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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Class 18: Wed. Apr. 3: Toxic Substances Control Act and Cost/Benefit Analysis Class Project on TSCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Class 18: Wed. Apr. 3: Toxic Substances Control Act and Cost/Benefit Analysis Class Project on TSCA This project element will examine how technologies you are studying. Each project team will focus on the microorganisms

Iglesia, Enrique

2

Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB)/Radioactive Waste Annual Inventory for Calendar Year 2013  

SciTech Connect

The Toxic Substances Control Act, 40 CFR 761.65(a)(1) provides an exemption from the one year storage time limit for PCB/radioactive waste. PCB/radioactive waste may exceed the one year time limit provided that the provisions at 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(ii) and 40 CFR 761.65(a)(2)(iii) are followed. These two subsections require, (ii) "A written record documenting all continuing attempts to secure disposal is maintained until the waste is disposed of" and (iii) "The written record required by subsection (ii) of this section is available for inspection or submission if requested by EPA." EPA Region 10 has requested the Department of Energy (DOE) to submit an inventory of radioactive-contaminated PCB waste in storage at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the previous calendar year. The annual inventory is separated into two parts, INL without Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) (this includes Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC, and the Naval Reactors Facility), and AMWTP.

no author on report

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

E-Print Network 3.0 - act tsca pl Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tetrakis(dimethylamino)hafnium P-6280-B Date: February 2005 Copyright 2002, 2004-2005, Praxair Technology, Inc. Page 1 of 8 Summary: Page 6 of 8 TSCA: TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT:...

4

Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Thomas L. McCall, Jr. http:www.em.doe.govffaaortsca.html 4252001 Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities Compliance Agree.. Page 12 of 26 Deputy...

5

Glossary of CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms and acronyms. Environmental Guidance  

SciTech Connect

This glossary contains CERCLA, RCRA and TSCA related terms that are most often encountered in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Emergency Preparedness activities. Detailed definitions are included for key terms. The CERCLA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended and related federal rulemakings. The RCRA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and related federal rulemakings. The TSCA definitions included in this glossary are taken from the Toxic Substances and Control Act (TSCA) and related federal rulemakings. Definitions related to TSCA are limited to those sections in the statute and regulations concerning PCBs and asbestos.Other sources for definitions include additional federal rulemakings, assorted guidance documents prepared by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), guidance and informational documents prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE), and DOE Orders. The source of each term is noted beside the term. Terms presented in this document reflect revised and new definitions published before July 1, 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Toxic Substances Toxic Substances Control Jump to: navigation, search Name California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Place Sacramento, California Website http://www.dtsc.ca.gov Coordinates 38.5815719°, -121.4943996° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5815719,"lon":-121.4943996,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

The Transport and Deposition of Persistent Toxic Substances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Elimination of Persistent Toxic Substances, held May 21-22, in Romulus Michigan. The material presented here was collected . . . . . . . u Bruce Kirschner . . . . . b Serge L'Italien . . . . . . c Paul Lioy . . . . . . . . . . a Maris Ratza . . . . . . . . l Orlando Cabrera Rivera k Bruce Rodger . . . . . . . k Joyce Rosenthal . . . . q

8

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

healthy. But when your environment exposes you to dangerous events or toxic substances, your health canNational Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry CDC's Climate and Health Program Environmental Health Your environment is everything around you--the air you

