National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tsunami wave triggered

  1. 2 Ionospheric GPS total electron content (TEC) disturbances triggered 3 by the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    Indian Ocean tsunami 4 Jann-Yenq Liu,1,2 Yi-Ben Tsai,3 Kuo-Fong Ma,3 Yuh-Ing Chen,4 Ho-Fang Tsai,5 5 2005; accepted 17 January 2006; published XX Month 2006. 7 [1] Tsunami ionospheric disturbances (TIDs that the 10 tsunami waves triggered atmospheric disturbances near the sea surface, which then 11 traveled

  2. Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2011-03-23

    that earthquakes and tsunami are no strangers to this island nation. Structures have long been built to withstand earthquakes. Tsunami appear in art and literature: The Big Wave by Pearl Buck, for example, is about the effects of a tidal wave on a fishing village...

  3. Changing forms and sudden smooth transitions of tsunami waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changing forms and sudden smooth transitions of tsunami waves R. H. J. Grimshaw1 , J. C. R. Hunt1 Engineering, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong August 14, 2014 Abstract In some tsunami waves travelling over can be as large as two, which may explain anomalous elevations of tsunamis at particular positions

  4. VARIATIONAL BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COASTAL WAVES AND TSUNAMIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    1 VARIATIONAL BOUSSINESQ MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF COASTAL WAVES AND TSUNAMIS DIDIT ADYTIA E. VAN different applications in this paper. One application deals with tsunami simulations, for which we show the phenomenon of tsunami waveguiding before the coast of Lampung in Indonesia. Another application deals

  5. TSUNAMI BENCHMARK RESULTS FOR FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    TSUNAMI BENCHMARK RESULTS FOR FULLY NONLINEAR BOUSSINESQ WAVE MODEL FUNWAVE-TVD, VERSION 1 by the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program CENTER FOR APPLIED COASTAL RESEARCH Ocean Engineering Laboratory University of Delaware Newark, Delaware 19716 #12;Abstract This report describes tsunami benchmark testing

  6. Surface water waves and tsunamis By Walter Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Surface water waves and tsunamis By Walter Craig Department of Mathematics and Statistics Mc earthquake in Sumatra on December 26, 2004, and the devastating tsunami which followed, I have chosen time of the recent tsunami from its epicenter off of the north Sumatra coast to the coast of nearby

  7. On the tsunami wave-submerged breakwater interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filianoti, P.; Piscopo, R. [Department of Mechanics and Materials, University Mediterranean of Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    The tsunami wave loads on a submerged rigid breakwater are inertial. It is the result arising from the simple calculation method here proposed, and it is confirmed by the comparison with results obtained by other researchers. The method is based on the estimate of the speed drop of the tsunami wave passing over the breakwater. The calculation is rigorous for a sinusoidal wave interacting with a rigid submerged obstacle, in the framework of the linear wave theory. This new approach gives a useful and simple tool for estimating tsunami loads on submerged breakwaters.An unexpected novelty come out from a worked example: assuming the same wave height, storm waves are more dangerous than tsunami waves, for the safety against sliding of submerged breakwaters.

  8. International Collaborative Tsunamis, Storm Surge, and Wave-Structure Interaction Research Opportunities Using the Oregon State Multidirectional Wave Basin and Large Wave Flume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Solomon C.

    1 International Collaborative Tsunamis, Storm Surge, and Wave-Structure Interaction Research experimental facility for tsunami and wave- structure interaction research, supported by the US National Science Foundation's Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) program. The Tsunami Wave Basin

  9. Introduction Modeling of large ocean waves Propagation speed Coherent wavetrains Near-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    dynamics Conclusions Tsunamis and ocean waves Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics AAAS Annual Meeting St. Louis Missouri February 19, 2006 Walter Craig McMaster University Tsunamis and ocean-shore wave dynamics Conclusions Introduction Tsunami waves are generated relatively often, from various

  10. Using a Bore-Soliton-Splash to understand Rogue Waves, Tsunamis & Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    & new experiments, in portable BSS wave tank or Roombeek channel [7]. 7 New Wave Energy Device [2]. · Clarify connection Bore-Soliton-Splash with rogue waves and tsunamis. · New wave energy device

  11. First tsunami gravity wave detection in ionospheric radio occultation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coïsson, Pierdavide; Lognonné, Philippe; Walwer, Damian; Rolland, Lucie M.

    2015-05-09

    After the 11 March 2011 earthquake and tsunami off the coast of Tohoku, the ionospheric signature of the displacements induced in the overlying atmosphere has been observed by ground stations in various regions of the Pacific Ocean. We analyze here the data of radio occultation satellites, detecting the tsunami-driven gravity wave for the first time using a fully space-based ionospheric observation system. One satellite of the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) recorded an occultation in the region above the tsunami 2.5 h after the earthquake. The ionosphere was sounded from top to bottom, thus providing themore »vertical structure of the gravity wave excited by the tsunami propagation, observed as oscillations of the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC). The observed vertical wavelength was about 50 km, with maximum amplitude exceeding 1 total electron content unit when the occultation reached 200 km height. We compared the observations with synthetic data obtained by summation of the tsunami-coupled gravity normal modes of the Earth/Ocean/atmosphere system, which models the associated motion of the ionosphere plasma. These results provide experimental constraints on the attenuation of the gravity wave with altitude due to atmosphere viscosity, improving the understanding of the propagation of tsunami-driven gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. They demonstrate that the amplitude of the tsunami can be estimated to within 20% by the recorded ionospheric data.« less

  12. Numerical simulation of tsunami waves generated by deformable submarine landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    wave model Tsunami wave Numerical modeling a b s t r a c t This paper presents a new submarine energy is mostly concentrated on a narrow band of the dominant slide direction for the waves generated-up along the coast. For example, submarine mass failure is considered as one of the major sources

  13. The Force of a Tsunami on a Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Dutykh, Denys; Dias, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing emphasis on renewable energy resources, wave power technology is fast becoming a realistic solution. However, the recent tsunami in Japan was a harsh reminder of the ferocity of the ocean. It is known that tsunamis are nearly undetectable in the open ocean but as the wave approaches the shore its energy is compressed creating large destructive waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand the force of an incoming tsunami. The analytical 3D model of Renzi & Dias (2012) developed within the framework of a linear theory and applied to an array of fixed plates is used. The time derivative of the velocity potential allows the hydrodynamic force to be calculated.

  14. Tsunami Wave Analysis and Possibility of Splay Fault Rupture During the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunami Wave Analysis and Possibility of Splay Fault Rupture During the 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake NORA DEDONTNEY 1 and JAMES R. RICE 1,2 Abstract--The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was observed by two, but which observed different tsunami lead wave morphologies. The earlier satellite, Jason-1, recorded a lead

  15. Dispersive tsunami waves in the ocean: Model equations and sensitivity to dispersion and Coriolis effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Dispersive tsunami waves in the ocean: Model equations and sensitivity to dispersion and Coriolis online 19 December 2012 Keywords: Boussinesq wave model Tsunami Dispersive effect Coriolis effect a b­Kutta scheme in time. In the context of tsunami generation and propagation over trans-oceanic distances

  16. Tsunami waveform inversion including dispersive waves: the 2004 earthquake off Kii Peninsula, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    Click Here for Full Article Tsunami waveform inversion including dispersive waves: the 2004 are often assumed to model tsunamis, but the wavelength of the initial water height distribution produced, is sometimes not much greater than the water depth. The resulting tsunami may have a dispersive character

  17. Horizontal displacements contribution to tsunami wave energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutykh, Denys; Chubarov, Leonid; Shokin, Yuriy

    2010-01-01

    The main reason for the generation of tsunamis is the deformation of the bottom of the ocean caused by an underwater earthquake. Usually, only the vertical bottom motion is taken into accound while the horizontal displacements are neglected. In the present paper we study both the vertical and the horizontal bottom motion while we propose a novel methodology for reconstructing the bottom coseismic displacements field which is transmitted to the free surface using a new three-dimensional Weakly Nonlinear (WN) approach. We pay a special attention to the evolution of kinetic and potential energies of the resulting wave while the contribution of horizontal displacements into wave energy balance is also quantified. Approaches proposed in this study are illustrated on the July 17, 2006 Java tsunami.

  18. Rayleigh and acoustic gravity waves detection on magnetograms during the Japanese Tsunami, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klausner, Virginia; Muella, Marcio T A H; Mendes, Odim; Domingues, Margarete O; Papa, Andres R R

    2015-01-01

    The continuous geomagnetic field survey holds an important potential in future prevention of tsunami damages, and also, it could be used in tsunami forecast. In this work, we were able to detected for the first time Rayleigh and ionospheric acoustic gravity wave propagation in the Z-component of the geomagnetic field due to the Japanese tsunami, 2011 prior to the tsunami arrival. The geomagnetic measurements were obtained in the epicentral near and far-field. Also, these waves were detected within minutes to few hours of the tsunami arrival. For these reasons, these results are very encouraging, and confirmed that the geomagnetic field monitoring could play an important role in the tsunami warning systems, and also, it could provide additional information in the induced ionospheric wave propagation models due to tsunamis.

  19. A two-layer granular landslide model for tsunami wave generation: Theory and computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    A two-layer granular landslide model for tsunami wave generation: Theory and computation Gangfeng for granular landslide motion and tsunami wave generation. The landslide, either submarine or subaerial experiments on impulsive wave generation by subaerial granular landslides. Model results illustrate a complex

  20. NEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Solomon C.

    -wave runup behavior is critical if we are to develop appropriate warning systems and evacuation strategiesNEES Multidirectional Wave Basin for Tsunami Research Solomon C. Yim1 , Harry H. Yeh2 , Daniel T requirements posed by tsunami researchers, with basin dimensions and wave generation capabilities closely

  1. Ionospheric gravity waves detected offshore Hawaii after tsunamis Lucie M. Rolland,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    an important role in the continuous oce- anic survey to prevent the damage produced by powerful tsunamis. We of a tsunami. This was triggered by the 23 June 2001 Mw 8.2 earthquake in Peru. TEC is the electron density

  2. Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian Ocean tsunamis from a pressure gauge array in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Observations of the 2004 and 2006 Indian Ocean tsunamis from a pressure gauge array in Indonesia located in straits in the southern Indonesian islands were used to evaluate tsunami signals triggered. Tsunami waves reached the pressure gauges around 5 to 6 hours after the 2004 earthquake; the largest waves

  3. The VOLNA code for the numerical modelling of tsunami waves: generation, propagation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the finite volume scheme implemented in the code. We explain the numerical treatment of the wet is decided on the base of inundation maps which are produced with this type of numerical tools. Finally we and the perspectives for future research presented. Key words: tsunami waves, shallow water equations, tsunami

  4. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    First Set of Atlantic Tsunami Buoy Stations," (DART), SeaExercise Pacific Wave 06," Tsunami Newsletter, Vol. 38, No.Jan. -April 2006," (tsunami, Buru Island, Indonesia, 14

  5. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  6. Ultralow frequency acoustic resonances and its potential for mitigating tsunami wave formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Bubbles display astonishing acoustical properties since they are able to absorb and scatter large amounts of energy coming from waves whose wavelengths are two orders of magnitude larger than the bubble size. Thus, as the interaction distance between bubbles is much larger than the bubble size, clouds of bubbles exhibit collective oscillations which can scatter acoustic waves three orders magnitude larger than the bubble size. Here we propose bubble based systems which resonate at frequencies that match the time scale relevant for seismogenic tsunami wave generation and may mitigate the devastating effects of tsunami waves. Based on a linear approximation, our na\\"ive proposal may open new research paths towards the mitigation of tsunami waves generation.

  7. THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO RENZI, DENYS DUTYKH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE FORCE OF A TSUNAMI ON A WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER LAURA O'BRIEN, PAUL CHRISTODOULIDES, EMILIANO waves. The question posed here is whether a nearshore wave energy converter (WEC) could withstand Acknowledgements 10 References 10 1. Introduction Wave energy devices are slowly becoming a reality. Various

  8. Les Tsunamis Tsunami!Tsunami!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madariaga, Raúl

    Les Tsunamis Tsunami!Tsunami! Sumatra 2004 29/12/2004 10/01/2003 #12;Sumatra December 2004 Classical tsunami model In reality the motion of the ocean Floor is more complex than thisFloor is more sismogèneZone sismogène Zone de transition Dé l t ti lDéplacement vertical du sol: génération de tsunami #12

  9. Optical tsunamis: shoaling of shallow water rogue waves in nonlinear fibers with normal dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In analogy with ocean waves running up towards the beach, shoaling of prechirped optical pulses may occur in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime of optical fibers. We present exact Riemann wave solutions of the optical shallow water equations and show that they agree remarkably well with the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, at least up to the point where a vertical pulse front develops. We also reveal that extreme wave events or optical tsunamis may be generated in dispersion tapered fibers in the presence of higher-order dispersion.

  10. Generation of surface waves by an underwater moving bottom: Experiments and application to tsunami modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamin, Timothée; Ruiz-Chavarría, Gerardo; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We report laboratory experiments on surface waves generated in a uniform fluid layer whose bottom undergoes a sudden upward motion. Simultaneous measurements of the free-surface deformation and the fluid velocity field are focused on the role of the bottom kinematics in wave generation. We observe that the fluid layer transfers bottom motion to the free surface as a temporal high-pass filter coupled with a spatial low-pass filter. Both filter effects are usually neglected in tsunami warning systems. Our results display good agreement with a prevailing linear theory without fitting parameter. Based on our experimental data, we provide a new theoretical approach for the rapid kinematics limit that is applicable even for non-flat bottoms: a key step since most approaches assume a uniform depth. This approach can be easily appended to tsunami simulations under arbitrary topography.

  11. Numerical Exercises Course Applied Finite Elements 2012 Tsunami Wave Amplification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    waves seen on our car window as ripples on water sheets during heavy rain are also shallow water waves-Dimensional Linear Shallow Water Equations Linear shallow water equations (LSWE) describe the the motion of waves travelling on the free surface of a liquid, such as sea water. They govern the motion of small

  12. WCCE ECCE TCCE Joint Conference: EARTHQUAKE & TSUNAMI BASIN SCALE TSUNAMI PROPAGATION MODELING USING BOUSSINESQ MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    WCCE ­ ECCE ­ TCCE Joint Conference: EARTHQUAKE & TSUNAMI 1 BASIN SCALE TSUNAMI PROPAGATION-scale tsunami modeling are based on the shallow water equations and neglect frequency dispersion effects in wave propagation. Recent studies on tsunami modeling revealed that such tsunami models may not be satisfactory

  13. WHO Conference onWHO Conference on Health Aspects of TsunamiHealth Aspects of Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    WHO Conference onWHO Conference on Health Aspects of TsunamiHealth Aspects of Tsunami Disaster and Measuring Impacts Who Was Affected?Who Was Affected? The Demography of TsunamiThe Demography of Tsunami ­ Lost livelihoods ­ Displacement #12;Who was exposed to the tsunami? · Wave heights were reported

  14. Introduc/on A tsunami is a sea wave generated by a sudden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Po

    the Pacific rim is the coastlines of Peru and Chile. Events have occurred on a 30 ­ Tsunami have been a common feature of life around the Pacific rim with many - Pacific Ocean Basin ­ Tsunamis are most common in the Pacific Ocean basin

  15. Your Mission: 1) Create a Tsunami in a box! Measure its velocity. 2) Analyze tsunami hazards and past tsunami data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Your Mission: 1) Create a Tsunami in a box! Measure its velocity. 2) Analyze tsunami hazards and past tsunami data Your Supplies: Plastic tub (outside) Sand and water (outside) Board with handle will be using this as a marker for timing the arrival of the tsunami wave. Length of the tub = _______________ m

  16. International Conference on Tsunami Warning (ICTW) Bali, Indonesia, November 12-14, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    International Conference on Tsunami Warning (ICTW) Bali, Indonesia, November 12-14, 2008 TSUNAMI in the propagation direction of a tsunami wave can produce largely amplified waves by the phenomenon that we call near-coast tsunami waveguiding. This phenomenon may contribute to an explanation that tsunami wave

  17. Tsunami Awareness for Fishermen and Mariners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    ? An earthquake somewhere along the Pacific Rim generates a significant tsunami. Buoys and sensors detect the wave earthquake in Alaska generated a tsunami that took four hours to reach Oregon. A tsunami generated in Japan waves will be followed by others. n Identify the location of inundation zones near your favorite boat

  18. Design Considerations for Tsunamis and Storm Surges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    away, underground pipeline can crack) An undermined sidewalk in Chennai Scour Damage of 2004 Tsunami ·Parameters influencing risk of tsunami-induced momentary liquefaction: Wave Height Permeability Porosity #12

  19. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    of December 2004 Tsunami on Kerala Coast," (India), Currentand Impact Along the Kerala Coast," (India), in Tsunami: Theof December 2004 Tsunami on Kerala Coast," (India), Current

  20. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Atlantic, and Arctic Tsunami Warning Systems for Canada,"Concepts for the Tsunami Warning Systems," Curr. Sci. , Vol.An Ideal Conceptual Tsunami Warning System for the Indian

  1. Cheap Textile Dam Protection of Seaport Cities against Hurricane Storm Surge Waves, Tsunamis, and Other Weather-Related Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-04

    Author offers to complete research on a new method and cheap applicatory design for land and sea textile dams. The offered method for the protection of the USA's major seaport cities against hurricane storm surge waves, tsunamis, and other weather-related inundations is the cheapest (to build and maintain of all extant anti-flood barriers) and it, therefore, has excellent prospective applications for defending coastal cities from natural weather-caused disasters. It may also be a very cheap method for producing a big amount of cyclical renewable hydropower, land reclamation from the ocean, lakes, riverbanks, as well as land transportation connection of islands, and islands to mainland, instead of very costly over-water bridges and underwater tunnels.

  2. May Gravity detect Tsunami ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fargion, D

    2004-01-01

    The present gravitational wave detectors are reaching lowest metric deviation fields able to detect galactic and extra-galactic gravitational waves, related to Supernova explosions up to Virgo cluster. The same gravitational wave detector are nevertheless almost able to reveal near field gravitational perturbations due to fast huge mass displacements as the ones occurring during largest Earth-Quake or Tsunami as the last on 26th December 2004 in Asiatic area. The prompt gravitational near field deformation by the Tsunami may reach the LIGO threshold sensitivity within 3000-10000 km distances. Their eventual discover (in LIGO data or in future on-line detector arrays) may offer the most rapid warning alarm system on earth. Nevertheless the later continental mass rearrangement and their gravitational field assessment on Earth must induce, for Richter Magnitude 9 Tsunami, a different terrestrial inertia momentum and a different rotation axis, as well as a detectable shrinking of the Earth radius of nearly R =1.7...

  3. May Gravity detect Tsunami ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion

    2005-11-23

    The present gravitational wave detectors are reaching lowest metric deviation fields able to detect galactic and extra-galactic gravitational waves, related to Supernova explosions up to Virgo cluster. The same gravitational wave detector are nevertheless almost able to reveal, in principle, near field Newtonian gravitational perturbations due to fast huge mass displacements as the ones occurring during largest Earth-Quake or Tsunami as the last on 26nd December 2004 in Asiatic area. Virgo and Ligo detector are unfortunately recording on high frequencies (above tens Hz) while the signal of the Tsunami lay at much lower range (below 0.1 Hz). Nevertheless prompt gravitational near field deformation by the Tsunami might reach the future LISA threshold sensitivity and frequency windows if such an array is located nearby (3000-10000) km distances. Unfortunately the present LISA system should be located at Lagrange point too far (1.5 million km. far away). We note however that the later continental mass rearrangement and their gravitational field assessment on Earth must induce, for Richter Magnitude 9-like Tsunami, a different terrestrial inertia momentum and a different principal rotation axis. In conclusion we remind that gravitational geodetic deviation on new precise satellites (GOCE 2006), assisted by GPS network, might nevertheless reach in the near future the needed threshold and accuracy to reveal Tsunami by their prompt tidal gravity field deviations . An array of such geoid detector maybe correlated with LISA-like satellite on Earth orbits may offer the fastest alarm system.

  4. A chain of winking (oscillating) filaments triggered by an invisible extreme-ultraviolet wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yuandeng; Tian, Zhanjun; Zhao, Ruijuan; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ishii, Takako T.; Shibata, Kazunari

    2014-05-10

    Winking (oscillating) filaments have been observed for many years. However, observations of successive winking filaments in one event have not yet been reported. In this paper, we present the observations of a chain of winking filaments and a subsequent jet that are observed right after the X2.1 flare in AR11283. The event also produced an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave that has two components: an upward dome-like wave (850 km s{sup –1}) and a lateral surface wave (554 km s{sup –1}) that was very weak (or invisible) in imaging observations. By analyzing the temporal and spatial relationships between the oscillating filaments and the EUV waves, we propose that all the winking filaments and the jet were triggered by the weak (or invisible) lateral surface EUV wave. The oscillation of the filaments last for two or three cycles, and their periods, Doppler velocity amplitudes, and damping times are 11-22 minutes, 6-14 km s{sup –1}, and 25-60 minutes, respectively. We further estimate the radial component magnetic field and the maximum kinetic energy of the filaments, and they are 5-10 G and ?10{sup 19} J, respectively. The estimated maximum kinetic energy is comparable to the minimum energy of ordinary EUV waves, suggesting that EUV waves can efficiently launch filament oscillations on their path. Based on our analysis results, we conclude that the EUV wave is a good agent for triggering and connecting successive but separated solar activities in the solar atmosphere, and it is also important for producing solar sympathetic eruptions.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Hydro-acoustic Waves In Weakly Compressible Fluid Ali Abdolali1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical Modeling of Hydro-acoustic Waves In Weakly Compressible Fluid Ali Abdolali1,2 , James T of Civil Engineering, University of Roma Tre Low-frequency hydro-acoustic waves are precursors of tsunamis. Detection of hydro-acoustic waves generated due to the water column compression triggered by sudden seabed

  6. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Issues in Tsunami Hazard Assessment of Nuclear Power Plant274 pp Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants inIssues in Tsunami Hazard Assessment of Nuclear Power Plant

  7. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan,Tsunami Assessment Methods for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan,Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan,

  8. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Yeh, Harry, and K. -T Chang, "Tsunami Propagation Caused byJr. , Model Study of Tsunami Amplification Around the IslandS. Ersoy, A.C. Yalciner, "Tsunami Generation of the Kocaeli

  9. Tsunami Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Seiche and Tsunami Effects from Nuclear Excavation of anof Seiche and Tsunami Effects from Nuclear Excavation of anFliegel, "Tsunami Protection of Coastal Nuclear Power Plants

  10. Tsunamis in Galaxy Clusters: Heating of Cool Cores by Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Fujita; Takeru Ken Suzuki; Keiichi Wada

    2003-09-30

    Using an analytical model and numerical simulations, we show that acoustic waves generated by turbulent motion in intracluster medium effectively heat the central region of a so-called ``cooling flow'' cluster. We assume that the turbulence is generated by substructure motion in a cluster or cluster mergers. Our analytical model can reproduce observed density and temperature profiles of a few clusters. We also show that waves can transfer more energy from the outer region of a cluster than thermal conduction alone. Numerical simulations generally support the results of the analytical study.

  11. On the modelling of tsunami generation and tsunami inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Frédéric; O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Stefanakis, Themistoklis

    2012-01-01

    While the propagation of tsunamis is well understood and well simulated by numerical models, there are still a number of unanswered questions related to the generation of tsunamis or the subsequent inundation. We review some of the basic generation mechanisms as well as their simulation. In particular, we present a simple and computationally inexpensive model that describes the seabed displacement during an underwater earthquake. This model is based on the finite fault solution for the slip distribution under some assumptions on the kinematics of the rupturing process. We also consider an unusual source for tsunami generation: the sinking of a cruise ship. Then we review some aspects of tsunami run-up. In particular, we explain why the first wave of a tsunami is sometimes less devastating than the subsequent waves. A resonance effect can boost the waves that come later. We also look at a particular feature of the 11 March 2011 tsunami in Japan - the formation of macro-scale vortices - and show that these macr...

  12. Tsunami Research Tsunami Science after 2004 Sumatra Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunami Research Tsunami Science after 2004 Sumatra Disaster Vasily Titov NOAA Center for Tsunami Research #12;NOAA Center for Tsunami Research NCTR Personnel September 2009 Develop methods and tools to reduce tsunami hazard and protect life. Testbed new tsunami forecast

  13. Tsunami Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Tsunami Assessment Manual for Nuclear Facilities," In 21st International Tsunami Symposium, IUGG XXIII General Assembly, Sapporo, Japan,Tsunami Behaviors Near the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant," In 21st International Tsunami Symposium, IUGG XXIII General Assembly, Sapporo, Japan,

  14. Tsunami Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Group for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific,Anon. , "US-USSR Tsunami Warning System Agreement," TsunamiGroup for the Tsunami Warning System in the Pacific (ITSU-

  15. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Aspects of Tsunami Warning Systems, Tsunami Analysis,Increase High-tech Tsunami Warning Systems," San FranciscoEffectiveness of the Tsunami Warning System in Selected

  16. NERC All rights reserved Differentiating earthquake tsunamis from other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    © NERC All rights reserved Differentiating earthquake tsunamis from other sources; how do we tell and colleagues, co-authors on SMFs and the Japan 2011 tsunami, it's an update, · New marine data presented, · The Japan event raises questions on our use of established methodologies ­ such as tsunami wave form

  17. Tsunami-Made Electric Current Could Offer Warning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    Tsunami-Made Electric Current Could Offer Warning Killer ocean waves apparently generate electric currents in the ocean that might be used to detect tsunamis quickly. By Larry O'Hanlon | Fri Jan 22, 2010 07:52 AM ET THE GIST: · A new model predicts that tsunamis can generate small surges of electricity

  18. WEB-BASED TSUNAMI VISUALIZATION Chris Janik1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Mike

    WEB-BASED TSUNAMI VISUALIZATION Chris Janik1 Mike Bailey2 Dylan Keon3 Cherri Pancake4 Harry Yeh5 ABSTRACT The Indonesian tsunami in December 2004 awakened the world to the need to better understand and predict tsunami wave behavior using simulations. In order to understand such an immense amount of data

  19. Theoretical comparison of tsunamis from dislocations and landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synolakis, Costas E.

    Theoretical comparison of tsunamis from E dislocations and landslides .A. Okal Department generated into a tsunami wave by seismic dislocations and underwate lumps. We conclude that the two sources can generate tsunamis of comparable total energy. i However, the slumping source is shown

  20. Tsunami detection in the [by Juliette Artru (Caltech, Pasadena, USA),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    Tsunami detection in the ionosphere [by Juliette Artru (Caltech, Pasadena, USA), Philippe Lognonné (Toulouse, France) and Makoto Murakami (GSI, Tsukuba, Japan] Introduction Tsunamis are surface gravity waves of measuring the sea surface variation in the case of large tsunamis (Okal et al. 1999) as was shown

  1. Diffusion and Dispersion Characterization of a Numerical Tsunami Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    Diffusion and Dispersion Characterization of a Numerical Tsunami Model David Burwell, Elena Tolkova and Arun Chawla February 6, 2007 1 Introduction Method Of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) is a depth averaged long wave tsunami inundation model that was originally developed by Titov and Synolakis (1995) for 1D

  2. Tsunamis: Detecting, Simulating, and Chasing Them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okal, Emile A. (Northwestern University) [Northwestern University

    2005-02-23

    Tsunamis are gravitational oscillations of the water mass of an ocean basin set up by earthquakes, landslides, volcanic eruptions, or bolide impacts. They represent an exceptional hazard capable of inflicting death and destruction on a global scale. Because their waves travel at a relatively slow speed (typically 200 m/s or the speed of a jetliner), there exists an opportunity for warning, at least in the far field. We will review the basic physics of the tsunami wave, the relationship between seismic source and tsunami excitation, and the scientific bases underlying the mitigation, warning, computer simulation, and real time detection of tsunami waves. In particular, we will describe the development of robust discriminants in the near and far fields for tsunamis generated by earthquakes and landslides, and will give examples of field methods for the recovery of quantitative databases of inundation measurements.

  3. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low latency gravitational wave triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Chu; E. J. Howell; A. Rowlinson; H. Gao; B. Zhang; S. J. Tingay; M. Boer; L. Wen

    2015-09-26

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of low-latency search pipelines we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. To determine what EM observations can be achieved, we consider a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high energy $\\gamma$-ray; we assess the performance of each using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo. We show that while challenging, breakthrough multimessenger science is possible to achieve with a range of follow-up facilities using low latency pipelines. To catch the prompt stage ($<$ 5s) of SGRBs under this scenario, it is challenging even for instruments with a large field-of-view; we suggest this provides motivation to speed up the follow-up pipelines of both the GW observatories and EM facilities. We further show that adding an Australian instrument to an expanded detector network including LIGO-India and Japanese KAGRA, will improve the angular resolution by a factor of 2. Using this network with an almost instantaneous GW triggering latency, we show that if wide field-of-view X-ray instruments such as the proposed ISS-Lobster can employ fast triggering mechanisms, one could obtain almost complete temporal and multiwavelength coverage of the prompt and early activity of SGRBs.

  4. Interferometric and schlieren characterization of the plasmas and shock wave dynamics during laser-triggered discharge in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen, E-mail: xwli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Wu, Jian; Yang, Zefeng; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-08-15

    This paper describes our efforts to reveal the underlying physics of laser-triggered discharges in atmospheric air using a Mach-Zehnder interferometer and schlieren photography. Unlike the hemispherical shock waves that are produced by laser ablation, bell-like morphologies are observed during laser-triggered discharges. Phase shifts are recovered from the interferograms at a time of 1000?ns by the 2D fast Fourier transform method, and then the values of the refractive index are deduced using the Abel inversion. An abundance of free electrons is expected near the cathode surface. The schlieren photographs visualize the formation of stagnation layers at ?600?ns in the interaction zones of the laser- and discharge-produced plasmas. Multiple reflected waves are observed at later times with the development of shock wave propagations. Estimations using the Taylor-Sedov self-similar solution indicated that approximately 45.8% and 51.9% of the laser and electrical energies are transferred into the gas flow motions, respectively. Finally, numerical simulations were performed, which successfully reproduced the main features of the experimental observations, and provided valuable insights into the plasma and shock wave dynamics during the laser-triggered discharge.

