Sample records for tsunami wave triggered

  1. The Force of a Tsunami on a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Dutykh, Denys; Dias, Frédéric

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing emphasis on renewable energy resources, wave power technology is fast becoming a realistic solution. However, the recent tsunami in Japan was a harsh reminder of the ferocity of the ocean. It is known that tsunamis are nearly undetectable in the open ocean but as the wave approaches the shore its energy is compressed creating large destructive waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand the force of an incoming tsunami. The analytical 3D model of Renzi & Dias (2012) developed within the framework of a linear theory and applied to an array of fixed plates is used. The time derivative of the velocity potential allows the hydrodynamic force to be calculated.

  2. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains NearMaster University Tsunamis and ocean waves #12;Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent

  3. Horizontal displacements contribution to tsunami wave energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutykh, Denys; Chubarov, Leonid; Shokin, Yuriy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main reason for the generation of tsunamis is the deformation of the bottom of the ocean caused by an underwater earthquake. Usually, only the vertical bottom motion is taken into accound while the horizontal displacements are neglected. In the present paper we study both the vertical and the horizontal bottom motion while we propose a novel methodology for reconstructing the bottom coseismic displacements field which is transmitted to the free surface using a new three-dimensional Weakly Nonlinear (WN) approach. We pay a special attention to the evolution of kinetic and potential energies of the resulting wave while the contribution of horizontal displacements into wave energy balance is also quantified. Approaches proposed in this study are illustrated on the July 17, 2006 Java tsunami.

  4. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the Asian Tsunami Evolution and Propagation with aEvolution and Runup of Solitary Waves on a Sloping Plane," in Local TsunamiEvolution and Runup of Solitary Waves on a Sloping Plane," in Local Tsunami

  5. The VOLNA code for the numerical modelling of tsunami waves: generation, propagation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the finite volume scheme implemented in the code. We explain the numerical treatment of the wet is decided on the base of inundation maps which are produced with this type of numerical tools. Finally we and the perspectives for future research presented. Key words: tsunami waves, shallow water equations, tsunami

  6. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)] [Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion – Israel institute of technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  7. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves generated by the1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1002/, Hydro-acoustic and tsunami waves TSUNAMI Abstract. Detection of low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves as precur-4 sor components model gave us the opportunity to study13 the hydro-acoustic wave propagation in a large-scale domain

  8. Experiment Indicates Sound Waves Can Trigger Quakes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher and his colleagues have shown that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often...

  9. THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO RENZI, DENYS DUTYKH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand Acknowledgements 10 References 10 1. Introduction Wave energy devices are slowly becoming a reality. Various

  10. The characteris+cs of tsunamis Historical tsunami events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    ·Historical tsunami events ·The early warning systems #12;·Tsunami is a wave produced ·Historical tsunami events ·The early warning systems #12;·DART II system hip ·The early warning systems #12;Activity 1 ! #12;See you next week!! Thank you

  11. Trigger-Wave Propagation in Arbitrary Metrics in Asynchronous Cellular Logic Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Piotr

    Trigger-Wave Propagation in Arbitrary Metrics in Asynchronous Cellular Logic Arrays Przemyslaw image processing tasks using trigger-wave propagation in a medium with a hardware-controlled metric. The principles of wave propagation in cellular four-connected logic arrays emulating different distance measure

  12. Numerical modeling of tsunami waves generated by the flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (La Palma, Canary Islands)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Palma, Canary Islands): Tsunami source and near field effects S. M. Abadie,1 J. C. Harris,2 S. T. Grilli of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV; La Palma, Canary Island, Spain) through numerical simulations performed in two of such wave trains on La Palma and other Canary Islands are assessed in detail in the paper. Citation: Abadie

  13. Using a Bore-Soliton-Splash to understand Rogue Waves, Tsunamis & Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    )compression] use wave focussing in a convergence [3]. · IPS wave buoy has a linear dynamo below sea level. · Designed & built new RogueWavEnergy device: it works, a LED is blinking & we measured the power output. 8

  14. Cheap Textile Dam Protection of Seaport Cities against Hurricane Storm Surge Waves, Tsunamis, and Other Weather-Related Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Author offers to complete research on a new method and cheap applicatory design for land and sea textile dams. The offered method for the protection of the USA's major seaport cities against hurricane storm surge waves, tsunamis, and other weather-related inundations is the cheapest (to build and maintain of all extant anti-flood barriers) and it, therefore, has excellent prospective applications for defending coastal cities from natural weather-caused disasters. It may also be a very cheap method for producing a big amount of cyclical renewable hydropower, land reclamation from the ocean, lakes, riverbanks, as well as land transportation connection of islands, and islands to mainland, instead of very costly over-water bridges and underwater tunnels.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Hydro-acoustic Waves In Weakly Compressible Fluid Ali Abdolali1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical Modeling of Hydro-acoustic Waves In Weakly Compressible Fluid Ali Abdolali1,2 , James T of Civil Engineering, University of Roma Tre Low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves are precursors of tsunamis. Detection of hydro-acoustic waves generated due to the water column compression triggered by sudden seabed

  16. Numerical Modeling of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Evolution of Ocean WAVEs) to reconstruct the tsunami across the Pacific and its transformation aroundNumerical Modeling of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami Yoshiki Yamazaki Post-doctoral Research 2011 Tohoku earthquake (Mw 9.0) generated a massive tsunami devastated the entire Pacific coast

  17. The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    - etation may shield coastlines from tsunami damage by reducing wave amplitude and energy (2). Analytical). At the river mouth, the tsunami completely destroyed parts of a village (fig. S1) and removed a sand spit, Greenbelt Tsunami Prevention in South-Pacific Region, available at http://eqtap. edm.bosai.go.jp/useful_outputs/report

  18. EOF analysis of a time series with application to tsunami detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    determines the accuracy of any forecast of the future tsunami evolution. A tsunami wave in the open ocean isEOF analysis of a time series with application to tsunami detection Elena Tolkova a, a. Decomposition of a tsunami buoy record in a functional space of tidal EOFs presents an efficient tool

  19. Development, testing, and applications of site-specific tsunami inundation models for real-time forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    can the forecasts completely cover the evolution of earthquake-generated tsunami waves: generationDevelopment, testing, and applications of site-specific tsunami inundation models for real and applications of site-specific tsunami inundation models (forecast models) for use in NOAA's tsunami forecast

  20. ON THE MODELLING OF TSUNAMI GENERATION AND TSUNAMI ERIC DIAS # , DENYS DUTYKH, LAURA O'BRIEN, EMILIANO RENZI,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Pacific Ocean). Wave run­up (maximum vertical extent of wave uprush on a beach above still water level on the finite fault solution for the slip distribution under some assumptions on the kinematics of the rupturing review some aspects of tsunami run­up. In particular, we explain why the first wave of a tsunami

  1. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India, "Setting up of Early Warning System for Tsunami andof the Tsunami Early Warning System for Indian Ocean," in1998 Gupta, H.K. , "Early Warning System for Oceanographic

  2. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen, E-mail: xwli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000?ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ?600?ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  3. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-114 Offshore forecasting of Hawaiian tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disaster Center (PDC). The activity included analytical and nu- merical sensitivity studies of tsunami wave the Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) with tsunami forecasting capabilities. PDC is a joint Department of Defense

  4. NTHMP FY14 Grant Project Narrative Project Name/Title: Modeling Tsunami Inundation and Hazard for the U.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    would model the combined effects of tidal phase and current magnitude on the evolution of tsunami wavesNTHMP FY14 Grant Project Narrative Project Name/Title: Modeling Tsunami Inundation and Hazard history of tsunami hazard assessment on the US West coast and Hawaii, tsunami hazard assessment along

  5. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lakes, Western Norway," Sedimentology, Vol. 44, 1997, ppFailure Mechanisms," Sedimentology, Vol. 45, 1998, pp 411-J. Mangerud, "Tsunami Sedimentology Facies Deposited by the

  6. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Term Coastal Evolution," In Caribbean Tsunami Hazard, eds.Price, "Tsunami as a Major Control of Coastal Evolution,

  7. Initial Waves from Deformable Submarine Landslides: A Study on the Separation Time and Parameter Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shay, Justin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Earthquake and submarine mass failure are the most frequent causes of tsunami waves. While the process of the tsunami generation by earthquakes is reasonably well understood, the generation of tsunami waves during submarine mass failure is not...

  8. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-112 IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTING OF THE METHOD OF SPLITTING TSUNAMI (MOST)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    processes of tsunami evolution, i.e., generation by an earthquake, transoceanic propagation, and inundation TSUNAMI (MOST) MODEL V.V. Titov F.I. Gonzalez Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory 7600 Sand Point Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4. Bird's-eye views of the computed tsunami waves

  9. Three-Dimensional Tsunami Modeling Using GPU-SPHysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz, Andrew J.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and Atmospheric Administration) has provided benchmarks for tsunami inundation and propagation models. These benchmarks consist of analytic tests, laboratory tests and field tests. A key benchmark for GPU-SPHysics to be verified against is the solitary wave...

  10. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B. Milburn, "A Tsunami Early Warning System - Summary," InBernard, E.N. , "Early Warning System for Tsunamis is Testedthe Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System in the North

  11. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mofjeld, and A.J. Venturato, Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -Pub. Co. , 2006, pp 205-217 Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -Military Dept. , 2002, 25 pp Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -

  12. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. II. VARIED SHOCK WAVE AND CLOUD CORE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A., E-mail: boss@dtm.ciw.edu, E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest solar system solids, including Type II supernovae (SNe), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin SN shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct SN injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that SN shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting from AGB star evolution cannot be conclusively ruled out. Wolf-Rayet (WR) star winds, however, are likely to lead to cloud core shredding, rather than to collapse. Injection efficiencies can be increased when the cloud is rotating about an axis aligned with the direction of the shock wave, by as much as a factor of {approx}10. The amount of gas and dust accreted from the post-shock wind can exceed that injected from the shock wave, with implications for the isotopic abundances expected for a SN source.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: tsunami

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tsunami ECIS and UOP (a Honewell Company): CSTs Clean Radioactive Waste in Fukushima and Worldwide On February 14, 2013, in Energy, Materials Science, Nuclear Energy, Partnership,...

  14. Joko Tingkir program for estimating tsunami potential rapidly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madlazim,, E-mail: m-lazim@physics.its.ac.id; Hariyono, E., E-mail: m-lazim@physics.its.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Negeri Surabaya (UNESA) , Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to estimate P-wave rupture durations (T{sub dur}), dominant periods (T{sub d}) and exceeds duration (T{sub 50Ex}) simultaneously for local events, shallow earthquakes which occurred off the coast of Indonesia. Although the all earthquakes had parameters of magnitude more than 6,3 and depth less than 70 km, part of the earthquakes generated a tsunami while the other events (Mw=7.8) did not. Analysis using Joko Tingkir of the above stated parameters helped understand the tsunami generation of these earthquakes. Measurements from vertical component broadband P-wave quake velocity records and determination of the above stated parameters can provide a direct procedure for assessing rapidly the potential for tsunami generation. The results of the present study and the analysis of the seismic parameters helped explain why the events generated a tsunami, while the others did not.

  15. Diffusion and Dispersion Characterization of a Numerical Tsunami Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    and numerical model. This plan is currently under devel- opment at the NCTR and a proof of concept has been-computed database of unit source solutions to determine the offshore tsunami waves. It then uses the MOST model (in nested grid mode) to propagate the offshore waves onshore for select regions. The critical factor

  16. IMPACT-GENERATED TSUNAMIS: AN OVER-RATED HAZARD. H. J. Melosh, Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (jmelosh@lpl.arizona.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melosh, H. Jay

    propagation theory is applicable and the evolution of the impact tsunami can be analyzed by well- establishedIMPACT-GENERATED TSUNAMIS: AN OVER-RATED HAZARD. H. J. Melosh, Lunar and Planetary Lab, University suggested that oceanic waves (tsunami) created by the impact of relatively small asteroids into the Earth

  17. Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined S. Viroulet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    epl draft Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined plane S. Viroulet1 , A Jersey 08544, USA PACS 47.57.Gc ­ Granular flow, complex fluids PACS 92.10.hl ­ Tsunamis PACS 45.70.Ht wave and the evolution of its amplitude during the propagation. The experiments show that whereas

  18. ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE HORIZONTAL SEA-BED DISPLACEMENTS INTO THE TSUNAMI GENERATION PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE HORIZONTAL SEA-BED DISPLACEMENTS INTO THE TSUNAMI GENERATION PROCESS for the generation of tsunamis is the deformation of the bot- tom of the ocean caused by an underwater earthquake attention to the evolution of kinetic and potential ener- gies of the resulting wave while the contribution

  19. THE CONTRIBUTION OF HORIZONTAL SEA-BED DISPLACEMENTS INTO TSUNAMI GENERATION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CONTRIBUTION OF HORIZONTAL SEA-BED DISPLACEMENTS INTO TSUNAMI GENERATION PROCESSES DENYS DUTYKH of tsunamis is the deformation of the bot- tom of the ocean caused by an underwater earthquake. Usually, only to the evolution of kinetic and potential en- ergies of the resulting wave while the contribution of horizontal

  20. A note on tsunami amplitudes above submarine slides and slumps M.I. Todorovska*, A. Hayir1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    rights reserved. Keywords: Tsunami; Near-®eld; Slumps; Submarine slides; Water waves; Gravity waves 1 the effects of source ®niteness and directivity. Five simple two-dimensional kinematic models of submarine functions. Tsunami waveforms for these models are computed using linearized shallow water theory

  1. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-Lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. IV. Effects of Rotational Axis Orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Alan P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both astronomical observations of the interaction of Type II supernova remnants (SNR) with dense interstellar clouds as well as cosmochemical studies of the abundances of daughter products of short-lived radioisotopes (SLRIs) formed by supernova nucleosynthesis support the hypothesis that the Solar Systems SLRIs may have been derived from a supernova. This paper continues a series devoted to examining whether such a shock wave could have triggered the dynamical collapse of a dense, presolar cloud core and simultaneously injected sufficient abundances of SLRIs to explain the cosmochemical evidence. Here we examine the effects of shock waves striking clouds whose spin axes are oriented perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the direction of propagation of the shock front. The models start with 2.2 solar mass cloud cores and shock speeds of 20 or 40 km/sec. Central protostars and protoplanetary disks form in all models, though with disk spin axes aligned somewhat randomly. The disks derive most of their angular...

  2. Optimisation of the Swift X-ray follow-up of Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave triggers in 2015--16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, P A; Kennea, J A; Campana, S; O'Brien, P T; Tanvir, N R; Racusin, J L; Burrows, D N; Cenko, S B; Gehrels, N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most exciting near-term prospects in physics is the potential discovery of gravitational waves by the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. To maximise both the confidence of the detection and the science return, it is essential to identify an electromagnetic counterpart. This is not trivial, as the events are expected to be poorly localised, particularly in the near-term, with error regions covering hundreds or even thousands of square degrees. In this paper we discuss the prospects for finding an X-ray counterpart to a gravitational wave trigger with the Swift X-ray Telescope, using the assumption that the trigger is caused by a binary neutron star merger which also produces a short gamma-ray burst. We show that it is beneficial to target galaxies within the GW error region, highlighting the need for substantially complete galaxy catalogues out to distances of 300 Mpc. We also show that nearby, on-axis short GRBs are either extremely rare, or are systematically less luminous than those detected to d...

  3. Tsunami evacuation mathematical model for the city of Padang

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusdiantara, R.; Hadianti, R.; Badri Kusuma, M. S.; Soewono, E. [Department of Mathematics Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Department of Civil Engineering Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Department of Mathematics Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Tsunami is a series of wave trains which travels with high speed on the sea surface. This traveling wave is caused by the displacement of a large volume of water after the occurrence of an underwater earthquake or volcano eruptions. The speed of tsunami decreases when it reaches the sea shore along with the increase of its amplitudes. Two large tsunamis had occurred in the last decades in Indonesia with huge casualties and large damages. Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System has been installed along the west coast of Sumatra. This early warning system will give about 10-15 minutes to evacuate people from high risk regions to the safe areas. Here in this paper, a mathematical model for Tsunami evacuation is presented with the city of Padang as a study case. In the model, the safe areas are chosen from the existing and selected high rise buildings, low risk region with relatively high altitude and (proposed to be built) a flyover ring road. Each gathering points are located in the radius of approximately 1 km from the ring road. The model is formulated as an optimization problem with the total normalized evacuation time as the objective function. The constraints consist of maximum allowable evacuation time in each route, maximum capacity of each safe area, and the number of people to be evacuated. The optimization problem is solved numerically using linear programming method with Matlab. Numerical results are shown for various evacuation scenarios for the city of Padang.

  4. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  5. Evaluation and Numerical Simulation of Tsunami for Coastal Nuclear Power Plants of India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Pavan K.; Singh, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre-Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunami-genic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. (authors)

  6. Supplementary Material A submarine landslide is required to explain the 2011 Tohoku tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    , geometry, slope stability analysis, and kinematics model Note S6 ­ Estimation of seismic wave generation simulated using non- dispersive nonlinear shallow water (NSW) wave equation models [Kowalik et al., 1993 to determine wave sources: earthquake and/or SMF Note S4 ­ Tsunami runup and inundation Note S5 ­ SMF geology

  7. asian tsunami perspectives: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de tsunami 12 Madariaga, Ral 9 Tsunami-related injury in Aceh Province, Indonesia * C. Robinsona Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Tsunami-related injury in Aceh...

  8. alleviate asian tsunami: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de tsunami 12 Madariaga, Ral 6 Tsunami-related injury in Aceh Province, Indonesia * C. Robinsona Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Tsunami-related injury in Aceh...

  9. BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion which govern the evolution of the barycenter; submarine landslides; wave run-up; tsunami. Corresponding author. 1 hal-00654386,version1-21Dec2011 #12;2 D topography are often termed tsunamis. Two distinct generation mechanisms of a tsunami are underwater

  10. LOCAL RUNUP AMPLIFICATION BY RESONANT WAVE INTERACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    wave-gage recordings from real tsunami simulations, are used as forcing conditions to the BVP. Resonant in enhanced runup of non-leading waves. The evolution of energy reveals the exis- tence of a quasi tsunamis (Nicaragua and Flores Island), measurements suggested that the shoreline receded before inundation

  11. Mathematical aspects of surface water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    questions remain. These have to do with the evolution of surface water waves, their approximation by model normally being chosen. Unless we are describing waves of a global extent, such as a tsunami, for our

  12. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

  13. BOUSSINESQ MODELING OF SURFACE WAVES DUE TO UNDERWATER LANDSLIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of a shallow body of fluid. The equations of motion which govern the evolution of the barycenter, submarine landslides, wave run-up, tsunami. PACS: 45.20.D,47.11.Df, 47.35.Bb, 47.35.Fg, 47.85.Dh. Contents 1 waves originating from sudden perturbations of the bottom topography are of- ten termed tsunamis. Two

  14. Shemer, et al.1 ON GENERATION OF SINGLE STEEP WAVES IN TANKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shemer, Lev

    is discussed. INTRODUCTION To model tsunami effect in laboratory conditions, an ability to excite a single of the tsunami wave damage potential and is thus of great importance. Excitation of single steep wave of Brown & Jensen (2001) demonstrated that nonlinear effects are essential in the evolution of those waves

  15. Grain-size distributions of tsunami sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Sarah

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of tsunamis. By implementing the use of simulation and modeling the tsunami depositional process may be fully understood. The program Python with PyLab was used to form distributions and calculate descriptive parameters with grain-size data from two past...

  16. Tsunami early warning using earthquake rupture duration Anthony Lomax1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawlinson, Nick

    -Indonesian tsunami early warning system (GITEWS) and the West Coast and Alaska (WCATWC), and Pacific (PTWC) TsunamiTsunami early warning using earthquake rupture duration Anthony Lomax1 and Alberto Michelini2] Effective tsunami early warning for coastlines near a tsunamigenic earthquake requires notification within 5

  17. Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report to the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program #12;#12;Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report should be cited as: Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico: U.S. Geological

  18. Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCure, Mari Mae

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves is the supporting document to the Master of Fine Arts thesis exhibition of the same title. Exhibited March 7-12 2010 in the Art and Design Gallery at the University of Kansas, Waves was comprised of a series of mixed media drawings...

  19. Toward tsunami early warning system in Indonesia by using rapid rupture durations estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madlazim [Physics Department, Faculty Mathematics and Sciences of Surabaya State University (UNESA) Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Indonesia has Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (Ina-TEWS) since 2008. The Ina-TEWS has used automatic processing on hypocenter; Mwp, Mw (mB) and Mj. If earthquake occurred in Ocean, depth < 70 km and magnitude > 7, then Ina-TEWS announce early warning that the earthquake can generate tsunami. However, the announcement of the Ina-TEWS is still not accuracy. Purposes of this research are to estimate earthquake rupture duration of large Indonesia earthquakes that occurred in Indian Ocean, Java, Timor sea, Banda sea, Arafura sea and Pasific ocean. We analyzed at least 330 vertical seismogram recorded by IRIS-DMC network using a direct procedure for rapid assessment of earthquake tsunami potential using simple measures on P-wave vertical seismograms on the velocity records, and the likelihood that the high-frequency, apparent rupture duration, T{sub dur}. T{sub dur} can be related to the critical parameters rupture length (L), depth (z), and shear modulus ({mu}) while T{sub dur} may be related to wide (W), slip (D), z or {mu}. Our analysis shows that the rupture duration has a stronger influence to generate tsunami than Mw and depth. The rupture duration gives more information on tsunami impact, Mo/{mu}, depth and size than Mw and other currently used discriminants. We show more information which known from the rupture durations. The longer rupture duration, the shallower source of the earthquake. For rupture duration greater than 50 s, the depth less than 50 km, Mw greater than 7, the longer rupture length, because T{sub dur} is proportional L and greater Mo/{mu}. Because Mo/{mu} is proportional L. So, with rupture duration information can be known information of the four parameters. We also suggest that tsunami potential is not directly related to the faulting type of source and for events that have rupture duration greater than 50 s, the earthquakes generated tsunami. With available real-time seismogram data, rapid calculation, rupture duration discriminant can be completed within 4-5 min after an earthquake occurs and thus can aid in effective, accuracy and reliable tsunami early warning for Indonesia region.

  20. Identification of earthquakes that generate tsunamis in Java and Nusa Tenggara using rupture duration analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribadi, S., E-mail: sugengpribadimsc@gmail.com [Tsunami Warning Information Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No. 2, Jakarta13920 and Graduate Student of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of T (Indonesia); Puspito, N. T.; Yudistira, T.; Afnimar,; Ibrahim, G. [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Laksono, B. I. [Database Maintenance Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No.2, Jakarta 13920 (Indonesia); Adnan, Z. [Database Maintenance Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No. 2, Jakarta 13920 and Graduate Student of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technol (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Java and Nusa Tenggara are the tectonically active of Sunda arc. This study discuss the rupture duration as a manifestation of the power of earthquake-generated tsunami. We use the teleseismic (30° - 90°) body waves with high-frequency energy Seismometer is from IRIS network as amount 206 broadband units. We applied the Butterworth high bandpass (1 - 2 Hz) filtered. The arrival and travel times started from wave phase of P - PP which based on Jeffrey Bullens table with TauP program. The results are that the June 2, 1994 Banyuwangi and the July 17, 2006 Pangandaran earthquakes identified as tsunami earthquakes with long rupture duration (To > 100 second), medium magnitude (7.6 < Mw < 7.9) and located near the trench. The others are 4 tsunamigenic earthquakes and 3 inland earthquakes with short rupture duration start from To > 50 second which depend on its magnitude. Those events are located far from the trench.

  1. Tsunami mortality and displacement in Aceh province, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    Tsunami mortality and displacement in Aceh province, Indonesia Abdur Rofi, MA Mercy Corps Indonesia, Indonesia, Shannon Doocy, PhD Research Associate, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, US. Keywords: displacement, internally displaced persons (IDPs), Indonesia, mortality, tsunami Introduction

  2. Mathematical Theory of Water Waves John D. Carter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    #12;Why Study Water Waves? Practical reasons Tsunamis Rogue waves Weather prediction Beach erosion Evolution Initial John D. Carter Mathematical Theory of Water Waves #12;The Stability Problem Exact Evolution Initial Later John D. Carter Mathematical Theory of Water Waves #12;The Stability Problem Stable

  3. ADVANCES IN GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 39 LOCAL TSUNAMIS AND EARTHQUAKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equations describe the evolution of tsunamis during run-up in such a way that the shoreline is fixed in (ADVANCES IN GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 39 LOCAL TSUNAMIS AND EARTHQUAKE SOURCE PARAMETERS ERIC L. GEIST u in estimating the severity of local tsunamis gener- ated by earthquakes is explaining the great event

  4. alaska tsunami warning: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seismic data from various 9 International Conference on Tsunami Warning (ICTW) Bali, Indonesia, November 12-14, 2008 Engineering Websites Summary: International Conference on...

  5. Evaluation of earthquake and tsunami on JSFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikazawa, Y.; Enuma, Y.; Kisohara, N.; Yamano, H.; Kubo, S.; Hayafune, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraci (Japan); Sagawa, H.; Okamura, S.; Shimakawa, Y. [Mitsubishi FBR Systems Inc., 2-34-17 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of earthquake and tsunami on JSFR has been analyzed. For seismic design, safety components are confirmed to maintain their functions even against recent strong earthquakes. As for Tsunami, some parts of reactor building might be submerged including component cooling water system whose final heat sink is sea water. However, in the JSFR design, safety grade components are independent from component cooling water system (CCWS). The JSFR emergency power supply adopts a gas turbine system with air cooling, since JSFR does not basically require quick start-up of the emergency power supply thanks to the natural convection DHRS. Even in case of long station blackout, the DHRS could be activated by emergency batteries or manually and be operated continuously by natural convection. (authors)

  6. Commissioning ATLAS Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Bold; for Atlas Tdaq

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will face the challenge of efficiently selecting interesting candidate events in $pp$ collisions at 14 TeV centre-of-mass energy, whilst rejecting the enormous number of background events. Therefore it is equipped with a three level trigger system. The first level is is hardware based and uses coarse granularity calorimeter information and fast readout muon chambers. The second and third level triggers, which are software based, will need to reduce the first level trigger output rate of ~ 75 kHz to ~ 200 Hz written out to mass storage. The progress in commissioning of this system will be reviewed in this paper.