9

Toxic Substances from Coal Combustion - Forms of Occurrence Analyses  

SciTech Connect

In a cooperative agreement with DOE (Contract No. DE- AC22- 95101), the USGS has participated with Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) in a project entitled "Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion -A Comprehensive Assessment". Samples from the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/ Hazard, Illinois No. 6, and Wyodak program coals were examined to determine the mode of occurrence of selected trace elements (As, Se, Cr, Hg, and Ni) using selective leaching, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X- ray diffraction techniques. Among other findings, our results indicate that the bulk of the arsenic in the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals is in pyrite. High percentages (60- 80%) of arsenic were leached by nitric acid, and microprobe data confirm the presence of arsenic in pyrite in each of these coals (concentrations ranging from <0.01 to 0.09 wt.% of the pyrite grains). In the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal, arsenic may have several modes of occurrences. About 30 percent of the arsenic in the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal was leached by hydrochloric acid, possibly indicating the presence of arsenates that were formed by the oxidation of pyrite. About 25 percent of the arsenic in the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal was leached by nitric acid, suggesting an association with pyrite. Only sixty percent of the total arsenic in the Elkhorn/ Hazard coal was leached. The low percentage of leachable arsenic may be accounted for by unleached pyrite grains, which were detected in solid residues from the nitric acid leach. In the Wyodak coal, arsenic probably occurs in iron oxides or carbonates (35 % arsenic leached by HCl) and clays (15% arsenic leached by HF). Arsenic in the Wyodak coal may also have an organic association, as indicated by low totals for leaching (50% unleached arsenic). In the four program coals 20 to 45 percent of the chromium was leached by hydrofluoric acid, suggesting an association with silicates (probably illite). Microprobe analysis of the Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/ Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 coals confirmed the presence of chromium in illite and possibly in other clays, at concentrations that are near the detection limits. Results related to the forms of occurrence of the other trace elements (Se, Hg, and Ni) are varied; further work in Phase II is planned to determine their mode of occurrence.

Allan Kolker; Curtis A. Palmer; Harvey E. Belkin; Jason Willet; Kathleen C. Kolb; Robert B. Finkelman; Sharon S. Crowley; Stanley J. Mroczkowski

1998-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA  

SciTech Connect

Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

Auletta, A.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry CS229334 from Health Threats. Saving Money Through Prevention. Environmental Health Your environment and healthy, you are more likely to stay healthy. But when your environment exposes you to dangerous events

12

On the impact of second generation mating and offspring in multi-generation reproductive toxicity studies on classification and labelling of substances in Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possible impact on classification and labelling decisions of effects observed in second generation parental (P1) and offspring (F2) parameters in multi-generation studies was investigated. This was done for 50 substances classified as reproductive toxicants in Europe, for which a multi-generation study was available. The P1 and F2 effects were compared to parental (P0) and first generation offspring (F1) effects with regard to type of effect as well as incidence, magnitude and severity (IMS), at any dose level. For every study with unique P1/F2 effects, or differences in IMS, the influence of the P1/F2 findings on the classification decision was investigated. Unique P1/F2 generation findings did not play a crucial role in the classification decision of any of the 50 classified substances, except for fenarimol. This substance however provided abundant alerts on the basis of its endocrine activity and developmental neurotoxicity and would therefore also be expected to be identified as a developmental neurotoxicant in an Extended One Generation Reproductive Toxicity Study (EOGRTS). These findings, in addition to the increased number of parameters analysed, increased statistical power and reduced animal use, provide strong further support for replacement of the classical two-generation reproductive toxicity study by the EOGRTS in regulatory reproductive toxicity assessment.

Emiel Rorije; Andr Muller; Manon E.W. Beekhuijzen; Ulla Hass; Barbara Heinrich-Hirsch; Martin Paparella; Erna Schenk; Beate Ulbrich; Betty C. Hakkert; Aldert H. Piersma

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Audit Report: IG-0451 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

51 Audit Report: IG-0451 August 13, 1999 Waste Incineration at the Oak Ridge Reservation The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator is located at the East Tennessee...

14

TOXIC SUBSTANCES FROM COAL COMBUSTION--A COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT, PHASE II: ELEMENT MODES OF OCCURRENCE FOR THE OHIO 5/6/7, WYODAK AND NORTH DAKOTA COAL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

This study reports on the second phase (Phase II) of USGS research activities in support of DOE contract DE-AC22-95PC95101 ''Toxic Substances From Coal Combustion--A Comprehensive Assessment'', funded under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-95PC95145. The purpose of the study was to provide a quantitative and semi-quantitative characterization of the modes of occurrence of trace elements in coal samples investigated under Phase II, including (1) Ohio 5/6/7, an Ohio bituminous coal sample blended from the No.5, No.6, and No.7 beds; (2) North Dakota, a lignite sample from the Falkirk Mine, Underwood, ND, and (3) Wyodak, a sub-bituminous coal sample from the Cordero Mine, Gillette, WY. Samples from these coal beds were selected for their range in rank and commercial applicability. Results of this research provide basic information on the distribution of elements in Phase II coal samples, information needed for development of a commercial predictive model for trace-element behavior during coal combustion.