  5. Tsunamis warning from space :Ionosphere seismology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larmat, Carene [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04

    Ionosphere is the layer of the atmosphere from about 85 to 600km containing electrons and electrically charged atoms that are produced by solar radiation. Perturbations - layering affected by day and night, X-rays and high-energy protons from the solar flares, geomagnetic storms, lightning, drivers-from-below. Strategic for radio-wave transmission. This project discusses the inversion of ionosphere signals, tsunami wave amplitude and coupling parameters, which improves tsunami warning systems.

  6. Tsunami Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Tsunami Response of Island Systems," Jour. Phys. Ocean. ,Tsunami Response for Islands Systems," Jour. Phys. Ocean. ,with Multiple- Island Systems," Jour. Geophys. Res. , Vol.

  7. Observations and modeling of tsunami-induced currents in ports and harbors Patrick J. Lynett a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Observations and modeling of tsunami-induced currents in ports and harbors Patrick J. Lynett a. Shearer Keywords: tsunami whirlpools eddies turbulent structures field observation numerical simulation Tsunamis, or "harbor waves" in Japanese, are so-named due to common observations of enhanced wave heights

  8. Tsunami recorded on the open ocean floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filloux, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    On March 14, 1979 a sizeable earth-quake (Ms-7.6 Richter scale) occurred on the continential shelf adjacent to S.W. Mexico, near Petatlan in the state of Guerrero. This earthquake generated a small tsunami that was recorded in deep water, 1000 km away, thus providing for the first time a glance at a tsunami traveling in the open ocean. The same sea floor pressure record displays conspicuous signals associated with vertical sea floor motions generated at the passage of the first Rayleight seismic wave, R1. Seismic and tsunami travel velocities are in agreement with our present understanding of the phenomena, and tsunami detectability in deep water is demonstrated to be well within present day state of the art in the design of sea floor pressure transducers. As calculations anticipate, the E.M. signals associated with the passage of the tsunami were too faint to be detected.

  9. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Fliegel, "Tsunami Protection of Coastal Nuclear Power Plantsof a Tsunami Assessment Manual for Nuclear Facilities," Inthe Tsunami Potential at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating

  10. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    JSCE), Tsunami Evaluation Subcommittee of the Nuclear Civil127-137) Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power PlantsCommittee, Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power

  11. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    R.R. Behn, "Regional Tsunami Warning System (THRUST)," Inin a Caribbean Tsunami Warning System: Science, Engineering,Case for an Atlantic Tsunami Warning System," In Caribbean

  12. Delayed triggering of microearthquakes by multiple surface waves circling the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankel, Kurt L.

    con- duct a systematic search of remotely triggered microearth- quakes near the Coso Geothermal Field of the auxiliary material shows the record sections for vertical displacement seismograms generated by the Mw 8

  13. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Lakes, Western Norway," Sedimentology, Vol. 44, 1997, ppFailure Mechanisms," Sedimentology, Vol. 45, 1998, pp 411-J. Mangerud, "Tsunami Sedimentology Facies Deposited by the

  14. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Tsunami Assessment Manual for Nuclear Facilities," In 21st International Tsunami Symposium, IUGG XXIII General Assembly, Sapporo, Japan,Tsunami Behaviors Near the Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant," In 21st International Tsunami Symposium, IUGG XXIII General Assembly, Sapporo, Japan,

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF COASTAL TSUNAMI DISSIPATION AND Stphan T. Grilli1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    1 NUMERICAL MODELING OF COASTAL TSUNAMI DISSIPATION AND IMPACT Stéphan T. Grilli1 , Jeffrey C Tehranirad2 Recent observations of the coastal impact of large tsunamis (e.g., Indian Ocean 2004; Tohoku 2011) and related numerical and theoretical works have made it increasingly clear that tsunami waves arrive

  16. NUMERICAL MODELING OF COASTAL TSUNAMI IMPACT DISSIPATION Stphan T. Grilli1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    1 NUMERICAL MODELING OF COASTAL TSUNAMI IMPACT DISSIPATION AND IMPACT Stéphan T. Grilli1 , Jeffrey Tehranirad2 Recent observations of the coastal impact of large tsunamis (e.g., Indian Ocean 2004; Tohoku 2011) and related numerical and theoretical works have made it increasingly clear that tsunami waves arrive

  17. Integrated Ground Motion and Tsunami Simulation for the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake Using High-Performance Supercomputers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    Integrated Ground Motion and Tsunami Simulation for the 1944 Tonankai Earthquake Using High-Performance Supercomputers Paper: Dr4-2-3680; 2009/4/13 Integrated Ground Motion and Tsunami Simulation for the 1944 Tonankai.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Received December 23, 2009; accepted February 4, 2009] An integrated simulation of seismic wave and tsunami

  18. NH13A: No-source tsunami forecasting for Alaska communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    NH13A: No-source tsunami forecasting for Alaska communities Dmitry Nicolsky (UAF) djnicolsky://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/ Wave trains to Alaska: direction structure (time history) tsunami source R E S P and accurate regional tsunami forecasts · A deep-ocean detector and a coastal site can be connected

  19. Hydrodynamic modeling of tsunamis from the Currituck landslide Eric L. Geist a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Hydrodynamic modeling of tsunamis from the Currituck landslide Eric L. Geist a, , Patrick J. Lynett: Accepted 24 September 2008 Keywords: tsunami landslide hydrodynamic runup numerical model sensitivity analysis Tsunami generation from the Currituck landslide offshore North Carolina and propagation of waves

  20. Three-dimensional waveform modeling of ionospheric signature induced by the 2004 Sumatra tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    Three-dimensional waveform modeling of ionospheric signature induced by the 2004 Sumatra tsunami, 2004, tsunami produced internal gravity waves in the neutral atmosphere and large disturbances reproduce, with a 3D numerical modeling of the ocean-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling, the tsunami signature

  1. Mass Movement-Induced Tsunami Hazard on Perialpine Lake Lucerne (Switzerland): Scenarios and Numerical Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Mass Movement-Induced Tsunami Hazard on Perialpine Lake Lucerne (Switzerland): Scenarios damaging waves on the lake, it was suggested that tsunamis generated by mass movements represent-dimensional, depth-averaged models for mass-movement propagation and for tsunami generation, propagation and inunda

  2. Three-Dimensional Tsunami Modeling Using GPU-SPHysics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz, Andrew J.

    2010-07-14

    on the GPU not only creates accurate, three-dimensional models but stunning visualizations of a tsunami wave breaking on beaches or other structures. Using the data from these models, coastal communities will be well prepared for any magnitude of tsunami...

  3. Tsunami Sources Icosahedron Globe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsunami Sources Icosahedron Globe August 2012 Edition NOAA National Geophysical Data Center World to reduce to 8.5" x 11". This globe of Earth shows the locations of historical tsunami sources, extracted from NGDC'sGlobal Historical Tsunami Database (ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard). A tsunamiisaseriesof traveling

  4. Parametric Excitation of Internal Gravity Waves in Ocean and Atmosphere as Precursors of Strong Earthquakes and Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2013-01-01

    The condition of internal gravity waves (IGW) parametric excitation in the rotating fluid layer heated from above, with the layer vibration along the vertical axis or with periodic modulation in time of the vertical temperature distribution, is obtained. We show the dual role of the molecular dissipative effects that may lead not only to the wave oscillations damping, but also to emergence of hydrodynamic dissipative instability (DI) in some frequency band of IGW. This DI also may take place for the localized in horizontal plane tornado-like disturbances, horizontal scale of which does not exceed the character vertical scale for the fluid layer of the finite depth. Investigated parametric resonance mechanism of IGW generation in ocean and atmosphere during and before earthquakes allows monitoring of such waves (with double period with respect to the period of vibration or temperature gradient modulation) as precursors of these devastating phenomena.

  5. Triggering collapse of the presolar dense cloud core and injecting short-lived radioisotopes with a shock wave. III. Rotating three-dimensional cloud cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A.

    2014-06-10

    A key test of the supernova triggering and injection hypothesis for the origin of the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes is to reproduce the inferred initial abundances of these isotopes. We present here the most detailed models to date of the shock wave triggering and injection process, where shock waves with varied properties strike fully three-dimensional, rotating, dense cloud cores. The models are calculated with the FLASH adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code. Three different outcomes can result: triggered collapse leading to fragmentation into a multiple protostar system; triggered collapse leading to a single protostar embedded in a protostellar disk; or failure to undergo dynamic collapse. Shock wave material is injected into the collapsing clouds through Rayleigh-Taylor fingers, resulting in initially inhomogeneous distributions in the protostars and protostellar disks. Cloud rotation about an axis aligned with the shock propagation direction does not increase the injection efficiency appreciably, as the shock parameters were chosen to be optimal for injection even in the absence of rotation. For a shock wave from a core-collapse supernova, the dilution factors for supernova material are in the range of ?10{sup –4} to ?3 × 10{sup –4}, in agreement with recent laboratory estimates of the required amount of dilution for {sup 60}Fe and {sup 26}Al. We conclude that a type II supernova remains as a promising candidate for synthesizing the solar system's short-lived radioisotopes shortly before their injection into the presolar cloud core by the supernova's remnant shock wave.

  6. A Model for TSUnami FLow INversion from Deposits (TSUFLIND)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Modern tsunami deposits are employed to estimate the overland flow characteristics of tsunamis. With the help of the overland-flow characteristics, the characteristics of the causative tsunami wave can be estimated. The understanding of tsunami deposits has tremendously improved over the last decades. There are three prominent inversion models: Moore advection model, Soulsby's model and TsuSedMod model. TSUFLIND incorporates all three models and adds new modules to better simulate tsunami deposit formation and calculate flow condition. TSUFLIND takes grain-size distribution, thickness, water depth and topography information as inputs. TSUFLIND computes sediment concentration, grain-size distribution of sediment source and initial flow condition to match the sediment thickness and grain size distribution from field observation. Furthermore, TSUFLIND estimates the flow speed, Froude number and representative wave amplitude. The model is tested by using field data collected at Ranganathapuram, India after the 20...

  7. TRIGGERING COLLAPSE OF THE PRESOLAR DENSE CLOUD CORE AND INJECTING SHORT-LIVED RADIOISOTOPES WITH A SHOCK WAVE. II. VARIED SHOCK WAVE AND CLOUD CORE PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.edu

    2013-06-10

    A variety of stellar sources have been proposed for the origin of the short-lived radioisotopes that existed at the time of the formation of the earliest solar system solids, including Type II supernovae (SNe), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and super-AGB stars, and Wolf-Rayet star winds. Our previous adaptive mesh hydrodynamics models with the FLASH2.5 code have shown which combinations of shock wave parameters are able to simultaneously trigger the gravitational collapse of a target dense cloud core and inject significant amounts of shock wave gas and dust, showing that thin SN shocks may be uniquely suited for the task. However, recent meteoritical studies have weakened the case for a direct SN injection to the presolar cloud, motivating us to re-examine a wider range of shock wave and cloud core parameters, including rotation, in order to better estimate the injection efficiencies for a variety of stellar sources. We find that SN shocks remain as the most promising stellar source, though planetary nebulae resulting from AGB star evolution cannot be conclusively ruled out. Wolf-Rayet (WR) star winds, however, are likely to lead to cloud core shredding, rather than to collapse. Injection efficiencies can be increased when the cloud is rotating about an axis aligned with the direction of the shock wave, by as much as a factor of {approx}10. The amount of gas and dust accreted from the post-shock wind can exceed that injected from the shock wave, with implications for the isotopic abundances expected for a SN source.

  8. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan,Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan,Tsunami Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants in Japan,

  9. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    28 March 2005, 18:32 UTC, Tsunami Newsletter, Vol. 37, No.10 April 2005, 11:14 UTC," Tsunami Newsletter, Vol. 37, No.15 June 2005, 02:51 UTC," Tsunami Newsletter, Vol. 37, No.

  10. Defining the source region of the Indian Ocean Tsunami from GPS, altimeters, tide gauges and tsunami models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Socquet, Anne

    propagation time of the rupture led to constructive interference of waves radiating first from the South and minutes later from the North, strengthening the tsunami in Southern India, Sri Lanka and Thailand. We

  11. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low latency gravitational wave triggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Q; Rowlinson, A; Gao, H; Zhang, B; Tingay, S J; Boer, M; Wen, L

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). Assuming BNS mergers are associated with short duration gamma ray bursts (SGRBs), we evaluate if rapid EM follow-ups can capture the prompt emission, early engine activity or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To examine the expected performance of low-latency search pipelines we simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters to estimate the detectability and localisation efficiency at different times before merger. To determine what EM observations can be achieved, we consider a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high energy $\\gamma$-ray; we assess the performance of each using observational SGRB flux data corrected to the range of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo. We ...

  12. IMPACT-GENERATED TSUNAMIS: AN OVER-RATED HAZARD. H. J. Melosh, Lunar and Planetary Lab, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (jmelosh@lpl.arizona.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melosh, H. Jay

    proposed by waves generated by nuclear explosions in the ocean. Authored by tsunami expert William Van DornIMPACT-GENERATED TSUNAMIS: AN OVER-RATED HAZARD. H. J. Melosh, Lunar and Planetary Lab, University suggested that oceanic waves (tsunami) created by the impact of relatively small asteroids into the Earth

  13. In many cases, tsunami waveheights and effects show a high variability along the coast. The possible causes are insecurities about the tectonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    In many cases, tsunami waveheights and effects show a high variability along the coast area in propagation direction of a tsunami wave can produce largely amplified waves by near coast tsunami waveguiding, see [1]. The waveguiding is caused by the fact that different propagation speeds

  14. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    109-117 "On the Flows," Enet, F. , and S.T. Grilli, "TsunamiSpain, IAHR, 2005. Paper No. Enet, Francois, and Stephen T.No. 10-11, 2003, pp 1,879- Enet, F. , S.T. Grilli, and P.

  15. Joko Tingkir program for estimating tsunami potential rapidly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madlazim,, E-mail: m-lazim@physics.its.ac.id; Hariyono, E., E-mail: m-lazim@physics.its.ac.id [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas Negeri Surabaya (UNESA) , Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    The purpose of the study was to estimate P-wave rupture durations (T{sub dur}), dominant periods (T{sub d}) and exceeds duration (T{sub 50Ex}) simultaneously for local events, shallow earthquakes which occurred off the coast of Indonesia. Although the all earthquakes had parameters of magnitude more than 6,3 and depth less than 70 km, part of the earthquakes generated a tsunami while the other events (Mw=7.8) did not. Analysis using Joko Tingkir of the above stated parameters helped understand the tsunami generation of these earthquakes. Measurements from vertical component broadband P-wave quake velocity records and determination of the above stated parameters can provide a direct procedure for assessing rapidly the potential for tsunami generation. The results of the present study and the analysis of the seismic parameters helped explain why the events generated a tsunami, while the others did not.

  16. Does MoSE cope with inland tsunamis hazard?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panza, Giuliano Francesco; Romanelli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this work we use morphostructural zonation and pattern recognition techniques to identify a potential seismic source located inland very near Venice, and then we evaluate how a tsunami wave generated from this source can affect the MoSE gates if they are standing up (closed) during the tsunami event. From our simulation we get both peaks and troughs as first arrivals: the behavior of the barriers in these two situations could be a very important design matter.

  17. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Liu, Philip L. -F. , "Wave Generation, Runup and RundownNumerical Simulation of Wave Generation and Run-up Due toCollapse and the Generation of Waves," Geochem. , Geophys. ,

  18. TsunamiPrep Social Media Plan #TsunamiPrep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tsunami es una serie de olas oceánicas generadas por un terremoto en el fondo del mar, deslizamientos de

  19. A Unique Large-Scale, Multidirectional Basin for Collaborative Tsunami and Coastal Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pancake, Cherri M.

    -wave runup behavior is critical if we are to develop appropriate warning systems and evacuation strategiesA Unique Large-Scale, Multidirectional Basin for Collaborative Tsunami and Coastal Research Solomon a unique laboratory for the tsunami and coastal engineering communities. Under the Network for Earthquake

  20. Triggering Collapse of the Presolar Dense Cloud Core and Injecting Short-Lived Radioisotopes with a Shock Wave. IV. Effects of Rotational Axis Orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    Both astronomical observations of the interaction of Type II supernova remnants (SNR) with dense interstellar clouds as well as cosmochemical studies of the abundances of daughter products of short-lived radioisotopes (SLRIs) formed by supernova nucleosynthesis support the hypothesis that the Solar Systems SLRIs may have been derived from a supernova. This paper continues a series devoted to examining whether such a shock wave could have triggered the dynamical collapse of a dense, presolar cloud core and simultaneously injected sufficient abundances of SLRIs to explain the cosmochemical evidence. Here we examine the effects of shock waves striking clouds whose spin axes are oriented perpendicular, rather than parallel, to the direction of propagation of the shock front. The models start with 2.2 solar mass cloud cores and shock speeds of 20 or 40 km/sec. Central protostars and protoplanetary disks form in all models, though with disk spin axes aligned somewhat randomly. The disks derive most of their angular...

  1. AUSTRALIAN TSUNAMI NEWSROOM GUIDE For information about tsunami warnings go to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    AUSTRALIAN TSUNAMI NEWSROOM GUIDE For information about tsunami warnings go to: www.bom.gov.au/tsunami basedTsunamiThreat Map This guide is to assist media to communicate tsunami warnings to the Australian public. · TheJointAustralianTsunami

  2. Optimisation of the Swift X-ray follow-up of Advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave triggers in 2015--16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, P A; Kennea, J A; Campana, S; O'Brien, P T; Tanvir, N R; Racusin, J L; Burrows, D N; Cenko, S B; Gehrels, N

    2015-01-01

    One of the most exciting near-term prospects in physics is the potential discovery of gravitational waves by the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors. To maximise both the confidence of the detection and the science return, it is essential to identify an electromagnetic counterpart. This is not trivial, as the events are expected to be poorly localised, particularly in the near-term, with error regions covering hundreds or even thousands of square degrees. In this paper we discuss the prospects for finding an X-ray counterpart to a gravitational wave trigger with the Swift X-ray Telescope, using the assumption that the trigger is caused by a binary neutron star merger which also produces a short gamma-ray burst. We show that it is beneficial to target galaxies within the GW error region, highlighting the need for substantially complete galaxy catalogues out to distances of 300 Mpc. We also show that nearby, on-axis short GRBs are either extremely rare, or are systematically less luminous than those detected to d...

  3. Tsunami evacuation mathematical model for the city of Padang

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusdiantara, R.; Hadianti, R.; Badri Kusuma, M. S.; Soewono, E. [Department of Mathematics Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Department of Civil Engineering Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Department of Mathematics Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2012-05-22

    Tsunami is a series of wave trains which travels with high speed on the sea surface. This traveling wave is caused by the displacement of a large volume of water after the occurrence of an underwater earthquake or volcano eruptions. The speed of tsunami decreases when it reaches the sea shore along with the increase of its amplitudes. Two large tsunamis had occurred in the last decades in Indonesia with huge casualties and large damages. Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System has been installed along the west coast of Sumatra. This early warning system will give about 10-15 minutes to evacuate people from high risk regions to the safe areas. Here in this paper, a mathematical model for Tsunami evacuation is presented with the city of Padang as a study case. In the model, the safe areas are chosen from the existing and selected high rise buildings, low risk region with relatively high altitude and (proposed to be built) a flyover ring road. Each gathering points are located in the radius of approximately 1 km from the ring road. The model is formulated as an optimization problem with the total normalized evacuation time as the objective function. The constraints consist of maximum allowable evacuation time in each route, maximum capacity of each safe area, and the number of people to be evacuated. The optimization problem is solved numerically using linear programming method with Matlab. Numerical results are shown for various evacuation scenarios for the city of Padang.

  4. Inversion Methods for Determining Tsunami Source Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Inversion Methods for Determining Tsunami Source Amplitudes from DART Buoy Data Don Percival: given data from DART buoys and models for unit magnitude earthquakes from various tsunami source

  5. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockridge, P. (National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  6. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  7. Evaluation and Numerical Simulation of Tsunami for Coastal Nuclear Power Plants of India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Pavan K.; Singh, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre-Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2006-07-01

    Recent tsunami generated on December 26, 2004 due to Sumatra earthquake of magnitude 9.3 resulted in inundation at the various coastal sites of India. The site selection and design of Indian nuclear power plants demand the evaluation of run up and the structural barriers for the coastal plants: Besides it is also desirable to evaluate the early warning system for tsunami-genic earthquakes. The tsunamis originate from submarine faults, underwater volcanic activities, sub-aerial landslides impinging on the sea and submarine landslides. In case of a submarine earthquake-induced tsunami the wave is generated in the fluid domain due to displacement of the seabed. There are three phases of tsunami: generation, propagation, and run-up. Reactor Safety Division (RSD) of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Trombay has initiated computational simulation for all the three phases of tsunami source generation, its propagation and finally run up evaluation for the protection of public life, property and various industrial infrastructures located on the coastal regions of India. These studies could be effectively utilized for design and implementation of early warning system for coastal region of the country apart from catering to the needs of Indian nuclear installations. This paper presents some results of tsunami waves based on different analytical/numerical approaches with shallow water wave theory. (authors)

  8. On the uniqueness of flow in a recent tsunami model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Octavian G

    2011-01-01

    We give an elementary proof of uniqueness for the integral curve starting from the vertical axis in the phase-plane analysis of the recent model [A. Constantin, R.S. Johnson, Propagation of very long water waves, with vorticity, over variable depth, with applications to tsunamis, Fluid Dynam. Res. 40 (2008), 175--211]. Our technique can be applied easily in circumstances where the reparametrization device from [A. Constantin, A dynamical systems approach towards isolated vorticity regions for tsunami background states, Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. doi: 10.1007/s00205-010-0347-1] might lead to some serious difficulties.

  9. On the uniqueness of flow in a recent tsunami model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Octavian G. Mustafa

    2011-03-12

    We give an elementary proof of uniqueness for the integral curve starting from the vertical axis in the phase-plane analysis of the recent model [A. Constantin, R.S. Johnson, Propagation of very long water waves, with vorticity, over variable depth, with applications to tsunamis, Fluid Dynam. Res. 40 (2008), 175--211]. Our technique can be applied easily in circumstances where the reparametrization device from [A. Constantin, A dynamical systems approach towards isolated vorticity regions for tsunami background states, Arch. Rational Mech. Anal. doi: 10.1007/s00205-010-0347-1] might lead to some serious difficulties.

  10. Seismogeodesy and Rapid Earthquake and Tsunami Source Assessment /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melgar Moctezuma, Diego

    2014-01-01

    using GPS for tsunami warning systems. Geophysical ResearchH. (1997). The new tsunami warning system of the Japanoperational tsunami early warning system (TEW) worldwide

  11. Initial Waves from Deformable Submarine Landslides: A Study on the Separation Time and Parameter Relationships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shay, Justin

    2012-07-16

    . Estimates of the energy released during a tsunamigenic earthquake and respective tsunami wave draw a clear picture of the efficiency of the tsunami-generating process. However for submarine landslides, this is not as straightforward because the generation...

  12. Rogue Waves UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI ROSENSTIEL SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    , monitoring what used to be considered merely nautical myth, and working to create a warning system to protect kinds of weather conditions. The Future: Preparation and Warning Systems Rosenstiel School researchers--the recent tsunami is testimony to that. But tsunamis are not freak or rogue waves--another kind of wave

  13. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  14. Quantifying tsunami risk using SRTM digital elevation data and scenario earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami Tsunami Quantifying tsunami risk submarine slides submarine slides suggest a history of great earthquakes #12;1m Chennai Tsunami run-up estimates from SRTM data for different tsunami maxima suggest that large tsunamis may leave a record in coastal swamps #12;3m Chennai

  15. INTERPOL Tsunami Evaluation Working The DVI Response to the South East Asian Tsunami between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirtes, Peter

    1 INTERPOL Tsunami Evaluation Working Group The DVI Response to the South East Asian Tsunami The Geographic Event 25 Regional Impact of the Tsunami 28 Initial Thai response 36 International response 42 DVI Register DVI Disaster Victim Identification DNA Deoxyribonucleic acid TTVI Thai Tsunami Victim

  16. Modeling of tsunami sources and propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin to assess coastal tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Modeling of tsunami sources and propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin to assess coastal tsunami 19716, USA Abstract Since 2010, under the auspices of the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Pro- gram (NTHMP), the authors have conducted modeling work to gradually develop tsunami inundation maps

  17. Tsunamis May Telegraph Their Presence Underwater Communication Network May Sense Tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    Tsunamis May Telegraph Their Presence Underwater Communication Network May Sense Tsunamis January 19, 2010 Tsunamis send electric signals through the ocean that appear to be sensed by the vast of an electric field created by the force of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami as it traveled over major submarine

  18. Tsunami Damage Detection at the Northwest Coast of Sumatra after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Tsunami Damage Detection at the Northwest Coast of Sumatra after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681 sully.lebron@upr.edu ABSTRACT. - The 2004 Indian Tsunami caused devastation of this research is to detect the effects of the tsunami in the northwest coast area of Sumatra, Indonesia. Landsat

  19. A real two-phase submarine debris flow and tsunami

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Miller, Stephen A. [Department of Geodynamics and Geophysics, Steinmann Institute, University of Bonn Nussallee 8, D-53115, Bonn (Germany)

    2012-09-26

    The general two-phase debris flow model proposed by Pudasaini is employed to study subaerial and submarine debris flows, and the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes and oceans. The model, which includes three fundamentally new and dominant physical aspects such as enhanced viscous stress, virtual mass, and generalized drag (in addition to buoyancy), constitutes the most generalized two-phase flow model to date. The advantage of this two-phase debris flow model over classical single-phase, or quasi-two-phase models, is that the initial mass can be divided into several parts by appropriately considering the solid volume fraction. These parts include a dry (landslide or rock slide), a fluid (water or muddy water; e.g., dams, rivers), and a general debris mixture material as needed in real flow simulations. This innovative formulation provides an opportunity, within a single framework, to simultaneously simulate the sliding debris (or landslide), the water lake or ocean, the debris impact at the lake or ocean, the tsunami generation and propagation, the mixing and separation between the solid and fluid phases, and the sediment transport and deposition process in the bathymetric surface. Applications of this model include (a) sediment transport on hill slopes, river streams, hydraulic channels (e.g., hydropower dams and plants); lakes, fjords, coastal lines, and aquatic ecology; and (b) submarine debris impact and the rupture of fiber optic, submarine cables and pipelines along the ocean floor, and damage to offshore drilling platforms. Numerical simulations reveal that the dynamics of debris impact induced tsunamis in mountain lakes or oceans are fundamentally different than the tsunami generated by pure rock avalanches and landslides. The analysis includes the generation, amplification and propagation of super tsunami waves and run-ups along coastlines, debris slide and deposition at the bottom floor, and debris shock waves. It is observed that the submarine debris speed can be faster than the tsunami speed. This information can be useful for early warning strategies in the coastal regions. These findings substantially increase our understanding of complex multi-phase systems and multi-physics and flows, and allows for the proper modeling of landslide and debris induced tsunami, the dynamics of turbidity currents and sediment transport, and the associated applications to hazard mitigation, geomorphology and sedimentology.

  20. Grain-size distributions of tsunami sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Sarah

    2011-08-08

    tsunamis, Chile 2010 and Peru 2008. The grain-size of the sediment from each tsunami was measured by two common techniques: sieving and digital particle counter. To interpret this real tsunami data, numerical and analytical analysis were used to simulate...

  1. Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis A grand challenge for Earth Sciences in devastating effects on heavily populated coastal areas from both ground shaking and tsunami. Robert Harris great earthquakes and tsunamis occur. Through Harris, COAS is involved in making fundamental temperature

  2. Statistical emulation of a tsunami model for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarri, A; Dias, F

    2012-01-01

    Due to the catastrophic consequences of tsunamis, early warnings need to be issued quickly in order to mitigate the hazard. Additionally, there is a need to represent the uncertainty in the predictions of tsunami characteristics corresponding to the uncertain trigger features (e.g. either position, shape and speed of a landslide, or sea floor deformation associated with an earthquake). Unfortunately, computer models are expensive to run. This leads to significant delays in predictions and makes the uncertainty quantification impractical. Statistical emulators run almost instantaneously and may represent well the outputs of the computer model. In this paper, we use the Outer Product Emulator to build a fast statistical surrogate of a landslide-generated tsunami computer model. This Bayesian framework enables us to build the emulator by combining prior knowledge of the computer model properties with a few carefully chosen model evaluations. The good performance of the emulator is validated using the Leave-One-O...

  3. Tsunami in the China Seas and its warning service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Lin; Wang Xinian; Bao Chenglan [National Marine Environment Forecasting Center, Beijing (China)

    1993-12-31

    This paper briefly describes the tsunamis that took place in the China Seas, discusses the possibility of influence of crossing oceanic tsunami on the China Seas, and emphatically introduces the tsunami along Hainan Island coasts in January 1992. It is the seldom tsunami recorded completely by instruments in China. Last, the operation of tsunami warning service in China is presented.

  4. Real-time Modelling of Tsunami Data Applied Physics Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    Real-time Modelling of Tsunami Data Applied Physics Laboratory Department of Statistics University for Tsunami Research #12;Background - I · even before disasterous Sumatra tsunami in December 2004, de- structive potential of earthquake-generated tsunamis was well- known · due to rate at which a tsunami

  5. Village Government in Aceh, Three Years after the Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorburn, Craig

    2008-01-01

    from cash responses to the tsunami. Case Studies. London:and Nias One Year after the Tsunami: The Recovery Effort andfor work programmes in post-tsunami Aceh: experiences and

  6. Fact #723: April 16, 2012 Japan's Earthquake and Tsunami Resulted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: April 16, 2012 Japan's Earthquake and Tsunami Resulted in Major Losses for Japanese Automakers Fact 723: April 16, 2012 Japan's Earthquake and Tsunami Resulted in Major Losses...

