hatchery programs for endemic species.

Gandy, Ryan Leighton

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Overview of the design, construction, and operation of interstate liquid petroleum pipelines.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. liquid petroleum pipeline industry is large, diverse, and vital to the nation's economy. Comprised of approximately 200,000 miles of pipe in all fifty states, liquid petroleum pipelines carried more than 40 million barrels per day, or 4 trillion barrel-miles, of crude oil and refined products during 2001. That represents about 17% of all freight transported in the United States, yet the cost of doing so amounted to only 2% of the nation's freight bill. Approximately 66% of domestic petroleum transport (by ton-mile) occurs by pipeline, with marine movements accounting for 28% and rail and truck transport making up the balance. In 2004, the movement of crude petroleum by domestic federally regulated pipelines amounted to 599.6 billion tonmiles, while that of petroleum products amounted to 315.9 billion ton-miles (AOPL 2006). As an illustration of the low cost of pipeline transportation, the cost to move a barrel of gasoline from Houston, Texas, to New York Harbor is only 3 cents per gallon, which is a small fraction of the cost of gasoline to consumers. Pipelines may be small or large, up to 48 inches in diameter. Nearly all of the mainline pipe is buried, but other pipeline components such as pump stations are above ground. Some lines are as short as a mile, while others may extend 1,000 miles or more. Some are very simple, connecting a single source to a single destination, while others are very complex, having many sources, destinations, and interconnections. Many pipelines cross one or more state boundaries (interstate), while some are located within a single state (intrastate), and still others operate on the Outer Continental Shelf and may or may not extend into one or more states. U.S. pipelines are located in coastal plains, deserts, Arctic tundra, mountains, and more than a mile beneath the water's surface of the Gulf of Mexico (Rabinow 2004; AOPL 2006). The network of crude oil pipelines in the United States is extensive. There are approximately 55,000 miles of crude oil trunk lines (usually 8 to 24 inches in diameter) in the United States that connect regional markets. The United States also has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 miles of small gathering lines (usually 2 to 6 inches in diameter) located primarily in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Wyoming, with small systems in a number of other oil producing states. These small lines gather the oil from many wells, both onshore and offshore, and connect to larger trunk lines measuring 8 to 24 inches in diameter. There are approximately 95,000 miles of refined products pipelines nationwide. Refined products pipelines are found in almost every state in the United States, with the exception of some New England states. These refined product pipelines vary in size from relatively small, 8- to 12-inch-diameter lines, to up to 42 inches in diameter. The overview of pipeline design, installation, and operation provided in the following sections is only a cursory treatment. Readers interested in more detailed discussions are invited to consult the myriad engineering publications available that provide such details. The two primary publications on which the following discussions are based are: Oil and Gas Pipeline Fundamentals (Kennedy 1993) and the Pipeline Rules of Thumb Handbook (McAllister 2002). Both are recommended references for additional reading for those requiring additional details. Websites maintained by various pipeline operators also can provide much useful information, as well as links to other sources of information. In particular, the website maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) (http://www.eia.doe.gov) is recommended. An excellent bibliography on pipeline standards and practices, including special considerations for pipelines in Arctic climates, has been published jointly by librarians for the Alyeska Pipeline Service Company (operators of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System [TAPS]) and the Geophysical Institute/International Arctic Research Center, both located in Fairbanks (Barboza and Trebelhorn 2001)

Pharris, T. C.; Kolpa, R. L.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect

Among the accomplishments of this past reporting period are obtaining a complete landgrid for the State of Michigan and the digital processing of the high and medium resolution DEM files. We can now extract lineations from the DEMs automatically using machine algorithms. One tentative result that may be very significant is that we may be seeing manifestations of buried structures in the DEM data. We are looking at a set of extracted lineations in the northern lower peninsula that appear to follow the trend of the pinnacle reefs (Silurian) which had relief approaching 300 feet but are now buried to greater than 3000 feet. We have also extracted the dolomite alteration data from all fields and can show that this is mainly confined to the basin center. It may be related to the paleo-rift suggested by the paleomagnetic and gravity data. As reported last time, the acquisition of a 3D seismic dataset over Stoney Point Field from Marathon Oil Company, is complete and attention is being devoted to incorporating the data into the project database and utilizing it. The surface lineation study is focusing on Stoney Point Field using the high-resolution DEM data and plotting of subsurface formation top data for the main reservoir, the Trenton (Ordovician) Formation. The fault pattern at Stoney Point is well documented by Marathon and we are looking for any manifestations on the surface. The main project database is now about as complete as it will be for this project. The main goals have been met, although the scanning of the paper records will have to continue beyond the scheduled end of the project due to the sheer number of records and the increased donations of data from companies as word spread of the project. One of the unanticipated benefits of the project has been the cooperation of gas and oil companies that are or were active in the Michigan Basin in donating material to the project. Both Michigan Tech and Western Michigan continue to receive donations at an accelerating pace. The data management software developed to handle the data, Atlas, is scheduled to undergo a 3rd revision before the project ends. The goals are to streamline access to the data by improving the display and add several new features, including the ability to turn the landgrid on and off. We may also be able to include the capability to calculate or recalculate footage calls as well. We discovered the reason that some of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan contain high levels of noise and are making one last attempt to acquire a set of good files before the project ends. This will greatly improve the large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) that has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan.

James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Distribution and Ratios of 137Cs and K in Control and K-treated Coconut Trees at Bikini Island where Nuclear Test Fallout Occurred: Effects and Implications  

SciTech Connect

Coconut trees growing on atolls of the Bikini Islands are on the margin of K deficiency because the concentration of exchangeable K in coral soil is very low ranging from only 20 to 80 mg kg{sup -1}. When provided with additional K, coconut trees absorb large quantities of K and this uptake of K significantly alters the patterns of distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the plant. Following a single K fertilization event, mean total K in trunks of K-treated trees is 5.6 times greater than in trunks of control trees. In contrast, {sup 137}Cs concentration in trunks of K-treated and control trees is statistically the same while {sup 137}Cs is significantly lower in edible fruits of K treated trees. Within one year after fertilization (one rainy season), K concentration in soil is back to naturally, low concentrations, however, the tissue concentrations of K in treated trees stays very high internally in the trees for years while {sup 137}Cs concentration in treated trees remains very low in all tree compartments except for the trunk. Potassium fertilization did not change soil Cs availability. Mass balance calculations suggest that the fertilization event increased above ground plant K content by at least a factor of 5 or 2.2 kg. Potassium concentrations and content were higher in all organs of K fertilized trees with the greatest increases seen in organs that receive a portion of tissue K through xylem transport (trunk, fronds and fruit husks) and lowest in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). {sup 137}Cesium concentrations and contents were dramatically lower in all organs of K treated trees with greatest proportional reductions observed in organs supplied predominantly with K via the phloem (palm heart, spathe, coco meat and fluid). All trees remobilize both K and {sup 137}Cs from fronds as they proceed toward senescence. In control trees the reduction in concentration of K and {sup 137}Cs in fronds as they age is logarithmic but K remobilization is linear in K-treated trees where K concentration is high. As a result of K treatment the {sup 137}Cs concentration in K-treated fronds is extremely low and constant with frond age. Fronds of K treated trees contain a greater amount of K than control tree fronds. As they fall to the ground and decay they provide a small continuing pool of K that is about 3% of the natural K in soil under the tree canopy. Results of K and {sup 137}Cs concentration and distribution in control and K-treated coconut trees suggest that the application of K reduces {sup 137}Cs uptake both in the short term immediately following K fertilization and in the long term, after soil K levels have returned to normal but while plant K stores remain high. These results suggests that high internal K concentration and not high soil K is primarily responsible for long-term reduction of {sup 137}Cs in edible fruits, and plays a significant role in limiting further uptake of {sup 137}Cs by roots, and affects allocation of {sup 137}Cs to edible fruits for years. Coconut trees are capable of luxury K accumulation when provided with excess K and in this example the additional K can effectively provide the K requirements of the plant for in excess of 10 years. The reduction of {sup 137}Cs uptake lasts for at least 10 y after K is last applied and greatly reduces the estimated radiation dose to people consuming local tree foods. Effectiveness and duration of K treatment provides important assurances that reduction in {sup 137}Cs is long term and the radiation dose from consuming local plant foods will remain low.