Allan Kolker; Stanley J. Mroczkowski; Curtis A. Palmer; Kristen O. Dennen; Robert B. Finkelman; John H. Bullock Jr.

2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Acute inhalation toxicity evaluation of a 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane, a replacement candidate for ozone depleting substances. Interim report, July--August 1997  

SciTech Connect

The DoD requires the development of toxicity profiles for chemical substitute candidates proposed to replace ozone depleting substances such as chloro- and fluorocarbons and halons. A 93:7 mixture of perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane was identified as a possible replacement candidate for ozone-depleting fire extinguishants. An acute inhalation toxicity test utilizing male and female Fischer 344 rats was performed on this test material. No deaths occurred in any of the rats exposed to 5.3 mg/L of the 93:7 perfluoro-2-butene and 1-bromopropane mixture. Body weights of male and female rats during the subsequent 14-day observation period were unaffected by treatment. The test material did not produce acute toxicity via the inhalation route.

Feldmann, M.L.; Leahy, H.F.; Vinegar, A.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

K-1435 Wastewater Treatment System for the Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Wastewater at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design and performance of a wastewater treatment system installed to support the operation of a hazardous waste incinerator. The Oak Ridge Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator (TSCAI), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), is designed and permitted to treat Resource ConservatioN and Recovery Act (RCRA) wastes including characteristic and listed wastes and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated mixed waste. the incinerator process generates acidic gases and particulates which consist of salts, metals, and radionuclides. These off-gases from the incinerator are treated with a wet off-gas scrubber system. The recirculated water is continuously purged (below down), resulting in a wastewater to be treated. Additional water sources are also collected on the site for treatment, including storm water that infiltrates into diked areas and fire water from the incinerator's suppression system. To meet regulatory requirements for discharge, a wastewater treatment system (WWTS) was designed, constructed, and operated to treat these water sources. The WWTS was designed to provide for periodic fluctuation of contaminant concentrations due to various feed streams to the incinverator. Blow down consists of total suspended solids (TSS) and total dissolved solids (TDS), encompassing metals, radionuclide contamination and trace organics. The system design flow rate range is 35 to 75 gallons per minute (gpm). The system is designed with redundancy to minimize time off-line and to reduce impacts to the TSCAI operations. A novel treatment system uses several unit operations, including chemical feed systems, two-stage chemical reaction treatment, microfiltration, sludge storage and dewatering, neutralization, granular activated carbon, effluent neutralization, and a complete programmable logic controller (PLC) and human-machine interface (HMI) control system. To meet the space requirements and to provide portability of the WWTS to other applications, the system was installed in three, over-the-road semi trailers, and interconnected with piping and power. Trailers were oriented on a small site footprint to facilitate ease of installation. A remote sump pump skid was provided to convey water from two holding sumps adjacent to the treatment process. An accumulation tank and pump were also provided to receive miscellaneous wastewaters for treatment if they meet the waste acceptance criteria. The paper includes details of the technology used in the design, the requirements for compliance, and the initial performance demonstration and jar testing results. The WWTS successfully allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment with compliant discharge to off-site surface water.

Swientoniewski M.D.

2008-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act, revised significantly in 2006, seeks to mitigate the use of toxic substances and the production of toxic byproducts through reporting requirements as well as resource conservation plans...

18

Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

19

The TSCA interagency testing committee`s approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups: 1977-1983  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the TSCA interagency testing committee`s (ITC) approaches to screening and scoring chemicals and chemical groups between 1977 and 1983. During this time the ITC conducted five scoring exercises to select chemicals and chemical groups for detailed review and to determine which of these chemicals and chemical groups should be added to the TSCA Section 4(e) Priority Testing List. 29 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Walker, J.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Soluble Substances and Evaporation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soluble Substances and Evaporation Soluble Substances and Evaporation Name: JD Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: FL Country: New Zealand Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: Do soluble substances evaporate with the water? Replies: JD, As a general rule, no. If the soluble substance is a solid, then its boiling point is well above that of water, so it cannot possibly boil off. If the substance is a liquid, it may have a boiling point that is below that of water and will boil off at a lower temperature than water. If the boiling point is higher than that of water, than it will boil off after the water has evaporated. Some substances, like ethanol for example, form an "azeotrope" with water. The combination of ethanol and water form a tight intermolecular connection that makes the two substances boil off at the same time.