  7. Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    by limited observations and some anecdotal reports, particularly following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami of the reef and the offshore distance of the reef. Reducing the threat to reefs from anthropogenic nutrients a de- crease in energy of wind-driven waves of at least 80% across reefs [Lugo-Fernandez et al., 1998a

  8. CONTROL ID: 1808137 TITLE: Earthquake and submarine landslide tsunamis: how can we tell the difference?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Japan, it was generally assumed that it was directly generated by the earthquake. The earthquake has observations and the wave data from offshore buoys, and that the SMF generated the large runups in the Sanriku be considered in future analyses of the tsunami hazard in Japan. The identification of two major SMF-generated

  9. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL PMEL-114 Offshore forecasting of Hawaiian tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prediction of the offshore tsunami wave heights at selected locations for a wide variety of AASZ earthquake.1 Sensitivity to Earthquake Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.2 Sensitivity to Fault Dimensions insensitive to the details of the earthquake fault plane parameters. Simulation results for unit sources have

  10. Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report to the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program #12;#12;Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report should be cited as: Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico: U.S. Geological

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Volcanic tsunami: a review of source mechanisms, past

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belousov, Alexander

    ORIGINAL PAPER Volcanic tsunami: a review of source mechanisms, past events and hazards Asia has had both volcanic tsunamis and possesses some of the most densely populated, economically tsunami hazard in Southeast Asia. Source mechanisms of tsunami related to eruptive and gravitational

  12. A revised tsunami source model for the 1707 Hoei earthquake and simulation of tsunami inundation of Ryujin Lake,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    A revised tsunami source model for the 1707 Hoei earthquake and simulation of tsunami inundation the currently accepted location at the westernmost end of Shikoku. Numerical simulation of the tsunami using a new source rupture model for the Hoei earthquake explains the distribution of the very high tsunami

  13. Modeling of Tsunami Propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin for Tsunami Hazard Assessment along the North Shore of Hispaniola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Modeling of Tsunami Propagation in the Atlantic Ocean Basin for Tsunami Hazard Assessment along to estimating future seismic and tsunami hazard in Hispaniola. In 2013, the UNESCO commissioned initial modeling studies to assess tsunami hazard along the North shore of Hispaniola (NSOH), which is shared

  14. Calculations of turbidite deposits and tsunamis from submarine landslides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gisler, Galen R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gittings, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Great underwater landslides like Storegga off the Norwegian coast leave massive deposits on the seafloor and must produce enormous tsunamis. Such events have occurred on continental slopes worldwide, and continue to do so. Triggers for such slides include earthquakes, gas hydrate releases, and underwater volcanos. We have petformed a numerical study of such landslides using the multi-material compressible hydrocode Sage in order to understand the relationship between the rheology of the slide material, the configuration of the resulting deposits on the seafloor, and the tsunami that is produced. Instabilities in the fluid-fluid mixing between slide material and seawater produce vortices and swirls with sizes that depend on the rheology of the slide material. These dynamical features of the flow may be preserved as ridges when the sliding material finally stops. Thus studying the configuration of the ridges in prehistoric slides may give us measures of the circumstances under which the slide was initiated. As part of this study, we have also done a convergence test showing that the slide velocity is sensitive to the resolution adopted in the simulation, but that extrapolation to infinite resolution is possible, and can yield good velocities. We will present two-dimensional simulations of schematic underwater slides for our study of rheology, and a three-dimensional simulation in bathymetric conditions that resemble the pre-Storegga Norwegian margin.

  15. Development of a Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshiaki Sakai; Tomoyoshi Takeda; Hiroshi Soraoka; Ken Yanagisawa [Tokyo Electric Power Company (Japan); Tadashi Annaka [Tokyo Electric Power Services Co., Ltd, 3-3, Higashiueno 3-Chome, Taito-ku, Tokyo 110-0015 (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    It is meaningful for tsunami assessment to evaluate phenomena beyond the design basis as well as seismic design. Because once we set the design basis tsunami height, we still have possibilities tsunami height may exceeds the determined design tsunami height due to uncertainties regarding the tsunami phenomena. Probabilistic tsunami risk assessment consists of estimating for tsunami hazard and fragility of structures and executing system analysis. In this report, we apply a method for probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA). We introduce a logic tree approach to estimate tsunami hazard curves (relationships between tsunami height and probability of excess) and present an example for Japan. Examples of tsunami hazard curves are illustrated, and uncertainty in the tsunami hazard is displayed by 5-, 16-, 50-, 84- and 95-percentile and mean hazard curves. The result of PTHA will be used for quantitative assessment of the tsunami risk for important facilities located on coastal area. Tsunami hazard curves are the reasonable input data for structures and system analysis. However the evaluation method for estimating fragility of structures and the procedure of system analysis is now being developed. (authors)

  16. Application of 2D-Nonlinear Shallow Water Model of Tsunami by using Adomian Decomposition Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waewcharoen, Sribudh; Boonyapibanwong, Supachai; Koonprasert, Sanoe [Department of Mathematics, King Mongkut's University of Technology, North Bangkok (Thailand)

    2008-09-01

    One of the most important questions in tsunami modeling is the estimation of tsunami run-up heights at different points along a coastline. Methods for numerical simulation of tsunami wave propagation in deep and shallow seas are well developed and have been widely used by many scientists (2001-2008). In this paper, we consider a two-dimensional nonlinear shallow water model of tsunami given by Tivon Jacobson is work [1]. u{sub t}+uu{sub x}+{nu}u{sub y} -c{sup 2}(h{sub x}+(h{sub b}){sub x}) {nu}{sub t}+u{nu}{sub x}+{nu}{nu}{sub y} = -c{sup 2}(h{sub y}+(h{sub b}){sub y}) h{sub t}+(hu){sub x}+(h{nu}){sub y} = 0 g-shore, h is surface elevation and s, t is time, u is velocity of cross-shore, {nu} is velocity of along-shore, h is surface elevation and h{sub b} is function of shore. This is a nondimensionalized model with the gravity g and constant reference depth H factored into c = {radical}(gH). We apply the Adomian Decompostion Method (ADM) to solve the tsunami model. This powerful method has been used to obtain explicit and numerical solutions of three types of diffusion-convection-reaction (DECR) equations. The ADM results for the tsunami model yield analytical solutions in terms of a rapidly convergent infinite power series. Symbolic computation, numerical results and graphs of solutions are obtained by Maple program.

  17. Science and Engineering of an Operational Tsunami Forecasting System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Frank

    2009-04-06

    After a review of tsunami statistics and the destruction caused by tsunamis, a means of forecasting tsunamis is discussed as part of an overall program of reducing fatalities through hazard assessment, education, training, mitigation, and a tsunami warning system. The forecast is accomplished via a concept called Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART). Small changes of pressure at the sea floor are measured and relayed to warning centers. Under development is an international modeling network to transfer, maintain, and improve tsunami forecast models.

  18. Science and Engineering of an Operational Tsunami Forecasting System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Frank

    2010-01-08

    After a review of tsunami statistics and the destruction caused by tsunamis, a means of forecasting tsunamis is discussed as part of an overall program of reducing fatalities through hazard assessment, education, training, mitigation, and a tsunami warning system. The forecast is accomplished via a concept called Deep Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART). Small changes of pressure at the sea floor are measured and relayed to warning centers. Under development is an international modeling network to transfer, maintain, and improve tsunami forecast models.

  19. Identification of earthquakes that generate tsunamis in Java and Nusa Tenggara using rupture duration analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribadi, S., E-mail: sugengpribadimsc@gmail.com [Tsunami Warning Information Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No. 2, Jakarta13920 and Graduate Student of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of T (Indonesia); Puspito, N. T.; Yudistira, T.; Afnimar,; Ibrahim, G. [Global Geophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Laksono, B. I. [Database Maintenance Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No.2, Jakarta 13920 (Indonesia); Adnan, Z. [Database Maintenance Division, Indonesian Meteorological Climatological and Geophysical Agency (BMKG), Jalan Angkasa I No. 2, Jakarta 13920 and Graduate Student of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Technology, Bandung Institute of Technol (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    Java and Nusa Tenggara are the tectonically active of Sunda arc. This study discuss the rupture duration as a manifestation of the power of earthquake-generated tsunami. We use the teleseismic (30° - 90°) body waves with high-frequency energy Seismometer is from IRIS network as amount 206 broadband units. We applied the Butterworth high bandpass (1 - 2 Hz) filtered. The arrival and travel times started from wave phase of P - PP which based on Jeffrey Bullens table with TauP program. The results are that the June 2, 1994 Banyuwangi and the July 17, 2006 Pangandaran earthquakes identified as tsunami earthquakes with long rupture duration (To > 100 second), medium magnitude (7.6 < Mw < 7.9) and located near the trench. The others are 4 tsunamigenic earthquakes and 3 inland earthquakes with short rupture duration start from To > 50 second which depend on its magnitude. Those events are located far from the trench.

  20. Toward tsunami early warning system in Indonesia by using rapid rupture durations estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madlazim [Physics Department, Faculty Mathematics and Sciences of Surabaya State University (UNESA) Jl. Ketintang, Surabaya 60231 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-20

    Indonesia has Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (Ina-TEWS) since 2008. The Ina-TEWS has used automatic processing on hypocenter; Mwp, Mw (mB) and Mj. If earthquake occurred in Ocean, depth < 70 km and magnitude > 7, then Ina-TEWS announce early warning that the earthquake can generate tsunami. However, the announcement of the Ina-TEWS is still not accuracy. Purposes of this research are to estimate earthquake rupture duration of large Indonesia earthquakes that occurred in Indian Ocean, Java, Timor sea, Banda sea, Arafura sea and Pasific ocean. We analyzed at least 330 vertical seismogram recorded by IRIS-DMC network using a direct procedure for rapid assessment of earthquake tsunami potential using simple measures on P-wave vertical seismograms on the velocity records, and the likelihood that the high-frequency, apparent rupture duration, T{sub dur}. T{sub dur} can be related to the critical parameters rupture length (L), depth (z), and shear modulus ({mu}) while T{sub dur} may be related to wide (W), slip (D), z or {mu}. Our analysis shows that the rupture duration has a stronger influence to generate tsunami than Mw and depth. The rupture duration gives more information on tsunami impact, Mo/{mu}, depth and size than Mw and other currently used discriminants. We show more information which known from the rupture durations. The longer rupture duration, the shallower source of the earthquake. For rupture duration greater than 50 s, the depth less than 50 km, Mw greater than 7, the longer rupture length, because T{sub dur} is proportional L and greater Mo/{mu}. Because Mo/{mu} is proportional L. So, with rupture duration information can be known information of the four parameters. We also suggest that tsunami potential is not directly related to the faulting type of source and for events that have rupture duration greater than 50 s, the earthquakes generated tsunami. With available real-time seismogram data, rapid calculation, rupture duration discriminant can be completed within 4-5 min after an earthquake occurs and thus can aid in effective, accuracy and reliable tsunami early warning for Indonesia region.

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Confidence levels for tsunami-inundation limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    ORIGINAL PAPER Confidence levels for tsunami-inundation limits in northern Oregon inferred from / Accepted: 25 August 2009 Ó Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 Abstract To explore the local tsunami coseismic deformations for simulation of tsunami inundation at Cannon Beach, Oregon. Maximum A brief summary

  2. TSUNAMI INUNDATION MAPPING FOR OCEAN CITY, MD NGDC DEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    TSUNAMI INUNDATION MAPPING FOR OCEAN CITY, MD NGDC DEM BY BABAK TEHRANIRAD, SAEIDEH BANIHASHEMI BY THE NATIONAL TSUNAMI HAZARD MITIGATION PROGRAM NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRANT NA10NWS4670010 CENTER FOR APPLIED COASTAL RESEARCH Ocean Engineering Laboratory University of Delaware Newark, Delaware 19716 #12;Tsunami

  3. Numerical modelling of tsunami mitigation by mangroves Putu Harry Gunawan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, Simona

    Numerical modelling of tsunami mitigation by mangroves Putu Harry Gunawan LAMA (Laboratoire d'Analyse et de Mathmatiques Appliques) UPEM putu-harry.gunawan@univ.paris-est.fr Abstract Figure 1: Mangrove-Tsunami Model. The role of mangroves (coastal forests) in the mitigation of tsunami impacts is a debated topic

  4. PROOF COPY 001403EQS Tsunami Hazards Associated with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synolakis, Costas E.

    PROOF COPY 001403EQS PROOF COPY 001403EQS Tsunami Hazards Associated with the Catalina Fault the tsunami hazard associated with the Catalina Fault off- shore of southern California. Realistic faulting scenarios with moment magnitudes ranging between 7.0 and 7.6 are used as initial conditions for tsunami

  5. The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    The Asian Tsunami: A Protective Role for Coastal Vegetation Finn Danielsen,1 * Mikael K. Sørensen,2 The scale of the 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was almost unprecedented. In areas with the maximum tsunami intensity, little could have prevented catastrophic coast- al destruction. Further away, however

  6. Tsunami early warning using earthquake rupture duration Anthony Lomax1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawlinson, Nick

    Tsunami early warning using earthquake rupture duration Anthony Lomax1 and Alberto Michelini2] Effective tsunami early warning for coastlines near a tsunamigenic earthquake requires notification within 5, greater than about 50 s. Here we show that T0 gives more information on tsunami importance than moment

  7. Numerical Simulation of the December 26, 2004: Indian Ocean Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical Simulation of the December 26, 2004: Indian Ocean Tsunami J. Asavanant1, M. Ioualalen2, N. Kaewbanjak1, S. Grilli3, P. Watts4, and J. Kirby5 Abstract: The December 26, 2004 tsunami is one of the most devastating tsunami in recorded history. It was generated in the Indian Ocean off the western coast

  8. Tsunami: Massively Parallel Homomorphic Hashing on Many-core GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zongpeng

    1 Tsunami: Massively Parallel Homomorphic Hashing on Many-core GPUs Xiaowen Chu Department. In this paper, we present a massively parallel solution, named Tsunami, by exploiting the widely available many-core Graphic Processing Units (GPUs). Tsunami includes the following optimization techniques to achieve

  9. The Silver Tsunami Proposal Providing the Seniors of Carroll County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    The Silver Tsunami Proposal Providing the Seniors of Carroll County with Personal Transportation for aging generations #12;Comparing Options The Silver Tsunami Proposal is: Cheaper than taxis More prevent the same collaboration. Silver Tsunami is acting as a mediating entity between various

  10. Water Levels at Crescent City Associated with the Great Chilean Earthquake Tsunami of May 1960

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Dean, Linda C; Bromirski, Peter D; Flick, Reinhard E; Hendershott, Myrl C; Magoon, Orville T; Kencall, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    2008. “The Kuril Islands Tsunami of November 2006, Part II:of the 1960 Chilean Tsunami at Crescent City, California”,to Coastal Disasters 2008: Tsunamis, Amer. Soc. Civil Eng. ,

  11. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 466, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 203-212 TSUNAMIS AND TSUNAMI PREPARDNESS IN COSTA RICA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -212 TSUNAMIS AND TSUNAMI PREPARDNESS IN COSTA RICA, CENTRALAMERICA Mario Fernández-Arce* and Guillermo Alvarado Rica, Costa Rica ABSTRACT The Costa Rican coasts are at risk of local tsunamis. On both Pacific the vulnerability of the coastal communities. In addition to tsunamis originating in the Middle American Trench (MAT

  12. Recent Improvements in State-of-the-art Models for Tsunami Hazard Assessment: Applications to Both Large Historical and Future Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 2011 in the Japan Trench have demonstrated that tsunamis pose one of the major coastal hazards to human and efficient parallel implementation on large scale computer clusters of a new generation of fully nonlinear and dispersive long wave models, as well as non-hydrostatic three-dimensional models, and their application

  13. Seismogeodesy and Rapid Earthquake and Tsunami Source Assessment /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melgar Moctezuma, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Tsunami induced damage was heavy on port infrastructure, major roadways and railways were severed, energy generating power stations (in particular, nuclear

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Role of Entrapped Air on Solitary Wave Forces on a Coastal Bridge Deck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Investigation of the Role of Entrapped Air on Solitary Wave Forces on a Coastal Bridge of bridge structures during tsunami and storm surge events, most recently the Tohoku (2011) and Indian Ocean a tsunami event, large volumes of water may propagate onshore at high speeds. Many coastal bridges

  15. Evaluation of earthquake and tsunami on JSFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chikazawa, Y.; Enuma, Y.; Kisohara, N.; Yamano, H.; Kubo, S.; Hayafune, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraci (Japan); Sagawa, H.; Okamura, S.; Shimakawa, Y. [Mitsubishi FBR Systems Inc., 2-34-17 Jingumae, Shibuya, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    Evaluation of earthquake and tsunami on JSFR has been analyzed. For seismic design, safety components are confirmed to maintain their functions even against recent strong earthquakes. As for Tsunami, some parts of reactor building might be submerged including component cooling water system whose final heat sink is sea water. However, in the JSFR design, safety grade components are independent from component cooling water system (CCWS). The JSFR emergency power supply adopts a gas turbine system with air cooling, since JSFR does not basically require quick start-up of the emergency power supply thanks to the natural convection DHRS. Even in case of long station blackout, the DHRS could be activated by emergency batteries or manually and be operated continuously by natural convection. (authors)

  16. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01

    tsunami and slope stability studies at the site for the San Onofre Nucleartsunamis California, South Coast Region, Subregion VIII, Subregion IX San Onofre Nucleartsunamis, coastal structures, wave climate California, San Diego Region, Subregion X, Oceanside Cell San Onofre Nuclear

  17. Tsunamis, Viscosity and the HBT Puzzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-13

    The equation of state and bulk and shear viscosities are shown to be able to affect the transverse dynamics of a central heavy ion collision. The net entropy, along with the femtoscopic radii are shown to be affected at the 10-20% level by both shear and bulk viscosity. The degree to which these effects help build a tsunami-like pulse is also discussed.

  18. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Schare, Joshua M. (Albuquerque, NM); Bunch, Kyle (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  19. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mendel, Clifford W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  20. On the use of finite fault solution for tsunami generation problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutykh, Denys; Gardeil, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The present study is devoted to the tsunami wave generation problem. The main goal of this work is two-fold. First of all, we propose a simple and computationally inexpensive model for the description of the sea bed displacement during an underwater earthquake, based on the finite fault solution for the slip distribution under some assumptions on the rupturing process dynamics. Once the bottom motion is reconstructed, we study waves induced on the free surface of the ocean. For this purpose we consider three different models approximating the Euler equations of the water wave theory. Namely, we deal with linearized Euler equations (also known as Cauchy-Poisson problem), a Boussinesq system and a weakly nonlinear model. An intercomparison of these approaches is performed. All developments in this study are illustrated on the real world example of the July 17, 2006 Java event.

  1. Mechanical models of the 1975 Kalapana, Hawaii earthquake and tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Mechanical models of the 1975 Kalapana, Hawaii earthquake and tsunami Simon J. Daya,*, Philip: Kalapana; Hilo; Kahului; Honolulu; Hilina; Hawaii; earthquake; slump; tsunami; volcano; Kilauea; extension earthquake to have affected Hawaii, after the slightly larger Great Kau earthquake of 1868 (Brigham, 1909

  2. HMSC Safety Committee Minutes: March 18, 2005 TSUNAMI PREPAREDNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ) tsunami can cause extreme damage Subduction zone quake is very costly (lives, $) Reinforced concrete "can it would withstand a tsunami. - Homes can be made more resistant to earthquakes by putting bolts into the foundation. It is not terribly difficult. Chris Heathman ­ DOGAMI #12;Tyree Wilde ­ National Weather Service

  3. Numerical Simulation of the December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami using a Boussinesq model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    tsunami education or tsunami warning system in the re- gion exaccerbated the number of fatalities, even. Scientists had been warning of the growing exposure of coastal residents to tsunami hazards for yearsNumerical Simulation of the December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami using a Boussinesq model Philip

  4. Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon lake August 2012; published 9 October 2012. [1] We test hypothetical tsunami scenarios against a 4,600-year for prehistoric Cascadia tsunamis. Tsunami simulations constrain coseismic slip estimates for the southern

  5. Effect of slip distribution on nearfield tsunami amplitudes; the 1952 Kamchatka earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winglee, Robert M.

    Effect of slip distribution on nearfield tsunami amplitudes; the 1952 Kamchatka earthquake Breanyn 8.8-9.0) and tsunami to explore the effect that internal slip distribution within a rupture has on tsunami amplitude in the nearfield. Our approach is to compare simulated tsunamis from 1952 Kamchatka

  6. f all Earth's natural hazards, tsunamis are among the most irregular and infrequent. Yet,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O f all Earth's natural hazards, tsunamis are among the most irregular and infrequent. Yet, they pose a major threat to coastal populations. Although tsunamis cannot be prevented, community tsunami in Japan and the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami have focused world attention on the rare but very real

  7. Recent Advances on Agent Based Tsunami Evacuation Simulation: Case Studies at Indonesia, Thailand, Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recent Advances on Agent Based Tsunami Evacuation Simulation: Case Studies at Indonesia, Thailand Through tsunami numerical models, tsunami researchers have worked on the understanding of the physics of tsunami events. Efforts to comprehend not only the natural phenomena but also the social complex behavior

  8. Estimating the effect of Earth elasticity and variable water density on tsunami speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    Estimating the effect of Earth elasticity and variable water density on tsunami speeds Victor C; revised 25 December 2012; accepted 7 January 2013; published 13 February 2013. [1] The speed of tsunami comparisons of tsunami arrival times from the 11 March 2011 tsunami suggest, however, that the standard

  9. Source Constraints and Model Simulation of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Source Constraints and Model Simulation of the December 26, 2004, Indian Ocean Tsunami Stéphan T ; and Philip Watts5 Abstract: The December 26, 2004 tsunami was perhaps the most devastating tsunami. There were numerous eyewitness observations and video digital recordings of coastal tsunami impact, as well

  10. A unified approach for computing tsunami, waves, floods, and landslides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olshanskii, Maxim A.

    of continuous medium. Since the computational complexity of full-scale simulations of such events is highly the physics of flows and accounting for their three- dimensional nature and real environment. Instead on one hand and the embedded hierarchy on the other hand, which make the re- construction and adaptation

  11. Waves in Nature, Lasers to Tsumanis and Beyond

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2009-09-01

    Waves are everywhere. Microwaves, laser beams, music, tsunamis. Electromagnetic waves emanating from the Big Bang fill the universe. Learn about the similarities and difference in all of these wavy phenomena with Ed Moses and Rick Sawicki, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11541

  12. Waves in Nature, Lasers to Tsumanis and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLNL - University of California Television

    2008-05-01

    Waves are everywhere. Microwaves, laser beams, music, tsunamis. Electromagnetic waves emanating from the Big Bang fill the universe. Learn about the similarities and difference in all of these wavy phenomena with Ed Moses and Rick Sawicki, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientists Series: Science on Saturday [10/2006] [Science] [Show ID: 11541

  13. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques of SCALE/TSUNAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI). The TSUNAMI code suite can quantify the predicted change in system responses, such as k{sub eff}, reactivity differences, or ratios of fluxes or reaction rates, due to changes in the energy-dependent, nuclide-reaction-specific cross-section data. Where uncertainties in the neutron cross-section data are available, the sensitivity of the system to the cross-section data can be applied to propagate the uncertainties in the cross-section data to an uncertainty in the system response. Uncertainty quantification is useful for identifying potential sources of computational biases and highlighting parameters important to code validation. Traditional validation techniques often examine one or more average physical parameters to characterize a system and identify applicable benchmark experiments. However, with TSUNAMI correlation coefficients are developed by propagating the uncertainties in neutron cross-section data to uncertainties in the computed responses for experiments and safety applications through sensitivity coefficients. The bias in the experiments, as a function of their correlation coefficient with the intended application, is extrapolated to predict the bias and bias uncertainty in the application through trending analysis or generalized linear least squares techniques, often referred to as 'data adjustment.' Even with advanced tools to identify benchmark experiments, analysts occasionally find that the application models include some feature or material for which adequately similar benchmark experiments do not exist to support validation. For example, a criticality safety analyst may want to take credit for the presence of fission products in spent nuclear fuel. In such cases, analysts sometimes rely on 'expert judgment' to select an additional administrative margin to account for gap in the validation data or to conclude that the impact on the calculated bias and bias uncertainty is negligible. As a result of advances in computer programs and the evolution of cross-section covariance data, analysts can use the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools in the TSUNAMI codes to estimate the potential impact on the application-specific bias and bias uncertainty resulting from nuclides not represented in available benchmark experiments. This paper presents the application of methods described in a companion paper.

  14. Entanglement Tsunami in (1+1)-Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Leichenauer; Mudassir Moosa

    2015-06-18

    We study the time dependence of the entanglement entropy of disjoint intervals following a global quantum quench in (1+1)-dimensional CFTs at large-$c$ with a sparse spectrum. The result agrees with a holographic calculation but differs from the free field theory answer. In particular, a simple model of free quasiparticle propagation is not adequate for CFTs with a holographic dual. We elaborate on the entanglement tsunami proposal of Liu and Suh and show how it can be used to reproduce the holographic answer.

  15. Entanglement Tsunami in (1+1)-Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leichenauer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We study the time dependence of the entanglement entropy of disjoint intervals following a global quantum quench in (1+1)-dimensional CFTs at large-$c$ with a sparse spectrum. The result agrees with a holographic calculation but differs from the free field theory answer. In particular, a simple model of free quasiparticle propagation is not adequate for CFTs with a holographic dual. We elaborate on the entanglement tsunami proposal of Liu and Suh and show how it can be used to reproduce the holographic answer.

  16. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth J. Barton; Jacob A. Arnold; Andrew R. Zentner; James S. Bullock; Risa H. Wechsler

    2007-08-21

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to ``field'' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than ``field'' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N=2 halos) and a control sample of isolated galaxies (N=1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M_Bj ~ 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context. (Abridged.)

  17. NGDC Tsunami Data Fact Sheethttp://ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/tsu.shtml Since 1690, more than 200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NGDC Tsunami Data Fact Sheethttp://ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/tsu.shtml Since 1690, more than 200 tsunami in economic loss Have tsunamis impacted the United States? Yes! While damaging tsunamis don't happen very often, the impacts can be devastating. Tsunamis have caused fatalities, damage and significant economic

  18. Response of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica, to ocean gravity-wave forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    wind waves and swell, infragravity (IG) waves and tsunami waves. The vibration response of the RIS between the vertical and horizontal sensors in the 8­12 Hz band from February to April, combined in mass, energy and stress balances (e.g. Scambos and others, 2000, 2009). The sudden catastrophic break

  19. Can Small Islands Protect Nearby Coasts From Tsunamis? An Active Experimental Design Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanakis, Themistoklis S; Vayatis, Nicolas; Dias, Frédéric; Synolakis, Costas E

    2013-01-01

    Small islands in the vicinity of the mainland are believed to offer protection from wind and waves and thus coastal communities have been developed in these areas. However, what happens when it comes to tsunamis is not clear. Will these islands act as natural barriers ? Recent post-tsunami survey data, supported by numerical simulations, reveal that the run-up on coastal areas behind small islands was significantly higher than on neighboring locations not affected by the presence of the island. To study the conditions of this run- up amplification, we solve numerically the nonlinear shallow water equations (NSWE). We use the simplified geometry of a conical island sitting on a flat bed in front of a uniform sloping beach. By doing so, the experimental setup is defined by five physical parameters, namely the island slope, the beach slope, the water depth, the distance between the island and the plane beach and the incoming wavelength, while the wave height was kept fixed. The objective is twofold: Find the max...

  20. Water levels and harbor response at Crescent City associated with the Great Chilean Earthquake tsunami of May 1960

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes-Dean, Linda Cheryl; Holmes-Dean, Linda Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    of the 1960 Chilean Tsunami at Crescent City, California,to Coastal Disasters 2008: Tsunamis, Amer. Soc. Civil Eng. ,2008. The Kuril Islands Tsunami of November 2006, Part I:

  1. Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison of free-surface elevation, velocity, and momentum flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Tsunami inundation modeling in constructed environments: A physical and numerical comparison April 2013 Available online 17 May 2013 Keywords: Tsunami Inundation Macro-roughness Benchmark COULWAVE Friction factor A laboratory benchmark test for tsunami inundation through an urban waterfront including

  2. Seismogeodesy and Rapid Earthquake and Tsunami Source Assessment /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melgar Moctezuma, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Chapter 5 Chapter 6 M w 9 Offshore Data and Tsunamifrom tsunami arrival times at offshore observation stations.we will demonstrate that offshore data in the form of ocean

  3. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    The 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and Fukushima nuclear accident: the Risk Policy Aftermath 3 #12;Personal experience in March 2011 Tsukuba 170km Tokyo 230km Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power

  4. Criticality Code Validation Exercises with TSUNAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    In the criticality code validation of common systems, many paths may exist to a correct bias, bias uncertainty, and upper subcritical limit. The challenge for the criticality analyst is to select an efficient, defensible, and safe methodology to consistently obtain the correct values. One method of testing criticality code validation techniques is to use a sample system with a known bias as a test application and determine whether the methods employed can reproduce the known bias. In this paper, a low-enriched uranium (LEU) lattice critical experiment with a known bias is used as the test application, and numerous other LEU experiments are used as the benchmarks for the criticality code validation exercises using traditional and advanced parametric techniques. The parameters explored are enrichment, energy of average lethargy causing fission (EALF), and the TSUNAMI integral index ck with experiments with varying degrees of similarity. This paper is an extension of a previously published summary.