Robison, W L; Brown, P H; Stone, E L; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Kehl, S R

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

An assessment of potential health impacts on Utrok Atoll from exposure to cesium-137 (137Cs) and plutonium  

SciTech Connect

Residual fallout contamination from the nuclear test program in the Marshall Islands is a concern to Marshall Islanders because of the potential health risks associated with exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment. Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been monitoring the amount of fallout radiation delivered to Utrok Atoll residents over the past 4 years. This briefing document gives an outline of our findings from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay monitoring programs. Additional information can be found on the Marshall Islands web site (http://eed.lnl.gov/mi/). Cesium-137 is an important radioactive isotope produced in nuclear detonations and can be taken up from coral soils into locally grown food crop products that form an important part of the Marshallese diet. The Marshall Islands whole body counting program has clearly demonstrated that the majority of Utrok Atoll residents acquire a very small but measurable quantity of cesium-137 in their bodies (Hamilton et al., 2006; Hamilton et. al., 2007a; 2007b;). During 2006, a typical resident of Utrok Atoll received about 3 mrem of radiation from internally deposited cesium-137 (Hamilton et al., 2007a). The population-average dose contribution from cesium-137 is around 2% of the total radiation dose that people normally experience from naturally occurring radiation sources in the Marshall Islands and is thousands of times lower than the level where radiation exposure is known to produce measurable health effects. The existing dose estimates from the whole body counting and plutonium bioassay programs are also well below radiological protection standards for protection of the public as prescribed by U.S. regulators and international agencies including the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claim Tribunal (NCT). Similarly, the level of internally deposited plutonium found in Utrok Atoll residents is well within the range normally expected for people living in the Northern Hemisphere. In addition, the preliminary results of the bioassay program on Utrok Atoll (Hamilton et al., 2007b) provide clear evidence that residents of Utrok Atoll have never acquired a significant uptake of plutonium either through an acute exposure event or from long-term chronic exposure to plutonium in the environment. This information and data should provide a level of assurance to the Utrok Atoll population group and its leadership that the dose contribution from exposure to residual radioactive fallout contamination on Utrok Atoll is very low, and is not likely to have any discernible impact on human health. We also estimate that the dose contribution based on current radiological exposure conditions will not produce any additional cancer fatalities (or any other measurable health condition) above that normally expected to arise in a population group of similar size. The potential risks from any genetic illnesses caused by exposure to residual fallout contamination in the environment will be even lower still. In conclusion, the data and information developed from the radiological protection monitoring program on Utrok appear to support a consensus that it is safe to live on Utrok Atoll. The health risks from exposure to residual fallout contamination on the atoll are minimal when compared with other lifetime risks that people normally experience, and are very small when compared to the threshold where radiation health effects could be either medically diagnosed in an individual or epidemiologically discerned in a group of people.

Hamilton, T

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Individual Radiation Protection Monitoring in the Marshall Islands: Enewetak Atoll (2002-2004)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) has recently implemented a series of strategic initiatives to address long-term radiological surveillance needs at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands. The plan is to engage local atoll communities in developing shared responsibilities for implementing radiation protection monitoring programs for resettled and resettling populations in the northern Marshall Islands. Using the pooled resources of the U.S. DOE and local atoll governments, individual radiological surveillance programs have been developed in whole body counting and plutonium urinalysis in order to accurately assess radiation doses resulting from the ingestion and uptake of fallout radionuclides contained in locally grown foods. Permanent whole body counting facilities have been established at three separate locations in the Marshall Islands including Enewetak Island (Figure 1) (Bell et al., 2002). These facilities are operated and maintained by Marshallese technicians with scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) providing on-going technical support services. Bioassay samples are collected under controlled conditions and analyzed for plutonium isotopes at the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at LLNL using state-of-the art measurement technologies. We also conduct an on-going environmental monitoring and characterization program at selected sites in the northern Marshall Islands. The aim of the environmental program is to determine the level and distribution of important fallout radionuclides in soil, water and local foods with a view towards providing more accurate and updated dose assessments, incorporating knowledge of the unique behaviors and exposure pathways of fallout radionuclides in coral atoll ecosystems. These scientific studies have also been essential in helping guide the development of remedial options used in support of island resettlement. Together, the individual and environmental radiological surveillance programs are helping meet the informational needs of the U.S. DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Our updated environmental assessments provide a strong scientific basis for predicting future change in exposure conditions especially in relation to changes in lifestyle, diet and/or land-use patterns. This information has important implications in addressing questions about existing (and future) radiological conditions on the islands, in determining the cost and estimating the effectiveness of potential remedial measures, and in general policy support considerations. Perhaps most importantly, the recently established individual radiological surveillance programs provide affected atoll communities with an unprecedented level of radiation protection monitoring where, for the first time, local resources are being made available to monitor resettled and resettling populations on a continuous basis. As a hard copy supplement to Marshall Islands Program website (http://eed.llnl.gov/mi/), this document provides an overview of the individual radiation protection monitoring program established for the Enewetak Atoll population group along with a full disclosure of all verified measurement data (2002-2004). Readers are advised that an additional feature of the associated web site is a provision where users are able calculate and track doses delivered to volunteers (de-identified information only) participating in the Marshall Islands Radiological Surveillance Program.