  7. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Schare, Joshua M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunch, Kyle (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  8. Tsunamis, Viscosity and the HBT Puzzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The equation of state and bulk and shear viscosities are shown to be able to affect the transverse dynamics of a central heavy ion collision. The net entropy, along with the femtoscopic radii are shown to be affected at the 10-20% level by both shear and bulk viscosity. The degree to which these effects help build a tsunami-like pulse is also discussed.

  9. Tsunami-related injury in Aceh Province, Indonesia * C. Robinsona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    Tsunami-related injury in Aceh Province, Indonesia S. Doocya * C. Robinsona , C. Moodieb and G; Indonesia Introduction The 2004 Asian tsunami resulted in over 175,000 deaths, nearly 50,000 missing, and over 1.7 million people displaced in the Indian Ocean region (USAID 2005). Indonesia's Aceh Province

  10. Tsunami Landslide Generation: Modelling and Experiments Francois Enet 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    -linear potential flow model of landslide tsunami generation. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS Overview Experiments depth and 1 Formerly at URI. Now at Alkyon, Hydraulic Consultancy & Research, PO Box 248 8300 AE for tsunami landslide experiments and computations. mechanical system (gates with electric wire) at three

  11. Mechanical models of the 1975 Kalapana, Hawaii earthquake and tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    interpretation of geological data from Kilauea, along with modeling of the tsunami using recent seismic analyses) a structural interpretation of geological data with (ii) modeling of the tsunami using recent seismic analy, because of its limited onshore expression near Kalapana. We argue that several different interpretations

  12. Waves in Nature, Lasers to Tsumanis and Beyond

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves are everywhere. Microwaves, laser beams, music, tsunamis. Electromagnetic waves emanating from the Big Bang fill the universe. Learn about the similarities and difference in all of these wavy phenomena with Ed Moses and Rick Sawicki, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11541

  13. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  14. asian tsunami disaster: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The 2004 tsunami had a divergent impact on the patterns of political instability in Indonesia and Sri Lanka. In the former... Omelicheva, Mariya Y. 2011-01-01 23 Educational...

  15. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident: the Risk Policy Aftermath 3 #12;Personal experience in March 2011 Tsukuba 170km Tokyo 230km Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power

  16. 5. Water waves 5.1. Travelling waves on deep water (2D)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    = d dk (c0k) = cp (e.g. tsunami in open ocean). If the waves are `fairly long', i.e. tanh kh kh - k3 t = -c0F (x - c0t) = -c0 x , i.e. t + c0 x = 0 . For a single Fourier component: = Re ^ei(kx-t) we

  17. Entanglement Tsunami: Universal Scaling in Holographic Thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in a strongly coupled holographic system, whose subsequent equilibration is described in the gravity dual by the gravitational collapse of a thin shell of matter resulting in a black hole. In the limit of large regions of entanglement, the evolution of entanglement entropy is controlled by the geometry around and inside the event horizon of the black hole, allowing us to identify regimes of pre-local- equilibration quadratic growth (in time), post-local-equilibration linear growth, a late-time regime in which the evolution does not carry any memory of the size and shape of the entangled region, and a saturation regime with critical behavior resembling those in continuous phase transitions. Collectively, these regimes suggest a picture of entanglement growth in which an "entanglement tsunami" carries entanglement inward from the boundary. We also make a conjecture on the maximal rate of entanglement growth in relativistic systems.

  18. The CMS High Level Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, W; Deldicque, C; Ero, J; Frühwirth, R; Jeitler, Manfred; Kastner, K; Köstner, S; Neumeister, N; Porth, M; Padrta P; Rohringer, H; Sakulinb, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Walzel, G; Wulz, C E; Lowette, S; Van De Vyver, B; De Lentdecker, G; Vanlaer, P; Delaere, C; Lemaître, V; Ninane, A; van der Aa, O; Damgov, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Lampen, T; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lehti, S; Nysten, J; Tuominiemi, J; Busson, P; Todorov, T; Schwering, G; Gras, P; Daskalakis, G; Sfyrla, A; Barone, M; Geralis, T; Markou, C; Zachariadou, K; Hidas, P; Banerjee, S; Mazumdara, K; Abbrescia, M; Colaleoa, A; D'Amato, N; De Filippis, N; Giordano, D; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Silvestris, L; Zito, G; Arcelli, S; Bonacorsi, D; Capiluppi, P; Dallavalle, G M; Fanfani, A; Grandi, C; Marcellini, S; Montanari, A; Odorici, F; Travaglini, R; Costa, S; Tricomi, A; Ciulli, a V; Magini, N; Ranieri, R; Berti, L; Biasotto, M; Gulminia, M; Maron, G; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L; Bellato, M; Gasparini, U; Lacaprara, S; Parenti, A; Ronchese, P; Vanini, S; Zotto, S; Ventura P L; Perugia; Benedetti, D; Biasini, M; Fano, L; Servoli, L; Bagliesi, a G; Boccali, T; Dutta, S; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Palla, F; Segneri, G; Starodumov, A; Tenchini, R; Meridiani, P; Organtini, G; Amapane, a N; Bertolino, F; Cirio, R; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Pac, Y; Joo, K; Kim, S B; Suwon; Choi, Y I; Yu, I T; Cho, K; Chung, J; Ham, S W; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, W; CKim, J; Oh, S K; Park, H; Ro, S R; Son, D C; Suh, J S; Aftab, Z; Hoorani, H; Osmana, A; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, K; Kazana, M; Królikowski, J; Kudla, I; Pietrusinski, M; Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Zabolotny, W M; Zalipska, J; Zych, P; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Almeida, C; Almeida, N; Da Silva, J C; Santos, M; Teixeira, I; Teixeira, J P; Varelaa, J; Vaz-Cardoso, N; Konoplyanikov, V F; Urkinbaev, A R; Toropin, A; Gavrilov, V; Kolosov, V; Krokhotin, A; Oulianov, A; Stepanov, N; Kodolova, O L; Vardanyan, I; Ilic, J; Skoro, G P; Albajar, C; De Troconiz, J F; Calderón, A; López-Virto, M A; Marco, R; Martínez-Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Vila, I; Cucciarelli, S; Konecki, M; Ashby, S; Barney, D; Bartalini, P; Benetta, R; Brigljevic, V; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Cittolin, S; Della Negra, M; de Roeck, A; Favre, P; Frey, A; Funk, W; Futyan, D; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gutleber, J; Hansen, M; Innocente, V; Jacobs, C; Jank, W; Kozlovszky, Miklos; Larsen, H; Lenzi, M; Magrans, I; Mannelli, M; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Mirabito, L; Murray, S J; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Palomares-Espiga, C; Pollet, L; Rácz, A; Reynaud, S; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schwick, C; Sguazzoni, G; Sinanis, N; Sphicas, P; Spiropulu, M; Strandlie, A; Taylor, B G; Van Vulpen, I; Wellisch, J P; Winkler, M; Villigen; Kotlinski, D; Zurich; Prokofiev, K; Speer, T; Dumanoglu, I; Bristol; Bailey, S; Brooke, J J; Cussans, D; Heath, G P; Machin, D; Nash, S J; Newbold, D; Didcot; Coughlan, A; Halsall, R; Haynes, W J; Tomalin, I R; Marinelli, N; Nikitenko, A; Rutherford, S; Seeza, C; Sharif, O; Antchev, G; Hazen, E; Rohlf, J; Wu, S; Breedon, R; Cox, P T; Murray, P; Tripathi, M; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Hauser, J; Kreuzer, P; Lindgren, M; Mumford, J; Schlein, P E; Shi, Y; Tannenbaum, B; Valuev, V; Von der Mey, M; Andreevaa, I; Clare, R; Villa, S; Bhattacharya, S; Branson, J G; Fisk, I; Letts, J; Mojaver, M; Paar, H P; Trepagnier, E; Litvine, V; Shevchenko, S; Singh, S; Wilkinson, R; Aziz, S; Bowden, M; Elias, J E; Graham, G; Green, D; Litmaath, M; Los, S; O'Dell, V; Ratnikova, N; Suzuki, I; Wenzel, H; Acosta, D; Bourilkov, D; Korytov, A; Madorsky, A; Mitselmakher, G; Rodríguez, J L; Scurlock, B; Abdullin, S; Baden, D; Eno, S; Grassi, T; Kunori, S; Pavlon, S; Sumorok, K; Tether, S; Cremaldi, L M; Sanders, D; Summers, D; Osborne, I; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Fisher,W C; Mans6, J; Stickland, D P; Tully, C; Wildish, T; Wynhoff, S; Padley, B P; Chumney, P; Dasu, S; Smith, W H; CMS Trigger Data Acquisition Group

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Large Hadron Collider at CERN the proton bunches cross at a rate of 40MHz. At the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment the original collision rate is reduced by a factor of O (1000) using a Level-1 hardware trigger. A subsequent factor of O(1000) data reduction is obtained by a software-implemented High Level Trigger (HLT) selection that is executed on a multi-processor farm. In this review we present in detail prototype CMS HLT physics selection algorithms, expected trigger rates and trigger performance in terms of both physics efficiency and timing.

  19. A high luminosity trigger design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abolins, M.; Edmunds, D.; Laurens, P.; Linnemann, J.; Pi, B.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors describe the triggering system for the DO Experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider. In Section II we give an overview of the structure of the trigger and data acquisition systems with particular attention to the principal signal paths. The Calorimeter Trigger is described in Section III and in Section IV, the authors discuss some of the Monte Carlo studies that were done to study the trigger performance and determine its design parameters. They end with a summary of their current status in Section V and acknowledgement of support in Section VI.

  20. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter W. Graham; Surjeet Rajendran; Jaime Varela

    2015-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large space-time volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  1. TSUNAMI SIMULATION IN INDONESIA'S AREAS BASED ON SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    TSUNAMI SIMULATION IN INDONESIA'S AREAS BASED ON SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS AND VARIATIONAL BOUSSINESQ Studi Matematika INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG 2008 #12;ABSTRACT TSUNAMI SIMULATION IN INDONESIA'S AREAS of the bathymetry of Indonesia which is incorporated into our FEM schemes. The tsunami simulation in the two areas

  2. Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation Sangyoung Son. The fundamental purpose of the coupling effort is to develop the capability to seamlessly model tsunami evolution water equations Boussinesq equations Coupling Coherent structures Turbulence Tsunami a b s t r a c

  3. NOAA Data Report ERL PMEL-THE 10 JUNE 1996 ANDREANOV TSUNAMI DATABASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -of-the-art simulation capability for the three primary phases of tsunami evolution: generation, propagationNOAA Data Report ERL PMEL- THE 10 JUNE 1996 ANDREANOV TSUNAMI DATABASE M. C. Eble1 J. Newman2 J Preface This work is part of the Early Detection and Forecast of Tsunamis (EDFT) project initiated in 1996

  4. Real-Time Deep-Ocean Tsunami Measuring, Monitoring, and Reporting System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    identified the requirements of the tsunami measurement system through evolution in both technologyReal-Time Deep-Ocean Tsunami Measuring, Monitoring, and Reporting System: The NOAA DART II the system components that make up the second-generation Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis

  5. Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1 Robert W. Hallberg,2 14 December 2006. [1] Significant buffering of the impact of tsunamis by coral reefs is suggested against tsunamis. Citation: Kunkel, C. M., R. W. Hallberg, and M. Oppenheimer (2006), Coral reefs reduce

  6. Evolution of water waves generated by subaerial solid landslide S. Viroulet1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evolution of water waves generated by subaerial solid landslide S. Viroulet1,* , D. C´ebron1,2 , O laws allow thus to predict the time evolution of the maximum amplitude wave generated by an aerial of landslide tsunamis are more dif- ficult than those generated by tectonic source due to the lack of knowledge

  7. Nonlinear acoustic/seismic waves in earthquake processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Paul A. [Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear dynamics induced by seismic sources and seismic waves are common in Earth. Observations range from seismic strong ground motion (the most damaging aspect of earthquakes), intense near-source effects, and distant nonlinear effects from the source that have important consequences. The distant effects include dynamic earthquake triggering-one of the most fascinating topics in seismology today-which may be elastically nonlinearly driven. Dynamic earthquake triggering is the phenomenon whereby seismic waves generated from one earthquake trigger slip events on a nearby or distant fault. Dynamic triggering may take place at distances thousands of kilometers from the triggering earthquake, and includes triggering of the entire spectrum of slip behaviors currently identified. These include triggered earthquakes and triggered slow, silent-slip during which little seismic energy is radiated. It appears that the elasticity of the fault gouge-the granular material located between the fault blocks-is key to the triggering phenomenon.

  8. Transitional relief housing for tsunami victims of Tamil Nadu, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Shauna

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the recent tsunami that swept across Asia, there is a dire need to salvage and rebuild the lives and livelihoods that were swept away. The aim of this thesis project is to design and model a transitional ...

  9. Fast quantum dot single photon source triggered at telecommunications wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley Rivoire; Sonia Buckley; Arka Majumdar; Hyochul Kim; Pierre Petroff; Jelena Vuckovic

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a quantum dot single photon source at 900 nm triggered at 300 MHz by a continuous wave telecommunications wavelength laser followed by an electro-optic modulator. The quantum dot is excited by on-chip-generated second harmonic radiation, resonantly enhanced by a GaAs photonic crystal cavity surrounding the InAs quantum dot. Our result suggests a path toward the realization of telecommunications-wavelength-compatible quantum dot single photon sources with speeds exceeding 1 GHz.

  10. Integral magnetic ignition pickup trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R.

    1992-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a trigger system for the ignition system of an internal combustion engine having a crankcase with a rotatable crankshaft therein, and a flywheel on one end of the crankcase connected to an end of the crankshaft. It comprises: a nonferromagnetic disk-shaped hub for connection to the crankshaft and rotatable therewith on the end opposite the flywheel; and a stationary sensor mounted adjacent the hub for detecting impulses from the magnetically responsive elements as the hub rotates and utilizing the impulses to trigger the ignition system.

  11. Mass Movement-Induced Tsunami Hazard on Perialpine Lake Lucerne (Switzerland): Scenarios and Numerical Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Mass Movement-Induced Tsunami Hazard on Perialpine Lake Lucerne (Switzerland): Scenarios of the sediments of Lake Lucerne have shown that massive subaqueous mass movements affecting unconsolidated

  12. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  13. Identification of Submarine Landslide for Tsunami Hazard Assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Using a Probabilistic Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohithakshan Parambath, Lisha

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    map, education, early warning and evacuation plans. Specifically in the GOM, assessing the tsunami hazard is to develop tsunami inundation map to identify potential submarine landslide sources, either by using a probabilistic approach or a...

  14. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  15. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution describes the trigger selection configuration system of the ATLAS low- and high-level trigger (HLT) and the upgrades it received in preparation for LHC Run 2. The ATLAS trigger configuration system is responsible for applying the physics selection parameters for the online data taking at both trigger levels and the proper connection of the trigger lines across those levels. Here the low-level trigger consists of the already existing central trigger (CT) and the new Level-1 Topological trigger (L1Topo), which has been added for Run 2. In detail the tasks of the configuration system during the online data taking are Application of the selection criteria, e.g. energy cuts, minimum multiplicities, trigger object correlation, at the three trigger components L1Topo, CT, and HLT On-the-fly, e.g. rate-dependent, generation and application of prescale factors to the CT and HLT to adjust the trigger rates to the data taking conditions, such as falling luminosity or rate spikes in the detector readout ...

  16. The Externalities of Strong Social Capital: Post-Tsunami Recovery in Southeast India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Externalities of Strong Social Capital: Post-Tsunami Recovery in Southeast India DANIEL P villages in Tamil Nadu, India following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, this paper demonstrates that high findings have important implications for academic studies of social capital and policy formation for future

  17. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM); Cowgill, Donald F. (Danville, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  18. Reflection and tunneling of ocean waves observed at a submarine Jim Thomson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    ., 1995], and can be used as proxies to detect tsunamis [Rabinovich and Stephenson, 2004]. Much transport and morphological evolution [Guza and Inman, 1975; Werner and Fink, 1993]. Consequently, mod- els be included in models for coastal waves, currents, and morphological evolution. 2. Theory [3] The reflection

  19. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  20. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  1. The ATLAS Trigger System Commissioning and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hamilton

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009 and 2010 LHC running at centre of mass energies of 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV, and 7 TeV. This paper presents the ongoing work to commission the ATLAS trigger with proton collisions, including an overview of the performance of the trigger based on extensive online running. We describe how the trigger has evolved with increasing LHC luminosity and give a brief overview of plans for forthcoming LHC running.

  2. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisa Musto

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

  3. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  4. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, S., E-mail: SJafari@guilan.ac.ir; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  5. Intelligent trigger processor for the crystal box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, G.H.; Butler, H.S.; Cooper, M.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large solid angle modular NaI(Tl) detector with 432 phototubes and 88 trigger scintillators is being used to search simultaneously for three lepton flavor changing decays of muon. A beam of up to 10/sup 6/ muons stopping per second with a 6% duty factor would yield up to 1000 triggers per second from random triple coincidences. A reduction of the trigger rate to 10 Hz is required from a hardwired primary trigger processor described in this paper. Further reduction to < 1 Hz is achieved by a microprocessor based secondary trigger processor. The primary trigger hardware imposes voter coincidence logic, stringent timing requirements, and a non-adjacency requirement in the trigger scintillators defined by hardwired circuits. Sophisticated geometric requirements are imposed by a PROM-based matrix logic, and energy and vector-momentum cuts are imposed by a hardwired processor using LSI flash ADC's and digital arithmetic loci. The secondary trigger employs four satellite microprocessors to do a sparse data scan, multiplex the data acquisition channels and apply additional event filtering.

  6. Upf1 Phosphorylation Triggers Translational Repression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    Upf1 Phosphorylation Triggers Translational Repression during Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay Olaf) during a pioneer round of translation. The subsequent binding of Upf1 to the EJC triggers Upf1 phosphorylation. We provide evi- dence that phospho-Upf1 functions after nonsense codon recognition during steps

  7. Gravity Waves Gravity Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    ;14/03/2014 6 H L H L L Phase & Group Velocity #12;14/03/2014 7 Doppler Effect #12;14/03/2014 8 Shock Waves #12;14/03/2014 14 Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A Supernova blast waves #12;14/03/2014 15 Tycho's Remnant (SN 1572AD A SNR flythrough Theory of Supernova Blast Waves Supernovae: Type Ia Subsonic deflagration wave turning

  8. Numerical Simulation of Three-Dimensional Tsunami Generation by Subaerial Landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Gyeongbo 1978-

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Tsunamis are one of the most catastrophic natural events impacting coastal regions often generated by undersea earthquakes. Nevertheless, in enclosed basins, i.e., fjords, reservoirs and lakes, subaerial or submarine landslides can initiate...

  9. The humanitarian relief supply chain : analysis of the 2004 South East Asia earthquake and Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Timothy Edward

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Humanitarian relief supply chains are not well documented. This thesis describes humanitarian relief supply chains in general and those specifically utilized in the 2004 South East Asia Earthquake and Tsunami relief effort. ...

  10. Probabilistic Hazard Assessment of Tsunamis Induced by the Translational Failure of Multiple Submarine Rigid Landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez Martinez, Arturo

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical study aimed at probabilistically assessing the coastal hazard posed by tsunamis induced by one-dimensional submarine rigid landslides that experience translational failure is presented. The numerical model here utilized is the finite...

  11. Potential for tsunami detection and early-warning using space-based passive microwave radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Rebecca G. (Rebecca Gwen)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat of a tsunami in coastal communities is considerable, especially in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Current warning systems consist of two networks: (1) a network of seismometers, and (2) a network of sea level ...

  12. Time and event triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Roger

    Time and event triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications ROGER JOHANSSON and event triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications 1 ROGER JOHANSSON Department triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications ROGER JOHANSSON © ROGER JOHANSSON, 2004

  13. The dangers of being trigger--happy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, J E; Bressert, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the evidence offered for triggered star formation against the backdrop provided by recent numerical simulations of feedback from massive stars at or below giant molecular cloud sizescales. We compile a catalogue of sixty--seven observational papers, mostly published over the last decade, and examine the signposts most commonly used to infer the presence of triggered star formation. We then determine how well these signposts perform in a recent suite of hydrodynamic simulations of star formation including feedback from O--type stars performed by Dale et al (2012a, b, 2013a, b, 2014). We find that none of the observational markers improve the chances of correctly identifying a given star as triggered by more than factors of two at most. This limits the fidelity of these techniques in interpreting star formation histories. We therefore urge caution in interpreting observations of star formation near feedback--driven structures in terms of triggering.

  14. Intriguing DNA Editor Has a Structural Trigger

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intriguing DNA Editor Has a Structural Trigger Print A powerful new tool for genome editing and gene regulation has emerged in the form of a family of enzymes known as Cas9. Cas9...

  15. Ocean fronts trigger high latitude phytoplankton blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    Density fronts are ubiquitous features of the upper ocean. Here, numerical simulations show that restratification at fronts inhibits vertical mixing, triggering phytoplankton blooms in low-light conditions. The stability ...

  16. atlas muon trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  17. atlas trigger monitoring: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  18. atlas central trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  19. atrial arrhythmia triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  20. arachidonic acid triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  1. activation trigger aminoglycoside-mediated: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  2. active myofascial trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  3. arabidopsis leaves triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  4. atlas trigger event: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  5. acidic organelles triggered: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  6. atlas jet trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  7. atlas level-2 trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  8. acute hepatitis triggered: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  9. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Peter W; Varela, Jaime

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism p...

  10. Generation of acoustic-gravity waves in ionospheric HF heating experiments : simulating large-scale natural heat sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradipta, Rezy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence ...

  11. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 461, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 137-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    of South-East Asia and the unique videotaped scenes of the tsunami evolution over the coastal zone-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI- RESISTING COASTAL STRUCTURES Christopher Koutitas* and Theophanis The recent mega-tsunami event on the 26th December 2004, revealed the importance and the necessity

  12. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  13. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  14. Non-equilibrium evolution of a "Tsunami" Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyanovsky, D; Holman, R; Kumar, S P; Pisarski, R D; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Vega, Hector J. de; Holman, Richard; Pisarski, Robert D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to study the non-equilibrium features of heavy-ion collisions by following the evolution of an initial state with a large number of quanta with a distribution around a momentum |\\vec k_0| corresponding to a thin spherical shell in momentum space, a `tsunami'. An O(N); ({\\vec \\Phi}^2)^2 model field theory in the large N limit is used as a framework to study the non-perturbative aspects of the non-equilibrium dynamics including a resummation of the effects of the medium (the initial particle distribution). In a theory where the symmetry is spontaneously broken in the absence of the medium, when the initial number of particles per correlation volume is chosen to be larger than a critical value the medium effects can restore the symmetry of the initial state. We show that if one begins with such a symmetry-restored, non-thermal, initial state, non-perturbative effects automatically induce spinodal instabilities leading to a dynamical breaking of the symmetry. As a result there is explosive particle pro...

  15. Non-equilibrium evolution of a `Tsunami': Dynamical Symmetry Breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; Hector J. de Vega; Richard Holman; S. Prem Kumar; Robert D. Pisarski

    1997-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to study the non-equilibrium features of heavy-ion collisions by following the evolution of an initial state with a large number of quanta with a distribution around a momentum |\\vec k_0| corresponding to a thin spherical shell in momentum space, a `tsunami'. An O(N); ({\\vec \\Phi}^2)^2 model field theory in the large N limit is used as a framework to study the non-perturbative aspects of the non-equilibrium dynamics including a resummation of the effects of the medium (the initial particle distribution). In a theory where the symmetry is spontaneously broken in the absence of the medium, when the initial number of particles per correlation volume is chosen to be larger than a critical value the medium effects can restore the symmetry of the initial state. We show that if one begins with such a symmetry-restored, non-thermal, initial state, non-perturbative effects automatically induce spinodal instabilities leading to a dynamical breaking of the symmetry. As a result there is explosive particle production and a redistribution of the particles towards low momentum due to the nonlinearity of the dynamics. The asymptotic behavior displays the onset of Bose condensation of pions and the equation of state at long times is that of an ultrarelativistic gas although the momentum distribution is non-thermal.

  16. Environmental Triggers that Affect Children's Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Triggers that Affect Children's Health A Clean Environment Can Lead to Better Health! An online course for child care providers and parents, presented by the Texas AgriLife Extension Service Children's Health Course developed by Janie L. Harris, M.Ed. Extension Housing and Environment Specialist

  17. High Level Trigger Configuration and Handling of Trigger Tables in the CMS Filter Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, G; Behrens, U; Boyer, V; Branson, J; Brett, A; Cano, E; Carboni, A; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; O'dell, V; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Kim, J C; Klute, M; Lipeles, E; Perez, J L; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mlot, E G; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Racz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, I; Tsirigkas, D; Varela, J

    2009-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently being commissioned and is scheduled to collect the first pp collision data in 2008. CMS features a two-level trigger system. The Level-1 trigger, based on custom hardware, is designed to reduce the collision rate of 40 MHz to approximately 100 kHz. Data for events accepted by the Level-1 trigger are read out and assembled by an Event Builder. The High Level Trigger (HLT) employs a set of sophisticated software algorithms, to analyze the complete event information, and further reduce the accepted event rate for permanent storage and analysis. This paper describes the design and implementation of the HLT Configuration Management system. First experiences with commissioning of the HLT system are also reported.