  5. Entanglement Tsunami: Universal Scaling in Holographic Thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We consider the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in a strongly coupled holographic system, whose subsequent equilibration is described in the gravity dual by the gravitational collapse of a thin shell of matter resulting in a black hole. In the limit of large regions of entanglement, the evolution of entanglement entropy is controlled by the geometry around and inside the event horizon of the black hole, allowing us to identify regimes of pre-local- equilibration quadratic growth (in time), post-local-equilibration linear growth, a late-time regime in which the evolution does not carry any memory of the size and shape of the entangled region, and a saturation regime with critical behavior resembling those in continuous phase transitions. Collectively, these regimes suggest a picture of entanglement growth in which an "entanglement tsunami" carries entanglement inward from the boundary. We also make a conjecture on the maximal rate of entanglement growth in relativistic systems.

  6. Entanglement Tsunami: Universal Scaling in Holographic Thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Liu; S. Josephine Suh

    2013-06-27

    We consider the time evolution of entanglement entropy after a global quench in a strongly coupled holographic system, whose subsequent equilibration is described in the gravity dual by the gravitational collapse of a thin shell of matter resulting in a black hole. In the limit of large regions of entanglement, the evolution of entanglement entropy is controlled by the geometry around and inside the event horizon of the black hole, resulting in regimes of pre-local- equilibration quadratic growth (in time), post-local-equilibration linear growth, a late-time regime in which the evolution does not carry any memory of the size and shape of the entangled region, and a saturation regime with critical behavior resembling those in continuous phase transitions. Collectively, these regimes suggest a picture of entanglement growth in which an "entanglement tsunami" carries entanglement inward from the boundary. We also make a conjecture on the maximal rate of entanglement growth in relativistic systems.

  7. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter W. Graham; Surjeet Rajendran; Jaime Varela

    2015-05-17

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large space-time volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  8. Tohoku Topo-Urbanism : oblique community form in post-Tsunami Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunza, Matthew (Matthew Peter)

    2013-01-01

    Tohoku Topo-Urbanism explores the potential inhabitation of the oblique as an alternative model of community form and resilient reconstruction in Post-Tsunami Japan. In its wake, the 2011 Tsunami left a redefined landscape ...

  9. Principal Component Analysis of Tsunami Buoy Record: Tide Prediction and Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    Principal Component Analysis of Tsunami Buoy Record: Tide Prediction and Removal Elena Tolkova a, a for short- term tidal predictions at tsunami buoy locations with precision of more advanced methods on a network of tsunameters (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys) to obtain high qual

  10. TSUNAMI SIMULATION IN INDONESIA'S AREAS BASED ON SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    TSUNAMI SIMULATION IN INDONESIA'S AREAS BASED ON SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS AND VARIATIONAL BOUSSINESQ Studi Matematika INSTITUT TEKNOLOGI BANDUNG 2008 #12;ABSTRACT TSUNAMI SIMULATION IN INDONESIA'S AREAS of the bathymetry of Indonesia which is incorporated into our FEM schemes. The tsunami simulation in the two areas

  11. An Earthquake Just Occurred Can I Read About It on NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers' Websites?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    countries and Pacific island states around the Pacific rim, outside the WCATWC area of responsibility. PTWC, the West Coast / Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WC/ATWC) in Palmer, Alaska and the Pacific Tsunami Warning, Alaska. Photo Credit: Bill Knight Figure 2: Richard H. Hagemeyer Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, Honolulu

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of SMF tsunami hazard along the upper US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of SMF tsunami hazard along the upper US East Coast: detailed impact around+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 Abstract With support from the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP), the authors have been developing tsunami inundation maps for the upper US East Coast (USEC), using high

  13. Numerical simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami: Comparison with field observations and sensitivity to model parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami: Comparison with field observations and sensitivity history, created a major tsunami that caused numerous deaths and enormous destruction on the nearby Hon- shu coast. Various tsunami sources were developed for this event, based on inverting seismic or GPS

  14. Coastal Dynamics 2013 MODELING OF THE TOHOKU-OKI 2011 TSUNAMI GENERATION, FAR-FIELD AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Coastal Dynamics 2013 Paper No. MODELING OF THE TOHOKU-OKI 2011 TSUNAMI GENERATION, FAR Tsunami hazard assessment for future megathrust earthquakes requires that we understand the source mechanisms and tsunami generation processes for large historical events, such as the devastating Tohoku

  15. Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation Sangyoung Son water equations Boussinesq equations Coupling Coherent structures Turbulence Tsunami a b s t r a c used in tsunami modeling, as well as an approach to two-way couple these models together

  16. Assessment of the tsunami-induced current hazard Patrick J. Lynett1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Assessment of the tsunami-induced current hazard Patrick J. Lynett1 , Jose Borrero1,2 , Sangyoung Abstract The occurrence of tsunami damage is not limited to events causing coastal inundation. Even without. Nearshore tsunami currents are governed by nonlinear and turbulent physics and often have large spatial

  17. Impacts of the 2004 tsunami on groundwater resources in Sri Lanka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Impacts of the 2004 tsunami on groundwater resources in Sri Lanka Tissa Illangasekare,1 Scott W 2006; accepted 9 March 2006; published 9 May 2006. [1] The 26 December 2004 tsunami caused widespread of the impacts of the tsunami and to provide recommendations for the future of coastal water resources in south

  18. VOL 60 NO 7 & 8 APRIL 2010 Monitoring Tsunamis through Underwater Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    VOL 60 NO 7 & 8 APRIL 2010 Monitoring Tsunamis through Underwater Communication Network A novel study reveals that tsunamis send electric signals through the ocean, which could be sensed by the vast the size of an electric field created by the force of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami as it traveled over

  19. Field Survey and Numerical Simulations: A Review of the 1998 Papua New Guinea Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Field Survey and Numerical Simulations: A Review of the 1998 Papua New Guinea Tsunami PATRICK J (PNG) tsunami of 1998 is re-examined through a detailed review of the field survey as well as numerous of frequency dispersion on the landslide-generated tsunami. The numerical comparisons indicate that the NLSW

  20. Vulnrabilit des zones ctires face aux tsunamis, l'exemple d'Hispaniola.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Vulnérabilité des zones côtières face aux tsunamis, l'exemple d'Hispaniola. Eric DAVID1-de-Paix, avaient déjà connu en 1842 un tremblement de terre d'une magnitude estimée Mw 7.6 à 8.1. Un tsunami destructeur l'avait accompagné. Le séisme et le tsunami ont fortement affecté la côte nord d'Hispaniola depuis

  1. INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION Tsunami ramp Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION Tsunami ramp Asia 26 december 2004 Het onstaan van tsunamis Robert Hack (met dank aan van Mark van der Meijde en Colin Reeves cause for tsunami #12;Worldwide plate boundaries Source: USGS #12;Tectonic Setting Source: USGS Breuk

  2. A note on differences in tsunami source parameters for submarine slides and earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    A note on differences in tsunami source parameters for submarine slides and earthquakes M The nature of tsunami sources is reviewed, including source duration, displacement amplitudes, and areas and volumes of selected past earthquakes, slumps and slides that have or may have generated a tsunami

  3. Tsunami signature in the ionosphere: A simulation of OTH radar observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    Tsunami signature in the ionosphere: A simulation of OTH radar observations Pierdavide Coïsson,1 ionospheric anomalies following major earthquakes and tsunamis have been detected. Global Positioning System and identification of new techniques to detect ionospheric tsunami signatures. We explore here a new groundbased

  4. SIMULATION NUMERIQUE DU TSUNAMI GENERE PAR UN EBOULEMENT DU FLANC DU VOLCAN CUMBRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    SIMULATION NUMERIQUE DU TSUNAMI GENERE PAR UN EBOULEMENT DU FLANC DU VOLCAN CUMBRE VIEJA (LA PALMA, CANARIES), PAR UNE APPROCHE COUPLEE NAVIER-STOKES / BOUSSINESQ NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF THE TSUNAMI Vieja (CVV) sur l'^ile de La Palma (Iles Canaries) g´en´ererait un m´ega- tsunami qui pourrait

  5. Did a submarine landslide contribute to the 2011 Tohoku tsunami? David R. Tappin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Did a submarine landslide contribute to the 2011 Tohoku tsunami? David R. Tappin a, , Stephan T September 2014 Accepted 15 September 2014 Available online 28 September 2014 Keywords: tsunami submarine mass failure earthquake Tohoku modeling Many studies have modeled the Tohoku tsunami of March 11, 2011

  6. Rapid determination of earthquake magnitude using GPS for tsunami warning systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    Rapid determination of earthquake magnitude using GPS for tsunami warning systems Geoffrey Blewitt Sumatra earthquake (Mw 9.2­9.3) generated the most deadly tsunami in history. Yet within the first hour, the true danger of a major oceanwide tsunami was not indicated by seismic magnitude estimates, which were

  7. Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami Dailin Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duputel, Zacharie

    Real-time forecasting of the April 11, 2012 Sumatra tsunami Dailin Wang,1 Nathan C. Becker,1 David generated a tsunami that was recorded at sea-level stations as far as 4800 km from the epi- center, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Maldives issued tsunami warnings for their coastlines. The United States

  8. A HIERARCHICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE VULNERABILITY TO TSUNAMIS OF PUERTO RICAN COASTAL CITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    A HIERARCHICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE VULNERABILITY TO TSUNAMIS OF PUERTO RICAN COASTAL CITIES Juan of a disaster. Unfortunately, that is not the case for Puerto Rican coastal cities when it comes to tsunamis. Over 55% of all cities in Puerto Rico have territories in tsunami evacuation zones (TEZ); nevertheless

  9. Amplification of Tsunami Heights by Delayed Rupture of Great Earthquakes along the Nankai Trough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    Amplification of Tsunami Heights by Delayed Rupture of Great Earthquakes along the Nankai Trough of delayed rupture of great earthquakes along the Nankai trough on tsunami heights on the Japanese coast. As the tsunami source, we used a model of the 1707 Hoei earthquake, which consists of four segments: Tokai

  10. STRATEGIC GEOGRAPHIC POSITIONING OF SEA LEVEL GAUGES TO AID IN EARLY DETECTION OF TSUNAMIS IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    STRATEGIC GEOGRAPHIC POSITIONING OF SEA LEVEL GAUGES TO AID IN EARLY DETECTION OF TSUNAMIS. University Blvd Melbourne, FL 32901 United States ABSTRACT The potential impact of past Caribbean tsunamis for coastal sea level gauges intended to serve as elements of a regional tsunami warning system. The goal

  11. Three-dimensional simulation of tsunami generation and propagation: Application to intraplate events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furumura, Takashi

    Three-dimensional simulation of tsunami generation and propagation: Application to intraplate simulation program based on the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations is developed for simulating 3-D tsunami generation and propagation. We can simulate tsunami propagation over more than 1000 km using this program

  12. Exploring the Deep... Exploring the Dynamic Earth Unit 5 Tsunami Hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    GEO/OC 103 Exploring the Deep... Lab 6 #12;Exploring the Dynamic Earth Unit 5 ­Tsunami Hazards Unit 5 Tsunami Hazards Inthisunit,youwill · Analyzetwomajortsunamieventsindetail the coast of Chile on May 22, 1960 produced a tsunami that affected the entire Pacific Basin. In Hilo

  13. Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Weakly Compressible Fluid Interacting with Viscous Weakly Compressible Seabed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Formation of Hydro-acoustic Waves in Weakly Compressible Fluid Interacting with Viscous Weakly@udel.edu, giorgio.bellotti@uniroma3.it 1. Objective Enhancement of Tsunami Early Warning Systems (TEWS) Hydro/s) [2]. Study of the characteristics of hydro-acoustic waves generated by sudden sea bottom motion

  14. 1 Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust 2 implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon lake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    1 Coseismic slip on the southern Cascadia megathrust 2 implied by tsunami deposits in an Oregon August 2012; accepted 29 August 2012; published XX Month 2012. 7 [1] We test hypothetical tsunami minimum inundation limits for prehistoric 9 Cascadia tsunamis. Tsunami simulations constrain coseismic

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF LOW FREQUENCY HYDRO-ACOUSTIC WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    NUMERICAL MODELING OF LOW FREQUENCY HYDRO-ACOUSTIC WAVES GENERATED BY SUBMARINE TSUNAMIGENIC#al to increase the reliability of the system · Can we use precursors of tsunami? Hydro numerical models applicable on an oceanic scale #12;Index · Introduc#on on hydro

  16. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 460, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 127-136 RAPID TSUNAMI MODELS AND EARTHQUAKE SOURCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    Carlo Analysis INTRODUCTION In contrast to tsunami warning systems designed for far-field tsunamis, designing warning systems for local tsunamis is difficult for two primary reasons. First, the time lapse in designing local tsunami warning systems is that, unlike distant tsunamis, there often is no direct

  17. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 464, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 171-188 SCENARIOS OF GIANT TSUNAMIS OF TECTONIC ORIGIN IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -188 SCENARIOS OF GIANT TSUNAMIS OF TECTONIC ORIGIN IN THE MEDITERRANEAN Stefano Tinti, Alberto Armigliato and evaluation of tsunami hazard and risk for any given region, and a basic step in the frame of tsunami serious care of tsunamis until the occurrence of the giant Indian Ocean tsunami on December 26, 2004

  18. Transitional relief housing for tsunami victims of Tamil Nadu, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Shauna

    2006-01-01

    In the wake of the recent tsunami that swept across Asia, there is a dire need to salvage and rebuild the lives and livelihoods that were swept away. The aim of this thesis project is to design and model a transitional ...

  19. Scale/TSUNAMI Sensitivity Data for ICSBEP Evaluations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL; Reed, Davis Allan [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Scale code system provide unique methods for code validation, gap analysis, and experiment design. For TSUNAMI analysis, sensitivity data are generated for each application and each existing or proposed experiment used in the assessment. The validation of diverse sets of applications requires potentially thousands of data files to be maintained and organized by the user, and a growing number of these files are available through the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (IHECSBE) distributed through the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Program (ICSBEP). To facilitate the use of the IHECSBE benchmarks in rigorous TSUNAMI validation and gap analysis techniques, ORNL generated SCALE/TSUNAMI sensitivity data files (SDFs) for several hundred benchmarks for distribution with the IHECSBE. For the 2010 edition of IHECSBE, the sensitivity data were generated using 238-group cross-section data based on ENDF/B-VII.0 for 494 benchmark experiments. Additionally, ORNL has developed a quality assurance procedure to guide the generation of Scale inputs and sensitivity data, as well as a graphical user interface to facilitate the use of sensitivity data in identifying experiments and applying them in validation studies.

  20. How Will Astronomy Archives Survive The Data Tsunami?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berriman, G Bruce

    2011-01-01

    The field of astronomy is starting to generate more data than can be managed, served and processed by current techniques. This paper has outlined practices for developing next-generation tools and techniques for surviving this data tsunami, including rigorous evaluation of new technologies, partnerships between astronomers and computer scientists, and training of scientists in high-end software engineering engineering skills.

  1. Modeling of Tsunami Detection by High Frequency Radar Based on Simulated Tsunami Case Studies in the Mediterranean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    basin) and HF radar remote sensing to develop and validate a new type of tsunami detection algorithm as low as 5 cm/s, i.e., in deeper water, beyond the shelf and further away from the coast, thus providing to the near- est coastal areas, and thus both their energy spreading is low and their propagation time

  2. MHD waves in sunspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sych, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The review addresses the spatial frequency morphology of sources of sunspot oscillations and waves, including their localization, size, oscillation periods, height localization with the mechanism of cut-off frequency that forms the observed emission variability. Dynamic of sunspot wave processes, provides the information about the structure of wave fronts and their time variations, investigates the oscillation frequency transformation depending on the wave energy is shown. The initializing solar flares caused by trigger agents like magnetoacoustic waves, accelerated particle beams, and shocks are discussed. Special attention is paid to the relation between the flare reconnection periodic initialization and the dynamics of sunspot slow magnetoacoustic waves. A short review of theoretical models of sunspot oscillations is provided.

  3. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  4. Eigenvalue Contributon Estimator for Sensitivity Calculations with TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Since the release of the Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI) codes in SCALE [1], the use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis techniques for criticality safety applications has greatly increased within the user community. In general, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is transitioning from a technique used only by specialists to a practical tool in routine use. With the desire to use the tool more routinely comes the need to improve the solution methodology to reduce the input and computational burden on the user. This paper reviews the current solution methodology of the Monte Carlo eigenvalue sensitivity analysis sequence TSUNAMI-3D, describes an alternative approach, and presents results from both methodologies.

  5. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  6. The Jefferson Lab Trigger Supervisor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ed Jastrzembsi; David Abbott; Graham Heyes; R.W. MacLeod; Carl Timmer; Elliott Wolin

    2000-04-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a Trigger Supervisor System for use in nuclear physics experiments at Jefferson Lab. We also discuss the enhanced features of a new Trigger Supervisor Module now under construction.

  7. Identification of Submarine Landslide for Tsunami Hazard Assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Using a Probabilistic Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohithakshan Parambath, Lisha

    2014-04-23

    The eastern coast of USA, including the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), is more prone to tsunamis caused by submarine landslides than earthquakes. The Tsunami Hazard Assessment research program lead by ten Brink, 2009, reported the presence of ancient...

  8. Ms. Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade Christa von Hillebrandt-Andrade is the Caribbean Tsunami Center Director of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    in discussions toward the establishment of the Caribbean Tsunami Warning System since 2000 and as of 2005, has and tsunami monitoring, warning and education services becoming a regional leader in this field. She has been and the oceans. In 2008 she was elected Chair of the Working Group I on Tsunami Monitoring and Warning Guidance

  9. LETTER Earth Planets Space, 63, 847851, 2011 Three-dimensional numerical modeling of tsunami-related internal gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    LETTER Earth Planets Space, 63, 847­851, 2011 Three-dimensional numerical modeling of tsunami, 2011; Accepted June 30, 2011; Online published September 27, 2011) The tremendous tsunami following, to reproduce the tsunami signature observed in the airglow by the imager located in Hawaii and clearly showing

  10. Imaging and modeling the ionospheric airglow response over Hawaii to the tsunami generated by the Tohoku earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    Imaging and modeling the ionospheric airglow response over Hawaii to the tsunami generated July 2011. [1] Although only centimeters in amplitude over the open ocean, tsunamis can generate observation of the airglow tsunami signature, resulting from the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake off

  11. An amalgamated meter-thick sedimentary package enabled by the 2011 Tohoku tsunami in El Garrapatero, Galapagos Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    An amalgamated meter-thick sedimentary package enabled by the 2011 Tohoku tsunami in El Garrapatero: Received 23 April 2012 Available online 21 May 2013 Keywords: Tsunami deposits Coastal morphology Natural hazards Tsunamis and storms instigate sedimentological and geomorphological changes to the coastal system

  12. On the tsunami-induced EM fields at the seafloor: Lessons learned from the 2006-2007 Kuril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    On the tsunami-induced EM fields at the seafloor: Lessons learned from the 2006-2007 Kuril and 2011 Tohoku tsunamis Hiroaki Toh, D.Sc. Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Japan Ctvrtek, 6. r with tsunamis from two earthquakes occurred along the Kuril Trench. Previous seismological analyses indicated

  13. A note on tsunami amplitudes above submarine slides and slumps M.I. Todorovska*, A. Hayir1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    A note on tsunami amplitudes above submarine slides and slumps M.I. Todorovska*, A. Hayir1 , M 2531, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2531, USA Accepted 27 October 2001 Abstract Tsunami generated by submarine functions. Tsunami waveforms for these models are computed using linearized shallow water theory

  14. Eos, Vol. 90, No. 22, 2 June 2009 It is unique in that its collection of tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Eos, Vol. 90, No. 22, 2 June 2009 It is unique in that its collection of tsunami deposit information and DART® databases in forms suitable for tsunami modeling pur- poses is not available online anywhere else. Finally, the tsunami database is strength- ened through integration with the other NGDC

  15. Could a 1755-Like Tsunami Reach the French Atlantic Coastline? Constraints from Twentieth Century Observations and Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madariaga, Raúl

    Could a 1755-Like Tsunami Reach the French Atlantic Coastline? Constraints from Twentieth Century and R. MADARIAGA 3 Abstract--The tsunami generated by the 1 November, 1755 earthquake off the coast the French coastline, we conducted a study to search for signs of the tsunami in historical records from all

  16. Real-Time Deep-Ocean Tsunami Measuring, Monitoring, and Reporting System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real-Time Deep-Ocean Tsunami Measuring, Monitoring, and Reporting System: The NOAA DART II Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) Hugh B. Milburn Oceanographic Engineer 1. Introduction This paper describes the system components that make up the second-generation Deep-Ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis

  17. EOF analysis of a time series with application to tsunami detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolkova, Elena

    -space basis can be derived via Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of a tidal record of a single buoy. Decomposition of a tsunami buoy record in a functional space of tidal EOFs presents an efficient tool and quantification (Tolkova, E. 2009. Principal Component Analysis of Tsunami Buoy Record: Tide Prediction

  18. The Externalities of Strong Social Capital: Post-Tsunami Recovery in Southeast India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The Externalities of Strong Social Capital: Post-Tsunami Recovery in Southeast India DANIEL P villages in Tamil Nadu, India following the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, this paper demonstrates that high on the southeast coast of India had very different patterns of recovery. One scholar described how, when relief

  19. Introduction to the Special Issue on the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Mark

    of Japan) and over a half million were displaced, mainly due to the tsunami impact on coastal towns, whereIntroduction to the Special Issue on the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami by T. Lay, Y. Fujii, E under northeastern Honshu, Japan. It was the fourth-largest recorded earthquake, with seismic

  20. Tsunami Generation by Submarine Mass Failure. II: Predictive Equations and Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Tsunami Generation by Submarine Mass Failure. II: Predictive Equations and Case Studies Philip generation by submarine mass failure SMF that are only valid in the vicinity of the tsunami sources. We give generated by submarine mass failures SMFs have received increased scrutiny in the research commu- nity

  1. Tsunami Generation by Submarine Mass Failure. I: Modeling, Experimental Validation, and Sensitivity Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Tsunami Generation by Submarine Mass Failure. I: Modeling, Experimental Validation, and Sensitivity with a two-dimensional 2D fully nonlinear potential flow FNPF model for tsunami generation by two idealized types of submarine mass failure SMF : underwater slides and slumps. These simulations feature rigid

  2. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 463, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 159-170 STRONG TSUNAMIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -170 STRONG TSUNAMIS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN SEA: A RE-EVALUATION Gerassimos A. Papadopoulos and Anna Fokaefs phenomena like tsunamis. A catalogue of historical tsunamis generated by earthquakes is compiled. One of the parameters included is the tsunami intensity calculated by several authors in the past on the basis

  3. JournalofCoastalResearch 15 1 45-60 RoyalPalmBeach,FloridaWinter1999 Evidence for Late Holocene Tsunamis at CatalaLake,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    Tsunamis at CatalaLake, British Columbia John J. Clague,t I. Hutchinson,t R.W. Mathewes,tt and RIsland,BritishColumbia.Theuppermostof these coarsesheets thins and fines landwardaway fromthe lakeoutlet,consistentwithdepositionbya tsunami- miniferacommunitybecamemorediverseafterthe tsunami.Thesechangesare due eitherto coseismicsubsidence or erosionofthe outletby the tsunami

  4. Tsunami Inundation Mapping on the Upper East Coast of the US Tehranirad, B., Kirby, J. T., Banihashmi, S., Grilli, S. T., Tajallibaskhsh, T., Shi, F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Tsunami Inundation Mapping on the Upper East Coast of the US Tehranirad, B., Kirby, J. T of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2010 Tohuku-oki tsunami reminded the world of the impacts associated with such events on coastal communities around the globe. Since 1995 the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

  5. Numerical Simulation of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami Based on a New Transient FEM Co-seismic Source: Comparison to Far-and Near-Field Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical Simulation of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami Based on a New Transient FEM Co-seismic Source Abstract--In this work, we simulate the 2011 M9 Tohoku-Oki tsunami using new coseismic tsunami sources com- pare observations and numerical simulations of the tsunami's far- and near-field coastal impact

  6. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brannon, P.J.; Cowgill, D.F.

    1990-12-18

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable. 10 figs.

  7. DNA waves and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Montagnier; J. Aissa; E. Del Giudice; C. Lavallee; A. Tedeschi; G. Vitiello

    2010-12-23

    Some bacterial and viral DNA sequences have been found to induce low frequency electromagnetic waves in high aqueous dilutions. This phenomenon appears to be triggered by the ambient electromagnetic background of very low frequency. We discuss this phenomenon in the framework of quantum field theory. A scheme able to account for the observations is proposed. The reported phenomenon could allow to develop highly sensitive detection systems for chronic bacterial and viral infections.

  8. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  9. Aspects of earthquake triggering and seismicity clustering /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xiaowei

    2013-01-01

    important for earthquake prediction and hazard mitigation.of great impor- tance for earthquake prediction and hazardearthquake triggering tends to deviate from ETAS modeling predictions.

  10. Tsunami effects on the Z component of the geomagnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klausner, Virginia; Mendes, Odim; Papa, Andres R R

    2011-01-01

    The vertical component (Z) of the geomagnetic field observed by ground-based observatories of the INTERMAGNET network has been used to analyze the effects of the movement of electrically conducting sea water through the geomagnetic field due to a propagation of a tsumani. The purpose of this work is to study the geomagnetic variations induced by the tsunamis occurred at 26 December, 2004, 27 February, 2010 and 11 March, 2011. For each case study, we selected four magnetic stations belonging to the INTERMAGNET programme that were influenced or more direct affected by the tsumani. To detect these disturbances in the geomagnetic data, the discrete wavelet technique have been used in four levels of decomposition. We were able to detect the localized behavior of the geomagnetic variations induced by the movement of electrically conducting sea-water through the geomagnetic field, i. e., the identification of transients related to the tsunamis. As well, using the minutely magnetogram data, it was able to localize th...

  11. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01

    tsunami generation, propagation, terminal effects, instrumentation, warning systems,early warning system. KEYWORDS: Coastal Processes tsunamisWarning System and a report of its operation during the tsunami

  12. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  13. Hierarchical Trigger of the ALICE Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, Hans [CERN, Geneva, Switzerland; Awes, Terry C [ORNL

    2010-05-01

    The trigger of the ALICE electromagnetic calorimeters is implemented in 2 hierarchically connected layers of electronics. In the lower layer, level-0 algorithms search shower energy above threshold in locally confined Trigger Region Units (TRU). The top layer is implemented as a single, global trigger unit that receives the trigger data from all TRUs as input to the level-1 algorithm. This architecture was first developed for the PHOS high p{sub T} photon trigger before it was adopted by EMCal also for the jet trigger. TRU units digitize up to 112 analogue input signals from the Front End Electronics (FEE) and concentrate their digital stream in a single FPGA. A charge and time summing algorithm is combined with a peakfinder that suppresses spurious noise and is precise to single LHC bunches. With a peak-to-peak noise level of 150 MeV the linear dynamic range above threshold spans from MIP energies at 215 up to 50 GeV. Local level-0 decisions take less than 600 ns after LHC collisions, upon which all TRUs transfer their level-0 trigger data to the upstream global trigger module which searches within the remaining level-1 latency for high p{sub T} gamma showers (PHOS) and/or for Jet cone areas (EMCaL).

  14. Methods for automatic trigger threshold adjustment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Benjamin J; Partridge, Michael E

    2014-03-18

    Methods are presented for adjusting trigger threshold values to compensate for drift in the quiescent level of a signal monitored for initiating a data recording event, thereby avoiding false triggering conditions. Initial threshold values are periodically adjusted by re-measuring the quiescent signal level, and adjusting the threshold values by an offset computation based upon the measured quiescent signal level drift. Re-computation of the trigger threshold values can be implemented on time based or counter based criteria. Additionally, a qualification width counter can be utilized to implement a requirement that a trigger threshold criterion be met a given number of times prior to initiating a data recording event, further reducing the possibility of a false triggering situation.

  15. 2011 Waves -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2011 Waves - 1 STANDING WAVES ON A STRING The objectives of the experiment are: · To show that standing waves can be set up on a string. · To determine the velocity of a standing wave. · To understand of waves. A #12;2011 Waves - 2 A standing wave is caused by superposing two similar (same frequency

  16. Potential for tsunami detection and early-warning using space-based passive microwave radiometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Rebecca G. (Rebecca Gwen)

    2008-01-01

    The threat of a tsunami in coastal communities is considerable, especially in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Current warning systems consist of two networks: (1) a network of seismometers, and (2) a network of sea level ...

  17. The humanitarian relief supply chain : analysis of the 2004 South East Asia earthquake and Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Timothy Edward

    2005-01-01

    Humanitarian relief supply chains are not well documented. This thesis describes humanitarian relief supply chains in general and those specifically utilized in the 2004 South East Asia Earthquake and Tsunami relief effort. ...

  18. Probabilistic Hazard Assessment of Tsunamis Induced by the Translational Failure of Multiple Submarine Rigid Landslides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez Martinez, Arturo

    2012-10-19

    A numerical study aimed at probabilistically assessing the coastal hazard posed by tsunamis induced by one-dimensional submarine rigid landslides that experience translational failure is presented. The numerical model here ...

  19. Fact #723: April 16, 2012 Japan's Earthquake and Tsunami Resulted in Major Losses for Japanese Automakers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 9.0 magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami that struck northern Japan on March 11, 2011 resulted in severe disruptions and losses for Japan's seven major automakers. Automotive News...

  20. Source of the tsunami associated with the Kalapana (Hawaii) earthquake of November 1975

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.C.