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air toxics Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics exposure Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

24

A question of substance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the week of January 27th to February 2nd, 1986 a design symposium was held in the Department of Architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This symposium, entitled "An Architecture of Substance" was ...

Gitlin, Jane M

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A Drug Toxicity Death Involving Propylhexedrine and Mitragynine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......toxicity urine Substance Abuse Detection methods Substance-Related...Tandem Mass Spectrometry Young Adult A death involving abuse of propylhexedrine and...decedent's computer and internet usage history indicated...and CEDIA for drugs of abuse. A full-scan (m......

Justin M. Holler; Shawn P. Vorce; Pamela C. McDonough-Bender; Joseph Magluilo; Jr.; Carol J. Solomon; Barry Levine

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Metal Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems posed to plants by metal toxicity in the soils of the world are basically of two kinds. The first kind are of natural origin. These arise either as a consequence of the nature of the parent material f...

T. McNeilly

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Toxic Substances Control Act Uranium Enrichment Federal Facilities...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

in Attachment I - Portsmouth and Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plants Remedial Implementation Plan. * EPA shall review all deliverables generated by DOE pursuant to this Agreement. *...

28

The Transport and Deposition of Persistent Toxic Substances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rosenthal, of CBNS, for valuable discussions and assistance; for example, portions of the analysis contained in this study were based in part on CBNS's earlier emissions inventory work for dioxins and hexachlorobenzene B.3. Destruction and Transformation of Atmospheric Pollutants by Chemical Reactions

29

Hazardous Substances Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture has the authority to promulgate regulations declaring specified substances to be hazardous and establishing labeling, transportation, storage, and...

30

C:\Program Files\Microsoft Publisher\ig0451.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OAK RIDGE RESERVATION OAK RIDGE RESERVATION DOE/IG-0451 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES AUGUST 1999 AUDIT REPORT August 13, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Waste Incineration at the Oak Ridge Reservation" BACKGROUND The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator is located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. It is the only incinerator in the Department of Energy (Department) that is permitted to treat TSCA-regulated, radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste. The objective of this audit was to determine whether the Department operated the TSCA Incinerator at the capacity permitted by the

31

The Oak Ridge Reservation PCB Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement, October 28, 1996 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Compliance Agreement Between The United States Compliance Agreement Between The United States Department of Energy and The United States Environmental Protection Agency Region 4 - Toxic Substances Control Act (Also Known As The Oak Ridge Reservation Polychlorinated Biphenyl Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (ORR-PCB-FFCA)) State Tennessee Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) TSCA Scope Summary Bring DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) into compliance with TSCA and its implementing regulations at 40 CFR Part 761, "Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Manufacturing, Processing, Distribution in Commerce, and Use Prohibitions" Parties DOE; US EPA Date 10/28/1996 SCOPE * Bring DOE's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) into compliance with TSCA and its implementing regulations at 40 CFR Part 761, "Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)

32

Substances of Abuse and Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUBSTANCES OF ABUSE SUBSTANCES OF ABUSE AND WORK Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-5/CM DOE Headquarters January 16, 2002 Americans 12 Years and Older Using Dru s or Alcohol in the Past Month 1915 1995 1999 Substance Abuse in Industry * Drug use - associated with higher rates of )>absenteeism )>injury l> medical care utilization )> involuntary separation l> health care costs * Alcohol use in the workplace associated with l> absenteeism l> performance on specific tasks ::... mixed data on other outcomes Americans Over 12 Years Reporting Lifetime (Ever Used) Drug Use "'.11---------11--------l * Aloobol *Airf.Udruc 50.11---------11--------l * Mari- ODd ........ 40.11---------11----&.---l * Cocaiae *llalaciaogoal * Horoia Substance Abuse and Work

33

Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program which covers drug and alcohol testing. Cancels DOE O 3792.3 Chg 1.