  18. Preliminary Report of the AMS analysis of tsunami deposits in Tohoku -- Japan -- 18th to the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wassmer, P; Hart, D E; Hiraishi, T; Azuma, R; Koenig, B; Trautmann, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentary records of tsunamis are a precious tool to assess the occurrence of past events, as attested by an abundant literature, which has seen a particular 'boom' in the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. Despite an extensive literature, there is very little to no understanding of the role that the changing coastal environment is playing on the record of a tsunami, and for a given location, it is still unclear whether the largest tsunamis leave the largest amount of deposits. To research this question, the present study took place in Japan, in the Tohoku Region at Agawa-pond, because the pond act as a sediment trap. Using a sediment-slicer, a 1 m thick deposit was retrieved, from which 4 tsunami sequences were identified, including the latest 2011 tsunami. Using a series of sedimentary proxies: the AMS (Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility), grain size analysis, quartz morphoscopy (morphology and surface characteristics) and the analysis of microfossils, disparities b...

  19. HMSC Safety Committee Minutes: March 18, 2005 TSUNAMI PREPAREDNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , submarine landslides can cause higher waves. - We are sitting on highly liquefiable sand. - Our LNG tank was not built under state regulations ­ it was build under federal regulations. There are ways to build LNG

  20. Characterization of tsunamigenic earthquake in Java region based on seismic wave calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribadi, Sugeng, E-mail: sugengpribadimsc@gmail.com [Badan Meteorologi Klimatologi Geofisika, Jl Angkasa I No. 2 Jakarta (Indonesia); Afnimar,; Puspito, Nanang T.; Ibrahim, Gunawan [Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is to characterize the source mechanism of tsunamigenic earthquake based on seismic wave calculation. The source parameter used are the ratio (?) between the radiated seismic energy (E) and seismic moment (M{sub o}), moment magnitude (M{sub W}), rupture duration (T{sub o}) and focal mechanism. These determine the types of tsunamigenic earthquake and tsunami earthquake. We calculate the formula using the teleseismic wave signal processing with the initial phase of P wave with bandpass filter 0.001 Hz to 5 Hz. The amount of station is 84 broadband seismometer with far distance of 30° to 90°. The 2 June 1994 Banyuwangi earthquake with M{sub W}=7.8 and the 17 July 2006 Pangandaran earthquake with M{sub W}=7.7 include the criteria as a tsunami earthquake which distributed about ratio ?=?6.1, long rupture duration To>100 s and high tsunami H>7 m. The 2 September 2009 Tasikmalaya earthquake with M{sub W}=7.2, ?=?5.1 and To=27 s which characterized as a small tsunamigenic earthquake.

  1. Tsunami response at Wake Island: azimuthal mode analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creswell, Wiltie Austin

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occur at certain resonant frequencies. In fact, the response versus frequency for selected azimuthal modes re- sembles, in many respects, that of a psraboloidal island, which is known to partially trap wave energy incident upon it. The implication... near a small Pacific atoll where the bathymetric effects would be minimized at least for the longer period waves. With this rationale in mind, Van Dorn (1960) installed specially designed long period recording gauges near several small Pacific...

  2. Local Runup Amplification By Resonant Wave Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis; Dutykh, Denys

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until now the analysis of long wave runup on a plane beach has been focused on finding its maximum value, failing to capture the existence of resonant regimes. One-dimensional numerical simulations in the framework of the Nonlinear Shallow Water Equations (NSWE) are used to investigate the Boundary Value Problem (BVP) for plane and non-trivial beaches. Monochromatic waves, as well as virtual wave-gage recordings from real tsunami simulations, are used as forcing conditions to the BVP. Resonant phenomena between the incident wavelength and the beach slope are found to occur, which result in enhanced runup of non-leading waves. The evolution of energy reveals the existence of a quasi-periodic state for the case of sinusoidal waves, the energy level of which, as well as the time required to reach that state, depend on the incident wavelength for a given beach slope. Dispersion is found to slightly reduce the value of maximum runup, but not to change the overall picture. Runup amplification occurs for both leadin...

  3. Review article Assessment of tsunami hazard to the U.S. Atlantic margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    , and the presence of ten nuclear power plants along the coast, make this region highly vulnerable to flooding to the generation of landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin. Analysis of landslide statistics along the fluvial initiated by seismic acceleration, and failed as aggregate slope failures. How tsunamis are generated from

  4. LETTER Earth Planets Space, 62, 353358, 2010 Can undersea voltage measurements detect tsunamis?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    monitoring systems. How- ever, no reported attempt has been made to study the electric fields in the oceans -dimensional electromagnetic induction code was used to predict the electric fields induced by the Indian Ocean Tsunami an alternative way of monitoring ocean flow. Secondary elec- tric and magnetic fields are induced when

  5. The LHCb trigger and its performance in 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M.

    This paper presents the design of the LHCb trigger and its performance on data taken at the LHC in 2011. A principal goal of LHCb is to perform flavour physics measurements, and the trigger is designed to distinguish charm ...

  6. Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting Nithya N. Vijayakumar {rramachandran, xli}@itsc.uah.edu Abstract-- Mesoscale meteorology forecasting as a data driven application Triggers, Data Mining, Stream Processing, Meteorology Forecasting I. INTRODUCTION Mesoscale meteorologists

  7. Gamma Ray Array Detector Trigger Sub-System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du Zhong-Wei; Su Hong; Qian Yi; Kong Jie

    2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one of External Target Facility (ETF) subsystems at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou. The trigger subsystem of the GRAD has been developed based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGAs) and PXI interface. The GRAD trigger subsystem makes prompt L1 trigger decisions to select valid events. These decisions are made by processing the hit signals from 1024 CsI scintillators of the GRAD. According to the physical requirements, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates 12-bit trigger signals that are passed to the ETF global trigger system. In addition, the GRAD trigger subsystem generates trigger data that are packed and transmitted to the host computer via PXI bus for off-line analysis. The trigger processing is implemented in the front-end electronics and one FPGA of the trigger module. The logic of PXI transmission and reconfiguration is implemented in the other FPGA of the trigger module. The reliable and efficient performance in the Gamma-ray experiments demonstrates that the GRAD trigger subsystem is capable to satisfy the physical requirements.

  8. Jet Trigger in the H1 Experiment at HERA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubak, Ana [University of Montenegro, Cetinjski put bb, Podgorica (Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel calorimeter trigger at the first level is developed to complement existing LAr trigger in the H1 experiment at HERA. It searches for localised energy depositions in the calorimeter, thus avoiding summing up noise distributed over large parts of the calorimeter. This will improve the efficiency of triggering on low energy depositions in the calorimeter.

  9. New methods for trigger electronics development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, W.E.; Stern, E.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The large and complex nature of RHIC experiments and the tight time schedule for their construction requires that new techniques for designing the electronics should be employed. This is particularly true of the trigger and data acquisition electronics which has to be ready for turn-on of the experiment. We describe the use of the Workview package from VIEWlogic Inc. for design, simulation, and verification of a flash ADC readout system. We also show how field-programmable gate arrays such as the Xilinx 4000 might be employed to construct or prototype circuits with a large number of gates while preserving flexibility.

  10. Triggering events with GPU at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing complexity of events produced in LHC collisions demands more and more computing power both for the on line selection and for the offline reconstruction of events. In recent years, the explosive performance growth of massively parallel processors like Graphical Processing Units both in computing power and in low energy consumption, make GPU extremely attractive for using them in a complex high energy experiment like ATLAS. Together with the optimization of reconstruction algorithms exploiting this new massively parallel paradigm, a small scale prototype of the full ATLAS High Level Trigger exploiting GPU has been implemented. We discuss the integration procedure of this prototype, the achieved performance and the prospects for the future.

  11. Triggered star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; Kenji Bekki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We discuss how tidal interaction between the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and the Galaxy triggers galaxy-wide star formation in the Clouds for the last ? 0.2 Gyr based on our chemodynamical simulations on the Clouds. Our simulations demonstrate that the tidal interaction induces the formation of asymmetric spiral arms with high gas densities and consequently triggers star formation within the arms in the LMC. Star formation rate in the present LMC is significantly enhanced just above the eastern edge of the LMC’s stellar bar owing to the tidal interaction. The location of the enhanced star formation is very similar to the observed location of 30 Doradus, which suggests that the formation of 30 Doradus is closely associated with the last Magellanic collision about 0.2 Gyr ago. The tidal interaction can dramatically compress gas initially within the outer part of the SMC so that new stars can be formed from the gas to become intergalactic young stars in the inter-Cloud region (e.g., the Magellanic Bridge). The metallicity distribution function of the newly formed stars in the Magellanic Bridge has a peak of [Fe/H] ? ?0.8, which is significantly lower than the stellar metallicity of the SMC.

  12. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  13. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  14. CDF/MEMO/TRIGGER/CDFR/5424 Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /4) + CSP Hit Bit 05 CMU High Pt Stub + CMP Stub (3/4) + CSP Hit 1 #12; Bit 06 Dimuon Test Bit - 2 CMU Low > 120deg) Bit 18 Cosmic Trigger II : 2 CMP Stubs (3/4) + CSP Hits (Top & Bottom) Bit 19 Bunch Zero Crossing Trigger Note A: CSP hits will be included in the de#12;nition of trigger bits 4 and 5. However, we

  15. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  16. Triggering events with GPUs at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing complexity of events produced in LHC collisions demands more and more computing power both for the online selection and for the offline reconstruction of events. In recent years, the explosive performance growth of massively parallel processors like Graphics Processing Units~(GPU) both in computing power and in low energy consumption, make GPU extremely attractive for using them in a complex high energy experiment like ATLAS. Together with the optimization of reconstruction algorithms this new massively parallel paradigm is exploited. For this purpose a small scale prototype of the full ATLAS High Level Trigger involving GPU has been implemented. We discuss the integration procedure of this prototype, the achieved performance and the prospects for the future

  17. Commissioning of the ATLAS Level-1 Trigger with Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thilo Pauly

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector at CERN's Large Hadron Collider will be exposed to proton-proton collisions from beams crossing at 40 MHz. A three-level trigger system was designed to select potentially interesting events and reduce the incoming rate to 100-200 Hz. The first trigger level (LVL1) is implemented in custom-built electronics, the second and third trigger levels are realized in software. Based on calorimeter information and hits in dedicated muon-trigger detectors, the LVL1 decision is made by the central-trigger processor yielding an output rate of less than 100 kHz. The allowed latency for the trigger decision at this stage is less than 2.5 microseconds. Installation of the final LVL1 trigger system at the ATLAS site is in full swing, to be completed later this year. We present a status report of the main components of the first-level trigger and the in-situ commissioning of the full trigger chain with cosmic-ray muons.

  18. Highly coherent electron beam from a laser-triggered tungsten needle tip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehberger, Dominik; Eisele, Max; Krüger, Michael; Noe, Jonathan; Högele, Alexander; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a quantitative measurement of the spatial coherence of electrons emitted from a sharp metal needle tip. We investigate the coherence in photoemission using near-ultraviolet laser triggering with a photon energy of 3.1 eV and compare it to DC-field emission. A carbon-nanotube is brought in close proximity to the emitter tip to act as an electrostatic biprism. From the resulting electron matter wave interference fringes we deduce an upper limit of the effective source radius both in laser-triggered and DC-field emission mode, which quantifies the spatial coherence of the emitted electron beam. We obtain $(0.80\\pm 0.05)\\,$nm in laser-triggered and $(0.55\\pm 0.02)\\,$nm in DC-field emission mode, revealing that the outstanding coherence properties of electron beams from needle tip field emitters are largely maintained in laser-induced emission. In addition, the relative coherence width of 0.36 of the photoemitted electron beam is the largest observed so far. The preservation of electronic coherence du...

  19. Application of the SCALE TSUNAMI Tools for the Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations Involving 233U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Don [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiochemical Development Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been storing solid materials containing 233U for decades. Preparations are under way to process these materials into a form that is inherently safe from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. This will be accomplished by down-blending the {sup 233}U materials with depleted or natural uranium. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, a study has been performed using the SCALE sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools to demonstrate how these tools could be used to validate nuclear criticality safety calculations of selected process and storage configurations. ISOTEK nuclear criticality safety staff provided four models that are representative of the criticality safety calculations for which validation will be needed. The SCALE TSUNAMI-1D and TSUNAMI-3D sequences were used to generate energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles for each nuclide and reaction present in the four safety analysis models, also referred to as the applications, and in a large set of critical experiments. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was used together with the sensitivity profiles and the cross-section uncertainty data contained in the SCALE covariance data files to propagate the cross-section uncertainties ({Delta}{sigma}/{sigma}) to k{sub eff} uncertainties ({Delta}k/k) for each application model. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was also used to evaluate the similarity of each of the 672 critical experiments with each application. Results of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment are presented in this report. A total of 142 experiments were judged to be similar to application 1, and 68 experiments were judged to be similar to application 2. None of the 672 experiments were judged to be adequately similar to applications 3 and 4. Discussion of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment is provided for each of the four applications. Example upper subcritical limits (USLs) were generated for application 1 based on trending of the energy of average lethargy of neutrons causing fission, trending of the TSUNAMI similarity parameters, and use of data adjustment techniques.

  20. Trigger LVL1 "Tower Builder" Add: Cables transmission of fast pulses for: The level 1 calorimeter-trigger in ATLAS (sent on 24-01-1995)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascual, J

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trigger LVL1 "Tower Builder" Add: Cables transmission of fast pulses for: The level 1 calorimeter-trigger in ATLAS (sent on 24-01-1995)

  1. The March 11, 2011 Tohoku M9.0 earthquake-induced tsunami and coastal inundation along the Japanese coast: A model assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    in Japan and around the world about the coastal environment and its potential long-term impacts.npa.go.jp/archive/keibi/biki/higaijokyo.pdf). The tsunami also caused major infrastructure damage at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP to investigate different aspects of the earthquake, tsunami, inundation, and nuclear disaster (EERI, 2012

  2. Investigation of possible resonant exitation at an island by tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muirhead, Charles Robert

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). For the variable depth region, r = r = r , of the given model, o 1' the general solution of (1) for monochromatic waves is -1 urn -0 - iX t r (a r "+ b r n) cos (nB) n n =o where m=(1+n-T) 2 2 n 1 mr c c =- (gD1) and a and b are constants to be determined.... Since c may be real n n n or imaginary, the r dependency of 0 msy be monotonic or oscillatory. Equation (5) may be put into the following form, which is convenient for computation: n=o -1 r r L A cosh(o ln ? ) n r r "I -imt + B sinh(tt ln ? ) J...

  3. Hydroelastic response of a floating runway to cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ertekin, R. C., E-mail: ertekin@hawaii.edu [Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Xia, Dingwu [Engineering Services, British Petroleum GoM, Houston, Texas 77079 (United States)] [Engineering Services, British Petroleum GoM, Houston, Texas 77079 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydroelastic response of mat-type Very Large Floating Structures (VLFSs) to severe sea conditions, such as tsunamis and hurricanes, must be assessed for safety and survivability. An efficient and robust nonlinear hydroelastic model is required to predict accurately the motion of and the dynamic loads on a VLFS due to such large waves. We develop a nonlinear theory to predict the hydroelastic response of a VLFS in the presence of cnoidal waves and compare the predictions with the linear theory that is also developed here. This hydroelastic problem is formulated by directly coupling the structure with the fluid, by use of the Level I Green-Naghdi theory for the fluid motion and the Kirchhoff thin plate theory for the runway. The coupled fluid structure system, together with the appropriate jump conditions are solved in two-dimensions by the finite-difference method. The numerical model is used to study the nonlinear response of a VLFS to storm waves which are modeled by use of the cnoidal-wave theory. Parametric studies show that the nonlinearity of the waves is very important in accurately predicting the dynamic bending moment and wave run-up on a VLFS in high seas.

  4. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  5. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakahama, Yu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully for the online event selection during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. During the next data-taking period starting in early 2015 (Run-2) the LHC will operate at a centre-of-mass energy of about 13 TeV resulting in roughly five times higher trigger rates. We will review the upgrades to the ATLAS Trigger system that have been implemented during the shutdown and that will allow us to cope with these increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter trigger, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module, improvements in the L1 muon system and the merging of the prev...

  6. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  7. Commissioning of the ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cibran Santamarina Rios for the ATLAS collaboration

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the start-up of the LHC end of 2009, the trigger commissioning is in full swing. The ATLAS trigger system is divided into three levels: the hardware-based first level trigger, and the software-based second level trigger and Event Filter, collectively referred to as the High Level Trigger (HLT). Initially, events have been selected online based on the Level-1 selections with the HLT algorithms run but not rejecting any events. This has been an important step in the commissioning of these triggers to ensure their correct functioning and subsequently to enable the HLT selections. Due to increasing LHC luminosity and the large QCD cross section, this has been a vital step to select leptons from J/$\\Psi$, bottom, charm, W and Z decays. This presentation gives an overview of the trigger performance of the electron and photon selection. Comparisons of the online selection variables with the offline reconstruction are shown as well as comparisons of data with MC simulations on which the current selection tuning is performed.

  8. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of 2 with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the double amount of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to 3 different sub-detector combinations. In this contribution, we give an overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis of the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are m...

  9. A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu Yu, E-mail: guojuan@bao.ac.c [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatories, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

  10. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  11. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  12. alarmone signalling triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30 Gamma Ray Array Detector Trigger Sub-System Nuclear Experiment (arXiv) Summary: Gamma Ray Array Detector (GRAD) is one of External Target Facility (ETF) subsystems at the...

  13. Advanced integrated safeguards using front-end-triggering devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Whitty, W.J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses potential uses of front-end-triggering devices for enhanced safeguards. Such systems incorporate video surveillance as well as radiation and other sensors. Also covered in the report are integration issues and analysis techniques.

  14. Controls on earthquake rupture and triggering mechanisms in subduction zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llenos, Andrea Lesley

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large earthquake rupture and triggering mechanisms that drive seismicity in subduction zones are investigated in this thesis using a combination of earthquake observations, statistical and physical modeling. A comparison ...

  15. atlas tau trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beyond the Standard Model, and to get precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson decaying to tau-leptons. We present the performance of the hadronic tau trigger...

  16. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 12th Workshop on Electronics For LHC and Future19-24, 2007 Front-end electronics and trigger systems –about a revolution in front-end electronics for large- scale

  17. A self-triggered readout for a time projection chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner, Andrew Thompson, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-triggering readout for a time projection chamber (TPC) is presented, with applications to novel forms of data acquisition for high energy physics application. The construction and initial testing of the readout ...

  18. Bioresponsive Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Neetu

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential carriers for therapeutic payloads. However, achieving triggered drug release from MSNPs in vivo has been challenging. Here, we ...

  19. atlas first-level trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  20. atlas high-level trigger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  1. atlas high-level triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  2. auxin-induced ethylene triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  3. agents stress-resistance triggers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  4. alpha-synuclein triggers microglial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow for a larger variety and more sophisticated trigger criteria. In addition, the software controlling the central trigger processor (CTP) has been extended to allow the...

  5. 273Bulletin of the World Health Organization | February 2007, 85 (2) Tsunami mortality in Aceh Province, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    Province, Indonesia Shannon Doocy,a Abdur Rofi,b Claire Moodie,c Eric Spring,c Scott Bradley,c Gilbert Burnhama & Courtland Robinsona Objective Nine tsunami-affected districts in Aceh, Indonesia, were surveyed. Indonesia's Aceh Province suffered the greatest mortality, with widespread destruction extending along more

  6. Near-and Far-field Tsunami Hazard from the Potential Flank Collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Palma (Canary Islands) could result in a large tsunami hav- ing effects throughout the North Atlantic-field on neighboring Canary Islands, and their far-field coastal hazard would still be significant at some locations-submarine landslides of O(100 km3) volume around the Canary Islands (Spain). Masson et al. (2002) iden- tified at least

  7. FAR-FIELD TSUNAMI IMPACT ON THE U.S. EAST COAST FROM AN EXTREME FLANK COLLAPSE OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    VOLCANO (CANARY ISLANDS) BY ANNETTE R. GRILLI AND STEPHAN T. GRILLI DEPT. OF OCEAN ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY that the potential en masse flank collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano (CVV) on La Palma (Canary Islands, Spain) could cause a large tsunami dramatically impacting both the Canary Islands and the Northwest African

  8. 15,000 Years of mass-movement history in Lake Lucerne: Implications for seismic and tsunami hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    15,000 Years of mass-movement history in Lake Lucerne: Implications for seismic and tsunami hazards, Central Switzerland 15,000 Years of mass-movement history in Lake Lucerne 409 ABSTRACT A chronological Lucerne (Vierwaldstät- tersee) reveals a complex history of natural hazards affecting the lake and its

  9. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  10. Integrated simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet Through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet Through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

  11. Integrated Simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

  12. TESTING TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION IN SIX H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirienzo, William J.; Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3818, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Brogan, Crystal; Friesen, Rachel K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Churchwell, Ed, E-mail: dirienzo@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated six H II regions with infrared, bright rimmed bubble or cometary morphology, in search of quantitative evidence for triggered star formation, both collect and collapse and radiatively driven implosion (RDI). We identified and classified 458 young stellar objects (YSOs) in and around the H II regions. YSOs were determined by fitting a collection of radiative transfer model spectral energy distributions to infrared photometry for a large sample of point sources. We determined areas where there exist enhanced populations of relatively unevolved YSOs on the bright rims of these regions, suggesting that star formation has been triggered there. We further investigated the physical properties of the regions by using radio continuum emission as a proxy for ionizing flux powering the H II regions, and {sup 13}CO (1-0) observations to measure masses and gravitational stability of molecular clumps. We used an analytical model of collect and collapse triggered star formation, as well as a simulation of RDI, and thus we compare the observed properties of the molecular gas with those predicted in the triggering scenarios. Notably, those regions in our sample that show evidence of cometary, or 'blister', morphology are more likely to show evidence of triggering.

  13. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 55, No. 190, 2009 193 Seismic observations of glaciogenic ocean waves (micro-tsunamis)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    and Department of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801, USA ABSTRACT. Seismometers deployed over a 3 year period on icebergs in the Ross Sea that these phenomena may be exploited in the future (using more purposefully designed observation schemes

  14. A semiconductor source of triggered entangled photon pairs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gilchrist; K. J. Resch; A. G. White

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The realisation of a triggered entangled photon source will be of great importance in quantum information, including for quantum key distribution and quantum computation. We show here that: 1) the source reported in ``A semiconductor source of triggered entangled photon pairs''[1. Stevenson et al., Nature 439, 179 (2006)]} is not entangled; 2) the entanglement indicators used in Ref. 1 are inappropriate, relying on assumptions invalidated by their own data; and 3) even after simulating subtraction of the significant quantity of background noise, their source has insignificant entanglement.

  15. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  16. Performance of the online track reconstruction and impact on hadronic triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentina Gori

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. The software-base HLT requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. This is going to be even more challenging during Run II, with a higher centre-of-mass energy, a higher instantaneous luminosity and pileup, and the impact of out-of-time pileup due to the 25 ns bunch spacing. The online algorithms need to be optimised for such a complex environment in order to keep the output rate under control without impacting the physics efficiency of the online selection. Tracking, for instance, will play an even more important role in the event reconstruction. In this poster we will present the performance of the online track and vertex reconstruction algorithms, and their impact on the hadronic triggers that make use of b-tagging and of jets reconstructed with the Particle Flow technique. We will show the impact of these triggers on physics performance of the experiment, and the latest plans for improvements in view of the Run II data taking in 2015.

  17. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  18. Carbon Detonation and Shock-Triggered Helium Burning in Neutron Star Superbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Nevin N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong degeneracy of the 12C ignition layer on an accreting neutron star results in a hydrodynamic thermonuclear runaway, in which the nuclear heating time becomes shorter than the local dynamical time. We model the resulting combustion wave during these superbursts as an upward propagating detonation. We solve the reactive fluid flow and show that the detonation propagates through the deepest layers of fuel and drives a shock wave that steepens as it travels upward into lower density material. The shock is sufficiently strong upon reaching the freshly accreted H/He layer that it triggers unstable 4He burning if the superburst occurs during the latter half of the regular Type I bursting cycle; this is likely the origin of the bright Type I precursor bursts observed at the onset of superbursts. The cooling of the outermost shock-heated layers produces a bright, ~0.1s, flash that precedes the Type I burst by a few seconds; this may be the origin of the spike seen at the burst onset in 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636...

  19. Triggered Star Formation in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association (Sco OB2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the star formation history of the Upper Scorpius OB association, the youngest part of Sco OB2. A wide field (160 square-degree) survey for low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars enabled us to increase the number of known low-mass members of Upper Scorpius to nearly 100 stars. In a detailed analysis of the locations of these stars in the HR diagram, taking proper account of the uncertainties and the effects of unresolved binaries, we find a mean stellar age of about 5 Myr and no evidence for a significant age dispersion among these stars. This implies that the star formation history of the Upper Scorpius association was dominated by a short star-burst, which started about 5 Myr ago and ended probably not more than one or two Myr later. Interestingly, the structure and kinematics of the HI shells surrounding the Sco OB2 association show that the shock wave of a supernova explosion in the nearby Upper Centaurus-Lupus association, the oldest part of Sco OB2, crossed Upper Scorpius just about 5 Myr ago. This strongly suggests that this supernova shock wave triggered the star-burst in Upper Scorpius.