Hamilton, T F; Kehl, S; Hickman, D; Brown, T; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R; Johannes, K; Henry, D

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC AND GENETIC TOOLS FOR FOXTAIL MILLET, AND USE OF THESE TOOLS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF BIOMASS PRODUCTION FOR BIOENERGY CROPS  

SciTech Connect

Foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is a warm-season, C4 annual crop commonly grown for grain and forage worldwide. It has a relatively short generation time, yet produces hundreds of seeds per inflorescence. The crop is inbred and it has a small-size genome (~500 Mb). These features make foxtail millet an attractive grass model, especially for bioenergy crops. While a number of genomic tools have been established for foxtail millet, including a fully sequenced genome and molecular markers, the objectives of this project were to develop a tissue culture system, determine the best explant(s) for tissue culture, optimize transient gene expression, and establish a stable transformation system for foxtail millet cultivar Yugu1. In optimizing a tissue culture medium for the induction of calli and somatic embryos from immature inflorescences and mature seed explants, Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2.5 mg l-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.6 mg l-1 6- benzylaminopurine was determined to be optimal for callus induction of foxtail millet. The efficiency of callus induction from explants of immature inflorescences was significantly higher at 76% compared to that of callus induction from mature seed explants at 68%. The calli induced from this medium were regenerated into plants at high frequency (~100%) using 0.2 mg l-1 kinetin in the regeneration media. For performing transient gene expression, immature embryos were first isolated from inflorescences. Transient expression of the GUS reporter gene in immature embryos was significantly increased after sonication, a vacuum treatment, centrifugation and the addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol, which led to the efficiency of transient expression at levels greater than 70% after Agrobacterium inoculation. Inoculation with Agrobacterium was also tested with germinated seeds. The radicals of germinated seeds were pierced with needles and dipped into Agrobacterium solution. This method achieved a 10% transient expression efficiency. Throughout these analyses, using plasmids with the hygromycin selectable marker, it was determined that 1.5 mg l-1 hygromycin was the optimal dose for genetic transformation of foxtail millet. In contrast, the nptII selectable marker appeared to yield many escapes. Three methods of transformation were employed in an attempt to produce stable transformants. An in planta transformation experiment, similar to the floral dip method used in Arabidopsis, which utilized a red fluorescent protein pporRFP from coral Porites porites and the hygromycin selectable marker, was tested using immature inflorescences. Although several plants were PCR positive using endpoint and Real-Time PCR and there was transient expression using pporRFP and GUS reporters, no plants were positive on Southern blot. Dipping in Agrobacterium may damage the anther or the pistil because seed production was significantly reduced. Agrobacterium transformation using embryogenic calli was also tested. Although hundreds of plants were regenerated from selection, none were positive using PCR. The third method was to wound germinated seeds with an Agrobacterium coated needle, but none of the plants were PCR positive. Although the Yugu1 genotype was recalcitrant to genetic transformation, several avenues of future research should be considered for foxtail millet. Calli from different foxtail millet genotypes should be screened and selected for regeneration potential, and some genotypes may be more amenable to transformation. Additional selectable markers should also be tested as hygromycin appears to be too stringent and there are too many escapes with nptII. This project has provided training for the following personnel: Dr. Xinlu Chen (postdoc), Xiaomei Liu (postdoc), Jayashree Desai (postdoc) and Kyle Berk (Undergraduate researcher). Conference presentations and peer-reviewed journal articles partly supported by this grant includes the following: 1. Baxter H., Equi R., Chen X, Berk K. and Zale J. Establishing Efficient in vitro Protocols For Foxtail Millet (Setaria italica L. cv. Yu