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Controlled Substance Security Plan (Schedules I, II, III, IV and V Controlled Substances)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlled Substance Security Plan (Schedules I, II, III, IV and V Controlled Substances) Guidelines for Acquiring & Accounting for Controlled Substances for Scientific Use Lawrence Berkeley National;LAWRENCEBERKELEYr\\IATIOMLI-ABOMTORY CONTROLLEDSUBSTANCEPROTOCOL (SCHEDULEr& il CONTROLLEDSUBSTANCES) Gontrolled

Eisen, Michael

35

Modification and expansion of X-7725A Waste Accountability Facility for storage of polychlorinated biphenyl wastes at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) must manage wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in accordance with Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requirements and as prescribed in a Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA) between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). PCB-containing wastes are currently stored in the PORTS process buildings where they are generated. DOE proposes to modify and expand the Waste Accountability facility (X-7725A) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS), Piketon, Ohio, to provide a central storage location for these wastes. The proposed action is needed to eliminate the fire and safety hazards presented by the wastes. In this EA, DOE considers four alternatives: (1) no action, which requires storing wastes in limited storage areas in existing facilities; (2) modifying and expanding the X-7725A waste accountability facility; (3) constructing a new PCB waste storage building; and (4) shipping PCB wastes to the K-25 TSCA incinerator. If no action is taken, PCB-contaminated would continue to be stored in Bldgs X-326, X-330, and X-333. As TSCA cleanup activities continue, the quantity of stored waste would increase, which would subsequently cause congestion in the three process buildings and increase fire and safety hazards. The preferred alternative is to modify and expand Bldg. X-7725A to store wastes generated by TSCA compliance activities. Construction, which could begin as early as April 1996, would last approximately five to seven months, with a total peak work force of 70.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ross Hazardous and Toxic Materials Handling Facility: Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) owns a 200-acre facility in Washington State known as the Ross Complex. Activities at the Ross Complex routinely involve handling toxic substances such as oil-filled electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organic and inorganic compounds for preserving wood transmission poles, and paints, solvents, waste oils, and pesticides and herbicides. Hazardous waste management is a common activity on-site, and hazardous and toxic substances are often generated from these and off-site activities. The subject of this environmental assessment (EA) concerns the consolidation of hazardous and toxic substances handling at the Complex. This environmental assessment has been developed to identify the potential environmental impacts of the construction and operation of the proposal. It has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to determine if the proposed action is likely to have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to the design elements included within the project, mitigation measures have been identified within various sections that are now incorporated within the project. This facility would be designed to improve the current waste handling practices and to assist BPA in meeting Federal and state regulations.

URS Consultants, Inc.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Role of Extracellular Polymeric Substances in Bioflocculation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microorganisms under GlucoseControlled Abstract: Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secreted by suspended cultures of microorganisms from an activated sludge plant in the...

38

Extremely Hazardous Substances Risk Management Act (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out provisions for local governments to implement regulations and standards for the management of extremely hazardous substances, which are defined and categorized as follows:

39

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

40

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Substance abuse precedes internet addiction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The purpose of the current study was to evaluate possible overlapping substance abuse and internet addiction in a large, uniformly sampled population, ranging in age from 13 to 18years. Participants (N=73,238) in the current study were drawn from the 6th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey (KYRBWS-V) for students from 400 middle schools and 400 high schools in 16 cities within South Korea. Of adolescent internet users, 85.2% were general users (GU), 11.9% were users with potential risk for internet addiction (PR), and 3.0% were users with high risk for internet addiction (HR). There was a difference in the number of students with alcohol drinking among the GU, PR, and HR groups (20.8% vs 23.1% vs 27.4%). There was a difference in the number of students who smoked among the GS, PR, and HR groups (11.7% vs 13.5% vs 20.4%). There was a difference in the number of students with drug use among the GU, PR, and HR groups (1.7% vs 2.0% vs 6.5%). After adjusting for sex, age, stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation, smoking may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=1.203, p=0.004). In addition, drug use may predict a high risk for internet addiction (OR=2.591, pinternet addiction have vulnerability for addictive behaviors, co-morbid substance abuse should be evaluated and, if found, treated in adolescents with internet addiction.