    1980-12-01

    The travel times of the tsunami generated on 29 November 1975 off the Kau-Puna coast of Hawaii to the tide gages at Hilo, Kahului, Honolulu, and Nawiliwili have been calculated from the arrival times indicated on the tide-gage records, applying gage-time corrections, assuming that the tsunami was generated at the time of the earthquake it accompanied. Travel times have also been calculated similarly to other places on the coast of Hawaii where arrival times of the tsunami were reported, and to Johnston Atoll. Inverse tsunami refraction diagrams have been constructed by graphical means for the path of the tsunami between the vicinity of its source and the places of known arrival times. The isochrones of the refraction diagrams corresponding to the respective calculated travel times for the tsunami front have been used to define the boundary of the area of upward sea-floor displacement from which the tsunami propagated. This area is about 15 or 20 miles long (parallel to the southeast coast of Hawaii) and on the order of 14 or 15 miles wide, considerably smaller than the area earlier considered the tsunami source. Coastal subsidence measured soon after the earthquake indicates that the area of initial upward displacement was separated from the coast by a narrow belt of downward displacement. Comparisons between the crest arrival times and the travel times indicated by the inverse refraction diagrams indicate a lag of about four minutes between the time of the earthquake and the accomplishment of the maximum upward displacement. Accuracies of estimation are insufficient to determine whether the maximum upward displacement occurred within the area of initial displacement or seaward of it within a distance of about 15 miles. Displacement resulting from a mega-landslide cannot be distinguished from strictly tectonic displacement by the comparison of arrival times and travel times. 14 references, 19 figures, 8 tables.

  1. The origin of the tsunami excited by the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake - Faulting or slumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuofong Ma; Satake, Kenji; Kanamori, Hiroo (California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena (United States))

    1991-04-01

    The authors investigated the tsunami recorded at Monterey, California, during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake (M{sub w} = 6.9). The first arrival of the tsunami was about 10 min after the origin time of the earthquake. Using an elastic half space, they computed vertical ground displacements for many different fault models for the Loma Prieta earthquake, and used them as the initial condition for computation of tsunamis in Monterey Bay. The synthetic tsunami computed for the uniform dislocation model determined from seismic data can explain the arrival time, polarity, and amplitude of the beginning of the tsunami. However, the period of the synthetic tsunami is too long compared with the observed. The authors tested other fault models with more localized slip distribution. None of the models could explain the observed period. The residual waveform, the observed minus the synthetic waveform, begins as a downward motion at about 18 min after the origin time of the earthquake, and could be interpreted as due to a secondary source near Moss Landing. If the large scale slumping near Moss Landing suggested by an eyewitness observation occurred about 9 min after the origin time of the earthquake, it could explain the residual waveform. To account for the amplitude of the observed tsunami, the volume of sediments involved in the slumping is approximately 0.013 km{sup 3}. Thus the most likely cause of the tsunami observed at Monterey is the combination of the vertical uplift of the sea floor due to the main faulting and a large scale slumping near Moss Landing.

  2. Time and event triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Roger

    Time and event triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications ROGER JOHANSSON and event triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications 1 ROGER JOHANSSON Department triggered communication scheduling for automotive applications ROGER JOHANSSON © ROGER JOHANSSON, 2004

  3. The dangers of being trigger--happy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, J E; Bressert, E

    2015-01-01

    We examine the evidence offered for triggered star formation against the backdrop provided by recent numerical simulations of feedback from massive stars at or below giant molecular cloud sizescales. We compile a catalogue of sixty--seven observational papers, mostly published over the last decade, and examine the signposts most commonly used to infer the presence of triggered star formation. We then determine how well these signposts perform in a recent suite of hydrodynamic simulations of star formation including feedback from O--type stars performed by Dale et al (2012a, b, 2013a, b, 2014). We find that none of the observational markers improve the chances of correctly identifying a given star as triggered by more than factors of two at most. This limits the fidelity of these techniques in interpreting star formation histories. We therefore urge caution in interpreting observations of star formation near feedback--driven structures in terms of triggering.

  4. Ocean fronts trigger high latitude phytoplankton blooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, John R.

    Density fronts are ubiquitous features of the upper ocean. Here, numerical simulations show that restratification at fronts inhibits vertical mixing, triggering phytoplankton blooms in low-light conditions. The stability ...

  5. Generation of acoustic-gravity waves in ionospheric HF heating experiments : simulating large-scale natural heat sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradipta, Rezy

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence ...

  6. Dark Matter Triggers of Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Peter W; Varela, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to $1.25 M_{\\odot}$ rules out primordial black holes with masses $\\sim 10^{19}$ gm - $10^{20}$ gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as $10^{24}$ gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range $10^{20}$ gm - $10^{22}$ gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism p...

  7. SRS Environmental Bioassay Laboratory Support Aids Japan | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    803-952-8060 AIKEN, SC- On March 11, 2011, an earthquake and a tsunami wave triggered a string of disasters in Japan that created an outpouring of relief efforts...

  8. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Technical Note, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 219-225 ANALYTICAL STUDY OF LIVING ENVIRONMENT IN THE TSUNAMI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -225 ANALYTICAL STUDY OF LIVING ENVIRONMENT IN THE TSUNAMI- AFFECTED AREAS OF TAMIL NADU, INDIA Vasudha A. Gokhale of the Indian coastline was badly affected by the tsunami on 26th December 2004. The worst affected state Tamil to the tsunami victims in order to find out the appropriate approach for the development of a sustainable

  9. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Technical Note, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 213-217 FAR-FIELD CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TSUNAMI OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -217 FAR-FIELD CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TSUNAMI OF 26 DECEMBER 2004 T.S. Murty*, N. Nirupama**, I. Nistor of Administrative Studies York University, Toronto, Canada ABSTRACT The tsunami of 26 December 2004 in the Indian. In this study, the emphasis is on the far-field characteristics, where the tsunami amplitudes are much smaller

  10. A note on the effects of nonuniform spreading velocity of submarine slumps and slides on the near-eld tsunami amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    -®eld tsunami amplitudes M.D. Trifunac*, A. Hayir1 , M.I. Todorovska Department of Civil and Environmental and slumps on near-®eld tsunami amplitudes are illustrated. It is shown that kinematic models of submarine are less than about 2cT, where cT gh p is the long period tsunami velocity in ocean of constant depth h

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2000 Tsunamis Within the Eastern Santa Barbara Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synolakis, Costas E.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2000 Tsunamis Within the Eastern Santa California, Los Angeles CA, 90089-2531 Abstract. Several locally generated tsunamis have been reported in Southern California during the past 200 years, yet the hazard from locally generated tsunamis has received

  12. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 461, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 137-145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    -145 A COMPUTATIONALAPPROACH TO DESIGN CODES FOR TSUNAMI- RESISTING COASTAL STRUCTURES Christopher Koutitas* and Theophanis The recent mega-tsunami event on the 26th December 2004, revealed the importance and the necessity of designing "tsunami-resisting" structures. The present study paves a path towards the organization of "design

  13. How Numerical Simulations May Contribute to Tsunami Risk Preparedness: The 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean Event and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    for the purpose of a tsunami warning system. In this context we describe the Thailand case study of the 26th, warning system, Thailand case study Introduction Any fast deformation of the ocean sea floor may, in some2 Keynote 2 How Numerical Simulations May Contribute to Tsunami Risk Preparedness: The 26 December

  14. Wave Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Carcione, F. Cavallini, Simulation of waves in porn-viscoelastic rocks Saturated by immiscible ?uids. Numerical evidence ofa second slow wave,]. Comput.

  15. Non-Hydrostatic Wave Model NHWAVE User's Guide for Modeling Submarine Landslide Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    benchmarks provided by Synolakis et al. (2007), and a landslide benchmark developed from results in Enet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 6 Examples 21 6.1 Enet and Grilli (2007) Laboratory Case section of underwater landslide (Enet and Grilli, 2007) . . . . . . . 22 4 Model/data comparisons at four

  16. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  17. Self-triggering superconducting fault current limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Xing (Albany, NY); Tekletsadik, Kasegn (Rexford, NY)

    2008-10-21

    A modular and scaleable Matrix Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. The matrix fault current limiter comprises a fault current limiter module that includes a superconductor which is electrically coupled in parallel with a trigger coil, wherein the trigger coil is magnetically coupled to the superconductor. The current surge doing a fault within the electrical power network will cause the superconductor to transition to its resistive state and also generate a uniform magnetic field in the trigger coil and simultaneously limit the voltage developed across the superconductor. This results in fast and uniform quenching of the superconductors, significantly reduces the burnout risk associated with non-uniformity often existing within the volume of superconductor materials. The fault current limiter modules may be electrically coupled together to form various "n" (rows).times."m" (columns) matrix configurations.

  18. Continuous-energy eigenvalue sensitivity coefficient calculations in TSUNAMI-3D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perfetti, C. M.; Rearden, B. T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6170 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Two methods for calculating eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in continuous-energy Monte Carlo applications were implemented in the KENO code within the SCALE code package. The methods were used to calculate sensitivity coefficients for several test problems and produced sensitivity coefficients that agreed well with both reference sensitivities and multigroup TSUNAMI-3D sensitivity coefficients. The newly developed CLUTCH method was observed to produce sensitivity coefficients with high figures of merit and a low memory footprint, and both continuous-energy sensitivity methods met or exceeded the accuracy of the multigroup TSUNAMI-3D calculations. (authors)

  19. Multiple output timing and trigger generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

  20. Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Throop, Henry

    Can Photo-Evaporation Trigger Planetesimal Formation? Henry Throop John Bally SWRI Univ.Colorado / CASA DPS 12-Oct-2004 #12;Orion Nebula Photo-evaporation by extr 4 O/B stars, UV-bright, 105 solar luminosities 2000 solar-type stars with disks Photo-evaporation (PE) by external O/B stars removes disks on 105

  1. FPGA Trigger System to Run Klystrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Darius; /Texas A-M /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    The Klystron Department is in need of a new trigger system to update the laboratory capabilities. The objective of the research is to develop the trigger system using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology with a user interface that will allow one to communicate with the FPGA via a Universal Serial Bus (USB). This trigger system will be used for the testing of klystrons. The key materials used consists of the Xilinx Integrated Software Environment (ISE) Foundation, a Programmable Read Only Memory (Prom) XCF04S, a Xilinx Spartan 3E 35S500E FPGA, Xilinx Platform Cable USB II, a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), a 100 MHz oscillator, and an oscilloscope. Key considerations include eight triggers, two of which have variable phase shifting capabilities. Once the project was completed the output signals were able to be manipulated via a Graphical User Interface by varying the delay and width of the signal. This was as planned; however, the ability to vary the phase was not completed. Future work could consist of being able to vary the phase. This project will give the operators in the Klystron Department more flexibility to run various tests.

  2. Retinal Remodeling Triggered by Photoreceptor Degenerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc, Robert E.

    retina drive signal-processing circuitries of the neural retina. Most retinal degenerationsRetinal Remodeling Triggered by Photoreceptor Degenerations BRYAN W. JONES,1* CARL B. WATT,1 JEANNE retina is largely resistant to this sensory deafferentation. New evidence from fast retinal degenerations

  3. Characterization of tsunamigenic earthquake in Java region based on seismic wave calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribadi, Sugeng, E-mail: sugengpribadimsc@gmail.com [Badan Meteorologi Klimatologi Geofisika, Jl Angkasa I No. 2 Jakarta (Indonesia); Afnimar,; Puspito, Nanang T.; Ibrahim, Gunawan [Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    This study is to characterize the source mechanism of tsunamigenic earthquake based on seismic wave calculation. The source parameter used are the ratio (?) between the radiated seismic energy (E) and seismic moment (M{sub o}), moment magnitude (M{sub W}), rupture duration (T{sub o}) and focal mechanism. These determine the types of tsunamigenic earthquake and tsunami earthquake. We calculate the formula using the teleseismic wave signal processing with the initial phase of P wave with bandpass filter 0.001 Hz to 5 Hz. The amount of station is 84 broadband seismometer with far distance of 30° to 90°. The 2 June 1994 Banyuwangi earthquake with M{sub W}=7.8 and the 17 July 2006 Pangandaran earthquake with M{sub W}=7.7 include the criteria as a tsunami earthquake which distributed about ratio ?=?6.1, long rupture duration To>100 s and high tsunami H>7 m. The 2 September 2009 Tasikmalaya earthquake with M{sub W}=7.2, ?=?5.1 and To=27 s which characterized as a small tsunamigenic earthquake.

  4. Preliminary Report of the AMS analysis of tsunami deposits in Tohoku -- Japan -- 18th to the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wassmer, P; Hart, D E; Hiraishi, T; Azuma, R; Koenig, B; Trautmann, M

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentary records of tsunamis are a precious tool to assess the occurrence of past events, as attested by an abundant literature, which has seen a particular 'boom' in the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Tohoku tsunami. Despite an extensive literature, there is very little to no understanding of the role that the changing coastal environment is playing on the record of a tsunami, and for a given location, it is still unclear whether the largest tsunamis leave the largest amount of deposits. To research this question, the present study took place in Japan, in the Tohoku Region at Agawa-pond, because the pond act as a sediment trap. Using a sediment-slicer, a 1 m thick deposit was retrieved, from which 4 tsunami sequences were identified, including the latest 2011 tsunami. Using a series of sedimentary proxies: the AMS (Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility), grain size analysis, quartz morphoscopy (morphology and surface characteristics) and the analysis of microfossils, disparities b...

  5. High Level Trigger Configuration and Handling of Trigger Tables in the CMS Filter Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, G; Behrens, U; Boyer, V; Branson, J; Brett, A; Cano, E; Carboni, A; Ciganek, M; Cittolin, S; O'dell, V; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino, R; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Kim, J C; Klute, M; Lipeles, E; Perez, J L; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mlot, E G; Murray, S; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Paus, C; Petrucci, A; Pieri, M; Pollet, L; Racz, A; Sakulin, H; Sani, M; Schieferdecker, P; Schwick, C; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, I; Tsirigkas, D; Varela, J

    2009-11-22

    The CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is currently being commissioned and is scheduled to collect the first pp collision data in 2008. CMS features a two-level trigger system. The Level-1 trigger, based on custom hardware, is designed to reduce the collision rate of 40 MHz to approximately 100 kHz. Data for events accepted by the Level-1 trigger are read out and assembled by an Event Builder. The High Level Trigger (HLT) employs a set of sophisticated software algorithms, to analyze the complete event information, and further reduce the accepted event rate for permanent storage and analysis. This paper describes the design and implementation of the HLT Configuration Management system. First experiences with commissioning of the HLT system are also reported.

  6. Differentiating earthquake tsunamis from other sources; how do we tell the difference?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Differentiating earthquake tsunamis from other sources; how do we tell the difference? David R. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA When a great earthquake through analysis of earthquake, tide and geodetic data, often in various combinations. These methods

  7. MULTI-HAZARD (BLAST, SEISMIC, TSUNAMIS, COLLISION) RESISTANT BRIDGE PIERS David Keller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    MULTI-HAZARD (BLAST, SEISMIC, TSUNAMIS, COLLISION) RESISTANT BRIDGE PIERS David Keller Structural piers retrofitted with steel jackets, both designed to be ductile from a seismic design perspective. LS the numerous and sometimes contradicting demands from the multiple hazards at the onset of the design process

  8. Level-2 Calorimeter Trigger Upgrade at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, G.U.; /Purdue U.

    2007-04-01

    The CDF Run II Level-2 calorimeter trigger is implemented in hardware and is based on an algorithm used in Run I. This system insured good performance at low luminosity obtained during the Tevatron Run II. However, as the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity increases, the limitations of the current system due to the algorithm start to become clear. In this paper, we will present an upgrade of the Level-2 calorimeter trigger system at CDF. The upgrade is based on the Pulsar board, a general purpose VME board developed at CDF and used for upgrading both the Level-2 tracking and the Level-2 global decision crate. This paper will describe the design, hardware and software implementation, as well as the advantages of this approach over the existing system.

  9. Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    Dynamic Filtering and Mining Triggers in Mesoscale Meteorology Forecasting Nithya N. Vijayakumar {rramachandran, xli}@itsc.uah.edu Abstract-- Mesoscale meteorology forecasting as a data driven application Triggers, Data Mining, Stream Processing, Meteorology Forecasting I. INTRODUCTION Mesoscale meteorologists

  10. Systemsize dependence of associated yields in hadron-triggered jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, Betty

    2010-01-01

    in hadron-triggered jets B.I.Abelev (STARCollaboration)yields in hadron-triggered jets B. I. Abelev 8 , M. M.+Au collisions reveal similar jet-like correlation yields at

  11. The LHCb trigger and its performance in 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M.

    This paper presents the design of the LHCb trigger and its performance on data taken at the LHC in 2011. A principal goal of LHCb is to perform flavour physics measurements, and the trigger is designed to distinguish charm ...

  12. When Science and the Media Mix AS THE DEVASTATING IMPACTS OF JAPAN'S EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI CONTINUE TO UNFOLD, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When Science and the Media Mix AS THE DEVASTATING IMPACTS OF JAPAN'S EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI CONTINUE TO UNFOLD, AND concern over the Fukushima nuclear power plant grows, communication between

  13. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio. The Sound Waves simulation becomes the source of an analogical mapping to Radio Waves. Concepts Radio Waves 1 - Sound Waves references water waves 2 - Water is analogy for Sound Waves 3 - Radio

  14. Triggering events with GPU at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The growing complexity of events produced in LHC collisions demands more and more computing power both for the on line selection and for the offline reconstruction of events. In recent years, the explosive performance growth of massively parallel processors like Graphical Processing Units both in computing power and in low energy consumption, make GPU extremely attractive for using them in a complex high energy experiment like ATLAS. Together with the optimization of reconstruction algorithms exploiting this new massively parallel paradigm, a small scale prototype of the full ATLAS High Level Trigger exploiting GPU has been implemented. We discuss the integration procedure of this prototype, the achieved performance and the prospects for the future.

  15. Engineering Challenges in Antiproton Triggered Fusion Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassenti, Brice [Department. of Engineering and Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 275 Windsor Avenue, Hattford, CT 06120 (United States); Kammash, Terry [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    During the last decade antiproton triggered fusion propulsion has been investigated as a method for achieving high specific impulse, high thrust in a nuclear pulse propulsion system. In general the antiprotons are injected into a pellet containing fusion fuel with a small amount of fissionable material (i.e., an amount less than the critical mass) where the products from the fission are then used to trigger a fusion reaction. Initial calculations and simulations indicate that if magnetically insulated inertial confinement fusion is used that the pellets should result in a specific impulse of between 100,000 and 300,000 seconds at high thrust. The engineering challenges associated with this propulsion system are significant. For example, the antiprotons must be precisely focused. The pellet must be designed to contain the fission and initial fusion products and this will require strong magnetic fields. The fusion fuel must be contained for a sufficiently long time to effectively release the fusion energy, and the payload must be shielded from the radiation, especially the excess neutrons emitted, in addition to many other particles. We will review the recent progress, possible engineering solutions and the potential performance of these systems.

  16. Visual TSUNAMI: A Versatile, User-Friendly, Multidimensional Ablation and Gas-Dynamics Design Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debonnel, C.S.; Wang, T.X.; Suzuki, M.; Garcia, E.; Peterson, P.F. [University of California (United States)

    2005-05-15

    Gas dynamics phenomena in thick-liquid protected inertial fusion target chambers have been explored since the early 1990's with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. The code has been recently redesigned entirely to make use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers, while expanding its capability to a larger variety of systems. The new code is named 'Visual Tsunami' to emphasize the programming language of its core, Fortran 95, as well as its graphics-based input file builder and output processors. It is aimed at providing a user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role.

  17. The ATLAS High Level Trigger Steering Framework and the Trigger Configuration System.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS detector system installed in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is designed to study proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions with a maximum centre of mass energy of 14 TeV at a bunch collision rate of 40MHz. In March 2010 the four LHC experiments saw the first proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV. Still within the year a collision rate of nearly 10 MHz is expected. At ATLAS, events of potential interest for ATLAS physics are selected by a three-level trigger system, with a final recording rate of about 200 Hz. The first level (L1) is implemented in custom hardware; the two levels of the high level trigger (HLT) are software triggers, running on large farms of standard computers and network devices. Within the ATLAS physics program more than 500 trigger signatures are defined. The HLT tests each signature on each L1-accepted event; the test outcome is recorded for later analysis. The HLT-Steering is responsible for this. It foremost ensures the independent test of each signature, guarantying u...

  18. SCALE TSUNAMI Analysis of Critical Experiments for Validation of 233U Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Don [ORNL] [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff used the SCALE TSUNAMI tools to provide a demonstration evaluation of critical experiments considered for use in validation of current and anticipated operations involving {sup 233}U at the Radiochemical Development Facility (RDF). This work was reported in ORNL/TM-2008/196 issued in January 2009. This paper presents the analysis of two representative safety analysis models provided by RDF staff.

  19. Detiding DART buoy data for real-time extraction of source coefficients for operational tsunami forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Donald B; Eble, Marie C; Gica, Edison; Huang, Paul Y; Mofjeld, Harold O; Spillane, Michael C; Titov, Vasily V; Tolkova, Elena I

    2014-01-01

    U.S. Tsunami Warning Centers use real-time bottom pressure (BP) data transmitted from a network of buoys deployed in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans to tune source coefficients of tsunami forecast models. For accurate coefficients and therefore forecasts, tides at the buoys must be accounted for. In this study, five methods for coefficient estimation are compared, each of which accounts for tides differently. The first three subtract off a tidal prediction based on (1) a localized harmonic analysis involving 29 days of data immediately preceding the tsunami event, (2) 68 pre-existing harmonic constituents specific to each buoy, and (3) an empirical orthogonal function fit to the previous 25 hrs of data. Method (4) is a Kalman smoother that uses method (1) as its input. These four methods estimate source coefficients after detiding. Method (5) estimates the coefficients simultaneously with a two-component harmonic model that accounts for the tides. The five methods are evaluated using archived data from eleven...

  20. Vacuum Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Wesson

    2012-12-11

    As an example of the unification of gravitation and particle physics, an exact solution of the five-dimensional field equations is studied which describes waves in the classical Einstein vacuum. While the solution is essentially 5D in nature, the waves exist in ordinary 3D space, and may provide a way to test for an extra dimension.

  1. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czodrowski, Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger system has been used successfully for data collection in the 2009-2013 Run 1 operation cycle of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at center-of-mass energies of up to 8 TeV. With the restart of the LHC for the new Run 2 data-taking period at 13 TeV, the trigger rates are expected to rise by approximately a factor of 5. This presentation gave a brief overview of the upgrades to the ATLAS trigger system that have been implemented during the LHC shutdown period in order to deal with the increased trigger rates while efficiently selecting the physics processes of interest. These upgrades include changes to the L1 calorimeter trigger, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module, improvements in the L1 muon system, and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single processing farm.

  2. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  3. CDF/MEMO/TRIGGER/CDFR/5424 Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /4) + CSP Hit Bit 05 CMU High Pt Stub + CMP Stub (3/4) + CSP Hit 1 #12; Bit 06 Dimuon Test Bit - 2 CMU Low > 120deg) Bit 18 Cosmic Trigger II : 2 CMP Stubs (3/4) + CSP Hits (Top & Bottom) Bit 19 Bunch Zero Crossing Trigger Note A: CSP hits will be included in the de#12;nition of trigger bits 4 and 5. However, we

  4. Triggering events with GPUs at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kama, Sami; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The growing complexity of events produced in LHC collisions demands more and more computing power both for the online selection and for the offline reconstruction of events. In recent years, the explosive performance growth of massively parallel processors like Graphics Processing Units~(GPU) both in computing power and in low energy consumption, make GPU extremely attractive for using them in a complex high energy experiment like ATLAS. Together with the optimization of reconstruction algorithms this new massively parallel paradigm is exploited. For this purpose a small scale prototype of the full ATLAS High Level Trigger involving GPU has been implemented. We discuss the integration procedure of this prototype, the achieved performance and the prospects for the future

  5. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  6. Hydroelastic response of a floating runway to cnoidal waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ertekin, R. C.; Xia, Dingwu

    2014-02-15

    The hydroelastic response of mat-type Very Large Floating Structures (VLFSs) to severe sea conditions, such as tsunamis and hurricanes, must be assessed for safety and survivability. An efficient and robust nonlinear hydroelastic model is required to predict accurately the motion of and the dynamic loads on a VLFS due to such large waves. We develop a nonlinear theory to predict the hydroelastic response of a VLFS in the presence of cnoidal waves and compare the predictions with the linear theory that is also developed here. This hydroelastic problem is formulated by directly coupling the structure with the fluid, by use of the Level I Green-Naghdi theory for the fluid motion and the Kirchhoff thin plate theory for the runway. The coupled fluid structure system, together with the appropriate jump conditions are solved in two-dimensions by the finite-difference method. The numerical model is used to study the nonlinear response of a VLFS to storm waves which are modeled by use of the cnoidal-wave theory. Parametric studies show that the nonlinearity of the waves is very important in accurately predicting the dynamic bending moment and wave run-up on a VLFS in high seas.

  7. Application of the SCALE TSUNAMI Tools for the Validation of Criticality Safety Calculations Involving 233U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Don [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    The Radiochemical Development Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been storing solid materials containing 233U for decades. Preparations are under way to process these materials into a form that is inherently safe from a nuclear criticality safety perspective. This will be accomplished by down-blending the {sup 233}U materials with depleted or natural uranium. At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, a study has been performed using the SCALE sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools to demonstrate how these tools could be used to validate nuclear criticality safety calculations of selected process and storage configurations. ISOTEK nuclear criticality safety staff provided four models that are representative of the criticality safety calculations for which validation will be needed. The SCALE TSUNAMI-1D and TSUNAMI-3D sequences were used to generate energy-dependent k{sub eff} sensitivity profiles for each nuclide and reaction present in the four safety analysis models, also referred to as the applications, and in a large set of critical experiments. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was used together with the sensitivity profiles and the cross-section uncertainty data contained in the SCALE covariance data files to propagate the cross-section uncertainties ({Delta}{sigma}/{sigma}) to k{sub eff} uncertainties ({Delta}k/k) for each application model. The SCALE TSUNAMI-IP module was also used to evaluate the similarity of each of the 672 critical experiments with each application. Results of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment are presented in this report. A total of 142 experiments were judged to be similar to application 1, and 68 experiments were judged to be similar to application 2. None of the 672 experiments were judged to be adequately similar to applications 3 and 4. Discussion of the uncertainty analysis and similarity assessment is provided for each of the four applications. Example upper subcritical limits (USLs) were generated for application 1 based on trending of the energy of average lethargy of neutrons causing fission, trending of the TSUNAMI similarity parameters, and use of data adjustment techniques.

  8. Earthquake triggering discussed in three Frontiers in Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science lectures Earthquake triggering discussed in three Frontiers in Science lectures Earthquakes and their possible causes is the topic of the next series of...

  9. Les enjeux principaux du projet taient de fournir des lments d'observations de tsunamis, et de proposer des estimations des impacts possibles sur les ctes franaises. L'approche a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Les enjeux principaux du projet étaient de fournir des éléments d'observations de tsunamis, et de française. Aléa tsunami pour les côtes françaises : bilan du projet ANR MAREMOTI (2009-2012) Hélène Hébert les tsunamis en France (projet ANR TSUMOD) et en Europe (projet FP6 TRANSFER) Le projet MAREMOTI

  10. The ATLAS Trigger System: Ready for Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maeda, Junpei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been successfully collecting collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. During the next data-taking period starting in 2015 (Run-2) the LHC will operate at a centre-of-mass energy of about 13 TeV resulting in roughly five times higher trigger rates. We will briefly review the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented during the shutdown, allowing us to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter and muon trigger system, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger module and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single event filter fa...

  11. The ATLAS Trigger System - Ready for Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backes, Moritz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been successfully collecting collision data during the first run of the LHC between 2009-2013 at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV. The trigger system consists of a hardware based Level-1 (L1) and a software based high-level trigger (HLT) that reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of a few hundred Hz. During the course of the ongoing Run-2 data-taking campaign at 13 TeV centre-of-mass energy the trigger rates will be approximately 5 times higher compared to Run-1. In these proceedings we briefly review the ATLAS trigger system upgrades that were implemented during the shutdown, allowing us to cope with the increased trigger rates while maintaining or even improving our efficiency to select relevant physics processes. This includes changes to the L1 calorimeter and muon trigger system, the introduction of a new L1 topological trigger subsystem and the merging of the previously two-level HLT system into a single ev...

  12. Triggering for Magnetic Field Measurements of the LCLS Undulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-12-13

    A triggering system for magnetic field measurements of the LCLS undulators has been built with a National Instruments PXI-1002 and a Xylinx FPGA board. The system generates single triggers at specified positions, regardless of encoder sensor jitter about a linear scale.

  13. Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – 33rd scale experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhinefrank, Kenneth E.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe

    2013-07-29

    Columbia Power Technologies (ColPwr) and Oregon State University (OSU) jointly conducted a series of tests in the Tsunami Wave Basin (TWB) at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory (HWRL). These tests were run between November 2010 and February 2011. Models at 33rd scale representing Columbia Power’s Manta series Wave Energy Converter (WEC) were moored in configurations of one, three and five WEC arrays, with both regular waves and irregular seas generated. The primary research interest of ColPwr is the characterization of WEC response. The WEC response will be investigated with respect to power performance, range of motion and generator torque/speed statistics. The experimental results will be used to validate a numerical model. The primary research interests of OSU include an investigation into the effects of the WEC arrays on the near- and far-field wave propagation. This report focuses on the characterization of the response of a single WEC in isolation. To facilitate understanding of the commercial scale WEC, results will be presented as full scale equivalents.