  20. Carbon Detonation and Shock-Triggered Helium Burning in Neutron Star Superbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nevin N. Weinberg; Lars Bildsten

    2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The strong degeneracy of the 12C ignition layer on an accreting neutron star results in a hydrodynamic thermonuclear runaway, in which the nuclear heating time becomes shorter than the local dynamical time. We model the resulting combustion wave during these superbursts as an upward propagating detonation. We solve the reactive fluid flow and show that the detonation propagates through the deepest layers of fuel and drives a shock wave that steepens as it travels upward into lower density material. The shock is sufficiently strong upon reaching the freshly accreted H/He layer that it triggers unstable 4He burning if the superburst occurs during the latter half of the regular Type I bursting cycle; this is likely the origin of the bright Type I precursor bursts observed at the onset of superbursts. The cooling of the outermost shock-heated layers produces a bright, ~0.1s, flash that precedes the Type I burst by a few seconds; this may be the origin of the spike seen at the burst onset in 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636-54, the only two bursts observed with RXTE at high time resolution. The dominant products of the 12C detonation are 28Si, 32S, and 36Ar. Gupta et al. showed that a crust composed of such intermediate mass elements has a larger heat flux than one composed of iron-peak elements and helps bring the superburst ignition depth into better agreement with values inferred from observations.

  1. Does Pet Arrival Trigger Prosocial Behaviors in Individuals with Autism?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Does Pet Arrival Trigger Prosocial Behaviors in Individuals with Autism? Marine Grandgeorge1 between the presence or the arrival of pets in families with an individual with autism and the changes of pets - two groups of 12 individuals and two groups of 8 individuals were assigned to: study 1 (pet

  2. Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Cooperative Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Photothermally Triggered Drug Delivery By Ji nanoparticles and drug molecules can be co- encapsulated in liposomes to simultaneously perform multiple and luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles to overcome such problems,[5,6] although these more complicated

  3. Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano Edward W. Knightly 1 Thursday, April 11 difficult to achieve in mobile devices Thursday, April 11, 2013 #12;5 Virtual MISO (vMISO) TX RX vMISO, 2013 #12;1. System Model 1.1. Distributed System 1.2. Single-Antenna Nodes 6 vMISO

  4. Externally triggered coherent two-photon emission from hydrogen molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Miyamoto; Hideaki Hara; Takahiko Masuda; Noboru Sasao; Minoru Tanaka; Satoshi Uetake; Akihiro Yoshimi; Koji Yoshimura; Motohiko Yoshimura

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report coherent enhancement of two-photon emission from the excited vibrational state of molecular hydrogen triggered by irradiating mid-infrared pulses externally. We previously observed the two-photon emission triggered by the internally generated fourth Stokes photons. By injecting independent mid-infrared pulses externally, it is possible to control experimental parameters and investigate the mechanism in more detail. In this article, we describe the two-photon emission using the external trigger pulses. Its spectrum and dependence on the energy and timing of the trigger pulse are presented along with numerical simulations based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations. The measured number of emitted photons is 6 10^11 photons/pulse and the resulting enhancement factor from the spontaneous emission is more than 10^18. This value is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the previous experiment. External control of emission process is expected to be essential for observation of weaker process of radiative emission of neutrino pair.

  5. CDF/DOC/TRIGGER/CDFR/3145 Version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and trigger systems in the CDF Run II upgrade. It involves a bunch counter to time stamp the data which bit board header word. The header word will be specified below. Once the system is setup and running which have a different value will be an indication of loss of synchronization. During commissioning

  6. Implementation and Performance of the ATLAS Second Level Jet Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conde-Muíño, P; Brelier, B; Cranmer, K; Delsart, P A; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ferland, J; Idarraga, J; Johns, K; LeCompte, T; Potter, C; Robertson, S; Santamarina-Rios, C; Segura, E; Silverstein, D; Vachon, B; International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ATLAS is one of the four major LHC experiments, designed to cover a wide range of physics topics. In order to cope with a rate of 40 MHz and 25 interactions per bunch crossing, the ATLAS trigger system is divided in three different levels. The first one (LVL1, hardware based) identifies signatures in 2 microseconds that are confirmed by the the following trigger levels (software based). The Second Level Trigger (LVL2) only looks at a region of the space around the LVL1 signature (called Region of Interest or ROI), confirming/rejecting the event in about 10 ms, while the Event Filter (Third Level Trigger, EF) has potential full event access and larger processing times, of the order of 1 s. The jet selection starts at the LVL1 with dedicated processors that search for high ET hadronic energy depositions. At the LVL2, the jet signatures are verified with the execution of a dedicated, fast jet reconstruction algorithm. Given the fact that the main jet's background are jets,the energy calibration at the LVL2 is on...

  7. Adding Decision Procedures to SMT Solvers using Axioms with Triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Adding Decision Procedures to SMT Solvers using Axioms with Triggers Claire Dross Sylvain Conchon Johannes Kanig Andrei Paskevich December 9, 2013 Abstract SMT solvers are efficient tools to decide of a given SMT solver, and is done mainly by the developers of the solver itself. For many useful theories

  8. Robot Studies on SaccadeTriggered Visual Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    Robot Studies on Saccade­Triggered Visual Prediction Wolfram Schenck Computer Engineering Group@ti.uni-bielefeld.de April 12, 2012 Abstract Three robot studies on visual prediction are presented. In all of them, a vi- sual forward model is used, which predicts the visual consequences of saccade­ like camera movements

  9. A Fast hardware Tracker for the ATLAS Trigger system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandini, Carlo Enrico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trigger system at the ATLAS experiment is designed to lower the event rate occurring from the nominal bunch crossing at 40 MHz to about 1 kHz for a designed LHC luminosity of 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. After a very successful data taking run the LHC is expected to run starting in 2015 with much higher instantaneous luminosities and this will increase the load on the High Level Trigger system. More sophisticated algorithms will be needed to achieve higher background rejection while maintaining good efficiency for interesting physics signals, which requires a more extensive use of tracking information. The Fast Tracker (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to perform full-scan track-finding at the event rate of 100 kHz. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful, Field Programmable Gate Arrays form an important part of the system architecture, and the combinatorial problem of pattern r...

  10. A Fast hardware tracker for the ATLAS Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandini, Carlo Enrico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trigger system at the ATLAS experiment is designed to lower the event rate occurring from the nominal bunch crossing at 40 MHz to about 1 kHz for a designed LHC luminosity of 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. To achieve high background rejection while maintaining good efficiency for interesting physics signals, sophisticated algorithms are needed which require extensive use of tracking information. The Fast TracKer (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to perform track-finding at 100 kHz and based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) form an important part of the system architecture, and the combinatorial problem of pattern recognition is solved by ~8000 standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memories. The availability of the tracking and subsequent vertex information within a short latency ensures robust selections and allows improved trigger performance for the most difficult sign...

  11. A microfluidics study of the triggering of underwater landslides by earthquakes M. El Bettah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    of tsunamigenic landslides. Thus, both large- and small-scale experiments are performed; the former are standard to the point of liquefaction) caused by excess inter-granular pore pressures resulting from sesimic activity liquefaction; Underwater landslide. INTRODUCTION Although "co-seismic" tsunamis generated by earthquakes

  12. AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan, E-mail: zhrsh@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)] [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

  13. Propagation of sound waves through a spatially homogeneous but smoothly time-dependent medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayrapetyan, A.G., E-mail: armen@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Grigoryan, K.K.; Petrosyan, R.G. [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State University, 1 Alex Manoogian Str., 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Fritzsche, S. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany) [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of sound through a spatially homogeneous but non-stationary medium is investigated within the framework of fluid dynamics. For a non-vortical fluid, especially, a generalized wave equation is derived for the (scalar) potential of the fluid velocity distribution in dependence of the equilibrium mass density of the fluid and the sound wave velocity. A solution of this equation for a finite transition period ? is determined in terms of the hypergeometric function for a phenomenologically realistic, sigmoidal change of the mass density and sound wave velocity. Using this solution, it is shown that the energy flux of the sound wave is not conserved but increases always for the propagation through a non-stationary medium, independent of whether the equilibrium mass density is increased or decreased. It is found, moreover, that this amplification of the transmitted wave arises from an energy exchange with the medium and that its flux is equal to the (total) flux of the incident and the reflected wave. An interpretation of the reflected wave as a propagation of sound backward in time is given in close analogy to Feynman and Stueckelberg for the propagation of anti-particles. The reflection and transmission coefficients of sound propagating through a non-stationary medium is analyzed in more detail for hypersonic waves with transition periods ? between 15 and 200 ps as well as the transformation of infrasound waves in non-stationary oceans. -- Highlights: •Analytically exact study of sound propagation through a non-stationary medium. •Energy exchange between the non-stationary medium and the sound wave. •Transformation of hypersonic and ultrasound frequencies in non-stationary media. •Propagation of sound backward in time in close analogy to anti-particles. •Prediction of tsunamis both in spatially and temporally inhomogeneous oceans.

  14. Reduced order prediction of rare events in unidirectional nonlinear water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousins, Will

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of short-term prediction of rare, extreme water waves in unidirectional fields, a critical topic for ocean structures and naval operations. One possible mechanism for the occurrence of such rare, unusually-intense waves is nonlinear wave focusing. Recent results have demonstrated that random localizations of energy, induced by the dispersive mixing of different harmonics, can grow significantly due to localized nonlinear focusing. Here we show how the interplay between i) statistical properties captured through linear information such as the waves power spectrum and ii) nonlinear dynamical properties of focusing localized wave groups defines a critical length scale associated with the formation of extreme events. The energy that is locally concentrated over this length scale acts as the "trigger" of nonlinear focusing for wave groups and the formation of subsequent rare events. We use this property to develop inexpensive, short-term predictors of large water waves. Specifically, we sho...

  15. Dependence of Ridge Formation on Trigger Azimuth: Correlated Emission Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles B. Chiu; Rudolph C. Hwa

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ridge formation in near-side correlation in heavy-ion collisions is studied in the framework of a phenomenological model, called Correlated Emission Model (CEM). Successive soft emissions due to jet-medium interaction lead to the enhancement of thermal partons which follow the local flow directions. The correlation between the flow direction and the semihard parton direction is the major factor that causes the ridge formation to depend on the trigger direction relative to the reaction plane. With the use of a few parameters we have been able to reproduce the data on the ridge yields as functions of the trigger azimuthal angle for different centralities. An inside-outside asymmetry function is proposed to further probe the characteristics of the azimuthal correlation function. Insights are provided for the understanding of some detailed aspects of the centrality dependence.

  16. Evaluation of Light-Triggered Thyristors for Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, L K; Fulkerson, E S; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has many needs for high reliability, high peak current, high di/dt switches. Solid-state switch technology offers the demonstrated advantage of reliability under a variety of conditions. Light-triggered switches operate with a reduced susceptibility to electromagnetic interference commonly found within pulsed power environments. Despite the advantages, commercially available solid-state switches are not typically designed for the often extreme pulsed power requirements. Testing was performed to bound the limits of devices for pulsed power applications beyond the manufacturers specified ratings. To test the applicability of recent commercial light-triggered solid-state designs, an adjustable high current switch test stand was assembled. Results from testing and subsequent selected implementations are presented.

  17. Triggering and data acquisition for the Hyper-Kamiokande experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dewhurst, Debra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hyper-Kamiokande has been proposed as a next generation neutrino oscillation experiment capable of observing accelerator, atmospheric, solar and astrophysical neutrinos, as well as possible proton decays, providing a rich scientific program. One of the main goals is the study of CP violation in the lepton sector. The Hyper-Kamiokande detector will be an underground water Cherenkov detector with a fiducial mass of 0.56 million metric tons, approximately 25 times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. With such a large fiducial mass, the Hyper-Kamiokande detector will need a robust trigger and data acquisition system (DAQ) to be sensitive to the physics events of interest. Several UK institutions are participating in the development of the trigger and DAQ. Here we present some of the on going studies from the UK DAQ group.

  18. Holographic p-wave superconductor models with Weyl corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lu; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of the Weyl corrections on the holographic p-wave dual models in the backgrounds of AdS soliton and AdS black hole via a Maxwell complex vector field model by using the numerical and analytical methods. We find that, in the soliton background, the Weyl corrections do not influence the properties of the holographic p-wave insulator/superconductor phase transition, which is different from that of the Yang-Mills theory. However, in the black hole background, we observe that similar to the Weyl correction effects in the Yang-Mills theory, the higher Weyl corrections make it easier for the p-wave metal/superconductor phase transition to be triggered, which shows that these two p-wave models with Weyl corrections share some similar features for the condensation of the vector operator.

  19. ATLAS Jet Trigger Update for the LHC Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 10^5 . The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intens...

  20. Triggered Star Formation in the Environment of Young Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gritschneder; T. Naab; F. Heitsch; A. Burkert

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope show clear evidence that star formation takes place in the surrounding of young massive O-type stars, which are shaping their environment due to their powerful radiation and stellar winds. In this work we investigate the effect of ionising radiation of massive stars on the ambient interstellar medium (ISM): In particular we want to examine whether the UV-radiation of O-type stars can lead to the observed pillar-like structures and can trigger star formation. We developed a new implementation, based on a parallel Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code (called IVINE), that allows an efficient treatment of the effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their turbulent gaseous environment. Here we present first results at very high resolution. We show that ionising radiation can trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable molecular cloud. The arising structures resemble observed structures (e.g. the pillars of creation in the Eagle Nebula (M16) or the Horsehead Nebula B33). Including the effect of gravitation we find small regions that can be identified as formation places of individual stars. We conclude that ionising radiation from massive stars alone can trigger substantial star formation in molecular clouds.

  1. Avoid the Tsunami of the Dirac sea in the Imaginary Time Step method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ying; Meng, Jie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrete single-particle spectra in both the Fermi and Dirac sea have been calculated by the imaginary time step (ITS) method for the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation after avoiding the "tsunami" of the Dirac sea, i.e., the diving behavior of the single-particle level into the Dirac sea in the direct application of the ITS method for the Dirac equation. It is found that by the transform from the Dirac equation to the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation, the single-particle spectra, which extend from the positive to the negative infinity, can be separately obtained by the ITS evolution in either the Fermi sea or the Dirac sea. Identical results with those in the conventional shooting method have been obtained via the ITS evolution for the equivalent Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation, which demonstrates the feasibility, practicality and reliability of the present algorithm and dispels the doubts on the ITS method in the relativistic system.

  2. Avoid the Tsunami of the Dirac sea in the Imaginary Time Step method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Zhang; Haozhao Liang; Jie Meng

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrete single-particle spectra in both the Fermi and Dirac sea have been calculated by the imaginary time step (ITS) method for the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation after avoiding the "tsunami" of the Dirac sea, i.e., the diving behavior of the single-particle level into the Dirac sea in the direct application of the ITS method for the Dirac equation. It is found that by the transform from the Dirac equation to the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation, the single-particle spectra, which extend from the positive to the negative infinity, can be separately obtained by the ITS evolution in either the Fermi sea or the Dirac sea. Identical results with those in the conventional shooting method have been obtained via the ITS evolution for the equivalent Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation, which demonstrates the feasibility, practicality and reliability of the present algorithm and dispels the doubts on the ITS method in the relativistic system.

  3. Late Pleistocene earthquake-triggered moraine dam failure and outburst of Lake Zurich, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Late Pleistocene earthquake-triggered moraine dam failure and outburst of Lake Zurich, Switzerland of $20,600 m3 sÀ1 . We also discuss long-term causes and short-term trigger mechanisms of the dam failure of Lake Zurich was initiated as a consequence of the moraine dam failure that either was triggered

  4. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  5. The ATLAS Tau Trigger Performance during LHC Run 1 and Prospects for Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Sakurai

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Triggering on hadronic tau decays is essential for a wide variety of analyses of interesting physics processes at ATLAS. The ATLAS tau trigger combines information from the tracking detectors and calorimeters to identify the signature of hadronically decaying tau leptons. In Run 2 operation expected to start in 2015, the trigger strategies will become more important than ever before. In this paper, the tau trigger performance during Run 1 is summarized and also an overview of the developments of Run 2 tau trigger strategy is presented.

  6. Your abstract submission has been has been submitted for the 2014 AGU Fall Meeting. You will receive an email confirmation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    and overlying water layer are formulated in the depth integrated, shallow water approximation, with kinematic for shallow or intermediate depth waves, the model has been shown to predict tsunami response to solid slides approached relative to the initial still water shoreline, and thus the triggering event may be either

  7. activity triggers microparticle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preprints Summary: Sound can move particles. A good example of this phenomenon is the Chladni plate, in which an acoustic wave is induced in a metallic plate and particles migrate...

  8. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

  9. High voltage switch triggered by a laser-photocathode subsystem

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ping; Lundquist, Martin L.; Yu, David U. L.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A spark gap switch for controlling the output of a high voltage pulse from a high voltage source, for example, a capacitor bank or a pulse forming network, to an external load such as a high gradient electron gun, laser, pulsed power accelerator or wide band radar. The combination of a UV laser and a high vacuum quartz cell, in which a photocathode and an anode are installed, is utilized as triggering devices to switch the spark gap from a non-conducting state to a conducting state with low delay and low jitter.

  10. The NA62 Liquid Krypton Electromagnetic Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bonaiuto; A. Fucci; G. Paoluzzi; A. Salamon; G. Salina; E. Santovetti; F. Sargeni; F. M. Scarfi'

    2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to measure the Branching Ratio of the very rare kaon decay K+ -> pi+ nu nubar collecting O(100) events with a 10% background to make a stringent test of the Standard Model. One of the main backgrounds to the proposed measurement is represented by the K+ -> pi+ pi0 decay. To suppress this background an efficient photo veto system is foreseen. In the 1-10 mrad angular region the NA48 high performance liquid krypton electromagnetic calorimeter is used. The design, implementation and current status of the Liquid Krypton Electromagnetic Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger are presented.

  11. The NA62 Liquid Krypton Electromagnetic Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Bonaiuto; Adolfo Fucci; Giovanni Paoluzzi; Andrea Salamon; Gaetano Salina; Emanuele Santovetti; Fausto Sargeni; Francesco M. Scarfi'

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to measure the Branching Ratio of the very rare kaon decay K+ -> pi+ nu nubar collecting O(100) events with a 10% background to make a stringent test of the Standard Model. One of the main backgrounds to the proposed measurement is represented by the K+ -> pi+ pi0 decay. To suppress this background an efficient photo veto system is foreseen. In the 1-10 mrad angular region the NA48 high performance liquid krypton electromagnetic calorimeter is used. The design, implementation and current status of the Liquid Krypton Electromagnetic Calorimeter Level 0 Trigger are presented.

  12. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - Ã?Â?165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  13. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  14. High energy physics experiment triggers and the trustworthiness of software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, T.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For all the time and frustration that high energy physicists expend interacting with computers, it is surprising that more attention is not paid to the critical role computers play in the science. With large, expensive colliding beam experiments now dependent on complex programs working at startup, questions of reliability -- the trustworthiness of software -- need to be addressed. This issue is most acute in triggers, used to select data to record -- and data to discard -- in the real time environment of an experiment. High level triggers are built on codes that now exceed 2 million source lines -- and for the first time experiments are truly dependent on them. This dependency will increase at the accelerators planned for the new millennium (SSC and LHC), where cost and other pressures will reduce tolerance for first run problems, and the high luminosities will make this on-line data selection essential. A sense of this incipient crisis motivated the unusual juxtaposition to topics in these lectures. 37 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Design of the Trigger Interface and Distribution Board for CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Jianhui; Dong, Hai; Cuevas, R; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Heyes, William; Jastrzembski, Edward; Kaneta, Scott; Nganga, Nicholas; Moffit, Bryan; Raydo, Benjamin; Timmer, Carl

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the Trigger Interface and Distribution (TID) board for the 12 GeV Upgrade at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at TJNAL is described. The TID board distributes a low jitter system clock, synchronized trigger, and synchronized multi-purpose SYNC signal. The TID also initiates data acquisition for the crate. With the TID boards, a multi-crate system can be setup for experiment test and commissioning. The TID board can be selectively populated as a Trigger Interface (TI) board, or a Trigger Distribution (TD) board for the 12 GeV upgrade experiments. When the TID is populated as a TI, it can be located in the VXS crate and distribute the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC through the VXS P0 connector; it can also be located in the standard VME64 crate, and distribute the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC through the VME P2 connector or front panel. It initiates the data acquisition for the front crate where the TI is positioned in. When the TID is populated as a TD, it fans out the CLOCK/TRIGGER/SYNC from trigger supervisor to the front end crates through optical fibres. The TD monitors the trigger processing on the TIs, and gives feedback to the TS for trigger flow control. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) is utilised on TID board to provide programmability. The TID boards were intensively tested on the bench, and various setups.

  16. SECONDARY WAVES AND/OR THE 'REFLECTION' FROM AND 'TRANSMISSION' THROUGH A CORONAL HOLE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2.2 FLARE OBSERVED WITH SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Vourlidas, Angelos [Space Science Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zhang Jie [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cheng Xin, E-mail: oscar.olmedo.ctr@nrl.navy.mil [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    For the first time, the kinematic evolution of a coronal wave over the entire solar surface is studied. Full Sun maps can be made by combining images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites, Ahead and Behind, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, thanks to the wide angular separation between them. We study the propagation of a coronal wave, also known as the 'Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope' wave, and its interaction with a coronal hole (CH) resulting in secondary waves and/or reflection and transmission. We explore the possibility of the wave obeying the law of reflection. In a detailed example, we find that a loop arcade at the CH boundary cascades and oscillates as a result of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave passage and triggers a wave directed eastward that appears to have reflected. We find that the speed of this wave decelerates to an asymptotic value, which is less than half of the primary EUV wave speed. Thanks to the full Sun coverage we are able to determine that part of the primary wave is transmitted through the CH. This is the first observation of its kind. The kinematic measurements of the reflected and transmitted wave tracks are consistent with a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave interpretation. Eventually, all wave tracks decelerate and disappear at a distance. A possible scenario of the whole process is that the wave is initially driven by the expanding coronal mass ejection and subsequently decouples from the driver and then propagates at the local fast-mode speed.

  17. Photon wave function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, the photon wave function exists as long as it can be precisely defined and made useful.

  18. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  19. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  20. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  1. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  2. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  3. PID Performance in the LHCb High Level Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb High Level Trigger (HLT) incorporates RICH particle identification (PID) calculations that are designed to be faster than those used for the offline reconstruction, which is necessary due to the timing constraints imposed on the HLT. The performance of this faster calculation has been evaluated using $B^+ \\to \\overline{D}^0\\pi^+$ events recorded during 2011 data taking and compared against the performance of the offline calculation. The time taken to calculate PID information in the HLT has been measured both for the configuration used in Run 1, and for configurations approaching that used offline. Similar overall efficiency and misidentification performance is seen in the configurations used offline and in the HLT, though the raw values of PID variables can differ substantially for a given candidate.

  4. The Fueling and Evolution of AGN: Internal and External Triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shardha Jogee

    2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter, I review the fueling and evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGN) under the influence of internal and external triggers, namely intrinsic properties of host galaxies (morphological or Hubble type, color, presence of bars and other non-axisymmetric features, etc) and external factors such as environment and interactions. The most daunting challenge in fueling AGN is arguably the angular momentum problem as even matter located at a radius of a few hundred pc must lose more than 99.99 % of its specific angular momentum before it is fit for consumption by a BH. I review mass accretion rates, angular momentum requirements, the effectiveness of different fueling mechanisms, and the growth and mass density of black BHs at different epochs. I discuss connections between the nuclear and larger-scale properties of AGN, both locally and at intermediate redshifts, outlining some recent results from the GEMS and GOODS HST surveys.

  5. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  6. Triggers and maintenance of multiple shifts in the state of a natural community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rassweiler, Andrew; Schmitt, Russell J.; Holbrook, Sally J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PAPER Triggers and maintenance of multiple shifts in theseparately on the causes and maintenance of state change canpotentially explaining the maintenance of the new state.

  7. Stereotype Threat in Organizations: An Examination of its Scope, Triggers, and Possible Interventions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kray, Laura J.; Shirako, Aiwa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and social identity threat. Advances in Experimental Socialmen triggers social identity threat among female engineers.C. (2007). Stereotype threat at work. Academy of Management

  8. Superconducting matrix fault current limiter with current-driven trigger mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular and scalable Matrix-type Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. An inductor is connected in series with the trigger superconductor in the trigger matrix and physically surrounds the superconductor. The current surge during a fault will generate a trigger magnetic field in the series inductor to cause fast and uniform quenching of the trigger superconductor to significantly reduce burnout risk due to superconductor material non-uniformity.

  9. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  10. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  11. Flows and Waves in Braided Solar Coronal Magnetic Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pant, V; Banerjee, Dipankar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicites (30 - 60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi periodic flows with wide range of velocities from 13 - 185 km/s associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find presence of short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillation may trigger reconnection.

  12. A geometric algorithm for efficient coincident detection of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. A. K. Robinson; B. S. Sathyaprakash; Anand S. Sengupta

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a network of gravitational wave detectors can be analyzed in coincidence to increase detection confidence and reduce non-stationarity of the background. We propose and explore a geometric algorithm to combine the data from a network of detectors. The algorithm makes optimal use of the variances and covariances that exist amongst the different parameters of a signal in a coincident detection of events. The new algorithm essentially associates with each trigger ellipsoidal regions in parameter space defined by the covariance matrix. Triggers from different detectors are deemed to be in coincidence if their ellipsoids have a non-zero overlap. Compared to an algorithm that uses uncorrelated windows separately for each of the signal parameters, the new algorithm greatly reduces the background rate thereby increasing detection efficiency at a given false alarm rate.