Young Sik Lee; Doug Hyun Han; Sun Mi Kim; Perry F. Renshaw

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Substance Abuse Testing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » New Employee Orientation » Substance Abuse Testing Services » New Employee Orientation » Substance Abuse Testing Program Substance Abuse Testing Program Executive Order 12564, Drug-Free Federal Workplace, states in part that "the use of illegal drugs or the use of legal drugs illegally by Federal employees impairs the efficiency of Federal Agencies, jeopardizes public health and safety, and violates the public trust." Substance abuse increases the burden on other employees who do not use illegal drugs and also is an economic problem due to lost productivity in the workplace, insurance claims, sick benefits, accidents, and theft. Abusers endanger all who rely on them for their well being and safety. The Department's Substance Abuse Testing Program covers all Federal employees of the Department of Energy. Authorization for this program comes

43

Multiple-Drug Toxicity Caused by the Coadministration of 4-Methylmethcathinone (Mephedrone) and Heroin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of Results Substance Abuse Detection Young Adult An accidental death...found for sale on the internet as a re- search chemical...be discovered through internet drug user forums. Multiple-DrugToxicity...considered a rare drug of abuse. However, in July 2009......

Amber J. Dickson; Shawn P. Vorce; Barry Levine; Marilyn R. Past

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of toxic substances in LCA. II: Assessing parameter06 iF fw- ingestion-USES-LCA (-) 1,0E-04 1,0E-02 Figure 5b04 iF fw-inhalation-USES-LCA (-) Figure 6a 1,0E-04 iF fw-

Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Hertwich, Edgar G.; McKone, Thomas E.; van de Meent, Dik

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

RL-721 Document ID Number: REV4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00128  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 I. Project Title: Washington River Protection Solutions LLC - Small-Scale Mercury Spill Cleanup under TSCA/ RCRA under CX 86.1, ncleanup Actions" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions ·e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will engage in short-term, small-scale mercury clean-up actions in accordance with the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). WRPS will perform all activities in accordance with all applicable regulations and procedures. Clean-up actions will not exceed ten million dollars and will be done when needed to reduce or eliminate adverse impacts

46

Savannah River Site sample and analysis plan for Clemson Technical Center waste  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to determine the chemical, physical and radiological properties of the SRS radioactive Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) liquid waste stream, to verify that it conforms to Waste Acceptance Criteria of the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Incineration Facility. Waste being sent to the ETTP TSCA Incinerator for treatment must be sufficiently characterized to ensure that the waste stream meets the waste acceptance criteria to ensure proper handling, classification, and processing of incoming waste to meet the Waste Storage and Treatment Facility`s Operating Permits. This sampling and analysis plan is limited to WSRC container(s) of homogeneous or multiphasic radioactive PCB contaminated liquids generated in association with a treatability study at Clemson Technical Center (CTC) and currently stored at the WSRC Solid Waste Division Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF).

Hagstrom, T.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

CONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

working practice and will encourage the evolution of a positive health and safety culture within the orgCONTROL of SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO HEALTH (COSHH) Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment HEALTH & SAFETY............................................................................................................9 2.6. Safety Data Sheets (SDS

48

Effects of Lifestyle and Toxicants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vast number of toxic chemicals encountered at the work place, in the environment or related to lifestyle have the potential to impair male reproductive health. The list of known male reproductive toxicants i...

J. P. Bonde

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

National Center for Environmental Health Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's National Center for Environmental Health: Hawaii CDC 24/7: Saving Lives. Protecting People from Health concerns for asthma care. Elevated levels of air pollutants that make up vog have been linked to breathing, the Hawaii State Asthma Control Program and its partners have worked with community health centers to improve

50

A delay differential equation model on harmful algal blooms in the presence of toxic substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Biological metabolism secretion Water Microbiology Zooplankton growth & development metabolism...1976; Lefevre et al., 1952; Kirk & Gilbert, 1992; Fay, 1983). There is also...www.metu.edu.tr). K IRK,K.&GILBERT,J.(1992) Variations in herbivore......

J. Chattopadhyay; R. R. Sarkar; A. el Abdllaoui

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Uncertainty in synthetic biology for release and possibilities for regulation under the Toxic Substances Control Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emerging field of synthetic biology is developing rapidly and promises diverse applications. Many anticipated applications, particularly those involving release of engineered microbes into the environment or human ...