  14. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    130 SAW Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . .QuasiStatic MEE Waves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .General MEE Wave Solution . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. CASMO5/TSUNAMI-3D spent nuclear fuel reactivity uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrer, R.; Rhodes, J. [Studsvik Scandpower, Inc., 504 Shoup Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States); Smith, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The CASMO5 lattice physics code is used in conjunction with the TSUNAMI-3D sequence in ORNL's SCALE 6 code system to estimate the uncertainties in hot-to-cold reactivity changes due to cross-section uncertainty for PWR assemblies at various burnup points. The goal of the analysis is to establish the multiplication factor uncertainty similarity between various fuel assemblies at different conditions in a quantifiable manner and to obtain a bound on the hot-to-cold reactivity uncertainty over the various assembly types and burnup attributed to fundamental cross-section data uncertainty. (authors)

  16. A FLUX ROPE ERUPTION TRIGGERED BY JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Juan; Zhang Hongqi; Deng Yuanyong; Lin Jiaben; Su Jiangtao; Liu Yu

    2010-03-10

    We present an observation of a filament eruption caused by recurrent chromospheric plasma injections (surges/jets) on 2006 July 6. The filament eruption was associated with an M2.5 two-ribbon flare and a coronal mass ejection (CME). There was a light bridge in the umbra of the main sunspot of NOAA 10898; one end of the filament was terminated at the region close to the light bridge, and recurrent surges were observed to be ejected from the light bridge. The surges occurred intermittently for about 8 hr before the filament eruption, and finally a clear jet was found at the light bridge to trigger the filament eruption. We analyzed the evolutions of the relative darkness of the filament and the loaded mass by the continuous surges quantitatively. It was found that as the occurrence of the surges, the relative darkness of the filament body continued growing for about 3-4 hr, reached its maximum, and kept stable for more than 2 hr until it erupted. If suppose 50% of the ejected mass by the surges could be trapped by the filament channel, then the total loaded mass into the filament channelwill be about 0.57x10{sup 16} g with a momentum of 0.57x10{sup 22} g cm s{sup -1} by 08:08 UT, which is a non-negligible effect on the stability of the filament. Based on the observations, we present a model showing the important role that recurrent chromospheric mass injection play in the evolution and eruption of a flux rope. Our study confirms that the surge activities can efficiently supply the necessary material for some filament formation. Furthermore, our study indicates that the continuous mass with momentum loaded by the surge activities to the filament channel could make the filament unstable and cause it to erupt.

  17. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of 2 with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the double amount of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to 3 different sub-detector combinations. In this contribution, we give an overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis of the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are m...

  18. Operation of the Upgraded ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glatzer, Julian Maximilian Volker; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger (L1CT) system is a central part of ATLAS data-taking and has undergone a major upgrade for Run 2 of the LHC, in order to cope with the expected increase of instantaneous luminosity of a factor of 2 with respect to Run 1. The upgraded hardware offers more flexibility in the trigger decisions due to the double amount of trigger inputs and usable trigger channels. It also provides an interface to the new topological trigger system. Operationally - particularly useful for commissioning, calibration and test runs - it allows concurrent running of up to 3 different subdetector combinations. An overview of the operational software framework of the L1CT system with particular emphasis of the configuration, controls and monitoring aspects is given. The software framework allows a consistent configuration with respect to the ATLAS experiment and the LHC machine, upstream and downstream trigger processors, and the data acquisition. Trigger and dead-time rates are monitored coherently at...

  19. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions B. R. Sutherland fluid, vertically propagating internal gravity waves of moderately large amplitude can become unstable, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  20. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy

    2013-01-01

    Encyclopedic article covering shallow water wave models used in oceanography and atmospheric science. Sections: Definition of the Subject; Introduction and Historical Perspective; Completely Integrable Shallow Water Wave Equations; Shallow Water Wave Equations of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Computation of Solitary Wave Solutions; Numerical Methods; Water Wave Experiments and Observations; Future Directions, and Bibliography.

  1. Bioresponsive Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Triggered Drug Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Neetu

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential carriers for therapeutic payloads. However, achieving triggered drug release from MSNPs in vivo has been challenging. Here, we ...

  2. Light-Triggered Myosin Activation for Probing Dynamic Cellular Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goguen, Brenda N.

    Shining light on myosin: The incorporation of a caging group onto the essential phosphoserine residue of myosin by protein semisynthesis enables light-triggered activation of the protein (see picture). Caging eliminates ...

  3. The run IIb trigger upgrade for the DO experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; Padley, P.; Olsen, J.; Narain, M.; Mitrevski, J.; Le Du, P.; Laurens, P.; Johnson, M.; Johns, K.; Hirosky, R.; Hildreth, M.

    2004-06-01

    The increase in instantaneous luminosity anticipated in Run IIb of the Tevatron collider at Fermilab requires increased background rejection capabilities from the trigger system of the DO detector. A set of upgrades is under way to improve...

  4. Studies of the CMS tracker at high trigger rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, M.

    During the latter months of 2006 and the first half of 2007, the CMS Tracker was assembled and operated at the Tracker Integration Facility at CERN. During this period the performance of the tracker at trigger rates up to ...

  5. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spieler, Helmuth G

    2008-01-01

    of the 12th Workshop on Electronics For LHC and Future19-24, 2007 Front-end electronics and trigger systems –about a revolution in front-end electronics for large- scale

  6. Distributed Self-triggered Control for Multi-agent Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimarogonas, Dimos V.

    It is desirable to limit the amount of communication and computation generated by each agent in a large multi-agent system. Event- and self-triggered control strategies have been recently proposed as alternatives to ...

  7. Controls on earthquake rupture and triggering mechanisms in subduction zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llenos, Andrea Lesley

    2010-01-01

    Large earthquake rupture and triggering mechanisms that drive seismicity in subduction zones are investigated in this thesis using a combination of earthquake observations, statistical and physical modeling. A comparison ...

  8. Generation of tsunamis by a slowly spreading uplift of the sea oor Maria I. Todorovska*, Mihailo D. Trifunac

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Generation of tsunamis by a slowly spreading uplift of the sea ¯oor Maria I. Todorovska*, Mihailo D spreading of the sea ¯oor uplift. A linearized solution for constant water depth is derived by transform methods (Laplace in time and Fourier in space), for sea ¯oor uplift represented by a sliding Heaviside

  9. Near-and Far-field Tsunami Hazard from the Potential Flank Collapse of the Cumbre Vieja Volcano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Palma (Canary Islands) could result in a large tsunami hav- ing effects throughout the North Atlantic-field on neighboring Canary Islands, and their far-field coastal hazard would still be significant at some locations-submarine landslides of O(100 km3) volume around the Canary Islands (Spain). Masson et al. (2002) iden- tified at least

  10. Page 1 of 14 Quick Report on the Study of the 2004 Sumatra Earthquake and Tsunami Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilham, Roger

    . In the islands of Great Nicobar, Car Nicobar, and Little Andaman, buildings constructed on the coast were washed Kanpur · Lt Col G Santhosh Kumar, M.Tech student, IIT Kanpur Car Nicobar Island GENERAL OBSERVATIONS: Due of tsunamis as the water could easily flow around such objects. At Car Nicobar about 100 personnel of air

  11. Gravitational waves and gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandra Corsi; for the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; for the Virgo Collaboration

    2012-05-11

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are likely associated with a catastrophic energy release in stellar mass objects. Electromagnetic observations provide important, but indirect information on the progenitor. On the other hand, gravitational waves emitted from the central source, carry direct information on its nature. In this context, I give an overview of the multi-messenger study of gamma-ray bursts that can be carried out by using electromagnetic and gravitational wave observations. I also underline the importance of joint electromagnetic and gravitational wave searches, in the absence of a gamma-ray trigger. Finally, I discuss how multi-messenger observations may probe alternative gamma-ray burst progenitor models, such as the magnetar scenario.

  12. Wave variability and wave spectra for wind generated gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bretschneider, Charles L.

    1959-01-01

    A series of experiments of forces on a fixed vertical truncated column due to Stokes 5th order like waves were done in a wave tank. An effort was made to generate the waves as close as possible to theoretical Stokes 5th order waves. A systematic...

  13. A Performance and Scalability Analysis of the Tsunami Simulation EasyWave for Different Multi-Core Architectures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnor, Bettina

    ]. The originally sequential C++ application was ported to differ- ent generations of NVidia Tesla GPUs (Tesla

  14. Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Localization of Classical Waves I: Acoustic Waves. Alexander Figotin \\Lambda Department, 1997 Abstract We consider classical acoustic waves in a medium described by a position dependent mass the existence of localized waves, i.e., finite energy solutions of the acoustic equations with the property

  15. Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Coda wave interferometry 1 Coda wave interferometry An interferometer is an instrument that is sensitive to the interference of two or more waves (optical or acoustic). For example, an optical interferometer uses two interfering light beams to measure small length changes. Coda wave interferometry

  16. Fronts and trigger wave patterns in an array of oscillating vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Tom

    in a laminar fluid flow with chaotic advection [10,11]. We use the well-known Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ.70.Fw ­ Chemically reactive flows PACS 47.52.+j ­ Chaos in fluid dynamics Abstract ­ We present and information on: ·reading the latest articles, free! ·receiving free e-mail alerts ·submitting your work to EPL

  17. Integrated simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet Through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet Through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

  18. Integrated Simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Simulation of ELM Triggered by Pellet through Energy Absorption and Transport Enhancement

  19. Simulation studies of the HADES first level trigger PART II: Performance in hadron induced reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schicker; H. Tsertos

    1996-10-03

    The HADES first level trigger is studied for the system p+Ni at a beam energy of 2 AGeV. The timing properties of the trigger signal are reported. The efficiency loss due to deadtime is specified. A trigger requirement of a time overlap window with the start detector is described. The trigger rates for different overlap windows are given.

  20. Nonabelian Debye screening and the {open_quotes}tsunami{close_quotes} problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pisarski, R.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-09-22

    The phenomenon of Debye screening is familiar from electrolytes and many other systems. Recently, it has been recognized that in nonabelian gauge theories at high temperature, even perturbatively Debye screening is much more complicated than in nonrelativistic systems. This was originally derived as {open_quotes}hard thermal loops{close_quotes}. Hard thermal loops have been derived perturbatively, by a semiclassical truncation of the Schwinger-Dyson equations, and by classical kinetic theory. In this talk I give a pedagogical derivation, following that of Kelly, Liu, Lucchesi, and Manuel. The derivation is valid not just for a thermal distribution, but (modulo certain obvious restrictions) for an arbitrary initial distribution of particles. Consider, for example, the {open_quotes}tsunami{close_quotes} problem: suppose that one starts, at time t = 0, with a spatially homogenous, infinite wall of particles, all moving with the same velocity at the speed of light.

  1. Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-01

    Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

  2. AN EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH A SURGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ruisheng; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Bi, Yi; Hong, Junchao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Dan

    2013-02-10

    Taking advantage of the high temporal and spatial resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we present an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wave associated with a surge on 2010 November 13. Due to the magnetic flux cancelation, some surges formed in the source active region (AR). The strongest surge produced our studied event. The surge was deflected by the nearby loops that connected to another AR, and disrupted the overlying loops that slowly expanded and eventually evolved into a weak coronal mass ejection (CME). The surge was likely associated with the core of the CME. The EUV wave happened after the surge deflected. The wave departed far from the flare center and showed a close location relative to the deflected surge. The wave propagated in a narrow angular extent, mainly in the ejection direction of the surge. The close timing and location relations between the EUV wave and the surge indicate that the wave was closely associated with the CME. The wave had a velocity of 310-350 km s{sup -1}, while the speeds of the surge and the expanding loops were about 130 and 150 km s{sup -1}, respectively. All of the results suggest that the EUV wave was a fast-mode wave and was most likely triggered by the weak CME.

  3. Nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernova explosions triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nobuya Nishimura; Tobias Fischer; Friedrich-Karl Thielemann; Carla Fröhlich; Matthias Hempel; Roger Käppeli; Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo; Thomas Rauscher; Irina Sagert; Christian Winteler

    2012-08-24

    We explore heavy element nucleosynthesis in the explosion of massive stars which are triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition during the early post bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. The present study is based on general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics simulations with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry, which utilize a quark-hadron hybrid equation of state based on the MIT bag model for strange quark matter. The quark-hadron phase transition inside the stellar core forms a shock wave propagating towards the surface of the proto-neutron star. The shock wave results in an explosion and ejects neutron-rich matter which is piled up or accreting on the proto-neutron star. Later, during the cooling phase, the proto-neutron star develops a proton-rich neutrino-driven wind. We present a detailed analysis of the nucleosynthesis outcome in both neutron-rich and proton-rich ejecta and compare our integrated nucleosynthesis with observations of metal poor stars.

  4. Triggered Star Formation in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association (Sco OB2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2000-08-01

    We explore the star formation history of the Upper Scorpius OB association, the youngest part of Sco OB2. A wide field (160 square-degree) survey for low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stars enabled us to increase the number of known low-mass members of Upper Scorpius to nearly 100 stars. In a detailed analysis of the locations of these stars in the HR diagram, taking proper account of the uncertainties and the effects of unresolved binaries, we find a mean stellar age of about 5 Myr and no evidence for a significant age dispersion among these stars. This implies that the star formation history of the Upper Scorpius association was dominated by a short star-burst, which started about 5 Myr ago and ended probably not more than one or two Myr later. Interestingly, the structure and kinematics of the HI shells surrounding the Sco OB2 association show that the shock wave of a supernova explosion in the nearby Upper Centaurus-Lupus association, the oldest part of Sco OB2, crossed Upper Scorpius just about 5 Myr ago. This strongly suggests that this supernova shock wave triggered the star-burst in Upper Scorpius.

  5. Carbon Detonation and Shock-Triggered Helium Burning in Neutron Star Superbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinberg, Nevin N

    2007-01-01

    The strong degeneracy of the 12C ignition layer on an accreting neutron star results in a hydrodynamic thermonuclear runaway, in which the nuclear heating time becomes shorter than the local dynamical time. We model the resulting combustion wave during these superbursts as an upward propagating detonation. We solve the reactive fluid flow and show that the detonation propagates through the deepest layers of fuel and drives a shock wave that steepens as it travels upward into lower density material. The shock is sufficiently strong upon reaching the freshly accreted H/He layer that it triggers unstable 4He burning if the superburst occurs during the latter half of the regular Type I bursting cycle; this is likely the origin of the bright Type I precursor bursts observed at the onset of superbursts. The cooling of the outermost shock-heated layers produces a bright, ~0.1s, flash that precedes the Type I burst by a few seconds; this may be the origin of the spike seen at the burst onset in 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636...

  6. Carbon Detonation and Shock-Triggered Helium Burning in Neutron Star Superbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nevin N. Weinberg; Lars Bildsten

    2007-08-13

    The strong degeneracy of the 12C ignition layer on an accreting neutron star results in a hydrodynamic thermonuclear runaway, in which the nuclear heating time becomes shorter than the local dynamical time. We model the resulting combustion wave during these superbursts as an upward propagating detonation. We solve the reactive fluid flow and show that the detonation propagates through the deepest layers of fuel and drives a shock wave that steepens as it travels upward into lower density material. The shock is sufficiently strong upon reaching the freshly accreted H/He layer that it triggers unstable 4He burning if the superburst occurs during the latter half of the regular Type I bursting cycle; this is likely the origin of the bright Type I precursor bursts observed at the onset of superbursts. The cooling of the outermost shock-heated layers produces a bright, ~0.1s, flash that precedes the Type I burst by a few seconds; this may be the origin of the spike seen at the burst onset in 4U 1820-30 and 4U 1636-54, the only two bursts observed with RXTE at high time resolution. The dominant products of the 12C detonation are 28Si, 32S, and 36Ar. Gupta et al. showed that a crust composed of such intermediate mass elements has a larger heat flux than one composed of iron-peak elements and helps bring the superburst ignition depth into better agreement with values inferred from observations.

  7. On the speed and acceleration of electron beams triggering interplanetary type III radio bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krupar, Vratislav; Soucek, Jan; Santolik, Ondrej; Maksimovic, Milan; Kruparova, Oksana

    2015-01-01

    Type III radio bursts are intense radio emissions triggered by beams of energetic electrons often associated with solar flares. These exciter beams propagate outwards from the Sun along an open magnetic field line in the corona and in the interplanetary (IP) medium. We performed a statistical survey of 29 simple and isolated IP type III bursts observed by STEREO/Waves instruments between January 2013 and September 2014. We investigated their time-frequency profiles in order to derive the speed and acceleration of exciter electron beams. We show these beams noticeably decelerate in the IP medium. Obtained speeds range from $\\sim$ 0.02c up to $\\sim$ 0.35c depending on initial assumptions. It corresponds to electron energies between tens of eV and hundreds of keV, and in order to explain the characteristic energies or speeds of type III electrons ($\\sim 0.1$c) observed simultaneously with Langmuir waves at 1 au, the emission of type III bursts near the peak should be predominately at double plasma frequency. Der...

  8. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS TRIGGERED BY A QUARK-HADRON PHASE TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Hempel, Matthias; Kaeppeli, Roger; Rauscher, Thomas; Winteler, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Froehlich, Carla [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, NC 27695 (United States); Sagert, Irina, E-mail: nobuya.nishimura@unibas.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis in the explosion of massive stars that are triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition during the early post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. The present study is based on general-relativistic radiation hydrodynamics simulations with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry, which utilize a quark-hadron hybrid equation of state based on the MIT bag model for strange quark matter. The quark-hadron phase transition inside the stellar core forms a shock wave propagating toward the surface of the proto-neutron star. This shock wave results in an explosion and ejects neutron-rich matter from the outer accreted layers of the proto-neutron star. Later, during the cooling phase, the proto-neutron star develops a proton-rich neutrino-driven wind. We present a detailed analysis of the nucleosynthesis outcome in both neutron-rich and proton-rich ejecta and compare our integrated nucleosynthesis with observations of the solar system and metal-poor stars. For our standard scenario, we find that a 'weak' r-process occurs and elements up to the second peak (A {approx} 130) are successfully synthesized. Furthermore, uncertainties in the explosion dynamics could barely allow us to obtain the strong r-process which produces heavier isotopes, including the third peak (A {approx} 195) and actinide elements.

  9. Wave Energy Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity.

  10. Wave Control Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    focussing: in crossing seas due to coastal or submarine convergences. Moreover, (rogue) wave energy devices maker to create the highest rogue wave? geometry and dynamo in a new rogue wave energy device? maximum

  11. Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites – An Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Liquefaction Triggering Evaluations at DOE Sites – An Update 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014 Germantown, Maryland Michael R. Lewis, Bechtel Corporation Michael D. Boone, Bechtel Corporation Rucker J. Williams, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC Brent Gutierrez, U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Site

  12. Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming Henrik Svensen a carbon cycle. The event lasted for approximately 200,000 years and was manifested by a global warming, and the Toarcian global warming. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: climate change; Toarcian

  13. A Fast hardware tracker for the ATLAS Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandini, Carlo Enrico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The trigger system at the ATLAS experiment is designed to lower the event rate occurring from the nominal bunch crossing at 40 MHz to about 1 kHz for a designed LHC luminosity of 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. To achieve high background rejection while maintaining good efficiency for interesting physics signals, sophisticated algorithms are needed which require extensive use of tracking information. The Fast TracKer (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to perform track-finding at 100 kHz and based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) form an important part of the system architecture, and the combinatorial problem of pattern recognition is solved by ~8000 standard-cell ASICs named Associative Memories. The availability of the tracking and subsequent vertex information within a short latency ensures robust selections and allows improved trigger performance for the most difficult sign...

  14. A Fast hardware Tracker for the ATLAS Trigger system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandini, Carlo Enrico; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The trigger system at the ATLAS experiment is designed to lower the event rate occurring from the nominal bunch crossing at 40 MHz to about 1 kHz for a designed LHC luminosity of 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. After a very successful data taking run the LHC is expected to run starting in 2015 with much higher instantaneous luminosities and this will increase the load on the High Level Trigger system. More sophisticated algorithms will be needed to achieve higher background rejection while maintaining good efficiency for interesting physics signals, which requires a more extensive use of tracking information. The Fast Tracker (FTK) trigger system, part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade program, is a highly parallel hardware device designed to perform full-scan track-finding at the event rate of 100 kHz. FTK is a dedicated processor based on a mixture of advanced technologies. Modern, powerful, Field Programmable Gate Arrays form an important part of the system architecture, and the combinatorial problem of pattern r...

  15. Coseismic ionospheric disturbances triggered by the ChiChi earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yuh-Ing

    Coseismic ionospheric disturbances triggered by the ChiChi earthquake J. Y. Liu,1,2 H. F. Tsai,3 C on 20 September 1999, a large earthquake of magnitude Mw 7.6 struck the central Taiwan near a small townChi earthquake. When the CIDs travel away from the origin on the Earth surface and then propagate

  16. Thermally Triggered Purification and Immobilization of ElastinOPH Fusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Thermally Triggered Purification and Immobilization of Elastin­OPH Fusions Mark Shimazu,2 Ashok; accepted 5 June 2002 DOI: 10.1002/bit.10446 Abstract: A bifunctional fusion protein consisting of or means of purifying the fusion protein. Over 1,300-fold purification was achieved after only 2 cycles

  17. Substorm triggering by new plasma intrusion: THEMIS allsky imager observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mende, Stephen B.

    Click Here for Full Article Substorm triggering by new plasma intrusion: THEMIS allsky imager) and followed by a northsouth (NS) arc moving equatorward toward the onset latitude. Because of the linkage by enhanced earthward plasma flows associated with enhanced reconnection near the preexisting openclosed field

  18. A Fast Hardware Tracker for the ATLAS Trigger System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark S. Neubauer; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-10-10

    In hadron collider experiments, triggering the detector to store interesting events for offline analysis is a challenge due to the high rates and multiplicities of particles produced. Maintaining high trigger efficiency for the physics we are most interested in while at the same time suppressing high rate physics from inclusive QCD processes is a difficult but important problem. It is essential that the trigger system be flexible and robust, with sufficient redundancy and operating margin. Providing high quality track reconstruction over the full ATLAS detector by the start of processing at LVL2 is an important element to achieve these needs. As the instantaneous luminosity increases, the computational load on the LVL2 system will significantly increase due to the need for more sophisticated algorithms to suppress backgrounds. The Fast Tracker (FTK) is a proposed upgrade to the ATLAS trigger system. It is designed to enable early rejection of background events and thus leave more LVL2 execution time by moving track reconstruction into a hardware system that takes massively parallel processing to the extreme. The FTK system completes global track reconstruction with near offline resolution shortly after the start of LVL2 processing by rapidly finding and fitting tracks in the inner detector for events passing LVL1 using pattern recognition from a large, pre-computed bank of possible hit patterns. We describe the FTK system design and expected performance in the areas of b-tagging, {\\tau}-tagging, and lepton isolation which play and important role in the ATLAS physics program.

  19. Externally triggered coherent two-photon emission from hydrogen molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuki Miyamoto; Hideaki Hara; Takahiko Masuda; Noboru Sasao; Minoru Tanaka; Satoshi Uetake; Akihiro Yoshimi; Koji Yoshimura; Motohiko Yoshimura

    2015-05-28

    We report coherent enhancement of two-photon emission from the excited vibrational state of molecular hydrogen triggered by irradiating mid-infrared pulses externally. We previously observed the two-photon emission triggered by the internally generated fourth Stokes photons. By injecting independent mid-infrared pulses externally, it is possible to control experimental parameters and investigate the mechanism in more detail. In this article, we describe the two-photon emission using the external trigger pulses. Its spectrum and dependence on the energy and timing of the trigger pulse are presented along with numerical simulations based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations. The measured number of emitted photons is 6 10^11 photons/pulse and the resulting enhancement factor from the spontaneous emission is more than 10^18. This value is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the previous experiment. External control of emission process is expected to be essential for observation of weaker process of radiative emission of neutrino pair.

  20. Externally triggered coherent two-photon emission from hydrogen molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Tanaka, Minoru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2015-01-01

    We report coherent enhancement of two-photon emission from the excited vibrational state of molecular hydrogen triggered by irradiating mid-infrared pulses externally. We previously observed the two-photon emission triggered by the internally generated fourth Stokes photons. By injecting independent mid-infrared pulses externally, it is possible to control experimental parameters and investigate the mechanism in more detail. In this article, we describe the two-photon emission using the external trigger pulses. Its spectrum and dependence on the energy and timing of the trigger pulse are presented along with numerical simulations based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations. The measured number of emitted photons is 6 10^11 photons/pulse and the resulting enhancement factor from the spontaneous emission is more than 10^18. This value is three orders of magnitude higher than that of the previous experiment. External control of emission process is expected to be essential for observation of weaker process of radiative ...

  1. Nonlinear dynamics, granular media and dynamic earthquake triggering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Université

    triggering appears more commonly in geothermal areas3 . Proposed mecha- nisms include increased pore pressure load corresponding to effective pressure P (effective pressure ¼ confining pressure minus pore pressure, and the pore pressure is 1 atm (0.101 MPa)) ranging from 0.07 to 0.3 MPa is applied to the granular sample

  2. Self-Triggered Control over Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Self-Triggered Control over Wireless Sensor and Actuator Networks Jos´e Ara´ujo, Adolfo Anta for the sensor and control nodes, thereby reducing energy consumption and increasing network lifetime, without- oped to reduce power consumption in WSNs. Unfortunately, the situation is much less favorable

  3. Geometrical vs wave optics under gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond Angélil; Prasenjit Saha

    2015-05-20

    We present some new derivations of the effect of a plane gravitational wave on a light ray. A simple interpretation of the results is that a gravitational wave causes a phase modulation of electromagnetic waves. We arrive at this picture from two contrasting directions, namely null geodesics and Maxwell's equations, or, geometric and wave optics. Under geometric optics, we express the geodesic equations in Hamiltonian form and solve perturbatively for the effect of gravitational waves. We find that the well-known time-delay formula for light generalizes trivially to massive particles. We also recover, by way of a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the phase modulation obtained under wave optics. Turning then to wave optics - rather than solving Maxwell's equations directly for the fields, as in most previous approaches - we derive a perturbed wave equation (perturbed by the gravitational wave) for the electromagnetic four-potential. From this wave equation it follows that the four-potential and the electric and magnetic fields all experience the same phase modulation. Applying such a phase modulation to a superposition of plane waves corresponding to a Gaussian wave packet leads to time delays.

  4. Introduction Earthquakes and tsunamis are some of the most deadly natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    from sedimentology, tests of synchroneity, stratigraphic correlation, and analysis of non, in the region of the 26 December 2004 Mw 9.1-9.3 earthquake18,19,20,21 . Marine turbidite stratigraphy is first tests for synchronous triggering of sedimentologically isolated turbidite systems and 2) using secondary

  5. Slamming of a breaking wave on a wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    This paper is intended to study impact forces of breaking waves on a rigid wall based on a nonlinear potential-flow theory. This is a model problem for some technologically important design issues such as the impact of breaking waves on ships, coastal and offshore structures. We are interested in the short-time successive triggering of nonlinear effects using a small-time expansion. The analytical solutions for the impact force on a rigid wall and the free-surface profile are derived.

  6. From Sumatra 2004 to Tohoku-Oki 2011: The systematic GPS detection of the ionospheric signature induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    monitoring to improve the response of the tsunami warning systems. [3] Improvement of classic techniques following the Sumatra tsunami demonstrated that ionosphere is sensitive to the tsunami propagation, tsunami induces internal gravity waves propagating within the neutral atmosphere and detectable

  7. Outlook for detection of GW inspirals by GRB-triggered searches in the Advanced detector era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Dietz; Nickolas Fotopoulos; Leo Singer; Curt Cutler

    2013-04-25

    Short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to originate from the coalescence of two neutron stars (NSs) or a NS and a black hole (BH). If this scenario is correct, then short GRBs will be accompanied by the emission of strong gravitational waves (GWs), detectable by GW observatories such as LIGO, Virgo, KAGRA, and LIGO-India. As compared with blind, all-sky, all-time GW searches, externally triggered searches for GW counterparts to short GRBs have the advantages of both significantly reduced detection threshold due to known time and sky location and enhanced GW amplitude because of face-on orientation. Based on the distribution of signal-to-noise ratios in candidate compact binary coalescence events in the most recent joint LIGO-Virgo data, our analytic estimates, and our Monte Carlo simulations, we find an effective sensitive volume for GRB-triggered searches that is about 2 times greater than for an all-sky, all-time search. For NS-NS systems, a jet angle of 20 degrees, a gamma-ray satellite field of view of 10% of the sky, and priors with generally precessing spin, this doubles the number of NS-NS short-GRB and NS-BH short-GRB associations, to ~3-4% of all detections of NS-NSs and NS-BHs. We also investigate the power of tests for statistical excesses in lists of subthreshold events, and show that these are unlikely to reveal a subthreshold population until finding GW associations to short GRBs is already routine. Finally, we provide useful formulas for calculating the prior distribution of GW amplitudes from a compact binary coalescence, for a given GW detector network and given sky location.

  8. Big Flippin' Wave Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Verdes, Campus Point, Coal Oil Point (Sands) Waves propagate perpendicular to isobaths (lines of constant

  9. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves nonlinear waves. Throughout the theory is based on the traditional assumptions that water is inviscid

  10. Evaluation of Light-Triggered Thyristors for Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, L K; Fulkerson, E S; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D

    2008-05-20

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has many needs for high reliability, high peak current, high di/dt switches. Solid-state switch technology offers the demonstrated advantage of reliability under a variety of conditions. Light-triggered switches operate with a reduced susceptibility to electromagnetic interference commonly found within pulsed power environments. Despite the advantages, commercially available solid-state switches are not typically designed for the often extreme pulsed power requirements. Testing was performed to bound the limits of devices for pulsed power applications beyond the manufacturers specified ratings. To test the applicability of recent commercial light-triggered solid-state designs, an adjustable high current switch test stand was assembled. Results from testing and subsequent selected implementations are presented.