  13. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy with their announcement that: "We find that a new type of sound wave, namely, the dust-acoustic waves, can appear" [1 and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some

  14. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  15. The Physical and Social Determinants of Mortality in the 3.11 Tsunami Daniel P. Aldrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germany, Italy, and Belgium) and forced the United States' Nuclear Regulatory Commission to rethink its 2 Estimates put the death rate from the earthquake at less than five pe of northeastern Japan. Instead, the mortality rate from the massive wave varied tremendously from zero to close

  16. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  17. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  18. HF radar detection of infrasonic waves generated in the ionosphere by the 28 March1 2005 Sumatra earthquake2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the advantage to preserve the information on the range variation and time9 evolution, and provides comprehensive explosions and particularly tsunamis, for future oceanic monitoring and1 tsunami warning systems.2 3 Keywords

  19. A comparison between matter wave and light wave interferometers for the detection of gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacôme Delva; Marie-Christine Angonin; Philippe Tourrenc

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate and compare the response of light wave interferometers and matter wave interferometers to gravitational waves. We find that metric matter wave interferometers will not challenge kilometric light wave interferometers such as Virgo or LIGO, but could be a good candidate for the detection of very low frequency gravitational waves.

  20. Event-triggered control with LQ optimality guarantees for saturated linear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Event-triggered control with LQ optimality guarantees for saturated linear systems A. Seuret , C of the domain of attraction. Keywords: event-based control, input saturation, linear quadratic performance 1 with event-triggered control algorithms for linear systems subject to plant input saturation. Hence, given

  1. Distributed Optimization, Estimation, and Control of Networked Systems through Event-triggered Message Passing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Michael

    -triggered Message Passing 1 Introduction This project will investigate distributed optimization, estimation, and control of networked systems through the use of event-triggered message passing. Networked systems consist of distributed decision systems. Indi- vidual agents coordinate their actions through message exchanges

  2. Neurocomputing 69 (2006) 10621065 Dependence of the spike-triggered average voltage on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstner, Wulfram

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Spike-triggered voltage; h-current; Damped voltage oscillations 1 oscillations. The model comprises a variable v for the membrane voltage, with time-scale tv and a secondNeurocomputing 69 (2006) 1062­1065 Dependence of the spike-triggered average voltage on membrane

  3. Shape memory poly(3-caprolactone)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) foams with body temperature triggering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Shape memory poly(3-caprolactone)-co-poly(ethylene glycol) foams with body temperature triggering the fabrication of porous foams with shape memory triggering at body temperature. Employing a modified porogen are crosslinked via thiol­ene chemistry to generate highly porous foam scaffolds with shape memory capacity

  4. Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, Water-triggered shape memory of multiblock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, 15783 Water-triggered shape memory of multiblock thermoplastic of a water-triggered shape memory polymer (SMP) family, PCL­PEG based thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs and recovery ratios were substantially improved using this new shape memory programming method, the mechanism

  5. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  6. Design, characterization, and sensitivity of the supernova trigger system at Daya Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Hanyu; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing an early warning of galactic supernova explosions from neutrino signals is important in studying supernova dynamics and neutrino physics. A dedicated supernova trigger system has been designed and installed in the data acquisition system at Daya Bay and integrated into the worldwide Supernova Early Warning System (SNEWS). Daya Bay's unique feature of eight identically-designed detectors deployed in three separate experimental halls makes the trigger system naturally robust against cosmogenic backgrounds, enabling a prompt analysis of online triggers and a tight control of the false-alert rate. The trigger system is estimated to be fully sensitive to 1987A-type supernova bursts throughout most of the Milky Way. The significant gain in sensitivity of the eight-detector configuration over a mass-equivalent single detector is also estimated. The experience of this online trigger system is applicable to future projects with spatially distributed detectors.

  7. Design, characterization, and sensitivity of the supernova trigger system at Daya Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanyu Wei; Logan Lebanowski; Fei Li; Zhe Wang; Shaomin Chen

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing an early warning of galactic supernova explosions from neutrino signals is important in studying supernova dynamics and neutrino physics. A dedicated supernova trigger system has been designed and installed in the data acquisition system at Daya Bay and integrated into the worldwide Supernova Early Warning System (SNEWS). Daya Bay's unique feature of eight identically-designed detectors deployed in three separate experimental halls makes the trigger system naturally robust against cosmogenic backgrounds, enabling a prompt analysis of online triggers and a tight control of the false-alert rate. The trigger system is estimated to be fully sensitive to 1987A-type supernova bursts throughout most of the Milky Way. The significant gain in sensitivity of the eight-detector configuration over a mass-equivalent single detector is also estimated. The experience of this online trigger system is applicable to future projects with spatially distributed detectors.

  8. Nonlinear spherical Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf Torkelsson; G. Christopher Boynton

    1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an one-dimensional numerical study of Alfven waves propagating along a radial magnetic field. Neglecting losses, any spherical Alfven wave, no matter how small its initial amplitude is, becomes nonlinear at sufficiently large radii. From previous simulations of Alfven waves in plane parallel atmospheres we did expect the waves to steepen and produce current sheets in the nonlinear regime, which was confirmed by our new calculations. On the other hand we did find that even the least nonlinear waves were damped out almost completely before 10 solar radii. A damping of that kind is required by models of Alfven wave-driven winds from old low-mass stars as these winds are mainly accelerated within a few stellar radii.

  9. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  10. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived #12;66 2. Wave Propagation Theory quantities of the quiescent (time independent) medium are identified perturbations is much smaller than the speed of sound. 2.1.1 The Nonlinear Wave Equation Retaining higher

  11. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  12. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Mathur, Manikandan; Gostiaux, Louis; Peacock, Thomas; Dauxois, Thierry

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (2007). This mechanism, which involves a tunable source comprised of oscillating plates, has so far been used for a few fundamental studies of internal waves, but its full potential has yet to be realized. Our studies reveal that this approach is capable of producing a wide variety of two-dimensional wave fields, including plane waves, wave beams and discrete vertical modes in finite-depth stratifications. The effects of discretization by a finite number of plates, forcing amplitude and angle of propagation are investigated, and it is found that the method is remarkably efficient at generating a complete wave field despite forcing only one velocity component in a controllable manner. We furthermore find that the nature of the radiated wave field is well predicted using Fourier transforms of the spatial structure of the wave generator.

  13. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  14. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwanke, U; Sulanke, K -H; Vorobiov, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E>20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger wi...

  15. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  16. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of the expression 'CSC studies' ('computing system commissioning'), which is occasionally referred to in these volumes. The work reported does generally assume that the detector is fully operational, and in this sense represents an idealised detector: establishing the best performance of the ATLAS detector with LHC proton-proton collisions is a challenging task for the future. The results summarised here therefore represent the best estimate of ATLAS capabilities before real operational experience of the full detector with beam. Unless otherwise stated, simulations also do not include the effect of additional interactions in the same or other bunch-crossings, and the effect of neutron background is neglected. Thus simulations correspond to the low-luminosity performance of the ATLAS detector. This report is broadly divided into two parts: firstly the performance for identification of physics objects is examined in detail, followed by a detailed assessment of the performance of the trigger system. This part is subdivided into chapters surveying the capabilities for charged particle tracking, each of electron/photon, muon and tau identification, jet and missing transverse energy reconstruction, b-tagging algorithms and performance, and finally the trigger system performance. In each chapter of the report, there is a further subdivision into shorter notes describing different aspects studied. The second major subdivision of the report addresses physics measurement capabilities, and new physics search sensitivities. Individual chapters in this part discuss ATLAS physics capabilities in Standard Model QCD and electroweak processes, in the top quark sector, in b-physics, in searches for Higgs bosons, supersymmetry searches, and finally searches for other new particles predicted in more exotic models.

  17. Large ELMs Triggered by MHD in JET Advanced Tokamak Plasmas: Impact on Plasmas Profiles, Plasmas Facing Components and Heating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Large ELMs Triggered by MHD in JET Advanced Tokamak Plasmas: Impact on Plasmas Profiles, Plasmas Facing Components and Heating Systems

  18. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  19. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  20. The trigger system of the Pierre Auger Surface Detector: operation, efficiency and stablility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, D.; Armengaud, E.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Bertou, Xavier; Billoir, P.; Bonifazi, C.; Chou, A.; Chye,; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dorofeev, A.; Ghia, P.L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gorgi, A.; Hamilton, J.C.; Harton, J.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The trigger system of the Surface Detector (SD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory is described, from the identification of candidate showers (E > 1 EeV) at the level of a single station, among a huge background (mainly single muons), up to the selection of real events and the rejection of random coincidences at a higher central trigger level (including the reconstruction accuracy). Efficiency of a single station trigger is evaluated using real data, and the high performance of event selection hierarchy will be demonstrated.

  1. Using neural networks as an event trigger in elementary particle physics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neis, E.; Starr, F.W.; Handler, T. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Gabriel, T.; Glover, C.; Saini, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elementary particle physics experiments often have to deal with high data rates. In order to avoid having to write out all data that is occurring online processors, triggers, are used to cull out the uninteresting data. These triggers are based on some particular aspect of the physics being examined. At times these aspects are often equivalent to simple pattern recognition problems. The reliability of artificial neural networks(ANNs) in pattern recognition problems in many fields has been well demonstrated. We present here the results of a study on the feasibility of using ANNs as an online trigger for high energy physics experiments.

  2. L0 Trigger for the EMCal Detector of the ALICE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kral, Jiri [University of Jyvaskyla, Finland; Awes, Terry C [ORNL; Muller, Hans [CERN, Geneva, Switzerland; Rak, Jan [University of Jyvaskyla, Finland; Schambach, Joachim [University of Texas, Austin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator was designed to study ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) was built to provide measurement of photons, electrons, and jets, and trigger selection of hard-QCD events containing them. The EMCal single-shower L0 trigger, which triggers on large energy deposit within a 4 x 4 tower sliding window, became operational in 2010. The implementation of the real-time FPGA based algorithm optimized to provide a fast L0 decision is presented.

  3. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslov, Sergei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of species in ecosystems are constrained by the availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by the reduction in size of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent property of the population dynamics in our system are cyclic "diversity waves" triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity in the environment peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Population ...

  4. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  5. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  6. Secondary dust density waves excited by nonlinear dust acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinrich, J. R.; Kim, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K.; Merlino, R. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Rosenberg, M. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary dust density waves were observed in conjunction with high amplitude (n{sub d}/n{sub d0}>2) dust acoustic waves (DAW) that were spontaneously excited in a dc glow discharge dusty plasma in the moderately coupled, {Gamma}{approx}1, state. The high amplitude dust acoustic waves produced large dust particle oscillations, displacements, and trapping. Secondary dust density waves were excited in the wave troughs of the high amplitude DAWs. The waveforms, amplitudes, wavelengths, and wave speeds of the primary DAWs and the secondary waves were measured. A dust-dust streaming instability is discussed as a possible mechanism for the production of the secondary waves.

  7. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  8. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  9. Efficient terahertz-wave generation and its ultrafast optical modulation in charge ordered organic ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Hirotake, E-mail: hiroitoh@m.tohoku.ac.jp; Iwai, Shinichiro, E-mail: s-iwai@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); JST, CREST, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Itoh, Keisuke; Goto, Kazuki [Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Yamamoto, Kaoru [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, Okayama 700-0005 (Japan); Yakushi, Kyuya [Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Nagakute 480-1192 (Japan)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation in strongly correlated organic compounds ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} and ??-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} (ET:bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene) was demonstrated. The spontaneous polarization induced by charge ordering or electronic ferroelectricity was revealed to trigger the THz-wave generation via optical rectification; the estimated 2nd-order nonlinear optical susceptibility for ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} is over 70 times larger than that for prototypical THz-source ZnTe. Ultrafast (<1 ps) and sensitive (?40%) photoresponse of the THz wave was observed for ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3}, which is attributable to photoinduced quenching of the polarization accompanied by insulator(ferroelectric)-to-metal transition. Modulation of the THz wave was observed for ??-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} upon the poling procedure, indicating the alignment of polar domains.

  10. Flow through porous media : from mixing of fluids to triggering of earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced oil recovery by displacing oil with solvents such as carbon dioxide requires development of miscibility between the two fluids to maximize the displacement efficiency. Prevention of inadvertent triggering of ...

  11. Nitric OxideTriggered Remodeling of Chloroplast Bioenergetics and Thylakoid Proteins upon Nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitric Oxide­Triggered Remodeling of Chloroplast Bioenergetics and Thylakoid Proteins upon Nitrogen droplets, but the accompanying changes in bioenergetics have been little studied so far. Here, we report

  12. Using automatically-triggered cameras to monitor and estimate bobcat abundance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heilbrun, Richard David

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    triggered cameras as part of a mark-recapture study design. I tested the assumptions that bobcats were individually identifiable by their natural markings and that information obtained from camera surveys can contribute to abundance estimates from mark...

  13. Electrically Triggered Release of a Small Molecule Drug from a Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Coating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Daniel J.

    Electrically triggered drug delivery represents an attractive option for actively and remotely controlling the release of a therapeutic from an implantable device (e.g., a “pharmacy-on-a-chip”). Here we report the fabrication ...

  14. EXPECTED TRIGGER RATES OF HIGH PT JETS AND DIRECT PHOTONS IN THE STAR EMC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELT-TONJES,M. FOR THE STAR COLLABORATION

    1999-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The STAR experiment at RHIC is a large acceptance detector. The electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) will provide a sensitive trigger to study high p{sub t} jets and hard photons in AuAu, pp, and pAu collisions. The capability for the EMC to trigger on jets and direct photons was studied for trigger level 0. Trigger efficiencies and expected process rates were obtained for pp reactions. Results from pp interactions will be essential to the interpretation of AuAu results as well as for the spin physics program. These studies were performed with the standard STAR software chain which includes GEANT and EMC simulations. The HIJING event generator was used to provide input for the simulations.

  15. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  16. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); MacDowall, R. J. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  17. Optically triggered high voltage switch network and method for switching a high voltage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Silberkleit, Lee I. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically triggered solid state switch and method for switching a high voltage electrical current. A plurality of solid state switches (350) are connected in series for controlling electrical current flow between a compensation capacitor (112) and ground in a reactive power compensator (50, 50') that monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b and 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. An optical transmitter (100) controlled by the reactive power compensation system produces light pulses that are conveyed over optical fibers (102) to a switch driver (110') that includes a plurality of series connected optical triger circuits (288). Each of the optical trigger circuits controls a pair of the solid state switches and includes a plurality of series connected resistors (294, 326, 330, and 334) that equalize or balance the potential across the plurality of trigger circuits. The trigger circuits are connected to one of the distribution lines through a trigger capacitor (340). In each switch driver, the light signals activate a phototransistor (300) so that an electrical current flows from one of the energy reservoir capacitors through a pulse transformer (306) in the trigger circuit, producing gate signals that turn on the pair of serially connected solid state switches (350).

  18. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  19. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, ASCE, Vol. 133, No. 6,Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, ASCE, Vol. No. Nov. /Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, ASCE, Vol. 123, No. 4,

  20. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Present Time," Annali di Geofisica, Vol. 13, 1960, pp 369-Slides," Annali de Geofisica, Vol. 43, 2000, pp Tinti, S. ,

  1. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation, Modeling, Risk and Mitigation, NATO Science Series, IV,Generation, Modeling, Risk and Mitigation, NATO Science Series, IV,Generation, Modeling, Risk and Mitigation, Istanbul, Turkey, May 23-26, 2001, NATO Science Series, IV,

  2. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landslide at La Palma, Canary Islands," Jour. Volcanologyof Fuerteventura, Canary Islands," Jour. Volcanology andRecent Megalandslides of the Canary Islands: El Golfo Debris

  3. Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, John C.

    Full wave simulations of lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks J. C. Wright , P. T. Bonoli , C hybrid (LH) waves have the attractive property of damping strongly via electron Landau resonance. Consequently these waves are well-suited to driving current in the plasma periphery where the electron

  4. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); Esarey, Eric (Chevy Chase, MD); Kim, Joon K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention.

  5. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, D.; Esarey, E.; Kim, J.K.

    1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention. 21 figs.

  6. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  7. Waving in the rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavaleri, Luigi; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effect of rain on wind wave generation and dissipation. Rain falling on a wavy surface may have a marked tendency to dampen the shorter waves in the tail of the spectrum, the related range increasing with the rain rate. Following the coupling between meteorological and wave models, we derive that on the whole this should imply stronger wind and higher waves in the most energetic part of the spectrum. This is supported by numerical experiments. However, a verification based on the comparison between operational model results and measured data suggests that the opposite is true. This leads to a keen analysis of the overall process, in particular on the role of the tail of the spectrum in modulating the wind input and the white-capping. We suggest that the relationship between white-capping and generation by wind is deeper and more implicative than presently generally assumed.

  8. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  9. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  10. Millimeter-wave sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seoktae

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    New millimeter wave interferometric, multifunctional sensors have been studied for industrial sensing applications: displacement measurement, liquid-level gauging and velocimetry. Two types of configuration were investigated to implement the sensor...

  11. Pilot-wave hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    Yves Couder, Emmanuel Fort, and coworkers recently discovered that a millimetric droplet sustained on the surface of a vibrating fluid bath may self-propel through a resonant interaction with its own wave field. This article ...

  12. Autoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    of the wave, the pump and the wave will phase lock at very low wave amplitude. When the pump reachesAutoresonant Excitation of Diocotron Waves J. Fajans E. Gilson U.C. Berkeley L. Friedland Hebrew of phase with the oscillator, and the os- cillator's amplitude will decrease, eventually reaching zero

  13. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  14. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Trigger probe for determining the orientation of the power distribution of an electron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a probe for determining the orientation of electron beams being profiled. To accurately time the location of an electron beam, the probe is designed to accept electrons from only a narrowly defined area. The signal produced from the probe is then used as a timing or triggering fiducial for an operably coupled data acquisition system. Such an arrangement eliminates changes in slit geometry, an additional signal feedthrough in the wall of a welding chamber and a second timing or triggering channel on a data acquisition system. As a result, the present invention improves the accuracy of the resulting data by minimizing the adverse effects of current slit triggering methods so as to accurately reconstruct electron or ion beams.

  16. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  17. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  18. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase-shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in the direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  19. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  20. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A., E-mail: francesco.evangelista@emory.edu [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  1. The Sector Collector of the CMS DT Trigger system: Installation and Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travaglini, R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drift Tubes chambers are used for muon detection in the central region of the CMS experiment at LHC. Custom electronics is used for reconstructing muon track segments and for triggering the CMS readout. The trigger Sector Collector modules collect muon segments identified by the on-chamber devices, synchronize the data received from different chambers and convert from LVDS to Optical for transmission to the off-detector electronics. Installation and integration tests were developed for tuning both firmware and hardware of the Sector Collector system: results are reviewed. The system performance during CMS data taking with cosmic rays is discussed.

  2. Trigger - and heat-transfer times measured during experimental molten-fuel-interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitznagel, N.; Dürig, T.; Zimanowski, B. [Physikalisch-Vulkanologisches Labor, Universität Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)] [Physikalisch-Vulkanologisches Labor, Universität Würzburg, Pleicherwall 1, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified setup featuring high speed high resolution data and video recording was developed to obtain detailed information on trigger and heat transfer times during explosive molten fuel-coolant-interaction (MFCI). MFCI occurs predominantly in configurations where water is entrapped by hot melt. The setup was modified to allow direct observation of the trigger and explosion onset. In addition the influences of experimental control and data acquisition can now be more clearly distinguished from the pure phenomena. More precise experimental studies will facilitate the description of MFCI thermodynamics.

  3. Multi-line triggering and interdigitated electrode structure for photoconductive semiconductor switches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mar, Alan (Albuquerque, NM); Zutavern, Fred J. (Albuquerque, NM); Loubriel, Guillermo (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved photoconductive semiconductor switch comprises multiple-line optical triggering of multiple, high-current parallel filaments between the switch electrodes. The switch can also have a multi-gap, interdigitated electrode for the generation of additional parallel filaments. Multi-line triggering can increase the switch lifetime at high currents by increasing the number of current filaments and reducing the current density at the contact electrodes in a controlled manner. Furthermore, the improved switch can mitigate the degradation of switching conditions with increased number of firings of the switch.

  4. The trigger system of the ICARUS experiment for the CNGS beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antonello; B. Baibussinov; P. Benetti; F. Boffelli; A. Bubak; E. Calligarich; S. Centro; A. Cesana; K. Cieslik; D. B. Cline; A. G. Cocco; A. Dabrowska; D. Dequal; A. Dermenev; R. Dolfini; A. Falcone; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; G. Fiorillo; D. Gibin; S. Gninenko; A. Guglielmi; M. Haranczyk; J. Holeczek; M. Kirsanov; J. Kisiel; I. Kochanek; J. Lagoda; S. Mania; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; C. Montanari; M. Nicoletto; S. Otwinowski; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; P. Plonski; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; P. Sala; A. Scaramelli; E. Segreto; F. Sergiampietri; D. Stefan; R. Sulej; M. Szarska; M. Terrani; M. Torti; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli; H. Wang; X. Yang; A. Zalewska; A. Zani; K. Zaremba

    2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ICARUS T600 detector, with its 470 tons of active mass, is the largest liquid Argon TPC ever built. Operated for three years in the LNGS underground laboratory, it has collected thousands of CNGS neutrino beam interactions and cosmic ray events with energy spanning from tens of MeV to tens of GeV, with a trigger system based on scintillation light, charge signal on TPC wires and time information (for beam related events only). The performance of trigger system in terms of efficiency, background and live-time as a function of the event energy for the CNGS data taking is presented.

  5. Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuksel, Cem

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

  6. Propagation of seismic waves through liquefied soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiebat, Mahdi; Jeremic, Boris; Dafalias, Yannis; Kaynia, Amir; Cheng, Zhao

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the mechanisms of wave propagation and ARTICLE IN PRESS M.Numerical analysis Wave propagation Earthquake Liquefactionenergy during any wave propagation. This paper summarizes

  7. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  8. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  9. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  10. Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Donald Eugene

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  11. Quantification and prediction of extreme events in a one-dimensional nonlinear dispersive wave model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Will Cousins; Themistoklis P. Sapsis

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is the quantification and prediction of rare events characterized by extreme intensity in nonlinear waves with broad spectra. We consider a one-dimensional non- linear model with deep-water waves dispersion relation, the Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak (MMT) model, in a dynamical regime that is characterized by broadband spectrum and strong non- linear energy transfers during the development of intermittent events with finite-lifetime. To understand the energy transfers that occur during the development of an extreme event we perform a spatially localized analysis of the energy distribution along different wavenumbers by means of the Gabor transform. A stochastic analysis of the Gabor coefficients reveals i) the low-dimensionality of the intermittent structures, ii) the interplay between non-Gaussian statis- tical properties and nonlinear energy transfers between modes, as well as iii) the critical scales (or critical Gabor coefficients) where a critical amount of energy can trigger the formation of an extreme event. We analyze the unstable character of these special localized modes directly through the system equation and show that these intermittent events are due to the interplay of the system nonlinearity, the wave dispersion, and the wave dissipation which mimics wave breaking. These localized instabilities are triggered by random localizations of energy in space, created by the dispersive propagation of low-amplitude waves with random phase. Based on these properties, we design low-dimensional functionals of these Gabor coefficients that allow for the prediction of the extreme event well before the nonlinear interactions begin to occur.

  12. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  13. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  14. Magnetohydrodynamic Shearing Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Johnson

    2007-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the nonaxisymmetric linear theory of a rotating, isothermal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shear flow. The analysis is performed in the shearing box, a local model of a thin disk, using a decomposition in terms of shearing waves, i.e., plane waves in a frame comoving with the shear. These waves do not have a definite frequency as in a normal mode decomposition, and numerical integration of a coupled set of amplitude equations is required to characterize their time dependence. Their generic time dependence, however, is oscillatory with slowly-varying frequency and amplitude, and one can construct accurate analytical solutions by applying the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method to the full set of amplitude equations. The solutions have the following properties: 1) Their accuracy increases with wavenumber, so that most perturbations that fit within the disk are well-approximated as modes with time-dependent frequencies and amplitudes. 2) They can be broadly classed as incompressive and compressive perturbations, the former including the nonaxisymmetric extension of magnetorotationally unstable modes, and the latter being the extension of fast and slow modes to a differentially-rotating medium. 3) Wave action is conserved, implying that their energy varies with frequency. 4) Their shear stress is proportional to the slope of their frequency, so that they transport angular momentum outward (inward) when their frequency increases (decreases). The complete set of solutions constitutes a comprehensive linear test suite for numerical MHD algorithms that incorporate a background shear flow. I conclude with a brief discussion of possible astrophysical applications.

  15. CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms at station 139. Keywords: wave energy, survivability, breaking waves, joint distribution, OWEC INTRODUCTION

  16. Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s & Dt^boooo^j Risø-R-525 Gas Explosion Characterization, Wave Propagation (Small-Scale Experiments EXPLOSION CHARACTERIZATION, WAVE PROPAGATION (Small-Scale Experiments) G.C. Larsen Abstract. A number characteristics 14 3.5. Characteristics of the primary pressure wave 21 3.6. Pressure propagation over a hard

  17. 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  18. EVOLUTION OF L HYBRID WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karney, Charles

    is an envelope solitary wave. These solitary waves are not solitons. The occurrence of the constant phase pulses-state propagation of one of the two lower hybrid rays in a homogeneous considering the balance between thermal break up into two types of solitary waves, constant phase pulses or envelope pulses. e examine

  19. PERIASTRON PASSAGE TRIGGERING OF THE 19TH CENTURY ERUPTIONS OF ETA CARINAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashi, Amit; Soker, Noam, E-mail: kashia@physics.technion.ac.i, E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i [Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the evolution of {eta} Car in the last two centuries under the assumption that the two 19th century eruptions were triggered by periastron passages and through this reconstruction constrain the binary parameters. The beginning of the lesser eruption (LE) at the end of the 19th century occurred when the system was very close to periastron passage, suggesting that the secondary triggered the LE. We assume that the 1838-1858 great eruption (GE) was triggered by a periastron passage as well. We also assume that mass transferred from the primary to the secondary star accounts for the extra energy of the GE. With these assumptions we constrain the total mass of the binary system to be M = M{sub 1} + M{sub 2} {approx}> 250 M{sub sun}. These higher than commonly used masses better match the observed luminosity with stellar evolutionary tracks. Including mass loss by the two stars and mass transfer from the primary to the secondary we obtain a good match of periastron passages to the two peaks in the light curve of the GE. Based on these findings and a similar behavior of P Cygni, we speculate that major luminous blue variable eruptions are triggered by stellar companions and that in extreme cases a short duration event with a huge mass transfer rate can lead to a bright transient event on timescales of weeks to months (a 'supernova impostor').