Lightfoot, Shlomiya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Field Evaluation of MERCEM Mercury Emission Analyzer System at the Oak Ridge TSCA Incinerator East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The authors reached the following conclusions: (1) The two-month evaluation of the MERCEM total mercury monitor from Perkin Elmer provided a useful venue in determining the feasibility of using a CEM to measure total mercury in a saturated flue gas. (2) The MERCEM exhibited potential at a mixed waste incinerator to meet requirements proposed in PS12 under conditions of operation with liquid feeds only at stack mercury concentrations in the range of proposed MACT standards. (3) Performance of the MERCEM under conditions of incinerating solid and liquid wastes simultaneously was less reliable than while feeding liquid feeds only for the operating conditions and configuration of the host facility. (4) The permeation tube calibration method used in this test relied on the CEM internal volumetric and time constants to relate back to a concentration, whereas a compressed gas cylinder concentration is totally independent of the analyzer mass flowmeter and flowrates. (5) Mercury concentration in the compressed gas cylinders was fairly stable over a 5-month period. (6) The reliability of available reference materials was not fully demonstrated without further evaluation of their incorporation into routine operating procedures performed by facility personnel. (7) The degree of mercury control occurring in the TSCA Incinerator off-gas cleaning system could not be quantified from the data collected in this study. (8) It was possible to conduct the demonstration at a facility incinerating radioactively contaminated wastes and to release the equipment for later unrestricted use elsewhere. (9) Experience gained by this testing answered additional site-specific and general questions regarding the operation and maintenance of CEMs and their use in compliance monitoring of total mercury emissions from hazardous waste incinerators.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Lignin Signature of Aquatic Humic Substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrology identification Klamath Marsh lakes lignin limnology...source identification, we group these phenols into families...colored stream draining Klamath Marsh (southern Ore-gon...the WR humic substance falls within the range of non-woody...containing vicinal hydroxyl groups are cleaved by CuO oxidation...

JOHN R. ERTEL; JOHN I. HEDGES; EDWARD M. PERDUE

1984-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

54

Silicotungstic acid for cytochemical localization of water soluble substance(s) of cholinergic motor nerve terminal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicotungstic acid (STA), an electron dense substance and a powerful precipitating agent of quaternary ammonium salts such as choline and acetylcholine, was employed on the frog motor end-plate in order to pr...

S. Tsuji; H. S. Alameddine

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

A comprehensive substance flow analysis of a municipal wastewater and sludge treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The fate of total organic carbon, 32 elements (Al, Ag, As, Ba, Be, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn) and 4 groups of organic pollutants (linear alkylbenzene sulfonates, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) in a conventional wastewater treatment plant were assessed. Mass balances showed reasonable closures for most of the elements. However, gaseous emissions were accompanied by large uncertainties and show the limitation of mass balance based substance flow analysis. Based on the assessment, it is evident that both inorganic and organic elements accumulated in the sewage sludge, with the exception of elements that are highly soluble or degradable by wastewater and sludge treatment processes. The majority of metals and metalloids were further accumulated in the incineration ash, while the organic pollutants were effectively destroyed by both biological and thermal processes. Side streams from the sludge treatment process (dewatering and incineration) back to the wastewater treatment represented less than 1% of the total volume entering the wastewater treatment processes, but represented significant substance flows. In contrast, the contribution by spent water from the flue gas treatment process was almost negligible. Screening of human and eco-toxicity by applying the consensus-based environmental impact assessment method \\{USEtox\\} addressing 15 inorganic constituents showed that removal of inorganic constituents by the wastewater treatment plant reduced the toxic impact potential by 8792%.

H. Yoshida; T.H. Christensen; T. Guildal; C. Scheutz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1345 -HANDLING AND SAFEGUARDING OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1345 - HANDLING AND SAFEGUARDING OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES FOR NONHUMAN USE: This Chapter describes NIH policies and procedures for handling and safeguarding controlled substances and Safeguarding of Controlled Substances for Nonhuman Use A. Purpose This policy describes policies and procedures

Bandettini, Peter A.

57

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Allometry versus physiologically-based toxicokinetics  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. The authors are then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. The question arises of how interspecific extrapolations should be made. Should extrapolations be limited to animals within the same class, order, family or genus? Alteratively, should extrapolations be made along trophic levels or physiologic similarities rather than by taxonomic classification? In other words, is an avian carnivore more like a mammalian carnivore or an avian granivore in its response to a toxic substance? Can general rules be set or does the type of extrapolation depend upon the class of chemical and its mode of uptake and toxicologic effect?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fluorine Gas Management Guidelines Fluorine is a highly toxic, pale yellow gas about 1.3 times as heavy as air at atmospheric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorine Gas Management Guidelines Overview Fluorine is a highly toxic, pale yellow gas about 1.3 times as heavy as air at atmospheric temperature and pressure. Fluorine gas is the most powerful oxidizing agent known, reacting with practically all organic and inorganic substances. Fluorine gas

de Lijser, Peter

60

Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Title 40 CFR 300 National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Federal RegulationFederal...