  11. Avoid the Tsunami of the Dirac sea in the Imaginary Time Step method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying Zhang; Haozhao Liang; Jie Meng

    2009-05-15

    The discrete single-particle spectra in both the Fermi and Dirac sea have been calculated by the imaginary time step (ITS) method for the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation after avoiding the "tsunami" of the Dirac sea, i.e., the diving behavior of the single-particle level into the Dirac sea in the direct application of the ITS method for the Dirac equation. It is found that by the transform from the Dirac equation to the Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation, the single-particle spectra, which extend from the positive to the negative infinity, can be separately obtained by the ITS evolution in either the Fermi sea or the Dirac sea. Identical results with those in the conventional shooting method have been obtained via the ITS evolution for the equivalent Schr\\"{o}dinger-like equation, which demonstrates the feasibility, practicality and reliability of the present algorithm and dispels the doubts on the ITS method in the relativistic system.

  12. Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, Water-triggered shape memory of multiblock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, 15783 Water-triggered shape memory of multiblock thermoplastic of a water-triggered shape memory polymer (SMP) family, PCL­PEG based thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs

  13. Design and performance of the ATLAS jet trigger system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider made by man. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyse and record these collisions. It generates a huge data volume that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored. The event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 10^{5}. The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intensive ...

  14. ATLAS Jet Trigger Update for the LHC Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tavares Delgado, Ademar; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Large Hadron Collider is the biggest and most powerful particle collider ever built. It produces up to 40 million proton-proton collisions per second at unprecedented energies to explore the fundamental laws and properties of Nature. The ATLAS experiment is one of the detectors that analyses and records these collisions. It generates dozens of GB/s of data that has to be reduced before it can be permanently stored, the event selection is made by the ATLAS trigger system, which reduces the data volume by a factor of 10^5 . The trigger system has to be highly configurable in order to adapt to changing running conditions and maximize the physics output whilst keeping the output rate under control. A particularly interesting pattern generated during collisions consists of a collimated spray of particles, known as a hadronic jet. To retain the interesting jets and efficiently reject the overwhelming background, optimal jet energy resolution is needed. Therefore the Jet trigger software requires CPU-intens...

  15. the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    1 waves the wave model A traveling wave is an organized disturbance propagating at a well-defined wave speed v. · In transverse waves the particles of the medium move perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation. · In longitudinal waves the particles of the medium move parallel to the direction

  16. In-phase waves: Their behavior, internal stratification and fabric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheel, R.J. (Brock Univ., St. Catharines, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences); Udri, A. (Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Geologie)

    1993-03-01

    Experiments were conducted in 0.305m wide, 9m long recirculating sediment flume on a bed of quartz sand (mean diameter of 0.18mm). The experiments included eight runs over the following range of conditions: 0.0605m [<=] depth [<=] 0.068m, 0.51m/s [<=] mean flow velocity [<=] 0.90m/s and 0.63 [<=] Froze Number (F) [<=] 1.1. For F < 0.83 dunes were the dominant bedform and these became longer and lower as F increased. At F = 0.83 the bed was nominally plane but locally and temporarily developed low in-phase waves or dunes. Post-run bed profiles showed symmetrical bedwaves with average length (L) of 0.26m and average height (H) of 0.005m. A complete cycle was characterized by: increased height of bed and water surface waves [r arrow] upstream migration [r arrow] breaking or decay [r arrow] planing of bed surface [r arrow] growth of new in-phase waves (initially migrating downstream and then remaining stationary during continued vertical growth). Each in-phase wave normally behaved independently of other waves although less commonly a breaking wave would trigger breaking of the next downstream wave. For F > 1.0 in-phase waves behaved as described above but a breaking wave would more commonly cause breaking of other waves. With increasing F it became more common for waves to break and rebuild quickly without complete planing of the bed surface. However, complete cycles occurred frequently with the following significant differences: (1) the upstream-migrating antidune developed upstream slopes that approached 25[degree]; (2) planing was accomplished by the rapid migration of a low, asymmetrical bedform through the antidune trough.

  17. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  18. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution

  19. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long WaveShort Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave­Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW 1Ã , Hiu Ning CHAN 1 online June 11, 2013) The long wave­short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase velocity of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. It is a system of nonlinear evolution equations

  20. Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Kwok Wing CHOW*(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a long wave matches the group velocity of a short wave. Significant interactions and energy transfer can1 Rogue Wave Modes for the Long Wave-Short Wave Resonance Model Kwok Wing CHOW*(1) , Hiu Ning CHAN.45.Yv; 47.35.Fg ABSTRACT The long wave-short wave resonance model arises physically when the phase

  1. SECONDARY WAVES AND/OR THE 'REFLECTION' FROM AND 'TRANSMISSION' THROUGH A CORONAL HOLE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE ASSOCIATED WITH THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2.2 FLARE OBSERVED WITH SDO/AIA AND STEREO/EUVI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Vourlidas, Angelos; Zhang Jie; Cheng Xin

    2012-09-10

    For the first time, the kinematic evolution of a coronal wave over the entire solar surface is studied. Full Sun maps can be made by combining images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory satellites, Ahead and Behind, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, thanks to the wide angular separation between them. We study the propagation of a coronal wave, also known as the 'Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope' wave, and its interaction with a coronal hole (CH) resulting in secondary waves and/or reflection and transmission. We explore the possibility of the wave obeying the law of reflection. In a detailed example, we find that a loop arcade at the CH boundary cascades and oscillates as a result of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wave passage and triggers a wave directed eastward that appears to have reflected. We find that the speed of this wave decelerates to an asymptotic value, which is less than half of the primary EUV wave speed. Thanks to the full Sun coverage we are able to determine that part of the primary wave is transmitted through the CH. This is the first observation of its kind. The kinematic measurements of the reflected and transmitted wave tracks are consistent with a fast-mode magnetohydrodynamic wave interpretation. Eventually, all wave tracks decelerate and disappear at a distance. A possible scenario of the whole process is that the wave is initially driven by the expanding coronal mass ejection and subsequently decouples from the driver and then propagates at the local fast-mode speed.

  2. Tsunami generated by a granular collapse down a rough inclined plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viroulet, Sylvain; Kimmoun, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter, we experimentally investigate the collapse of initially dry granular media into water and the subsequent impulse waves. We systematically characterize the influence of the slope angle and the granular material on the initial amplitude of the generated leading wave and the evolution of its amplitude during the propagation. The experiments show that whereas the evolution of the leading wave during the propagation is well predicted by a solution of the linearized Korteweg-de Vries equation, the generation of the wave is more complicated to describe. Our results suggest that the internal properties of the granular media and the interplay with the surrounding fluid are important parameters for the generation of waves at low velocity impacts. Moreover, the amplitude of the leading wave reaches a maximum value at large slope angle. The runout distance of the collapse is also shown to be smaller in the presence of water than under totally dry conditions. This study provides a first insight into tsunam...

  3. High voltage switch triggered by a laser-photocathode subsystem

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Ping; Lundquist, Martin L.; Yu, David U. L.

    2013-01-08

    A spark gap switch for controlling the output of a high voltage pulse from a high voltage source, for example, a capacitor bank or a pulse forming network, to an external load such as a high gradient electron gun, laser, pulsed power accelerator or wide band radar. The combination of a UV laser and a high vacuum quartz cell, in which a photocathode and an anode are installed, is utilized as triggering devices to switch the spark gap from a non-conducting state to a conducting state with low delay and low jitter.

  4. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-09-19

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - Ã?Â?165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  5. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (TechnicalTransmission, Distributioncoupled-channelsCalorimetry Triggering in

  6. Internal Wave Interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Manikandan S.

    Internal waves are a ubiquitous and significant means of momentum and energy transport in the oceans, atmosphere, and astrophysical bodies. Here, we show that internal wave propagation in nonuniform density stratifications, ...

  7. New wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J.

    We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123–130). This ...

  8. Gravitational Waves on Conductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2004-03-12

    We consider a gravitational wave of arbitrary frequency incident on a normal or a super-conductor. The gravitationally induced fields inside the conductor are derived. The outward propagating EM waves are calculated for a low frequency wave on a small sphere and for a high frequency wave incident on a large disk. We estimate for both targets the GW to EM conversion efficiencies and also the magnitude of the superconductor's phase perturbation.

  9. Bragg grating rogue wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degasperis, Antonio; Aceves, Alejandro B

    2015-01-01

    We derive the rogue wave solution of the classical massive Thirring model, that describes nonlinear optical pulse propagation in Bragg gratings. Combining electromagnetically induced transparency with Bragg scattering four-wave mixing, may lead to extreme waves at extremely low powers.

  10. Wave Particles Cem Yuksel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    Wave Particles Cem Yuksel Computer Science Texas A&M University Donald H. House Visualization captured from our real-time simulation system (approximately 100,000 wave particles) Abstract We present a new method for the real-time simulation of fluid sur- face waves and their interactions with floating

  11. Internal wave instability: Wave-wave versus wave-induced mean flow interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    , known as parametric sub- harmonic instability, results generally when a disturbance of one frequency imparts energy to disturbances of half that frequency.13,14 Generally, a plane periodic internal wave, energy from primary waves is transferred, for example, to waves with half frequency. Self

  12. Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Performance Assessment of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter Based on the EquiMar Methodology S of the wave energy sector, device developers are called to provide reliable estimates on power performanceMar, Nissum Bredning, Hanstholm, North Sea, Ekofisk, Wave-to-wire, Wave energy. I. INTRODUCTION The wave

  13. A Solar Coronal Jet Event Triggers A Coronal Mass Ejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Kai; Pan, Zonghao; Wang, S

    2015-01-01

    We present the multi-point and multi-wavelength observation and analysis on a solar coronal jet and coronal mass ejection (CME) event in this paper. Employing the GCS model, we obtained the real (three-dimensional) heliocentric distance and direction of the CME and found it propagate in a high speed over 1000 km/s . The jet erupted before and shared the same source region with the CME. The temporal and spacial relation- ship between them guide us the possibility that the jet triggered the CME and became its core. This scenario could promisingly enrich our understanding on the triggering mechanism of coronal mass ejections and their relations with coronal large-scale jets. On the other hand, the magnetic field configuration of the source region observed by the SDO/HMI instrument and the off- limb inverse Y-shaped configuration observed by SDO/AIA 171 A passband, together provide the first detailed observation on the three-dimensional reconnection process of large-scale jets as simulated in Pariat et al. 2009. ...

  14. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 459, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 111-125 TSUNAMI SOURCES IN THE SUMATRA REGION, INDONESIAAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 459, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 111 Bandung Jalan Ganeca 10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia ABSTRACT A total of 19 tsunamis generated by earthquakes occurred in the Sumatra region in the period from 1770 to 2005. About 84% of the tsunamigenic earthquakes

  15. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 465, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 189-201 ASSESSING THE HAZARD RELATED TO TSUNAMIS OF TECTONIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 465, Vol. 42, No. 4, December 2005, pp. 189 and submarine slides cannot be neglected, most tsunamis were the results of coastal and submarine earthquakes. Therefore, assessing the occurrence probability of tsunamigenic earthquakes is an important contribution

  16. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  17. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  18. The Trigger System for the External Target Experiment in CSR of HIRFL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min Li; Lei Zhao; Jin Xin Liu; Yi Ming Lu; Shu Bin Liu; Qi An

    2015-12-16

    A trigger system was designed for the external target experiment in the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR) of the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Considering that different detectors are scattered in a large area, the trigger system is designed based on a master-slave structure and fiber-based serial data transmission technique. The trigger logic is organized in hierarchies, and flexible reconfiguration of the trigger function is achieved based on command register access or overall field-programmable gate array (FPGA) logic on-line reconfiguration controlled by remote computers. We also conducted tests to confirm the function of the trigger electronics, and the results indicate that this trigger system works well.

  19. Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan G. Siegel, Ph.D.

    2012-11-30

    This program allowed further advancing the development of a novel type of wave energy converter, a Cycloidal Wave Energy Converter or CycWEC. A CycWEC consists of one or more hydrofoils rotating around a central shaft, and operates fully submerged beneath the water surface. It operates under feedback control sensing the incoming waves, and converts wave power to shaft power directly without any intermediate power take off system. Previous research consisting of numerical simulations and two dimensional small 1:300 scale wave flume experiments had indicated wave cancellation efficiencies beyond 95%. The present work was centered on construction and testing of a 1:10 scale model and conducting two testing campaigns in a three dimensional wave basin. These experiments allowed for the first time for direct measurement of electrical power generated as well as the interaction of the CycWEC in a three dimensional environment. The Atargis team successfully conducted two testing campaigns at the Texas A&M Offshore Technology Research Center and was able to demonstrate electricity generation. In addition, three dimensional wave diffraction results show the ability to achieve wave focusing, thus increasing the amount of wave power that can be extracted beyond what was expected from earlier two dimensional investigations. Numerical results showed wave cancellation efficiencies for irregular waves to be on par with results for regular waves over a wide range of wave lengths. Using the results from previous simulations and experiments a full scale prototype was designed and its performance in a North Atlantic wave climate of average 30kW/m of wave crest was estimated. A full scale WEC with a blade span of 150m will deliver a design power of 5MW at an estimated levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in the range of 10-17 US cents per kWh. Based on the new results achieved in the 1:10 scale experiments these estimates appear conservative and the likely performance at full scale will exceed this initial performance estimates. In advancing the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of this type of wave energy converter from 3 to 4, we find the CycWEC to exceed our initial estimates in terms of hydrodynamic performance. Once fully developed and optimized, it has the potential to not just outperform all other WEC technologies, but to also deliver power at a lower LCOE than competing conventional renewables like wind and solar. Given the large wave power resource both domestically and internationally, this technology has the potential to lead to a large improvement in our ability to produce clean electricity at affordable cost.

  20. Superconducting FCL using a combined inducted magnetic field trigger and shunt coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D. (Rexford, NY)

    2007-10-16

    A single trigger/shunt coil is utilized for combined induced magnetic field triggering and shunt impedance. The single coil connected in parallel with the high temperature superconducting element, is designed to generate a circulating current in the parallel circuit during normal operation to aid triggering the high temperature superconducting element to quench in the event of a fault. The circulating current is generated by an induced voltage in the coil, when the system current flows through the high temperature superconducting element.

  1. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  2. Superconducting matrix fault current limiter with current-driven trigger mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan; Xing (Albany, NY)

    2008-04-15

    A modular and scalable Matrix-type Fault Current Limiter (MFCL) that functions as a "variable impedance" device in an electric power network, using components made of superconducting and non-superconducting electrically conductive materials. An inductor is connected in series with the trigger superconductor in the trigger matrix and physically surrounds the superconductor. The current surge during a fault will generate a trigger magnetic field in the series inductor to cause fast and uniform quenching of the trigger superconductor to significantly reduce burnout risk due to superconductor material non-uniformity.

  3. Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic trigger shatters mystery of how glass deforms Bond switching underpins warping of strong metallic glasses Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences Director Takeshi Egami, left,...

  4. Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Robert L.

    Dust-Acoustic Waves: Visible Sound Waves Robert L. Merlino Department of Physics and Astronomy and experimental work on dust acoustic waves is given. The basic physics of the dust acoustic wave and some findings and outstanding problems are also presented. Keywords: dusty plasmas, dust acoustic waves PACS: 52

  5. Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Wave momentum flux parameter: a descriptor for nearshore waves Steven A. Hughes* US Army Engineer Available online 7 October 2004 Abstract A new parameter representing the maximum depth-integrated wave momentum flux occurring over a wave length is proposed for characterizing the wave contribution

  6. Structure-borne sound Flexural wave (bending wave)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Structure-borne sound · Flexural wave (bending wave) »One dimensional (beam) +(/x)dx +(/x)dx = (/x) (/x)dx=(2/x2)dx Mz +(Mz/x)dx Mz vy Fy Fy +(Fy/x)dx Structure-borne sound · Bending wave ­ flexural wave #12;2 Structure-borne sound · Two obliquely propagating waves + - + + - + - Structure

  7. REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keyser, John

    REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE PARTICLES A Dissertation by Cem Yuksel Submitted to the Office of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;REAL-TIME WATER WAVES WITH WAVE, Valerie E. Taylor August 2010 Major Subject: Computer Science #12;iii ABSTRACT Real-time Water Waves

  8. GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GN Wave theory and TEBEM for Wave-Body Interaction Dr. BinBin Zhao and Professor Wenyang Duan of simulating irregular nonlinear water wave interaction with arbitrary floating bodies, the Green-Naghdi wave corners. The results show that the high-level GN theory can predict wave transformation over uneven seabed

  9. Trimodal steady water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Ehrnström; Erik Wahlén

    2013-10-31

    We construct three-dimensional families of small-amplitude gravity-driven rotational steady water waves on finite depth. The solutions contain counter-currents and multiple crests in each minimal period. Each such wave generically is a combination of three different Fourier modes, giving rise to a rich and complex variety of wave patterns. The bifurcation argument is based on a blow-up technique, taking advantage of three parameters associated with the vorticity distribution, the strength of the background stream, and the period of the wave.

  10. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  11. Simulating Astro-E2 Observations of Galaxy Clusters: the Case of Turbulent Cores Affected by Tsunamis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaka Fujita; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Keiichi Wada; Tae Furusho

    2004-12-14

    This is the first attempt to construct detailed X-ray spectra of clusters of galaxies from the results of high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations and simulate X-ray observations in order to study velocity fields of the intracluster medium (ICM). The hydrodynamic simulations are based on the recently proposed tsunami model, in which cluster cores are affected by bulk motions of the ICM and turbulence is produced. We note that most other solutions of the cooling flow problem also involve the generation of turbulence in cluster cores. From the mock X-ray observations with Astro-E2 XRS, we find that turbulent motion of the ICM in cluster cores could be detected with the satellite. The Doppler shifts of the metal lines could be used to discriminate among turbulence models. The gas velocities measured through the mock observations are consistent with the line-emission weighted values inferred directly from hydrodynamic simulations.

  12. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risø-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  13. Wave Energy Resource Analysis for Use in Wave Energy Conversion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastor, J.; Liu, Y.; Dou, Y.

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict the response of wave energy converters an accurate representation of the wave climate resource is crucial. This paper gives an overview of wave resource modeling techniques as well as detailing a methodology for estimating...

  14. Wave-Corpuscle Mechanics for Electric Charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babin, Anatoli; Figotin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    superposition in nonlinear wave dynamics. Rev. Math. Phys.6. Babin, A. , Figotin, A. : Wave-corpuscle mechanics forV. , Fortunato, D. : Solitary waves in the nonlinear wave

  15. Microstructural Design for Stress Wave Energy Management /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tehranian, Aref

    2013-01-01

    Nasser, S. , 2010. Stress-wave energy management throughNemat-Nasser, Stress-wave energy management through materialconstitute pressure wave energy and/or shear wave energy.

  16. Triggers: A Dynamic Approach to Testing Multiuser Software Robert F. Dugan Jr., Ephraim P. Glinert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    Triggers: A Dynamic Approach to Testing Multiuser Software Robert F. Dugan Jr., Ephraim P. Glinert or CSCW software. We have de- veloped CAMELOT [4], a technology-focused methodology for testing CSCW¡ @cs.rpi.edu ABSTRACT In this paper we describe triggers, a novel technique for test- ing multiuser

  17. Optimal power flow in microgrids using event-triggered optimization Pu Wan and Michael D. Lemmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmon, Michael

    Optimal power flow in microgrids using event-triggered optimization Pu Wan and Michael D. Lemmon Abstract-- Microgrids are power generation and distribution systems in which users and generators-triggered distributed optimization algorithm to solve the optimal power flow (OPF) problem in microgrids. Under event

  18. Ultra-Low Voltage VCO Design Using Schmitt Trigger on SOI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    Ultra-Low Voltage VCO Design Using Schmitt Trigger on SOI Kyung Ki Kim Department of Electrical trigger and an ultra low voltage current source on PD-SOI with low temperature and supply voltage oscillator based VCOs on SOI CMOS [4][5] have been reported. However, VCO with ultra low voltage less than 0

  19. Harmonic generation of gravitational wave induced Alfven waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mats Forsberg; Gert Brodin

    2007-11-26

    Here we consider the nonlinear evolution of Alfven waves that have been excited by gravitational waves from merging binary pulsars. We derive a wave equation for strongly nonlinear and dispersive Alfven waves. Due to the weak dispersion of the Alfven waves, significant wave steepening can occur, which in turn implies strong harmonic generation. We find that the harmonic generation is saturated due to dispersive effects, and use this to estimate the resulting spectrum. Finally we discuss the possibility of observing the above process.

  20. Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Robin

    Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases Robin Kaiser and Mark D. Havey Mesoscopic Electromagnetic Wave Dynamics in Ultracold Atomic Gases #12;39 E xperimental developments permit in the transport proper- ties of electromagnetic radiation in strongly scattering random media. Even in weakly

  1. CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    CATCHING THE FOURTH WAVE YOU MAY HAVE RIDDEN THEM YOURSELF -- the swells that develop farther out beyond Toffler, the fourth wave -- biologi- cal intelligence and medical technology -- is on the horizon second and fourth nationally in terms of cities that receive the most research funds from the National

  2. Developing de Broglie Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J X Zheng-Johansson; P-I Johansson

    2006-08-27

    The electromagnetic component waves, comprising together with their generating oscillatory massless charge a material particle, will be Doppler shifted when the charge hence particle is in motion, with a velocity $v$, as a mere mechanical consequence of the source motion. We illustrate here that two such component waves generated in opposite directions and propagating at speed $c$ between walls in a one-dimensional box, superpose into a traveling beat wave of wavelength ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$$=(\\frac{v}{c}){\\mit\\Lambda}$ and phase velocity $c^2/v+v$ which resembles directly L. de Broglie's hypothetic phase wave. This phase wave in terms of transporting the particle mass at the speed $v$ and angular frequency ${\\mit\\Omega}_d=2\\pi v /{\\mit\\Lambda}_d$, with ${\\mit\\Lambda}_d$ and ${\\mit\\Omega}_d$ obeying the de Broglie relations, represents a de Broglie wave. The standing-wave function of the de Broglie (phase) wave and its variables for particle dynamics in small geometries are equivalent to the eigen-state solutions to Schr\\"odinger equation of an identical system.

  3. Rayleigh WaveInternal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave­Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear­generation of inter­ nal waves in the atmosphere

  4. Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear-generation of inter- nal waves in the atmosphere

  5. An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    An unsteady wave driver for narrowbanded waves: modeling nearshore circulation driven by wave Abstract In this paper, we derive an unsteady refraction­diffraction model for narrowbanded water waves for use in computing coupled wave­current motion in the nearshore. The end result is a variable

  6. Recirculation in multiple wave conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brizard, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    model lies with the simple wave energy conservation law itthe recirculation of wave energy introduces interference e?particles, the tertiary-wave energy may be negative and thus

  7. Lab 8: Stress Triggering and Prediction Overview: Students will investigate the `randomness' of earthquakes, first through a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    . Objectives: (1) Test `time-predictable' nature of earthquakes (the larger the slip in the last earthquake and `chance'. For this exercise, students will test two primary hypotheses: (1) Earthquakes are 'time-predictable efforts of earthquake prediction and analysis: http://tsunami.geo.ed

  8. Testing and Performance of UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ripa, J; Lee, J; Park, I H; Kim, J E; Lim, H; Jeong, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Connell, P H; Eyles, C; Reglero, V; Rodrigo, J M; Bogomolov, V; Panasyuk, M I; Petrov, V; Svertilov, S; Yashin, I; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jorgensen, C; Chang, Y -Y; Chen, P; Huang, M A; Liu, T -C; Nam, J W; Wang, M -Z; Chen, C R; Choi, H S; Kim, S -W; Min, K W

    2015-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder (UFFO-p) is a new space mission dedicated to detect Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and rapidly follow their afterglows in order to provide early optical/ultraviolet measurements. A GRB location is determined in a few seconds by the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger telescope (UBAT) employing the coded mask imaging technique and the detector combination of Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate (YSO) scintillating crystals and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. The results of the laboratory tests of UBAT's functionality and performance are described in this article. The detector setting, the pixel-to-pixel response to X-rays of different energies, the imaging capability for rays, the localization accuracy measurements, and the combined test with the Block for X-ray and Gamma-Radiation Detection (BDRG) scintillator detector to check the efficiency of UBAT are all described. The UBAT instrument has been assembled and integrated with other equipment on UFFO-p and should be launche...

  9. Center for Wave Phenomena Wave Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    research and education program in seismic exploration, monitoring and wave propagation. The main focus into a life of scientific discovery." Kurang Mehta, Ph.D. Class of 2007 Shell Exploration and Production Phil of CWP is on seismic modeling, imaging and inversion methods, as well as on improving the accuracy

  10. Electron acceleration during the decay of nonlinear Whistler waves in low-beta electron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Saito, Shinji; Nariyuki, Yasuhiro E-mail: saito@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-10

    Relativistic electron acceleration through dissipation of a nonlinear, short-wavelength, and monochromatic electromagnetic whistler wave in low-beta plasma is investigated by utilizing a one-dimensional fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The nonlinear (large-amplitude) parent whistler wave decays through the parametric instability which enhances electrostatic ion acoustic waves and electromagnetic whistler waves. These waves satisfy the condition of three-wave coupling. Through the decay instability, the energy of electron bulk velocity supporting the parent wave is converted to the thermal energy perpendicular to the background magnetic field. Increase of the perpendicular temperature triggers the electron temperature anisotropy instability which generates broadband whistler waves and heats electrons in the parallel direction. The broadband whistler waves are inverse-cascaded during the relaxation of the electron temperature anisotropy. In lower-beta conditions, electrons with a pitch angle of about 90° are successively accelerated by inverse-cascaded whistler waves, and selected electrons are accelerated to over a Lorentz factor of 10. The result implies that the nonlinear dissipation of a finite-amplitude and short-wavelength whistler wave plays an important role in producing relativistic nonthermal electrons over a few MeV especially at lower beta plasmas.

  11. Diagonalization of pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-21

    A coordinate transformation is found which diagonalizes the axisymmetric pp-waves. Its effect upon concrete solutions, including impulsive and shock waves, is discussed.

  12. TRIGGERED STAR FORMATION AROUND MID-INFRARED BUBBLES IN THE G8.14+0.23 H II REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chakraborti, S.; Anandarao, B. G.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2012-09-10

    Mid-infrared shells or bubbles around expanding H II regions have received much attention due to their ability to initiate a new generation of star formation. We present multi-wavelength observations around two bubbles associated with a southern massive star-forming region G8.14+0.23, to investigate the triggered star formation signature on the edges of the bubbles by the expansion of the H II region. We have found observational signatures of the collected molecular and cold dust material along the bubbles and the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) velocity map reveals that the molecular gas in the bubbles is physically associated around the G8.14+0.23 region. We have detected 244 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the region and about 37% of these YSOs occur in clusters. Interestingly, these YSO clusters are associated with the collected material on the edges of the bubbles. We have found good agreement between the dynamical age of the H II region and the kinematical timescale of bubbles (from the {sup 12}CO(J = 3-2) line data) with the fragmentation time of the accumulated molecular materials to explain possible 'collect and collapse' process around the G8.14+0.23 region. However, one cannot entirely rule out the possibility of triggered star formation by compression of the pre-existing dense clumps by the shock wave. We have also found two massive embedded YSOs (about 10 and 22 M{sub Sun }) which are associated with the dense fragmented clump at the interface of the bubbles. We conclude that the expansion of the H II region is also leading to the formation of these two young massive embedded YSOs in the G8.14+0.23 region.

  13. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  14. Single photon state generation from a continuous-wave non-degenerate optical parametric oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne E. B. Nielsen; Klaus Mølmer

    2014-10-08

    We present a theoretical treatment of conditional preparation of one-photon states from a continuous-wave non-degenerate optical parametric oscillator. We obtain an analytical expression for the output state Wigner function, and we maximize the one-photon state fidelity by varying the temporal mode function of the output state. We show that a higher production rate of high fidelity Fock states is obtained if we condition the outcome on dark intervals around trigger photo detection events.

  15. Toward Early-Warning Detection of Gravitational Waves from Compact Binary Coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kipp Cannon; Romain Cariou; Adrian Chapman; Mireia Crispin-Ortuzar; Nickolas Fotopoulos; Melissa Frei; Chad Hanna; Erin Kara; Drew Keppel; Laura Liao; Stephen Privitera; Antony Searle; Leo Singer; Alan Weinstein

    2014-05-07

    Rapid detection of compact binary coalescence (CBC) with a network of advanced gravitational-wave detectors will offer a unique opportunity for multi-messenger astronomy. Prompt detection alerts for the astronomical community might make it possible to observe the onset of electromagnetic emission from (CBC). We demonstrate a computationally practical filtering strategy that could produce early-warning triggers before gravitational radiation from the final merger has arrived at the detectors.

  16. Efficient terahertz-wave generation and its ultrafast optical modulation in charge ordered organic ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, Hirotake Iwai, Shinichiro; Itoh, Keisuke; Goto, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Yakushi, Kyuya

    2014-04-28

    Efficient terahertz (THz) wave generation in strongly correlated organic compounds ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} and ??-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} (ET:bis(ethylenedithio)-tetrathiafulvalene) was demonstrated. The spontaneous polarization induced by charge ordering or electronic ferroelectricity was revealed to trigger the THz-wave generation via optical rectification; the estimated 2nd-order nonlinear optical susceptibility for ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3} is over 70 times larger than that for prototypical THz-source ZnTe. Ultrafast (<1 ps) and sensitive (?40%) photoresponse of the THz wave was observed for ?-(ET){sub 2}I{sub 3}, which is attributable to photoinduced quenching of the polarization accompanied by insulator(ferroelectric)-to-metal transition. Modulation of the THz wave was observed for ??-(ET){sub 2}IBr{sub 2} upon the poling procedure, indicating the alignment of polar domains.

  17. Expected Performance of the ATLAS Experiment - Detector, Trigger and Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington /Athens U. /Natl. Tech. U., Athens /Baku, Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /Belgrade U. /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /Humboldt U., Berlin /Bern U., LHEP /Birmingham U. /Bogazici U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U.