  20. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700091 Remotely Triggered Release from Magnetic Nanoparticles**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200700091 Remotely Triggered Release from Magnetic Nanoparticles** By Austin M, and Sangeeta N. Bhatia* Multivalent nanoparticles have tremendous potential in the diagnosis and treatment nanoparticle homing, polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol (PEG)) to improve nanoparticle pharmacokinetics

  1. Virtual MISO Triggers in WiFi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knightly, Edward W.

    Virtual MISO Triggers in WiFi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly ECE Department, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 Technical Report Abstract--Virtual Multiple-Input Single-Output (vMISO) sys- tems distribute multi-antenna diversity capabilities between a sending and a cooperating node. vMISO

  2. Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knightly, Edward W.

    Virtual MISO Triggers in Wi-Fi-like Networks Oscar Bejarano and Edward W. Knightly ECE Department-Input Single-Output (vMISO) sys- tems distribute multi-antenna diversity capabilities between a sending and a cooperating node. vMISO has the potential to vastly improve wireless link reliability and bit error rates

  3. A ground level gamma-ray burst observed in association with rocket-triggered lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    A ground level gamma-ray burst observed in association with rocket-triggered lightning J. R. Dwyer 2004; published 13 March 2004. [1] We report the observation of an intense gamma-ray burst observed lightning channel with gamma-ray energies extending up to more than 10 MeV. The burst consisted of 227

  4. Quantifying the gap between embedded control models and time-triggered implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Quantifying the gap between embedded control models and time-triggered implementations Hakan the controller design is complete, the designed controller model is typically expressed as a set of control control components to exe- cutable code introduces errors due to a variety of factors

  5. Theory of optically-triggered electrical breakdown of semiconductors Kenneth E. Kambour1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myles, Charles W.

    experimental work has focused on determining the ultimate breakdown field for an insulator [1,2 destruction if unchecked. Much effort has been focused on understanding breakdown of solid insulators [1, 2Theory of optically-triggered electrical breakdown of semiconductors Kenneth E. Kambour1 , Harold P

  6. Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdmann, Martin

    Energy Measurement and Strategy for a Trigger of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays Measured with Radio Ray induced Air Showers 3 2.1 Physics of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.1 Energy Spectrum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.1.2 Composition

  7. Drought triggered tree mortality in mixed conifer forests in Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    such as fire or wind- throw may be identified easily, longer periods of elevated tree mortality are usuallyDrought triggered tree mortality in mixed conifer forests in Yosemite National Park, California form 26 July 2005; accepted 26 July 2005 Abstract Tree mortality is an important process causing forest

  8. Monsoon surges trigger oceanic eddy formation and propagation in the lee of the Philippine Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with eddies that form in the lee of the Cabo Verde and Canary Islands [Chavanne et al., 2002; Sangra et al., 2007]. The Hawaii, Cabo Verde and Canary Islands are located in the trades where winds have typicalMonsoon surges trigger oceanic eddy formation and propagation in the lee of the Philippine Islands

  9. A Self-Triggered Readout for a Time Projection Andrew Thompson Werner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Self-Triggered Readout for a Time Projection Chamber by Andrew Thompson Werner Submitted in Physics at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY February 2004 c Andrew Thompson Werner, MMIV. All for a Time Projection Chamber by Andrew Thompson Werner Submitted to the Department of Physics on December 9

  10. Adapting Task Utility in Externally Triggered Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Adapting Task Utility in Externally Triggered Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensing Systems Jamie tajana@ucsd.edu Abstract--Energy harvesting sensor nodes eliminate the need for post-deployment physical the utility of their tasks to accommodate the energy availability. For example, on sunny days, a solar

  11. Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Sudip K.

    1 Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids Muhammad. I. INTRODUCTION Effective integration of multiple distributed generation (DG) units in microgrids. Conventionally the secondary control in a microgrid is based on a centralized control structure using periodic

  12. The triggering of subglacial lake drainage during rapid glacier drawdown: Crane Glacier, Antarctic Peninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The triggering of subglacial lake drainage during rapid glacier drawdown: Crane Glacier, Antarctic Glacier, Antarctic Peninsula, shows an unusual temporal pattern of elevation loss: a period of very rapid is not seen. Bathymetry in Crane Glacier fjord reveals a series of flat-lying, formerly subglacial deeps

  13. `ODDS ALGORITHM'-BASED OPPORTUNITY-TRIGGERED PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE WITH PRODUCTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 `ODDS ALGORITHM'-BASED OPPORTUNITY-TRIGGERED PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE WITH PRODUCTION POLICY THOMAS.monnin}@cran.uhp-nancy.fr Abstract: In the field of manufacturing, the planning of opportunistic preventive maintenance actions' (Bruss algorithm), opportunistic preventive maintenance. 1. INTRODUCTION With today's growing demand

  14. ATLAS Jet Trigger Performance in LHC Run I and Initial Run II Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The immense rate of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be reduced from the nominal bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to approximately 1 kHz before the data can be written on disk offline. The ATLAS Trigger System performs real-time selection of these events in order to achieve this reduction. Dedicated selection of events containing jets is uniquely challenging at a hadron collider where nearly every event contains significant hadronic energy. Following the very successful first LHC run from 2010 to 2012, the ATLAS Trigger was much improved, including a new hardware topological module and a restructured High Level Trigger system, merging two previous software-based processing levels. This allowed the optimization of resources and a much greater re-use of the precise but costly offline software base. After summarising the overall performance of the jet trigger during the first LHC run, the software design choices and use of the topological module will be reviewed. The expected perform...

  15. Conduct and Impact vs. State of the Market Triggers for Automatic Market Mitigation Shmuel S. Oren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    /distributed control mechanisms integrated into the traditional command and control power systems operations. HenceConduct and Impact vs. State of the Market Triggers for Automatic Market Mitigation Shmuel S. Oren characteristics of power systems make electricity markets extremely vulnerable to temporal and locational market

  16. Distributed Network Utility Maximization using Event-triggered augmented Lagrangian methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Michael

    Distributed Network Utility Maximization using Event-triggered augmented Lagrangian methods Pu Wan problems in networked systems, like distributed control of sensor-actuator networks [1], resource to collaboratively solve a network opti- mization problem. A variety of distributed algorithms have been proposed

  17. Ultra-Low Voltage VCO Design Using Schmitt Trigger on SOI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    , and self-heating effect. In order to reduce this disadvantage, several techniques for body-contact haveUltra-Low Voltage VCO Design Using Schmitt Trigger on SOI Kyung Ki Kim Department of Electrical of Electrical and Computer Engineering Northeastern University Boston, U.S.A ybk@ece.neu.edu Young Jun Lee Next

  18. A co-simulation framework for design of time-triggered automotive cyber physical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    A co-simulation framework for design of time-triggered automotive cyber physical systems Zhenkai Automotive control system SystemC a b s t r a c t Designing cyber-physical systems (CPS) is challenging due to the tight interactions between software, network/platform, and physical components. Automotive control sys

  19. A Wakeup Call for Internet Monitoring Systems: The Case for Distributed Triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is not perceived to be a DDoS attack, e.g., the aggregate traffic to any destination from a set of nodes runningA Wakeup Call for Internet Monitoring Systems: The Case for Distributed Triggers Ankur Jain is to continually record system state (e.g., to study traffic pat- terns in a network) or to obtain an instantaneous

  20. Uncorking the bottle: What triggered the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum methane release?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    realms that has been attributed to a massive methane (CH4) release from marine gas hydrate reservoirs(s) to increase water temperatures rapidly enough to trigger the massive thermal dissociation of gas hydrate the sediment column and show the effect of the temperature change on the gas hydrate stability zone through

  1. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialNasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  2. A Fast Topological Trigger for Real Time Analysis of Nanosecond Phenomena; Opening the Gamma Ray Window to Our Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krennrich, Frank [Iowa State University] Iowa State University

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This work was to enable the development of a proof-of-principle nanosecond trigger system that is designed to perform a real time analysis of fast Cherenkov light flashes from air showers. The basic building blocks of the trigger system have been designed and constructed, and a real world system is now operating in the VERITAS experiment.

  3. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE INSPIRAL SIGNALS ASSOCIATED WITH SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DURING LIGO'S FIFTH AND VIRGO'S FIRST SCIENCE RUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Aso, Y. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Accadia, T. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Acernese, F. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte Sant Angelo, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Allen, G. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amin, R. S. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Antonucci, F. [INFN, Sezione di Roma, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Aoudia, S. [Universite Nice-Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, F-06304 Nice (France); Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Arun, K. G. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, F-91898 Orsay (France); Aston, S. [University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progenitor scenarios for short gamma-ray bursts (short GRBs) include coalescenses of two neutron stars or a neutron star and black hole, which would necessarily be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves. We present a search for these known gravitational-wave signatures in temporal and directional coincidence with 22 GRBs that had sufficient gravitational-wave data available in multiple instruments during LIGO's fifth science run, S5, and Virgo's first science run, VSR1. We find no statistically significant gravitational-wave candidates within a [ - 5, + 1) s window around the trigger time of any GRB. Using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney U-test, we find no evidence for an excess of weak gravitational-wave signals in our sample of GRBs. We exclude neutron star-black hole progenitors to a median 90% confidence exclusion distance of 6.7 Mpc.

  4. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cabaret; P. Béquin; G. Theocharis; V. Andreev; V. E. Gusev; V. Tournat

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control devices such as strong amplitude-dependent filters.

  5. Nonlinear Hysteretic Torsional Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabaret, J; Theocharis, G; Andreev, V; Gusev, V E; Tournat, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically study and experimentally report the propagation of nonlinear hysteretic torsional pulses in a vertical granular chain made of cm-scale, self-hanged magnetic beads. As predicted by contact mechanics, the torsional coupling between two beads is found nonlinear hysteretic. This results in a nonlinear pulse distortion essentially different from the distortion predicted by classical nonlinearities, and in a complex dynamic response depending on the history of the wave particle angular velocity. Both are consistent with the predictions of purely hysteretic nonlinear elasticity and the Preisach-Mayergoyz hysteresis model, providing the opportunity to study the phenomenon of nonlinear dynamic hysteresis in the absence of other type of material nonlinearities. The proposed configuration reveals a plethora of interesting phenomena including giant amplitude-dependent attenuation, short term memory as well as dispersive properties. Thus, it could find interesting applications in nonlinear wave control de...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysically triggered searches Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 49 Correlation between gamma-ray bursts and gravitational waves P. Tricarico,* A. Ortolan, A. Solaroli, and G. Vedovato...

  7. Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortega, Jose Alberto

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING USING STRESS WAVES: WAVE PROPAGATION IN LAYERED MEDIA A Senior Honors Thesis by JOSE ALBERTO ORTEGA Submitted to the Office of Honors Program & Academic Scholarships Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2002 Group: Engineering NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING USI WAVE PROPAGATION IN LA A Senior Honors The ~pe -C JOSE ALBERTO ORTI /CI Submitted to the Office of Honors Program k. Academic...

  8. Control and monitoring of on-line trigger algorithms using a SCADA system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Herwijnen, E; Barczyk, A; Damodaran, B; Frank, M; Gaidioz, B; Gaspar, C; Jacobsson, R; Jost, B; Neufeld, N; Bonifazi, F; Callot, O; Lopes, H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LHCb [1] has an integrated Experiment Control System (ECS) [2], based on the commercial SCADA system PVSS [3]. The novelty of this approach is that, in addition to the usual control and monitoring of experimental equipment, it provides control and monitoring for software processes, namely the on-line trigger algorithms. Algorithms based on Gaudi [4] (the LHCb software framework) compute the trigger decisions on an event filter farm of around 2000 PCs. Gaucho [5], the GAUdi Component Helping Online, was developed to allow the control and monitoring of Gaudi algorithms. Using Gaucho, algorithms can be monitored from the run control system provided by the ECS. To achieve this, Gaucho implements a hierarchical control system using Finite State Machines. In this article we describe the Gaucho architecture, the experience of monitoring a large number of software processes and some requirements for future extensions.

  9. Triggered star formation on the borders of the Galactic HII region RCW 82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pomares; A. Zavagno; L. Deharveng; M. Cunningham; P. Jones; S. Kurtz; D. Russeil; J. Caplan; F. Comeron

    2008-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We are engaged in a multi-wavelength study of several Galactic HII regions that exhibit signposts of triggered star formation on their borders, and where the collect and collapse process could be at work. When addressing the question of triggered star formation it is critically important to ensure the real association between the ionized gas and the neutral material observed nearby. In this paper we stress this point, and present CO observations of the RCW 82 star forming region. The velocity distribution of the molecular gas is combined with the study of young stellar objects (YSOs) detected in the direction of RCW 82. We discuss the YSO's evolutionary status using near- and mid-IR data. The spatial and velocity distributions of the molecular gas are used to discuss the possible scenarios for the star formation around RCW 82.

  10. Convection Triggering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's Electronicnew

  11. Respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography: A novel method to reduce imaging dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Benjamin J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Engineering, Canberra Hospital, Canberra, ACT 2605 (Australia); O'Brien, Ricky T.; Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balik, Salim; Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, 401 College Street, P.O.Box 980058, Richmond, Virginia 23298-0058 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: A novel method called respiratory triggered 4D cone-beam computed tomography (RT 4D CBCT) is described whereby imaging dose can be reduced without degrading image quality. RT 4D CBCT utilizes a respiratory signal to trigger projections such that only a single projection is assigned to a given respiratory bin for each breathing cycle. In contrast, commercial 4D CBCT does not actively use the respiratory signal to minimize image dose. Methods: To compare RT 4D CBCT with conventional 4D CBCT, 3600 CBCT projections of a thorax phantom were gathered and reconstructed to generate a ground truth CBCT dataset. Simulation pairs of conventional 4D CBCT acquisitions and RT 4D CBCT acquisitions were developed assuming a sinusoidal respiratory signal which governs the selection of projections from the pool of 3600 original projections. The RT 4D CBCT acquisition triggers a single projection when the respiratory signal enters a desired acquisition bin; the conventional acquisition does not use a respiratory trigger and projections are acquired at a constant frequency. Acquisition parameters studied were breathing period, acquisition time, and imager frequency. The performance of RT 4D CBCT using phase based and displacement based sorting was also studied. Image quality was quantified by calculating difference images of the test dataset from the ground truth dataset. Imaging dose was calculated by counting projections. Results: Using phase based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 47% less imaging dose on average compared to conventional 4D CBCT. Image quality differences were less than 4% at worst. Using displacement based sorting RT 4D CBCT results in 57% less imaging dose on average, than conventional 4D CBCT methods; however, image quality was 26% worse with RT 4D CBCT. Conclusions: Simulation studies have shown that RT 4D CBCT reduces imaging dose while maintaining comparable image quality for phase based 4D CBCT; image quality is degraded for displacement based RT 4D CBCT in its current implementation.

  12. Elements of Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank G. Borg; Ismo Hakala; Jukka Määttälä

    2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of the basic properties of the radio wave generation, propagation and reception, with a special attention to the gigahertz bandwidth region which is of interest for wireless sensor networks. We also present some measurement results which use the so-called RSSI indicator in order to track how the field strength varies with position and distance of the transceivers. We hope the paper may be useful to anyone who looks for a quick review of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory with application to antennas.

  13. Spin waves in the (

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipscombe, O. J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chen, G. F. [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Fang, Chen [Purdue University; Perring, T. G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL; Egami, Takeshi [ORNL; Wang, Nanlin [The Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Hu, Jiangping [Purdue University and Chinese Academy of Sciences; Dai, Pengcheng [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use neutron scattering to show that spin waves in the iron chalcogenide Fe{sub 1.05}Te display novel dispersion clearly different from both the first principles density functional calculations and recent observations in the related iron pnictide CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. By fitting to a Heisenberg Hamiltonian, we find that although the nearest-neighbor exchange couplings in the two systems are quite different, their next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings are similar. This suggests that superconductivity in the pnictides and chalcogenides share a common magnetic origin that is intimately associated with the NNN magnetic coupling between the irons.

  14. Wave-driven

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHE FUTURE LOOKSof Energy Wave

  15. Feasibility of Respiratory Triggering for MR-Guided Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morikawa, Shigehiro, E-mail: morikawa@belle.shiga-med.ac.jp; Inubushi, Toshiro [Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Ohtsu, Molecular Neuroscience Research Center (Japan); Kurumi, Yoshimasa; Naka, Shigeyuki; Sato, Koichiro; Demura, Koichi; Tani, Tohru [Shiga University of Medical Science, Department of Surgery (Japan); Haque, Hasnine A [GE-Yokogawa Medical Systems (Japan)

    2004-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtained clear and reproducible MR fluoroscopic images and temperature maps for MR image-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory information was directly obtained from air-way pressure without a sensor on the chest wall. The trigger signal started scanning of one whole image with a spoiled gradient echo sequence. The delay time before the start of scanning was adjusted to acquire the data corresponding to the k-space center at the maximal expiratory phase. The triggered images were apparently clearer than the nontriggered ones and the location of the liver was consistent, which made targeting of the tumor easy. MR temperature images, which were highly susceptible to the movement of the liver, during microwave ablation using a proton resonance frequency method, could be obtained without suspending the artificial ventilation. Respiratory triggering technique was found to be useful for MR fluoroscopic images and MR temperature monitoring in MR-guided microwave ablation of liver tumors under general anesthesia.

  16. LASER TRIGGERED GAS SWITCHES UTILIZING BEAM TRANSPORT THROUGH 1 MO-cm DEIONIZED WATER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Lehr, Jane [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Blickem, James R.; Wallace, Zachariah R.; Anaya, Victor Jr; Corley, John P; Lott, John; Hodge, Keith; Zameroski, Nathan D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful attempts to trigger high voltage pressurized gas switches by utilizing beam transport through 1 MO-cm deionized water. The wavelength of the laser radiation was 532 nm. We have investigated Nd: YAG laser triggering of a 6 MV, SF6 insulated gas switch for a range of laser and switch parameters. Laser wavelength of 532 nm with nominal pulse lengths of 10 ns full width half maximum (FWHM) were used to trigger the switch. The laser beam was transported through 67 cm-long cell of 1 MO-cm deionized water constructed with anti reflection UV grade fused silica windows. The laser beam was then focused to form a breakdown arc in the gas between switch electrodes. Less than 10 ns jitter in the operation of the switch was obtained for laser pulse energies of between 80-110 mJ. Breakdown arcs more than 35 mm-long were produced by using a 70 cm focusing optic.

  17. Performance study of GPUs in real-time trigger applications for HEP experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketchum, W.; /Chicago U.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Bastieri, D.; Bauce, M.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Catastini, P.; /Fermilab; Gelain, S.; /Padua U.; Hahn, K.; /Fermilab; Kim, Y.K.; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Liu, T.; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Urso, G.; ,

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved into highly parallel, multi-threaded, multicore powerful processors with high memory bandwidth. GPUs are used in a variety of intensive computing applications. The combination of highly parallel architecture and high memory bandwidth makes GPUs a potentially promising technology for effective real-time processing for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. However, not much is known of their performance in real-time applications that require low latency, such as the trigger for HEP experiments. We describe an R and D project with the goal to study the performance of GPU technology for possible low latency applications, performing basic operations as well as some more advanced HEP lower-level trigger algorithms (such as fast tracking or jet finding). We present some preliminary results on timing measurements, comparing the performance of a CPU versus a GPU with NVIDIA's CUDA general-purpose parallel computing architecture, carried out at CDF's Level-2 trigger test stand. These studies will provide performance benchmarks for future studies to investigate the potential and limitations of GPUs for real-time applications in HEP experiments.

  18. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a h...

  19. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb?1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain ...

  20. Measurement of the B ? lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Huffman, B. T.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collection of a large number of B-hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II Detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper-decay-time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias, and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper, we present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty due to the differences between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B? using the mode B??D???. The B? lifetime is measured as ?B?=1.663±0.023±0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  1. Measurement of the $B^-$ lifetime using a simulation free approach for trigger bias correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The collection of a large number of B hadron decays to hadronic final states at the CDF II detector is possible due to the presence of a trigger that selects events based on track impact parameters. However, the nature of the selection requirements of the trigger introduces a large bias in the observed proper decay time distribution. A lifetime measurement must correct for this bias and the conventional approach has been to use a Monte Carlo simulation. The leading sources of systematic uncertainty in the conventional approach are due to differences between the data and the Monte Carlo simulation. In this paper they present an analytic method for bias correction without using simulation, thereby removing any uncertainty between data and simulation. This method is presented in the form of a measurement of the lifetime of the B{sup -} using the mode B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}. The B{sup -} lifetime is measured as {tau}{sub B{sup -}} = 1.663 {+-} 0.023 {+-} 0.015 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This new method results in a smaller systematic uncertainty in comparison to methods that use simulation to correct for the trigger bias.

  2. Reliability Analysis of the Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System of the LHC Beam Dumping System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filippini, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Trigger Synchronisation and Distribution System (TSDS) is one of the core components of the LHC Beam Dumping System and an essential element to guarantee that operation with the beam is always safe. The most critical failure of the TSDS is the missed trigger and re-trigger of at least 2 MKD magnets. This report presents the modelling and analysis of the likelihood of the TSDS to develop such a failure scenario during operation. The analysis returns the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) for the TSDS, and the list of the most important contributors. Sensitivity analysis is performed with respect to the failure parameters and with respect to failure dependencies among components that are in the redundant sets. This includes a study of the common cause failures that are in the TSDS architecture. The results in terms of SIL for the TSDS will be compared to the SIL for the previous architecture which was operational until the Long Shutdown 1. Recommendations in order to obtain higher safety by design will also be gi...

  3. The readiness of ATLAS Trigger-DAQ system for the second LHC run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rammensee, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After its first shutdown, LHC will provide pp collisions with increased luminosity and energy. In the ATLAS experiment, the Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system has been upgraded to deal with the increased event rates. The updated system is radically different from the previous implementation, both in terms of architecture and expected performance. The main architecture has been reshaped in order to profit from the technological progress and to maximize the flexibility and efficiency of the data selection process. The trigger system in ATLAS consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. The pre-existing two-level software filtering, known as L2 and the Event Filter, are now merged into a single process, performing incremental data collection and analysis. This design has many advantages, among which are: the radical simplification of the architec...

  4. The ATLAS Trigger Core Configuration and Execution System in Light of the ATLAS Upgrade for LHC Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, Lukas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 2013/14 shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) the ATLAS first level trigger (L1) and the data acquisition system (DAQ) were substantially upgraded to cope with the increase in luminosity and collision multiplicity, expected to be delivered by the LHC in 2015. Upgrades were performed at both the L1 stage and the single combined subsequent high level trigger (HLT) stage that has been introduced to replace the two-tiered HLT stage used in Run 1. Because of these changes, the HLT execution framework and the trigger configuration system had to be upgraded. Also, tools and data content were adapted to the new ATLAS analysis model.

  5. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  6. Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hart F.

    Curvelets Wave Evolution On the Evolution of Curvelets by the Wave Equation Hart F. Smith of Curvelets by the Wave Equation #12;Curvelets Wave Evolution Curvelets and the Second Dyadic Decomposition Curvelets A curvelet frame {} is a wave packet frame on L2(R2) based on second dyadic decomposition. f

  7. Wave Mechanics and the Fifth Dimension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson; James M. Overduin

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing 4D Minkowski space by 5D canonical space leads to a clearer derivation of the main features of wave mechanics, including the wave function and the velocity of de Broglie waves. Recent tests of wave-particle duality could be adapted to investigate whether de Broglie waves are basically 4D or 5D in nature.

  8. Tsunami Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at http://neic.usgs.gov/neis/eq_depot/2004/eq_041226/ neic_7 pages http://neic.usgs/neis/eq+depot/2004/eq_041226/neic _

  9. Ultrascale Tsunami of Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*Thee n0738F4-19513

  10. Physically based modeling of rainfall-triggered landslides: a case study in the Luquillo forest, Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnone, E.

    This paper presents the development of a rainfall-triggered landslide module within an existing physically based spatially distributed ecohydrologic model. The model, tRIBS-VEGGIE (Triangulated Irregular Networks-based ...

  11. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 773 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Implementation of the first level trigger for the auger observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Suomij¨arvi, 2001) powered by solar panels. The station electronics communicates with the observatory delivery schedule, power consump- tion, functionality, and cost goals. This paper discusses the trigger

  12. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  13. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  14. Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Fully nonlinear wave-current interactions and kinematics by a BEM-based numerical wave tank S. Ryu and the resulting kinematics. In the present paper, the variation of wave amplitude and wave length and minimize wave reflections from the down- stream wall. Nonlinear wave kinematics as a result of nonlinear

  15. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A. (Lafayette, CA); Bakulin, Andrey (Houston, TX)

    2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  16. Tube-wave seismic imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korneev, Valeri A [LaFayette, CA

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed analysis of cross well seismic data for a gas reservoir in Texas revealed two newly detected seismic wave effects, recorded approximately 2000 feet above the reservoir. A tube-wave (150) is initiated in a source well (110) by a source (111), travels in the source well (110), is coupled to a geological feature (140), propagates (151) through the geological feature (140), is coupled back to a tube-wave (152) at a receiver well (120), and is and received by receiver(s) (121) in either the same (110) or a different receiving well (120). The tube-wave has been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in reservoir characteristics. Tube-waves appear to couple most effectively to reservoirs where the well casing is perforated, allowing direct fluid contact from the interior of a well case to the reservoir.