Chen, Xinlu; Zale, Janice; Chen, Feng

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

448

Biological & Environmental Research Abstracts Database  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Search Term(s) Search Term(s) (supports AND and OR operators and phrase in "double quotes") Register Number Title Abstract Principal Investigator PI Lookup Institution Institution Lookup City Adelaide SA 5001 Aiken Albany Albuquerque Alcoa Center Alexandria Ames Amherst Anchorage Ann Arbor Ardmore Argonne Arlington Asheville Athens Atlanta Auburn Auburn University Augusta Aurora Austin Bailrigg, Lancaster UK, LA1 4Y Baltimore Bar Harbor Batavia Baton Rouge Beaufort Beaverton Belleville Bellevue Bellingham Beltsville Berkeley Bern Bethesda Billerica Bilthoven Binghamton Birmingham Blacksburg Bloomington Boise Boston Bothell Boulder Bozeman Bronx Bronxville Brooklyn Buffalo Burlington Calverton Cambridge Cambridge CB1 4RN Canal Point Carbondale Champaign Chapel Hill Charleston Charlottesville Chestnut Hill Chicago Chico Cincinnati Claremont Clayton Clemson Cleveland Clifton Park Colchester Cold Spring Harbor College Park College Station Colorado Springs Columbia Columbus Concord Cookeville Copenhagen Coral Gables Corvallis Dallas Danville Davis Dayton DeBilt DeKalb Delft Denton Denver Des Plaines Detroit Docklands, Victoria Downsview Duarte Durham East Lansing El Paso Esch-sur-Alzette Essen Eugene Evanston Fairbanks Fairfax Falmouth Flagstaff Fort Collins Gainesville Gaithersburg Galveston Germantown Gloucester Point Golden Grand Forks Grand Junction Great Falls Greenbelt Greenville Guelph Halifax Hamburg Hamilton, Ontario Hampton Hanover Hattiesburg Helsinki Hershey Honolulu Houghton Houston Hunt Valley Huntsville Hyde Park Idaho Falls Indianapolis Iowa City Irvine Ithaca Jerusalem Kalamazoo Kansas City Kennewick Kent Keystone Kingston Kingsville Klamath Falls Knoxville LS2 9JT La Jolla La Jolla, Lafayette Lake Placid Lakewood Lanham Laramie Las Cruces Las Vegas Lausanne Lawrence Lawrenceville Leawood Lethbridge Lewes Lexington Lincoln Little Rock Livermore Loma Linda London London NW1 2BE Los Alamos Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Lutherville Lyngby Madison Manchester Manhattan Mayaguez McLean Medford Melbourne Memphis Menands Menlo Park Merced Mercer Island Miami Middlesex Middletown Millbrook Milwaukee Minneapolis Mississippi State Missoula Moab Mobile Modena Moffett Field Monash, Australia Monterey Montreal Montreal (Quebec) Morgantown Moscow Moss Landing Mountain View Nashua Nashville New Brunswick New Haven New Orleans New York Newark Newport News Newtown Square Norfolk Norman North Dartmouth Norwich Notre Dame Oak Brook Oak Ridge Oakdale Oakland Oklahoma City Old Westbury Omaha Ontario Ontario K1N 6N5 Orlando Orono Ottawa Oxford Oxon Palisades Palo Alto Pasadena Pasco Peoria Philadelphia Phoenix Piscataway Pittsburgh Placitas Plymouth Portland Potsdam Princeton Providence Pullman Radnor Raleigh Rapid City Reading Redmond Reno Rensselaer Research Triangle Pk Reston Richland Richmond Riverside Roanoke Rochester Rockville Rohnert Park Rome Royal Oak Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Fransisco San Jose San Marcos Santa Barbara Santa Cruz Santa Fe Santa Monica Santiago Savannah Scranton Seattle Sequims Sharon Hill Shreveport Silver Spring Silverthorne Sioux Falls Socorro Sonoma St. Louis St. Paul St. Petersburg Stanford State College Stennis Space Center Stennis Space Ctr. Stillwater Stockholm Stockton Stony Brook Storrs Storrs Mansfield Stowe Syracuse Tallahassee Tampa Tempe Thousand Oaks Toledo Toronto Toronto, ON Troy Tucson Tulsa Tuscaloosa Tuskegee Ulm University University Park Upton Urbana Victoria Walpole Waltham Washington Watkinsville West Kingston West Lafayette Westhampton Beach Wheeling Winston-Salem Woodland Park Woods Hole Worcester Yorktown Heights