    2011-11-28

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN promises a major step forward in the understanding of the fundamental nature of matter. The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector for the LHC, whose design was guided by the need to accommodate the wide spectrum of possible physics signatures. The major remit of the ATLAS experiment is the exploration of the TeV mass scale where groundbreaking discoveries are expected. In the focus are the investigation of the electroweak symmetry breaking and linked to this the search for the Higgs boson as well as the search for Physics beyond the Standard Model. In this report a detailed examination of the expected performance of the ATLAS detector is provided, with a major aim being to investigate the experimental sensitivity to a wide range of measurements and potential observations of new physical processes. An earlier summary of the expected capabilities of ATLAS was compiled in 1999 [1]. A survey of physics capabilities of the CMS detector was published in [2]. The design of the ATLAS detector has now been finalised, and its construction and installation have been completed [3]. An extensive test-beam programme was undertaken. Furthermore, the simulation and reconstruction software code and frameworks have been completely rewritten. Revisions incorporated reflect improved detector modelling as well as major technical changes to the software technology. Greatly improved understanding of calibration and alignment techniques, and their practical impact on performance, is now in place. The studies reported here are based on full simulations of the ATLAS detector response. A variety of event generators were employed. The simulation and reconstruction of these large event samples thus provided an important operational test of the new ATLAS software system. In addition, the processing was distributed world-wide over the ATLAS Grid facilities and hence provided an important test of the ATLAS computing system - this is the origin of the expression 'CSC studies' ('computing system commissioning'), which is occasionally referred to in these volumes. The work reported does generally assume that the detector is fully operational, and in this sense represents an idealised detector: establishing the best performance of the ATLAS detector with LHC proton-proton collisions is a challenging task for the future. The results summarised here therefore represent the best estimate of ATLAS capabilities before real operational experience of the full detector with beam. Unless otherwise stated, simulations also do not include the effect of additional interactions in the same or other bunch-crossings, and the effect of neutron background is neglected. Thus simulations correspond to the low-luminosity performance of the ATLAS detector. This report is broadly divided into two parts: firstly the performance for identification of physics objects is examined in detail, followed by a detailed assessment of the performance of the trigger system. This part is subdivided into chapters surveying the capabilities for charged particle tracking, each of electron/photon, muon and tau identification, jet and missing transverse energy reconstruction, b-tagging algorithms and performance, and finally the trigger system performance. In each chapter of the report, there is a further subdivision into shorter notes describing different aspects studied. The second major subdivision of the report addresses physics measurement capabilities, and new physics search sensitivities. Individual chapters in this part discuss ATLAS physics capabilities in Standard Model QCD and electroweak processes, in the top quark sector, in b-physics, in searches for Higgs bosons, supersymmetry searches, and finally searches for other new particles predicted in more exotic models.

  18. CLUSTER FORMATION TRIGGERED BY FILAMENT COLLISIONS IN SERPENS SOUTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Fumitaka; Kawabe, Ryohei; Shinnaga, Hiroko; Sugitani, Koji; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Kimihiko; Tokuda, Kazuki; Kozu, Minato; Okada, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Ogawa, Hideo; Nishitani, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Izumi; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Kameno, Seiji; Momose, Munetake; Nakajima, Taku; and others

    2014-08-20

    The Serpens South infrared dark cloud consists of several filamentary ridges, some of which fragment into dense clumps. On the basis of CCS (J{sub N} = 4{sub 3}-3{sub 2}), HC{sub 3}N (J = 5-4), N{sub 2}H{sup +} (J = 1-0), and SiO (J = 2-1, v = 0) observations, we investigated the kinematics and chemical evolution of these filamentary ridges. We find that CCS is extremely abundant along the main filament in the protocluster clump. We emphasize that Serpens South is the first cluster-forming region where extremely strong CCS emission is detected. The CCS-to-N{sub 2}H{sup +} abundance ratio is estimated to be about 0.5 toward the protocluster clump, whereas it is about 3 in the other parts of the main filament. We identify six dense ridges with different V {sub LSR}. These ridges appear to converge toward the protocluster clump, suggesting that the collisions of these ridges may have triggered cluster formation. The collisions presumably happened within a few × 10{sup 5} yr because CCS is abundant only for a short time. The short lifetime agrees with the fact that the number fraction of Class I objects, whose typical lifetime is 0.4 × 10{sup 5} yr, is extremely high, about 70% in the protocluster clump. In the northern part, two ridges appear to have partially collided, forming a V-shape clump. In addition, we detected strong bipolar SiO emission that is due to the molecular outflow blowing out of the protostellar clump, as well as extended weak SiO emission that may originate from the filament collisions.

  19. Phase-I Trigger Readout Electronics Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid-Argon Calorimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Tatsuya; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is foreseen to be upgraded during the shut-down period of 2018-2019 to deliver about 3 times the instantaneous design luminosity. Since the ATLAS trigger system, at that time, will not support such an increase of the trigger rate an improvement of the trigger system is required. The ATLAS LAr Calorimeter readout will therefore be modified and digital trigger signals with a higher spatial granularity will be provided to the trigger. The new trigger signals will be arranged in 34000 Super Cells which achieves a 5-10 better granularity than the trigger towers currently used and allows an improved background rejection. The Super Cell readout is composed of custom developed 12-bit combined SAR ADCs in 130 nm CMOS technology which will be installed on-detector in a radiation environment and digitizes the detector pulses at 40 MHz. The data will be transmitted to the back end using a custom serializer and optical converter applying 5.44 Gb/s optical links. These components are install...

  20. A versatile digital camera trigger for telescopes in the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwanke, U; Sulanke, K -H; Vorobiov, S; Wischnewski, R

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of an FPGA-based digital camera trigger for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, developed for the future Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The proposed camera trigger is designed to select images initiated by the Cherenkov emission of extended air showers from very-high energy (VHE, E>20 GeV) photons and charged particles while suppressing signatures from background light. The trigger comprises three stages. A first stage employs programmable discriminators to digitize the signals arriving from the camera channels (pixels). At the second stage, a grid of low-cost FPGAs is used to process the digitized signals for camera regions with 37 pixels. At the third stage, trigger conditions found independently in any of the overlapping 37-pixel regions are combined into a global camera trigger by few central FPGAs. Trigger prototype boards based on Xilinx FPGAs have been designed, built and tested and were shown to function properly. Using these components a full camera trigger wi...

  1. Shallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hereman, Willy A.M.

    . Water Wave Experiments and Observations VII. Future Directions VIII. Bibliography Glossary Deep water A surface wave is said to be in deep water if its wavelength is much shorter than the local water depthShallow Water Waves and Solitary Waves Willy Hereman Department of Mathematical and Computer

  2. Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig, Walter

    Long wave expansions for water waves over random topography Anne de Bouard1 , Walter Craig2 interacting with the random bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed numbers: 76B15, 35Q53, 76M50, 60F17 Keywords :Water waves, random topography, long wave asymptotics #12

  3. On Generating Gravity Waves with Matter and Electromagnetic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Barrabes; P. A. Hogan

    2008-04-05

    If a homogeneous plane light-like shell collides head-on with a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave having a step-function profile then no backscattered gravitational waves are produced. We demonstrate, by explicit calculation, that if the matter is accompanied by a homogeneous plane electromagnetic shock wave with a step-function profile then backscattered gravitational waves appear after the collision.

  4. Simulation studies of the HADES first level trigger PART I: Performance in heavy-ion induced reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schicker; H. Tsertos

    1996-10-03

    The first level trigger of the HADES spectrometer is studied for the heavy-ion collision systems Au+Au and Ne+Ne. The trigger efficiency for central events is given in dependence of the imposed charged particle multiplicity condition. The timing properties of the trigger signal are described. The losses due to deadtime are specified. Finally, the first level trigger rate is reported.

  5. Evolution of Rogue Waves in Interacting Wave Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Grönlund; B. Eliasson; M. Marklund

    2009-04-03

    Large amplitude water waves on deep water has long been known in the sea faring community, and the cause of great concern for, e.g., oil platform constructions. The concept of such freak waves is nowadays, thanks to satellite and radar measurements, well established within the scientific community. There are a number of important models and approaches for the theoretical description of such waves. By analyzing the scaling behavior of freak wave formation in a model of two interacting waves, described by two coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations, we show that there are two different dynamical scaling behaviors above and below a critical angle theta_c of the direction of the interacting waves below theta_c all wave systems evolve and display statistics similar to a wave system of non-interacting waves. The results equally apply to other systems described by the nonlinear Schroedinger equations, and should be of interest when designing optical wave guides.

  6. LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VII: WAVE OPTICS Lab VII - 1 In this lab, you will solve problems in ways that take-like behavior. These conditions may be less familiar to you than the conditions for which geometrical optics

  7. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Vawter, Gregory A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size.

  8. Surface wave interferometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halliday, David Fraser

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the application of seismic interferometry to surface waves. Seismic interferometry is the process by which the wavefield between two recording locations is estimated, resulting in new recordings at ...

  9. Relativistic quaternionic wave equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, C

    2006-01-01

    Schrodinger ?time dependent? equation, ? 1 and ? 2 , then?TCP?. The current conservation equation ?3.2? is still truefor this extended wave equation ?8.1?, however, Eq. ?6.7?

  10. Traveling-wave photodetector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.

    1993-12-14

    The traveling-wave photodetector of the present invention combines an absorptive optical waveguide and an electrical transmission line, in which optical absorption in the waveguide results in a photocurrent at the electrodes of the electrical transmission line. The optical waveguide and electrical transmission line of the electrically distributed traveling-wave photodetector are designed to achieve matched velocities between the light in the optical waveguide and electrical signal generated on the transmission line. This velocity synchronization provides the traveling-wave photodetector with a large electrical bandwidth and a high quantum efficiency, because of the effective extended volume for optical absorption. The traveling-wave photodetector also provides large power dissipation, because of its large physical size. 4 figures.

  11. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 T more »top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.« less

  12. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    Waves in Magnetoelectric Materials . . . Need forApplication of Multiferroic Materials to Receive AntennaMaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  13. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, D.; Esarey, E.; Kim, J.K.

    1997-06-10

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention. 21 figs.

  14. Method for generating a plasma wave to accelerate electrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); Esarey, Eric (Chevy Chase, MD); Kim, Joon K. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for generating large amplitude nonlinear plasma waves, driven by an optimized train of independently adjustable, intense laser pulses. In the method, optimal pulse widths, interpulse spacing, and intensity profiles of each pulse are determined for each pulse in a series of pulses. A resonant region of the plasma wave phase space is found where the plasma wave is driven most efficiently by the laser pulses. The accelerator system of the invention comprises several parts: the laser system, with its pulse-shaping subsystem; the electron gun system, also called beam source, which preferably comprises photo cathode electron source and RF-LINAC accelerator; electron photo-cathode triggering system; the electron diagnostics; and the feedback system between the electron diagnostics and the laser system. The system also includes plasma source including vacuum chamber, magnetic lens, and magnetic field means. The laser system produces a train of pulses that has been optimized to maximize the axial electric field amplitude of the plasma wave, and thus the electron acceleration, using the method of the invention.

  15. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Jane McKee Smith, World Scientific, 2007, Vol. 2, pp Panza,Irizarry and Philip Liu, World Scientific Pub. Co. , 2006,Irizarry and Philip Liu, World Scientific Pub. Co. , 2006,

  16. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Dept. , B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, B.C. ,Design Division, B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver,Dept. , B.C. Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, B.C. ,

  17. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Landslide at La Palma, Canary Islands," Jour. Volcanologyof Fuerteventura, Canary Islands," Jour. Volcanology andRecent Megalandslides of the Canary Islands: El Golfo Debris

  18. Nitric OxideTriggered Remodeling of Chloroplast Bioenergetics and Thylakoid Proteins upon Nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitric Oxide­Triggered Remodeling of Chloroplast Bioenergetics and Thylakoid Proteins upon Nitrogen droplets, but the accompanying changes in bioenergetics have been little studied so far. Here, we report

  19. The Paleoproterozoic snowball Earth: A climate disaster triggered by the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    cyanobacteria finally surmounted some geochemical, environmental, or ecological barrier and successfully- house and thereby directly and rapidly triggered a planetary-scale glaciation, the 2.3­2.2 Ga

  20. Design of a Hardware Track Finder (Fast Tracker) for the ATLAS Trigger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavaliere, Viviana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The use of tracking information at the trigger level in the LHC Run II period is crucial for the trigger an data acquisition (TDAQ) system and will be even more so as contemporary collisions that occur at every bunch crossing will increase in Run III. The Fast TracKer (FTK) is part of the ATLAS trigger upgrade project; it is a hardware processor that will provide every Level-1 accepted event (100 kHz) and within 100$\\mu$s, full tracking information for tracks with momentum as low as 1 GeV. Providing fast, extensive access to tracking information, with resolution comparable to the offline reconstruction, FTK will help in precise detection of the primary and secondary vertices to ensure robust selections and improve the trigger performance.

  1. Flow through porous media : from mixing of fluids to triggering of earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jha, Birendra, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced oil recovery by displacing oil with solvents such as carbon dioxide requires development of miscibility between the two fluids to maximize the displacement efficiency. Prevention of inadvertent triggering of ...

  2. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maslov, Sergei; Sneppen, Kim

    2015-09-14

    Populations of species in ecosystems are often constrained by availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by comparable reduction in populations of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt and severe collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant e.g. for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g.more »by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent dynamics of our system is cyclic ‘‘diversity waves’’ triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Species abundances are characterized by a bimodal time-aggregated distribution with the lower peak formed by populations of recently collapsed or newly introduced species while the upper peak - species that has not yet collapsed in the current wave. In most waves both upper and lower peaks are composed of several smaller peaks. This self-organized hierarchical peak structure has a long-term memory transmitted across several waves. It gives rise to a scale-free tail of the time-aggregated population distribution with a universal exponent of 1.7. We show that diversity wave dynamics is robust with respect to variations in the rules of our model such as diffusion between multiple environments, species-specific growth and extinction rates, and bet-hedging strategies.« less

  3. Results of the Triggered TROI Steam Explosion Experiments with a Narrow Interaction Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, J.H.; Park, I.K.; Min, B.T.; Hong, S.W.; Hong, S.H.; Song, J.H.; Kim, H.D.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of the interaction vessel geometry has been studied on the energetics of a steam explosion in the TROI experiment. The interaction vessel was 30 cm in diameter (1-D geometry). Two types of corium composition were used as a melt. One was spontaneously non-explosive 80 : 20 corium (UO{sub 2} : ZrO{sub 2}) and the other was spontaneously explosive 70 : 30 eutectic corium. A test with 80 : 20 corium was carried out without an external triggering. Another test with 80 : 20 corium was also carried out with an external trigger. In addition, two tests with 70 : 30 corium were carried out with an external trigger. The external trigger was applied just before the contact between the melt and the bottom of the interaction vessel. This time was thought to be the triggering time of a spontaneous steam explosion. The external trigger was a chemical explosive of PETN 1.0 g. However, none of these tests led to steam explosions even with an external triggering. Since eutectic corium led to spontaneous or triggered steam explosions in a previous test using a 60 cm wide interaction vessel (3-D geometry), it is quite probable that a geometry effect of the interaction vessel could exist. The reason for no steam explosions in the narrow (1-D) interaction vessel is believed to be a relatively high void fraction in the vessel when compared with the 3-D vessel. Due to the high void fraction, a steam explosion could not propagate to the surroundings of the melt where the water was depleted. (authors)

  4. The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Electron and Photon Triggers towards Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichert, Joseph; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs particle. Dedicated triggers are also used for the collection of J/? ?e+ e? , W? e? and QCD background samples for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based (Level 1) and a software based high level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the long shutdown of the LHC in preparation for data taking in 2015. The increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions as well as the planned higher centre-of-mass energy demanded the optimisation of the trigger selections at each level to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. The evolution of the ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance will be presented, includin...

  5. The Upgrade of the ATLAS Electron and Photon Triggers towards LHC Run 2 and their Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs particle. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based (Level 1) and a software based high level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the long shutdown of the LHC in preparation for data taking in 2015. The increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions as well as the planned higher center-of-mass energy demanded the optimisation of the trigger selections at each level to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. The evolution of the ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance will be presented, including ini...

  6. Kinetic simulation studies of laser-triggering in the Z gas switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Thoma, C.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C.; Madrid, E. A.; Zimmerman, W. R. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)] [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Rambo, P. K.; Schwarz, J.; Savage, M.; Atherton, B. W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Advanced z-pinch accelerators require precise timing of multiple mega-ampere drivers to deliver terawatt power. The triggering of these drivers is now largely initiated by laser ionization of gas switches. In this paper, we discuss detailed fully kinetic simulation of the Z laser-triggered gas switch involving detailed finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell Monte Carlo modeling of the trigger section of the switch. Other components of the accelerator from the Marx bank through the pulse-forming line are described as circuit elements. The simulations presented here build on a recently developed model of electro-negative gas breakdown and streamer propagation that included photons produced from de-excited neutrals. New effects include multi-photon ionization of the gas in a prescribed laser field. The simulations show the sensitivity of triggering to laser parameters including focal plane within the anode-cathode gap of the trigger section of the switch, intensity at focus, and laser pulse length. Detailed electromagnetic simulations of the trigger section with circuit modeling of the upstream and downstream components are largely in agreement with Z data and demonstrate a new capability.

  7. Optically triggered high voltage switch network and method for switching a high voltage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Silberkleit, Lee I. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

    1993-01-19

    An optically triggered solid state switch and method for switching a high voltage electrical current. A plurality of solid state switches (350) are connected in series for controlling electrical current flow between a compensation capacitor (112) and ground in a reactive power compensator (50, 50') that monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b and 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. An optical transmitter (100) controlled by the reactive power compensation system produces light pulses that are conveyed over optical fibers (102) to a switch driver (110') that includes a plurality of series connected optical triger circuits (288). Each of the optical trigger circuits controls a pair of the solid state switches and includes a plurality of series connected resistors (294, 326, 330, and 334) that equalize or balance the potential across the plurality of trigger circuits. The trigger circuits are connected to one of the distribution lines through a trigger capacitor (340). In each switch driver, the light signals activate a phototransistor (300) so that an electrical current flows from one of the energy reservoir capacitors through a pulse transformer (306) in the trigger circuit, producing gate signals that turn on the pair of serially connected solid state switches (350).

  8. Gravitational-wave Detection With Matter-wave Interferometers Based On Standing Light Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongfeng Gao; Peng Ju; Baocheng Zhang; Mingsheng Zhan

    2011-03-25

    We study the possibility of detecting gravitational-waves with matter-wave interferometers, where atom beams are split, deflected and recombined totally by standing light waves. Our calculation shows that the phase shift is dominated by terms proportional to the time derivative of the gravitational wave amplitude. Taking into account future improvements on current technologies, it is promising to build a matter-wave interferometer detector with desired sensitivity.

  9. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1988-03-08

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 4 figs.

  10. Explosive plane-wave lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marsh, S.P.

    1987-03-12

    An explosive plane-wave air lens which enables a spherical wave form to be converted to a planar wave without the need to specially machine or shape explosive materials is described. A disc-shaped impactor having a greater thickness at its center than around its periphery is used to convert the spherical wave into a plane wave. When the wave reaches the impactor, the center of the impactor moves first because the spherical wave reaches the center of the impactor first. The wave strikes the impactor later in time as one moves radially along the impactor. Because the impactor is thinner as one moves radially outward, the velocity of the impactor is greater at the periphery than at the center. An acceptor explosive is positioned so that the impactor strikes the acceptor simultaneously. Consequently, a plane detonation wave is propagated through the acceptor explosive. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Piezoelectric wave motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yerganian, Simon Scott (Lee's Summit, MO)

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  12. Standing wave compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Timothy S. (4614 River Mill Ct., Glen Allen, VA 23060)

    1991-01-01

    A compressor for compression-evaporation cooling systems, which requires no moving parts. A gaseous refrigerant inside a chamber is acoustically compressed and conveyed by means of a standing acoustic wave which is set up in the gaseous refrigerant. This standing acoustic wave can be driven either by a transducer, or by direct exposure of the gas to microwave and infrared sources, including solar energy. Input and output ports arranged along the chamber provide for the intake and discharge of the gaseous refrigerant. These ports can be provided with optional valve arrangements, so as to increase the compressor's pressure differential. The performance of the compressor in either of its transducer or electromagnetically driven configurations, can be optimized by a controlling circuit. This controlling circuit holds the wavelength of the standing acoustical wave constant, by changing the driving frequency in response to varying operating conditions.

  13. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff ?. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than ?. The resulting ?-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (?+SD-CI), which is based on a small ?-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build ?-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The ?-CI and ?+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the ?-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the ?-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  14. Thermoplastic waves in magnetars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetar activity is generated by shear motions of the neutron star surface, which relieve internal magnetic stresses. An analogy with earthquakes and faults is problematic, as the crust is permeated by strong magnetic fields, which greatly constrain crustal displacements. We describe a new deformation mechanism that is specific to strongly magnetized neutron stars. The magnetically stressed crust begins to move because of a thermoplastic instability, which launches a wave that shears the crust and burns its magnetic energy. The propagating wave front resembles the deflagration front in combustion physics. We describe the conditions for the instability, the front structure and velocity, and discuss implications for observed magnetar activity.

  15. Wave runup on cylinders subject to deep water random waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrebo, Ann Kristin

    2001-01-01

    runup. Laboratory measurements of irregular waves interfering with vertical platform cylinders were used to obtain the Weibull coefficients necessary for the analytical model. Six data sets with different configurations where the wave elevation...

  16. Real-time Water Waves with Wave Particles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuksel, Cem

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation describes the wave particles technique for simulating water surface waves and two way fluid-object interactions for real-time applications, such as video games. Water exists in various different forms in our environment...

  17. Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

  18. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    combiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .solutions . . . . . . . . mm-wave imaging for medical and

  19. Cellular Mechanisms Underlying Retinal Wave Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Underlying Retinal Wave Generation By Kevin J Ford AUnderlying Retinal Wave Generation By Kevin J Ford Doctor ofwith age, so does the wave generation mechanism. The most

  20. Guided wave monitoring of prestressing tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    and applications of ultrasonic waves. CRC series in pure andStrands by Guided Stress Waves, ASCE Journal of Materials inin Cable Stays via Guided Wave Magnetostrictive Ultrasonics,

  1. mm-Wave Phase Shifters and Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adabi Firouzjaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    4.1.1 Slow wave transmissioncombiners . . . . . . . . . . . 5.3 mm-Wave implementationfailed to predict current mm-wave design trend [1] . . . . .

  2. Super compact equation for water waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyachenko, A I; Zakharov, V E

    2015-01-01

    We derive very simple compact equation for gravity water waves which includes nonlinear wave term (`a la NLSE) and advection term (may results in wave breaking).

  3. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  4. Generating Electromagnetic Waves from Gravity Waves in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Hogan; S. O'Farrell

    2009-05-18

    Examples of test electromagnetic waves on a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker(FLRW) background are constructed from explicit perturbations of the FLRW space-times describing gravitational waves propagating in the isotropic universes. A possible physical mechanism for the production of the test electromagnetic waves is shown to be the coupling of the gravitational waves with a test magnetic field, confirming the observation of Marklund, Dunsby and Brodin [Phys.Rev. D62,101501(R) (2000)].

  5. Wave refraction and wave energy on Cayo Arenas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Donald Eugene

    1962-01-01

    WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis By Donald E. Welsh Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1962 Major Subject: Physical Oceanography WAVE REFRACTION AND WAVE ENERGY ON CAYO ARENAS A Thesis Donald E. Walsh Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of the Committee ead of Department ' / January 1962 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS...

  6. LONG WAVE EXPANSIONS FOR WATER WAVES OVER RANDOM TOPOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LONG WAVE EXPANSIONS FOR WATER WAVES OVER RANDOM TOPOGRAPHY ANNE DE BOUARD 1 , WALTER CRAIG 2 with the ran­ dom bottom. We show that the resulting influence of the random topography is expressed in terms of bottom topography a#ects the equations describing the limit of solutions in the long wave regime. We

  7. Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Secular Sediment Waves, Channel Bed Waves, and Legacy Sediment L. Allan James* Geography Department, University South Carolina Abstract The concept of sediment waves is reviewed and clarifications are proposed for nomenclature con- cerning vertical channel responses to large fluvial sediment fluxes over a period of a decade

  8. Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 Wave Propagation Theory 2.1 The Wave Equation The wave equation in an ideal fluid can be derived from hydrodynamics and the adia- batic relation between pressure and density. The equation for conservation of mass, Euler's equation (Newton's 2nd Law), and the adiabatic equation of state are respec

  9. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  10. Deflagration Wave Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-04-03

    Shock initiation in a plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) is due to hot spots. Current reactive burn models are based, at least heuristically, on the ignition and growth concept. The ignition phase occurs when a small localized region of high temperature (or hot spot) burns on a fast time scale. This is followed by a growth phase in which a reactive front spreads out from the hot spot. Propagating reactive fronts are deflagration waves. A key question is the deflagration speed in a PBX compressed and heated by a shock wave that generated the hot spot. Here, the ODEs for a steady deflagration wave profile in a compressible fluid are derived, along with the needed thermodynamic quantities of realistic equations of state corresponding to the reactants and products of a PBX. The properties of the wave profile equations are analyzed and an algorithm is derived for computing the deflagration speed. As an illustrative example, the algorithm is applied to compute the deflagration speed in shock compressed PBX 9501 as a function of shock pressure. The calculated deflagration speed, even at the CJ pressure, is low compared to the detonation speed. The implication of this are briefly discussed.

  11. Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transformative Wave Technologies Kent, Washington www.transformativewave.com #12;#12;North America are shifted to off peak times #12;#12;Transformative Wave Technologies www.transformativewave.com #12

  12. The Upgrade of the ATLAS Electron and Photon Triggers towards LHC Run 2 and their Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasztor, Gabriella; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs particle. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based (Level 1) and a software based high level trigger (HLT), both of which were upgraded during the long shutdown of the LHC in preparation for data taking in 2015. The increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions as well as the planned higher center-of-mass energy demanded the optimisation of the trigger selections at each level, to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To improve the performance multivariate analysis techniques are introduced at the HLT. The evolution of...

  13. The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Trigger towards Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karamaoun, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Tau triggers are used in a variety of highly anticipated ATLAS physics analyses, including the measurement of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions and searches for Higgs boson partners or heavy resonances decaying into pairs of tau leptons. As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10 34 cm ?2 s ?1 , the strategies for triggering have become more sophisticated than in Run 1. In these conditions single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitations, despite the advancements in algorithms used in the tau identification. Further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main developments to allow a large program of physics analysis. In Run 2, topological criteria can be applied already at the first trigger level, due to the addition of the L1 topological processor. This makes it possible to use detailed information from sub-detectors in order to apply real-time event topology cuts. The evolution of the ATLAS tau trigger and its performance...

  14. The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Triggers towards Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karamaoun, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Upgrade and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Triggers towards Run 2 Tau triggers are used in a variety of highly anticipated ATLAS physics analyses, including the measurement of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions and searches for Higgs boson partners or heavy resonances decaying into pairs of tau leptons. As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach instantaneous luminosities of over 10^34cm^ -2s-1, the strategies for triggering have become more sophisticated than in Run 1. In these conditions single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitations, despite the advancements in algorithms used in the tau identification. Further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main developments to allow a large program of physics analysis. In Run 2 topological criteria can be applied already at the first trigger level, due to the addition of the L1 topological processor. This makes it possible to use detailed information from sub-detectors in order to apply real-time event topology cuts...

  15. CDF trigger final balance: Offline resolution at low level selections to fight against Tevatron increasing luminosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2010-01-01

    The CDF detector at Tevatron collider is at present the most long-lasting high energy physics experiment. Since its first data taking in 1992 it has produced many results of primary importance, such as the discovery of top quark and, more recently, the observations of Bs oscillations and single-top production. None of them would have been possible without a fast and efficient trigger system. Based on a three level architecture, the CDF trigger takes decisions on simple calorimetric and tracking objects and assures both high efficiency on signal events and low dead time. It reduces the data flow rate from 2.53 MHz, the collision rate, to 150 Hz, the current limit on tape writing and is flexible enough to be easily adapted to the continuously growing instantaneous luminosity. In the last years the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity has rapidly increased and is now reaching 4 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The CDF trigger system has been widely upgraded to cope with increasing trigger rates. The upgrade result is online reconstruction of missing transverse energy, jets and tracks with a quality comparable to the offline one. Jet energy and direction can be precisely determined and tracks can be subjected to 3-D reconstruction with good resolution. These upgrades reduce high trigger rates to acceptable levels and have provided invaluable tools to increase the purity of the collected samples. They also represent a helpful experience for LHC experiments where background rates will be much more demanding.

  16. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California, State and Federal Agencies and their expectations in respect to potential wave power deployments Jim a huge amount of wave measurement data from various data sources Asfaw Beyene of the Department

  17. Water wave interactions Walter Craig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomann, Laurent

    Water wave interactions Walter Craig Department of Mathematics & Statistics ´EquationsMaster University) Water wave interactions 25 janvier 2011 1 / 34 #12;Joint work with: Philippe Guyenne University, Killam Research Fellows Program, Fields Institute Walter Craig (McMaster University) Water wave

  18. Extreme wave impinging and overtopping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2009-06-02

    This investigates the velocity fields of a plunging breaking wave impinging on a structure through measurements in a two-dimensional wave tank. As the wave breaks and overtops the structure, so-called green water is generated. The flow becomes multi...

  19. 2, 70177025, 2014 Freaque wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NHESSD 2, 7017­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract to the corresponding final paper in NHESS if available. Brief Communication: Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu­7025, 2014 Freaque wave occurrences in 2013 P. C. Liu Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  20. 2014 Tube -1 STANDING WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    2014 Tube - 1 STANDING WAVES IN AN AIR COLUMN The objective of the experiment is: · To study the harmonic structure of standing waves in an air column. APPARATUS: Computer, FFTScope software, PC speaker will produce nothing noteworthy. But, if the phase relationship is correct, standing waves can be formed