  17. 2011 Interference -1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    2011 Interference - 1 INTERFERENCE OF SOUND WAVES The objectives of this experiment are: · To measure the wavelength, frequency, and propagation speed of ultrasonic sound waves. · To observe interference phenomena with ultrasonic sound waves. APPARATUS: Oscilloscope, function generator, ultrasonic

  18. Electrostatic-plasma-wave energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amendt, P.; Rostoker, N.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would reduce cross- field wave-energy convection since theor cross-field leakage of wave energy are ap- that thecomposition of electrostatic-wave-energy field degrees of

  19. Walking Wave as a Model of Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Goryunov

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of walking wave is introduced from classical relativistic positions. One- and three-dimensional walking waves considered with their wave equations and dispersion equations. It is shown that wave characteristics (de Broglie's and Compton's wavelengths) and corpuscular characteristics (energy-momentum vector and the rest mass) of particle may be expressed through parameters of walking wave. By that the new view on a number concepts of physic related with wave-particle duality is suggested.

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Wave Energy Resource Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationWave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites Wave Energy Resource Characterization at US Test Sites Sandia Report Presents...

  1. THE KINEMATICS AND PLASMA PROPERTIES OF A SOLAR SURGE TRIGGERED BY CHROMOSPHERIC ACTIVITY IN AR11271

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayshap, P.; Srivastava, Abhishek K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India)] [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India); Murawski, K., E-mail: kmur@kft.umcs.lublin.pl [Group of Astrophysics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We observe a solar surge in NOAA AR11271 using the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 304 A image data on 2011 August 25. The surge rises vertically from its origin up to a height of Almost-Equal-To 65 Mm with a terminal velocity of Almost-Equal-To 100 km s{sup -1}, and thereafter falls and fades gradually. The total lifetime of the surge was Almost-Equal-To 20 minutes. We also measure the temperature and density distribution of the observed surge during its maximum rise and find an average temperature and a density of 2.0 MK and 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, respectively. The temperature map shows the expansion and mixing of cool plasma lagging behind the hot coronal plasma along the surge. Because SDO/HMI temporal image data do not show any detectable evidence of significant photospheric magnetic field cancellation for the formation of the observed surge, we infer that it is probably driven by magnetic-reconnection-generated thermal energy in the lower chromosphere. The radiance (and thus the mass density) oscillations near the base of the surge are also evident, which may be the most likely signature of its formation by a reconnection-generated pulse. In support of the present observational baseline of the triggering of the surge due to chromospheric heating, we devise a numerical model with conceivable implementation of the VAL-C atmosphere and a thermal pulse as an initial trigger. We find that the pulse steepens into a slow shock at higher altitudes which triggers plasma perturbations exhibiting the observed features of the surge, e.g., terminal velocity, height, width, lifetime, and heated fine structures near its base.

  2. Starbursts and the triggering of the activity in nearby powerful radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Tadhunter; T. G. Robinson; R. M. Gonzalez Delgado; K. Wills; R. Morganti

    2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high quality long-slit spectra for three nearby powerful radio galaxies 3C293, 3C305, PKS1345+12. These were taken with the aim of characterising the young stellar populations (YSP), and thereby investigating the evolution of the host galaxies, as well as the events that triggered the activity. Isochrone spectral synthesis modelling of the wide wavelength coverage spectra of nuclear and off-nuclear continuum-emitting regions have been used to estimate the ages, masses and luminosities of the YSP component, taking full account of reddening effects and potential contamination by activity-related components. We find that the YSP make a substantial contribution to the continuum flux in the off-nuclear regions on a radial scale of 1 - 20kpc in all three objects. Moreover, in two objects we find evidence for reddened post-starburst stellar populations in the near-nuclear regions of the host galaxies. The YSP are relatively old (0.1- 2Gyr), massive and make up a large proportion (~1 - 50%) of the total stellar mass in the regions of galaxies sampled by the observations. Overall, these results are consistent with the idea that AGN activity in some radio galaxies is triggered by major gas-rich mergers. Therefore, these radio galaxies form part of the subset of early-type galaxies that is evolving most rapidly in the local universe. Intriguingly, the results also suggest that the radio jets are triggered relatively late in the merger sequence, and that there is an evolutionary link between radio galaxies and luminous/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies.

  3. An Optimization of the FPGA Based Wavelet Trigger in Radio Detection of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zbigniew Szadkowski for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments that observe coherent radio emission from extensive air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays are designed for a detailed study of the development of the electromagnetic part of air showers. Radio detectors can operate with 100% up time as e.g. surface detectors based on water-Cherenkov tanks. They are being developed for ground-based experiments (e.g. the Pierre Auger Observatory) as another type of air shower detector in addition to the fluorescence detectors, which operate with only ~10% of duty in dark nights. The radio signals from air showers are caused by the coherent emission due to geomagnetic radiation and charge excess processes. Currently used self-triggers in radio detectors often generate a dense stream of data, which is analyzed afterwards. Huge amounts of registered data requires a significant man-power for the off-line analysis. An improvement of the trigger efficiency becomes a relevant factor. In this work, Morlet wavelets with various scaling factors were used for an analysis of real data from the Auger Engineering Radio Array and for an optimization of the utilization of the resources in an FPGA. The wavelet analysis showed that the power of events is concentrated mostly in a limited range of the frequency spectrum (consistent with a range imposed by the input analog band-pass filter). However, we found several events with suspicious spectral characteristics, where the signal power is spread over the full band-width sampled by a 200 MHz digitizer with significant contribution of very high and very low frequencies. These events may not origin from cosmic ray showers but can be human-made contaminations. The engine of the wavelet analysis can be implemented into the modern powerful FPGA and can remove suspicious events on-line to reduce the trigger rate.

  4. Gamma Ray Burst triggering Supernova Explosion (and other effects on neighbouring stars)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial burst of a gamma ray burst (GRB) is usually followed by a longer-lived afterglow emitted at longer wavelengths. The evidence for a physical connection between GRBs and core collapse supernovae (SN) has increased since the discovery of GRB afterglows. So far SN signatures have been found in only a few GRBs. Here we propose the possibility of a GRB triggering the collapse of a WR or RG star in a binary system producing a SN, and typical signatures. We also look at the effects of GRBs on MS and WD stars in the neighbourhood. The possibility of GRBs retarding star formation in an interstellar cloud is also discussed.

  5. Feasibility of using neural networks as a level 2 calorimeter trigger for jet tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handler, T.; Neis, E. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics; Glover, C.; Gabriel, T.; Saini, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of expected decay modes of the Higgs particle will result in jet formation. We propose to incorporate a second level trigger into the SDC detector, using neural network VSLI hardware, to tag such Higgs decay modes. The input to the neural network will be the energy depositions in both the barrel and endcap regions of the calorimeter. The neural network`s output would be a value representing the degree of correlation between the observed energy distribution and the type of physical scattering that has occurred. Preliminary results indicate that neural networks may be of use in tagging jet decays of the Higgs particle.

  6. Feasibility of using neural networks as a level 2 calorimeter trigger for jet tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handler, T.; Neis, E. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics); Glover, C.; Gabriel, T.; Saini, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of expected decay modes of the Higgs particle will result in jet formation. We propose to incorporate a second level trigger into the SDC detector, using neural network VSLI hardware, to tag such Higgs decay modes. The input to the neural network will be the energy depositions in both the barrel and endcap regions of the calorimeter. The neural network's output would be a value representing the degree of correlation between the observed energy distribution and the type of physical scattering that has occurred. Preliminary results indicate that neural networks may be of use in tagging jet decays of the Higgs particle.

  7. INITIATORS AND TRIGGERING CONDITIONS FOR ADAPTIVE AUTOMATION IN ADVANCED SMALL MODULAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna h Oxstrand

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is anticipated that Advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMRs) will employ high degrees of automation. High levels of automation can enhance system performance, but often at the cost of reduced human performance. Automation can lead to human out-of the loop issues, unbalanced workload, complacency, and other problems if it is not designed properly. Researchers have proposed adaptive automation (defined as dynamic or flexible allocation of functions) as a way to get the benefits of higher levels of automation without the human performance costs. Adaptive automation has the potential to balance operator workload and enhance operator situation awareness by allocating functions to the operators in a way that is sensitive to overall workload and capabilities at the time of operation. However, there still a number of questions regarding how to effectively design adaptive automation to achieve that potential. One of those questions is related to how to initiate (or trigger) a shift in automation in order to provide maximal sensitivity to operator needs without introducing undesirable consequences (such as unpredictable mode changes). Several triggering mechanisms for shifts in adaptive automation have been proposed including: operator initiated, critical events, performance-based, physiological measurement, model-based, and hybrid methods. As part of a larger project to develop design guidance for human-automation collaboration in AdvSMRs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have investigated the effectiveness and applicability of each of these triggering mechanisms in the context of AdvSMR. Researchers reviewed the empirical literature on adaptive automation and assessed each triggering mechanism based on the human-system performance consequences of employing that mechanism. Researchers also assessed the practicality and feasibility of using the mechanism in the context of an AdvSMR control room. Results indicate that there are tradeoffs associated with each mechanism, but that some are more applicable to the AdvSMR domain. The two mechanisms that consistently improve performance in laboratory studies are operator initiated adaptive automation based on hierarchical task delegation and the Electroencephalogram(EEG) –based measure of engagement. Current EEG methods are intrusive and require intensive analysis; therefore it is not recommended for an AdvSMR control rooms at this time. Researchers also discuss limitations in the existing empirical literature and make recommendations for further research.

  8. Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrebo, Ann Kristin

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate prediction of wave runup on deepwater offshore platform columns is of great importance for design engineers. Although linear predictive models are commonly used in the design and analysis process, many of the important effects...

  9. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the naturally available and technically recoverable resource in a given location. The methodology was developed by the EPRI and uses a modified Gamma spectrum that interoperates hindcast sea state parameter data produced by NOAA's Wave watch III. This Gamma...

  10. Backreacting p-wave Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raúl E. Arias; Ignacio Salazar Landea

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gravitational backreaction of the non-abelian gauge field on the gravity dual to a 2+1 p-wave superconductor. We observe that as in the $p+ip$ system a second order phase transition exists between a superconducting and a normal state. Moreover, we conclude that, below the phase transition temperature $T_c$ the lowest free energy is achieved by the p-wave solution. In order to probe the solution, we compute the holographic entanglement entropy. For both $p$ and $p+ip$ systems the entanglement entropy satisfies an area law. For any given entangling surface, the p-wave superconductor has lower entanglement entropy.

  11. Nonlinear dust acoustic waves and shocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merlino, R. L.; Heinrich, J. R.; Hyun, S.-H.; Meyer, J. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe experiments on (1) nonlinear dust acoustic waves and (2) dust acoustic shocks performed in a direct current (DC) glow discharge dusty plasma. First, we describe experiments showing nonlinear dust acoustic waves characterized by waveforms of the dust density that are typically sharper in the wave crests and flatter in the wave troughs (compared to sinusoidal waves), indicating the development of wave harmonics. We discuss this behavior in terms of a second-order fluid theory for dust acoustic waves. Second, experimental observations of the propagation and steepening of large-amplitude dust acoustic waves into dust acoustic shock waves are presented. The observed shock wave evolution is compared with numerical calculations based on the Riemann solution of the fully nonlinear fluid equations for dust acoustic waves.

  12. Plasma waves driven by gravitational waves in an expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Papadopoulos

    2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model with zero spatial curvature, we consider the interaction of the gravitational waves with the plasma in the presence of a weak magnetic field. Using the relativistic hydromagnetic equations it is verified that large amplitude magnetosonic waves are excited, assuming that both, the gravitational field and the weak magnetic field do not break the homogeneity and isotropy of the considered FRW spacetime.

  13. The parametric decay of Alfven waves into shear Alfven waves and dust lower hybrid waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Crescent Model School Shadman, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A.; Zubia, K.; Zeba, I.; Uzma, Ch. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parametric decay instability of Alfven wave into low-frequency electrostatic dust-lower-hybrid and electromagnetic shear Alfven waves has been investigated in detail in a dusty plasma in the presence of external/ambient uniform magnetic field. Magnetohydrodynamic fluid equations of plasmas have been employed to find the linear and nonlinear response of the plasma particles for this three-wave nonlinear coupling in a dusty magnetoplasma. Here, relatively high frequency electromagnetic Alfven wave has been taken as the pump wave. It couples with other two low-frequency internal possible modes of the dusty magnetoplasma, viz., the dust-lower-hybrid and shear Alfven waves. The nonlinear dispersion relation of the dust-lower-hybrid wave has been solved to obtain the growth rate of the parametric decay instability. The growth rate is maximum for small value of external magnetic field B{sub s}. It is noticed that the growth rate is proportional to the unperturbed electron number density n{sub oe}.

  14. Boosted object hardware trigger development and testing for the Phase I upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Giordon Holtsberg; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Global Feature Extraction (gFEX) module is a Level 1 jet trigger system planned for installation in ATLAS during the Phase 1 upgrade in 2018. The gFEX selects large-radius jets for capturing Lorentz-boosted objects by means of wide-area jet algorithms refined by subjet information. The architecture of the gFEX permits event-by-event local pile-up suppression for these jets using the same subtraction techniques developed for offline analyses. The gFEX architecture is also suitable for other global event algorithms such as missing transverse energy (MET), centrality for heavy ion collisions, and "jets without jets". The gFEX will use 4 processor FPGAs to perform calculations on the incoming data and a Hybrid APU-FPGA for slow control of the module. The gFEX is unique in both design and implementation and substantially enhance the selectivity of the L1 trigger and increases sensitivity to key physics channels.

  15. Hydrogen-Triggered Type I X-ray Bursts in a Two-Zone Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall L. Cooper; Ramesh Narayan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the two-zone model of Cooper & Narayan to study the onset and time evolution of hydrogen-triggered type I X-ray bursts on accreting neutron stars. At the lowest accretion rates, thermally unstable hydrogen burning ignites helium as well and produces a mixed hydrogen and helium burst. For somewhat higher accretion rates, thermally unstable hydrogen burning does not ignite helium and thus triggers only a weak hydrogen flash. The peak luminosities of weak hydrogen flashes are typically much lower than the accretion luminosity. These results are in accord with previous theoretical work. We find that a series of weak hydrogen flashes generates a massive layer of helium that eventually ignites in an energetic pure helium flash. Although previously conjectured, this is the first time such bursting behavior has been actually demonstrated in a theoretical model. For yet higher accretion rates, hydrogen burning is thermally stable and thus steadily generates a layer of helium that ultimately ignites in a pure helium flash. We find that, for a narrow range of accretion rates between the mixed hydrogen and helium burst and weak hydrogen flash regimes, unstable hydrogen burning ignites helium only after a short series of weak hydrogen flashes has generated a sufficiently deep layer of helium. These bursts have fluences that are intermediate between those of normal mixed hydrogen and helium bursts and energetic pure helium flashes.

  16. 1994 Triggered Lightning Test Program: Measured responses of a reinforced concrete building under direct lightning attachments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Chael, J.; Davis, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fisher, R.J.; Magnotti, P.J. [Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rocket-triggered lightning test was carried out during the summer of 1994 on a specially designed steel reinforced concrete test building located at Ft. McClellan, Alabama. Currents, voltages, and magnetic fields were measured at 24 instrumented locations during 42 return strokes triggered to designated points on the structure and its lightning protection systems. As was found during an earlier similar lightning test of an earth covered munitions storage building, the buried power service conduits carried a much larger fraction of incident stroke current away from the building than did the intended grounding elements of the lightning protection system. Electrical breakdown and subsequent arcing occurred repeatedly to create dominant current paths to earth that were not accounted for in pretest linear modeling. Potential hazard level transient voltages, surprisingly more resistive than inductive in nature, were recorded throughout the structure. Also surprisingly, strikes to a single grounded protection mast system resulted in internal environments that were generally comparable to those occurring during strikes to roof-mounted air terminals. A description of the test structure, experimental procedures, and a full set of the resultant data are presented in this two-volume report.

  17. Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators for ATLAS: Commissioning and Run 2 Initial Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dano Hoffmann, Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Minimum Bias Trigger Scintillators (MBTS) delivered the primary trigger for selecting events from low luminosity proton-proton, lead-lead and lead-proton collisions with the smallest possible bias during LHC Run 1 (2009-2013). Similarly, the MBTS will select events for the first Run 2 physics measurements, for instance charge multiplicity, proton-proton cross section, rapidity gap measurements, etc. at the unprecedented 13 TeV center of mass energy of proton-proton collisions. We will review the upgrades to the MBTS detector that have been implemented during the 2013-2014 shutdown. New scintillators have been installed to replace the radiation damaged ones, a modified optical readout scheme have been adopted to increase the light yield and an improved data acquisition chain has been used to cope with the few issues observed during Run 1 operations. Since late 2014, MBTS have been commissioned during cosmic data taking, first LHC beam splashes and single beam LHC fills. The goal is to have a fully commissi...

  18. Wave Energy Extraction from buoys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnaud, Xavier

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different types of Wave Energy Converters currently tested or under development are using the vertical movement of floating bodies to generate electricity. For commercial applications, arrays have to be considered in order ...

  19. Jet quenching in shock waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Spillane; Alexander Stoffers; Ismail Zahed

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the propagation of an ultrarelativistic light quark jet inside a shock wave using the holographic principle. The maximum stopping distance and its dependency on the energy of the jet is obtained.

  20. Two-photon wave mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian J. Smith; M. G. Raymer

    2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The position-representation wave function for multi-photon states and its equation of motion are introduced. A major strength of the theory is that it describes the complete evolution (including polarization and entanglement) of multi-photon states propagating through inhomogeneous media. As a demonstration of the two-photon wave function's use, we show how two photons in an orbital-angular-momentum entangled state decohere upon propagation through a turbulent atmosphere.

  1. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The most prudent path to a full-scale design, build and deployment of a wave energy conversion (WEC) system involves establishment of validated numerical models using physical experiments in a methodical scaling program. This Project provides essential additional rounds of wave tank testing at 1:33 scale and ocean/bay testing at a 1:7 scale, necessary to validate numerical modeling that is essential to a utility-scale WEC design and associated certification.

  2. Wave function as geometric entity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Lev

    2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach to the geometrization of the electron theory is proposed. The particle wave function is represented by a geometric entity, i.e., Clifford number, with the translation rules possessing the structure of Dirac equation for any manifold. A solution of this equation is obtained in terms of geometric treatment. Interference of electrons whose wave functions are represented by geometric entities is considered. New experiments concerning the geometric nature of electrons are proposed.

  3. Steady water waves with multiple critical layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahlén

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

  4. Physica D 159 (2001) 3557 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelinovsky, Dmitry

    Physica D 159 (2001) 35­57 Wave group dynamics in weakly nonlinear long-wave models Roger Grimshawa Communicated by A.C. Newell Abstract The dynamics of wave groups is studied for long waves, using the framework reserved. Keywords: Wave group dynamics; Korteweg­de Vries equation; Nonlinear Schr¨odinger equation 1

  5. Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey Nazarenko,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    Gravity Wave Turbulence in Wave Tanks: Space and Time Statistics Sergei Lukaschuk,1,* Sergey the first simultaneous space-time measurements for gravity wave turbulence in a large laboratory flume. We found that the slopes of k and ! wave spectra depend on wave intensity. This cannot be explained by any

  6. Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } ky = n a Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y + - +- + + - +- + - + + +- - - (m,n) #12;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz k

  7. Propagation Plane waves -High order Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes y x a ky = n a One wave: p(x,y,t)=p0 cos(k y)e-jk x e j t vy(y,t)= 0 ; y=0,a xy } Propagation · Plane waves - High order Modes x n a p(x,y,t)=pn cos( y;4 Propagation · Circular duct ­ Helical waves (spiralling waves) kc=m/a kz kH Projection: Propagation #12

  8. Elevated temperature triggers human respiratory syncytial virus F protein six-helix bundle formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunus, Abdul S.; Jackson, Trent P.; Crisafi, Katherine; Burimski, Irina; Kilgore, Nicole R.; Zoumplis, Dorian; Allaway, Graham P.; Wild, Carl T. [Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 209 Perry Parkway, Suite 7, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (United States); Salzwedel, Karl, E-mail: salzwedelkd@niaid.nih.go [Panacos Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 209 Perry Parkway, Suite 7, Gaithersburg, MD 20877 (United States)

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. The RSV fusion (F) protein mediates fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane during virus entry and is a primary target for antiviral drug and vaccine development. The F protein contains two heptad repeat regions, HR1 and HR2. Peptides corresponding to these regions form a six-helix bundle structure that is thought to play a critical role in membrane fusion. However, characterization of six-helix bundle formation in native RSV F protein has been hindered by the fact that a trigger for F protein conformational change has yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that RSV F protein on the surface of infected cells undergoes a conformational change following exposure to elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of the six-helix bundle structure. We first generated and characterized six-helix bundle-specific antibodies raised against recombinant peptides modeling the RSV F protein six-helix bundle structure. We then used these antibodies as probes to monitor RSV F protein six-helix bundle formation in response to a diverse array of potential triggers of conformational changes. We found that exposure of 'membrane-anchored' RSV F protein to elevated temperature (45-55 deg. C) was sufficient to trigger six-helix bundle formation. Antibody binding to the six-helix bundle conformation was detected by both flow cytometry and cell-surface immunoprecipitation of the RSV F protein. None of the other treatments, including interaction with a number of potential receptors, resulted in significant binding by six-helix bundle-specific antibodies. We conclude that native, untriggered RSV F protein exists in a metastable state that can be converted in vitro to the more stable, fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation by an increase in thermal energy. These findings help to better define the mechanism of RSV F-mediated membrane fusion and have important implications for the identification of therapeutic strategies and vaccines targeting RSV F protein conformational changes.

  9. The Upgrade Path from Legacy VME to VXS Dual Star Connectivity for Large Scale Data Acquisition and Trigger Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuevas, C; Barbosa, F J; Dong, H; Gu, W; Jastrzembski, E; Kaneta, S R; Moffitt, B; Nganga, N; Raydo, B J; Somov, A; Taylor, W M

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New instrumentation modules have been designed by Jefferson Lab and to take advantage of the higher performance and elegant backplane connectivity of the VITA 41 VXS standard. These new modules are required to meet the 200KHz trigger rates envisioned for the 12GeV experimental program. Upgrading legacy VME designs to the high speed gigabit serial extensions that VXS offers, comes with significant challenges, including electronic engineering design, plus firmware and software development issues. This paper will detail our system design approach including the critical system requirement stages, and explain the pipeline design techniques and selection criteria for the FPGA that require embedded Gigabit serial transceivers. The entire trigger system is synchronous and operates at 250MHz clock with synchronization signals, and the global trigger signals distributed to each front end readout crate via the second switch slot in the 21 slot, dual star VXS backplane. The readout of the buffered detector signals relies on 2eSST over the standard VME64x path at >200MB/s. We have achieved 20Gb/s transfer rate of trigger information within one VXS crate and will present results using production modules in a two crate test configuration with both VXS crates fully populated. The VXS trigger modules that reside in the front end crates, will be ready for production orders by the end of the 2011 fiscal year. VXS Global trigger modules are in the design stage now, and will be complete to meet the installation schedule for the 12GeV Physics program.

  10. Calorimeter-Based Triggers at the ATLAS Detector for Searches for Supersymmetry in Zero-Lepton Final States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Mann

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three closely related parts. An analysis of data recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2010 in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 33.4/pb is performed, searching for supersymmetric final states containing jets and missing transverse energy and no electrons or muons (zero-lepton channel). No excess over the Standard Model background expectation is observed. Using the CLs and PLR methods, exclusion limits are set in two different supergravity models. These considerably extend the excluded parameter ranges from earlier experiments. The rates and efficiencies of triggers based on combined signatures with jets plus missing transverse energy in ATLAS are studied, which are the primary triggers for the search for Supersymmetry in the zero-lepton channel. For the measurement of the efficiencies in data collected in 2010 and 2011, the bootstrap method is applied. Different sample triggers based on jets and missing transverse energy are compared and their efficiencies are measured. A reweighting approach is used to correct for the bias from the propagation of the uncertainties in the bootstrap method. A universal model is developed to describe the contribution of fake missing transverse energy from resolution effects to the rates of missing transverse energy triggers as function of the level of in-time pile-up, i.e. the number of concurrent proton-proton interactions. The input parameters are tuned to the properties of the ATLAS trigger system, and the model predictions are compared to measurements of trigger rates in ATLAS. Good agreement is found for low thresholds for which the rates are dominated by resolution effects, whereas the rates for higher thresholds are underestimated due to additional sources of fake and real missing transverse energy, which are not incorporated in the model.

  11. Search for gravitational waves associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts using data from the second, third, and fourth LIGO runs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Anderson, S. B.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B. C.; Bhawal, B.; Billingsley, G.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Busby, D.; Cardenas, L.; Cepeda, C.; Chatterji, S.; Coyne, D. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-Gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and the significant change in sensitivity of the detectors over the three runs, however, limits the usefulness of a population study for the S2, S3, and S4 runs. Finally, we discuss prospects for the search sensitivity for the ongoing S5 run, and beyond for the next generation of detectors.

  12. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with 39 Gamma-Ray Bursts Using Data from the Second, Third, and Fourth LIGO Runs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a search for short-duration gravitational-wave bursts associated with 39 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by gamma-ray satellite experiments during LIGO's S2, S3, and S4 science runs. The search involves calculating the crosscorrelation between two interferometer data streams surrounding the GRB trigger time. We search for associated gravitational radiation from single GRBs, and also apply statistical tests to search for a gravitational-wave signature associated with the whole sample. For the sample examined, we find no evidence for the association of gravitational radiation with GRBs, either on a single-GRB basis or on a statistical basis. Simulating gravitational-wave bursts with sine-gaussian waveforms, we set upper limits on the root-sum-square of the gravitational-wave strain amplitude of such waveforms at the times of the GRB triggers. We also demonstrate how a sample of several GRBs can be used collectively to set constraints on population models. The small number of GRBs and the significant change in sensitivity of the detectors over the three runs, however, limits the usefulness of a population study for the S2, S3, and S4 runs. Finally, we discuss prospects for the search sensitivity for the ongoing S5 run, and beyond for the next generation of detectors.

  13. Electroluminescence from isolated defects in zinc oxide, towards electrically triggered single photon sources at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Sumin; Gentle, Angus; Ton-That, Cuong; Phillips, Matthew R; Aharonovich, Igor

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single photon sources are required for a wide range of applications in quantum information science, quantum cryptography and quantum communications. However, so far majority of room temperature emitters are only excited optically, which limits their proper integration into scalable devices. In this work, we overcome this limitation and present room temperature electrically triggered light emission from localized defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles and thin films. The devices emit at the red spectral range and show excellent rectifying behavior. The emission is stable over an extensive period of time, providing an important prerequisite for practical devices. Our results open up possibilities to build new ZnO based quantum integrated devices that incorporate solid-state single photon sources for quantum information technologies.

  14. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-triggered GRBs with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M S; Atkins, R; Benbow, W; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) making it an ideal all-sky monitor of the northern hemisphere in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. More than 45 satellite-triggered gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have occurred in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, with the rate of bursts increasing significantly with the launch of Swift. We discuss the most recent results of a search for very high energy (VHE) emission from these GRBs.

  15. Promiscuous Substrate Recognition in Folding and Assembly Activities of the Trigger Factor Chaperone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Hackert, E.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trigger factor (TF) is a molecular chaperone that binds to bacterial ribosomes where it contacts emerging nascent chains, but TF is also abundant free in the cytosol where its activity is less well characterized. In vitro studies show that TF promotes protein refolding. We find here that ribosome-free TF stably associates with and rescues from misfolding a large repertoire of full-length proteins. We identify over 170 members of this cytosolic Escherichia coli TF substrate proteome, including ribosomal protein S7. We analyzed the biochemical properties of a TF:S7 complex from Thermotoga maritima and determined its crystal structure. Thereby, we obtained an atomic-level picture of a promiscuous chaperone in complex with a physiological substrate protein. The structure of the complex reveals the molecular basis of substrate recognition by TF, indicates how TF could accelerate protein folding, and suggests a role for TF in the biogenesis of protein complexes.

  16. Laser triggered Z-pinch broadband extreme ultraviolet source for metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, I.; Lunney, J. G. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Juschkin, L. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland) [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Department of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, Steinbachstr. 15 D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Sidelnikov, Y. [ISAN Institute of Spectroscopy, Fizicheskaya Str. 5, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation)] [ISAN Institute of Spectroscopy, Fizicheskaya Str. 5, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142190 (Russian Federation); O'Reilly, F.; Sokell, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Sheridan, P. [Newlambda Technologies, UCD Science Centre North, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)] [Newlambda Technologies, UCD Science Centre North, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare the extreme ultraviolet emission characteristics of tin and galinstan (atomic %: Ga: 78.35, In: 14.93, Sn: 6.72) between 10 nm and 18 nm in a laser-triggered discharge between liquid metal-coated electrodes. Over this wavelength range, the energy conversion efficiency for galinstan is approximately half that of tin, but the spectrum is less strongly peaked in the 13-15 nm region. The extreme ultraviolet source dimensions were 110 {+-} 25 {mu}m diameter and 500 {+-} 125 {mu}m length. The flatter spectrum, and -19 Degree-Sign C melting point, makes this galinstan discharge a relatively simple high radiance extreme ultraviolet light source for metrology and scientific applications.

  17. Ethanol seeking triggered by environmental context is attenuated by blocking dopamine D1 receptors in the nucleus accumbens core and shell in rats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhri, Nadia; Sahuque, Lacey L.; Janak, Patricia H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ment into the prior ethanol self-administration context. SCHreinstatement of responding for ethanol cues triggered byplacement into an ethanol-associated context. Keywords

  18. Wave-Turbulence Interactions in a Breaking Mountain Wave Craig Epifanio and Tingting Qian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Dissipation of Mean Wave Energy · Mean wave energy E is just the total energy (kinetic + available · The dissipation of mean wave energy is caused by the turbulent momentum fluxes--specifically, by their tendency

  19. Energy-momentum relation for solitary waves of relativistic wave equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Dudnikova; A. I. Komech; H. Spohn

    2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Solitary waves of relativistic invariant nonlinear wave equation with symmetry group U(1) are considered. We prove that the energy-momentum relation for spherically symmetric solitary waves coincides with the Einstein energy-momentum relation for point particles.

  20. Experimental studies of irregular water wave component interactions with comparisons to the hybrid wave model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longridge, Jonathon Kent

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waves in the oceans pose challenging problems to offshore structural design because they arc irregular and can be highly nonlinear. Although these irregular waves can be viewed as the summation of many linear wave components of different...

  1. Modulation and kinematics of mechanically-generated short gravity waves riding on long waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spell, Charles Anthony

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering MODULATION AND KINEMATICS OF MECHANICALLY- GENERATED SHORT GRAVITY WAVES RIDING ON LONG WAVES A Thesis by C~S ANTHONY SPELL Approved as to style and content by: Jun Zhang... fundamental nonlinear wave interaction occurring in an irregular wave field. The objectives of the present study are now stated: ~ Generate a dual-component wave formed from the interaction of two inde- pendently propagating monochromatic wave trains in a...

  2. Surface wave chemical detector using optical radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface wave chemical detector comprising at least one surface wave substrate, each of said substrates having a surface wave and at least one measurable surface wave parameter; means for exposing said surface wave substrate to an unknown sample of at least one chemical to be analyzed, said substrate adsorbing said at least one chemical to be sensed if present in said sample; a source of radiation for radiating said surface wave substrate with different wavelengths of said radiation, said surface wave parameter being changed by said adsorbing; and means for recording signals representative of said surface wave parameter of each of said surface wave substrates responsive to said radiation of said different wavelengths, measurable changes of said parameter due to adsorbing said chemical defining a unique signature of a detected chemical.

  3. Two-wave interaction in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Zaqarashvili; B. Roberts

    2006-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The weakly nonlinear interaction of sound and linearly polarised Alfv{\\'e}n waves propagating in the same direction along an applied magnetic field is studied. It is found that a sound wave is coupled to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave with double period and wavelength when the sound and Alfv{\\'e}n speeds are equal. The Alfv{\\'e}n wave drives the sound wave through the ponderomotive force, while the sound wave returns energy back to the Alfv{\\'e}n wave through the parametric (swing) influence. As a result, the two waves alternately exchange their energy during propagation. The process of energy exchange is faster for waves with stronger amplitudes. The phenomenon can be of importance in astrophysical plasmas, including the solar atmosphere and solar wind.

  4. Global coherence of dust density waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The coherence of self-excited three-dimensional dust density waves has been experimentally investigated by comparing global and local wave properties. For that purpose, three-dimensional dust clouds have been confined in a radio frequency plasma with thermophoretic levitation. Global wave properties have been measured from the line-of-sight integrated dust density obtained from homogenous light extinction measurements. Local wave properties have been obtained from thin, two-dimensional illuminated laser slices of the cloud. By correlating the simultaneous global and local wave properties, the spatial coherence of the waves has been determined. We find that linear waves with small amplitudes tend to be fragmented, featuring an incoherent wave field. Strongly non-linear waves with large amplitudes, however, feature a strong spatial coherence throughout the dust cloud, indicating a high level of synchronization.

  5. B8 Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    B8 ­ Page 1 B8. Using CMS-Wave The most recent CMS-Wave code developed is Version 3.2. Several new capabilities and advanced features in this version include: · Full-plane wind-generation of waves · Automatic wave run-up calculation · Infra-gravity wave calculation · Nonlinear wave-wave interaction · Muddy

  6. Nonlocal theory of electromagnetic wave decay into two electromagnetic waves in a rippled density plasma channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sati, Priti; Tripathi, V. K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, Delhi 110054 (India)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric decay of a large amplitude electromagnetic wave into two electromagnetic modes in a rippled density plasma channel is investigated. The channel is taken to possess step density profile besides a density ripple of axial wave vector. The density ripple accounts for the momentum mismatch between the interacting waves and facilitates nonlinear coupling. For a given pump wave frequency, the requisite ripple wave number varies only a little w.r.t. the frequency of the low frequency decay wave. The radial localization of electromagnetic wave reduces the growth rate of the parametric instability. The growth rate decreases with the frequency of low frequency electromagnetic wave.

  7. Wave propagation in anisotropic viscoelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Hanyga

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the theory of complete Bernstein functions to matrix-valued functions and apply it to analyze Green's function of an anisotropic multi-dimension\\-al linear viscoelastic problem. Green's function is given by the superposition of plane waves. Each plane wave is expressed in terms of matrix-valued attenuation and dispersion functions given in terms of a matrix-valued positive semi-definite Radon measure. More explicit formulae are obtained for 3D isotropic viscoelastic Green's functions. As an example of an anisotropic medium the transversely isotropic medium with a constant symmetry axis is considered.

  8. Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff, 2002) | OpenEnergy AS Jump to:WaveWave

  9. atmospheric gravity waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gravity waves (AGWs). Satellite imagery shows evidence the characteristics of these waves. The favorable wave propagation conditions in 12;this region are illustrated 5...

  10. anomalous spin waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered....

  11. Identifying two steps in the internal wave energy cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Oliver Ming-Teh

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1.1 The internal wave energy cascade . . . . . . .? ? , which contain only wave energy trav- eling upward anddistinction is made between wave energy propagating upward

  12. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Abstract: Traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TW IMS) is a...

  13. MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable...

  14. alfven wave spectrum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v Guedel, Manuel 14 Anisotropic weak turbulence of Alfven waves in collisionless...

  15. alfven wave avalanches: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    waves are easily excited by various processes. Linear waves propagate at the Alfv'en speed v Guedel, Manuel 13 Anisotropic weak turbulence of Alfven waves in collisionless...

  16. Multicomponent seismic data, combining P-wave and converted P-to-SV wave (C-wave) wavefields, provide inde-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    (fast and slow) with differing polarization. The 4C, 3D ocean-bottom cable (OBC) multicomponent seismic and stratigraphic features within the gas-charged intervals. C- waves (Figure 3) penetrate these P-wave wipeout

  17. A Blast Wave from the 1843 Eruption of Eta Carinae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Very massive stars shed much of their mass in violent precursor eruptions as luminous blue variables (LBVs) before reaching their most likely end as supernovae, but the cause of LBV eruptions is unknown. The 19th century eruption of Eta Carinae, the prototype of these events, ejected about 12 solar masses at speeds of 650 km/s, with a kinetic energy of almost 10^50 ergs. Some faster material with speeds up to 1000-2000 km/s had previously been reported but its full distribution was unknown. Here I report observations of much faster material with speeds up to 3500-6000 km/s, reaching farther from the star than the fastest material in earlier reports. This fast material roughly doubles the kinetic energy of the 19th century event, and suggests that it released a blast wave now propagating ahead of the massive ejecta. Thus, Eta Car's outer shell now mimics a low-energy supernova remnant. The eruption has usually been discussed in terms of an extreme wind driven by the star's luminosity, but fast material reported here suggests that it was powered by a deep-seated explosion rivalling a supernova, perhaps triggered by the pulsational pair instability. This may alter interpretations of similar events seen in other galaxies.

  18. Wave VelocityWave Velocity Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Wave VelocityWave Velocity v=/T =f Diff t f ti l l itDifferent from particle velocity Depends on the medium in which the wave travelsDepends on the medium in which the wave travels stringaonvelocity F v of Waves11-8. Types of Waves Transverse wave Longitudinal wave Liu UCD Phy1B 2014 37 #12;Sound Wave

  19. Modeling X-ray Emissions from Rocket Triggered A Thesis Submitted in Partial Satisfaction Of the Requirements for the Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    Modeling X-ray Emissions from Rocket Triggered Lightning A Thesis Submitted in Partial Satisfaction . . . 3 1.1 X-ray emissions from lightning . . . 4 1.2 Gamma-ray emissions . . . 5 1.3 Detection by the return stroke. The dart leader/return stroke sequence can repeat multiple times. The net eect

  20. Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straneo, Fiamma

    Did changes in the Subpolar North Atlantic trigger the recent mass loss from the Greenland Ice) Leigh A. Stearns (University of Kansas) The Greenland Ice Sheet's (GIS) contribution to sea level rise and nearly-simultaneous acceleration of several outlet glaciers in Greenland's western and southeastern

  1. A simple high-voltage high current spark gap with subnanosecond jitter triggered by femtosecond laser filamentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A simple high-voltage high current spark gap with subnanosecond jitter triggered by femtosecond and able to switch currents in excess of 10 kA with sub-nanosecond jitter. The spark gap is remotely with a nanosecond jitter time2-7 . The jitter could be reduced to hundred of picoseconds with a SF6 filled cell8

  2. August 26, 2010 Thursday 16 Elul 5770 12:11 IST 'Climate change didn't trigger agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldar, Yonina

    August 26, 2010 Thursday 16 Elul 5770 12:11 IST 'Climate change didn't trigger agricultural that dramatic climate changes were responsible for the ancient Near East's Agricultural Revolution, about 8 argue against climate change being the origin of Near Eastern agriculture, and believe that a slow

  3. Aluminum Triggers Decreased Aconitase Activity via Fe-S Cluster Disruption and the Overexpression of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appanna, Vasu

    Aluminum Triggers Decreased Aconitase Activity via Fe-S Cluster Disruption and the Overexpression Research, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 6B4, Canada Although aluminum is known to be toxic to most or- ganisms, its that aluminum promotes the inhibition of aconitase (Acn) activity via the perturbation of the Fe-S cluster

  4. Triggered single photon emitters based on stimulated parametric scattering in weakly nonlinear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyriienko, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a scheme of single photon emission based on four-wave mixing in a three mode system with weak Kerr-type nonlinearity. A highly populated lower energy mode results in strong stimulated scattering of particle pairs out of the central mode, which consequently limits the central mode occupation. Thus, the system can be reduced to a $\\chi^{(2)}$ nonlinear medium with greatly enhanced interaction constant. As a model setup we consider dipolaritons in semiconductor microcavities. Using the master equation approach we show strong antibunching under continuous wave pump, which largely exceeds the conventional blockade mechanism. Finally, using a pulsed excitation we demonstrate theoretically an on-demand single photon emitter in a weakly nonlinear system.

  5. WAVE-ENERGY DENSITY AND WAVE-MOMENTUM DENSITY OF EACH SPECIES OF A COLLISION-LESS PLASMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cary, John R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case, the electrons have negative wave energy for 2w ne w wave energy for 2w .w > 0 nl Hence, unstable waves with negative phase velocity,

  6. Einstein, Black Holes Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Greg

    1 #12;Einstein, Black Holes and Gravitational Waves Gregory B. Cook Wake Forest University 2 #12;Einstein's Miraculous Year: 1905 · Einstein, A. "¨Uber einen die Erzeugung und Verwandlung des Lichtes Concerning the Production and Transformation of Light. · Einstein, A. "¨Uber die von der molekularkinetischen

  7. Wave functions of linear systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Sowinski

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete analysis of quantum wave functions of linear systems in an arbitrary number of dimensions is given. It is shown how one can construct a complete set of stationary quantum states of an arbitrary linear system from purely classical arguments. This construction is possible because for linear systems classical dynamics carries the whole information about quantum dynamics.

  8. Probing the cosmic gamma-ray burst rate with trigger simulations of the swift burst alert telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lien, Amy; Cannizzo, John K. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sakamoto, Takanori [Department of Physics and Mathematics, College of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara-shi, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Gehrels, Neil; Barthelmy, Scott D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Palmer, David M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, B244, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Graziani, Carlo [Astronomy Department, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) rate is essential for revealing the connection between GRBs, supernovae, and stellar evolution. Additionally, the GRB rate at high redshift provides a strong probe of star formation history in the early universe. While hundreds of GRBs are observed by Swift, it remains difficult to determine the intrinsic GRB rate due to the complex trigger algorithm of Swift. Current studies of the GRB rate usually approximate the Swift trigger algorithm by a single detection threshold. However, unlike the previously flown GRB instruments, Swift has over 500 trigger criteria based on photon count rate and an additional image threshold for localization. To investigate possible systematic biases and explore the intrinsic GRB properties, we develop a program that is capable of simulating all the rate trigger criteria and mimicking the image threshold. Our simulations show that adopting the complex trigger algorithm of Swift increases the detection rate of dim bursts. As a result, our simulations suggest that bursts need to be dimmer than previously expected to avoid overproducing the number of detections and to match with Swift observations. Moreover, our results indicate that these dim bursts are more likely to be high redshift events than low-luminosity GRBs. This would imply an even higher cosmic GRB rate at large redshifts than previous expectations based on star formation rate measurements, unless other factors, such as the luminosity evolution, are taken into account. The GRB rate from our best result gives a total number of 4568{sub ?1429}{sup +825} GRBs per year that are beamed toward us in the whole universe.

  9. Turbidity current flow over an obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Moshe

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current ...

  10. Nonlinear Saturation of Vertically Propagating Rossby Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannitsis, Constantine

    The interaction between vertical Rossby wave propagation and wave breaking is studied in the idealized context of a beta-plane channel model. Considering the problem of propagation through a uniform zonal flow in an ...

  11. Arnold Schwarzenegger DEVELOPING WAVE ENERGY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor DEVELOPING WAVE ENERGY IN COASTAL CALIFORNIA: POTENTIAL SOCIO. Developing Wave Energy In Coastal California: Potential Socio-Economic And Environmental Effects. California-ECONOMIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program

  12. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  13. On quantization of nondispersive wave packets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altaisky, M. V. [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)] [Space Research Institute RAS, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kaputkina, N. E. [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)] [National University of Science and Technology “MISIS” Leninsky prospect 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondispersive wave packets are widely used in optics and acoustics. We found it interesting that such packets could be also a subject of quantum field theory. Canonical commutation relations for the nondispersive wave packets are constructed.

  14. Wave Mechanics and General Relativity: A Rapprochement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using exact solutions, we show that it is in principle possible to regard waves and particles as representations of the same underlying geometry, thereby resolving the problem of wave-particle duality.

  15. Wind effects on shoaling wave shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddersen, F; Veron, F

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    breaking in the presence of wind drift and swell. J. Fluidlin, 1995: Asymmetry of wind waves studied in a laboratorycoupling between swell and wind-waves. J. Phys. Oceanogr. ,

  16. Carbon nanotube-guided thermopower waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Wonjoon

    Thermopower waves are a new concept for the direct conversion of chemical to electrical energy. A nanowire with large axial thermal diffusivity can accelerate a self-propagating reaction wave using a fuel coated along its ...

  17. Oblique reflections of internal gravity wave beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karimi, Hussain H. (Hussain Habibullah)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study nonlinear effects in reflections of internal gravity wave beams in a continuously stratified liquid which are incident upon a uniform slope at an oblique angle. Wave motion in a stratified fluid medium is unique ...

  18. Turbulent round jet under gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant horizontal turbulent round jet under a wavy environment was investigated. Progressive waves with different wave amplitudes in an intermediate water depth were used. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique...

  19. Gravitational waves from merging compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Scott A.

    Largely motivated by the development of highly sensitive gravitational-wave detectors, our understanding of merging compact binaries and the gravitational waves they generate has improved dramatically in recent years. ...

  20. Analysis of optimum Lamb wave tuning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yijun, 1970-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guided waves are of enormous interest in the nondestructive evaluation of thin-walled structures and layered media. Due to their dispersive and multi-modal nature, it is desirable to tune the waves by discriminating one ...

  1. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the ? channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  2. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation through fractures and cracks is an important subject in exploration and production geophysics, earthquake seismology and mining.

  3. Comparison of P-wave and S-wave data processed by DIP moveout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Misnid, Abdulaziz Mugbel

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of compressional (P) and shear (S) wave data in a fractured reservoir can show whether amplitude anomalies on the P-wave section are associated with the presence of gas or change of lithology. The P-wave and S-wave data selected for this study were shot in Burleson...

  4. High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    773 High amplitude wave propagation in collapsible tubes. II. Forerunners and high amplitude waves that, under certain circumstances, a pressure wave of large amplitude which propagates in a fluid feature of such a shock wave propagation inside an initially collapsed tube is the presence ofwavelets

  5. Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    Thompson/Ocean 420/Winter 2004 2D waves 1 Two-dimensional wave propagation So far we have talked about wave propagation in one-dimension. For two or three spatial dimensions, we vectorize our ideas propagation. For surface waves, there is no vertical propagation, and we are only concerned with the two

  6. WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAVE HEIGHTS IN A 4D OCEAN WAVE FIELD Paul C. Liu NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research a preliminary examination and analysis of a small suite of 4-D wave data to explore what new insight century. We feel it is timely to encourage further 4-D ocean wave measurement and thereby facilitate fresh

  7. Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Showalter, Kenneth

    Wave Front Interaction Model of Stabilized Propagating Wave Segments Vladimir S. Zykov1 and Kenneth; published 14 February 2005) A wave front interaction model is developed to describe the relationship between excitability and the size and shape of stabilized wave segments in a broad class of weakly excitable media

  8. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Outline Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He: Energy Cascades, Rogue Waves & Kinetic Phenomena Conference, Chernogolovka, 3 August 2009 McClintock Efimov Ganshin Kolmakov Mezhov-Deglin Wave Turbulence in Superfluid 4 He #12;Outline Outline 1 Introduction Motivation 2 Modelling wave turbulence Need for models

  9. Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tams Bnsgi, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinbock, Oliver

    Wave-pinned filaments of scroll waves Tamás Bánsági, Jr., Kevin J. Meyer, and Oliver Steinbocka Received 5 November 2007; accepted 26 December 2007; published online 6 March 2008 Scroll waves are three can be pinned to the wake of traveling wave pulses. This pinning is studied in experiments with the 1

  10. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Spencer

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waves generated by the thermoacoustic mechanism, little workproduction by the thermoacoustic mechanism is suppressed,

  11. Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Dan

    Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building Paper: Wave Impact Study on a Residential Building John residential light- frame wood buildings and wave and surge loading be- cause often little is left residential structures and wave loading. To do this, one-sixth scale residen- tial building models typical

  12. Beauty waves: an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, Jay Allen

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present a method for computing an artistic representation of ocean waves using Bezier curves. Wave forms are loosely based on procedural wave models and are designed to emulate those found in both art and nature. The wave forms...

  13. Autoresonance of coupled nonlinear waves L. Friedland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedland, Lazar

    wave train solutions of the decoupled problem. At the same time, the waves are globally phase locked, allowing the continuation of the phase locking between the waves despite the variation of system's param and sustaining this multidimensional autoresonance are the internal reso- nant excitation of one of the coupled

  14. EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES ON YOUNG SALMON Marine Biological Laboratory X. 1 33 R A. RTT ir.':; WOODS instantaneously to sounds. It was con- were tested in an experimental tank and in eluded that sound waves were, Wash . sound studies conducted under the above contract are terminated. #12;EFFECTS OF SOUND WAVES

  15. Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hongkai

    Coupled Parabolic Equations for Wave Propagation Kai Huang, Knut Solna and Hongkai Zhao #3; April simulation of wave propagation over long distances. The coupled parabolic equations are derived from a two algorithms are important in order to understand wave propagation in complex media. Resolving the wavelength

  16. Solitary waves propagating over variable Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solitary waves propagating over variable topography Roger Grimshaw Loughborough University waves that can propagate steadily over long distances. They were first observed by Russell in 1837 in a now famous report [26] on his observations of a solitary wave propagating along a Scottish canal

  17. Seminario de Matemtica Aplicada "Renowable wave energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tradacete, Pedro

    Seminario de Matemática Aplicada "Renowable wave energy: potencial and technical challenges Abstract: Among the various renewable energy sources, ocean wave energy has been only recently investiga will be at first to introduce the potential of wave energy, as a significant, and often neglected, contributor

  18. Wave propagation Remco Hartkamp (University of Twente)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    ) waves Sound: 20 Hz ­ 20 kHz Gas: P Liquid: P Plasma: P Solid: P & S #12;Stretched string example 1D wave Dispersion: Waves with different wavelengths propagate at different speeds 6 k c k k Shallow water: c gh mJ K material parameter (related to the strain saturation of the material) det FJ bulk modulus

  19. Multi-reflective acoustic wave device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andle, Jeffrey C.

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic wave device, which utilizes multiple localized reflections of acoustic wave for achieving an infinite impulse response while maintaining high tolerance for dampening effects, is disclosed. The device utilized a plurality of electromechanically significant electrodes disposed on most of the active surface. A plurality of sensors utilizing the disclosed acoustic wave mode device are also described.

  20. Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Wave guides: vacuum w/ tube of conductor boundary conditions for conductor Properties: non-transverse waves except TEM mode in coaxial cable speed normal modes (from Liouville problem) TE or TM TEM for coaxial cable cuto frequency otherwise evanescent waves separation into and components with 1 #12;B