62

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 14mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Measurement endpoints  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to ail organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazard to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which are the appropriate measurement endpoints. Should only mortality, growth, or reproductive endpoints be used? Since toxicity threshold values may be used to make management decisions, should values related to each measurement endpoint be presented to allow the risk assessor to choose the measurement endpoint most relevant to the assessment questions being asked, or is a standard approach that uses the lowest value that causes a toxicologic response in any system of the animal a more appropriate, conservative estimate?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

65

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Dose metric  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which dose metric to use for threshold determination and interspecific extrapolation, Since wild animals are exposed to environmental contaminants primarily through ingestion, should threshold values be expressed as amount of chemical in the diet (e.g., ppm) or as a body weight-adjusted dose (mg/kg/day)? Which of these two approaches is most relevant for ecological risk assessment decision making? Which is best for interspecific extrapolations? Converting from one metric to the other can compound uncertainty if the actual consumption rates of a species is unknown. How should this be dealt with? Is it of sufficient magnitude to be of concern?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-proliferative substance taurolidine...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engaging youth with concurrent problems Review Successful... with substances Most young people try substances, typically ... Source: Simon Fraser University, School of...

67

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic humic substances Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-accepting capacity than humic substances extracted from aquatic sediments. and sediment humic substances had more... electron-accepting capacity than dissolved aquatic humic...

69

Internet Program Development Leading to Certification in Substance Abuse Prevention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to develop a multidisciplinary educational program that would provide information needed to work more efficiently in substance abuse prevention and prepare the lea...

Julia Hagemaster

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Puzzling Unidimensionality of DSM-5 Substance Use Disorder Diagnoses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to the development of DSM-5 criteria for substancerelated disorders: 2. Proposed DSM-5 criteria for alcohol,JBW. Substance use disorders in DSM-III-R: evidence for the

MacCoun, Robert J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Page 9, Department of Energy Substance Abuse Testing Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 of 11 Previous Page DOE Substance Abuse Testing Program Executive Order 12564, Drug-Free Federal Workplace, states in part that "the use of illegal drugs or the use of legal...

72

Inpatient Treatment for Children and Adolescents with Substance Abuse Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The report revealed that the bulk of the literature collectively examines adults and adolescents, rather than investigating the unique issues that adolescents with substance abuse issues have. The review explored outcome ...

Oelklaus, Kirsten; Petr, Chris

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia  

SciTech Connect

Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

Oikari, A.O.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment ... While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. ... Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. ...

Melissa A. Maurer-Jones; Ian L. Gunsolus; Catherine J. Murphy; Christy L. Haynes

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

75

Lidocaine Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke Benjamin Bursell, MDdysfunction, manifested as a stroke, occurred acutely in andeterioration suggesting stroke. We will review the dosing,

Bursell, Benjamin; Smally, Alan J; Ratzan, Richard M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Toxic substances from coal combustion -- Forms of occurrence analyses. Technical progress report, April 30--November 1, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to provide analytical support for the Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI) effort being performed under a DOE Contract. The Pittsburgh, Elkhorn/Hazard, and Illinois No. 6 program coals have been examined to determine the mode of occurrence of selected trace elements using scanning electron microscopy, microprobe analysis, and experimental leaching procedures. Preliminary microprobe data indicates that the arsenic content of pyrite grains in the Illinois No. 6 (0.0--0.027 ppm As) and Pittsburgh (0.0--0.080 ppm As) coals is similar. Pyrite grains observed in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal generally have arsenic concentrations (0.0--0.272 wt.% As) that are slightly higher than those of the Pittsburgh or Illinois No. 6 coals. One pyrite grain observed in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal contained much higher levels of arsenic (approximately 2 wt.% As). Preliminary microprobe analyses and data from leaching experiments indicate the association of arsenic with pyrite in the Pittsburgh and Illinois No. 6 coals. Leaching data for arsenic in the Elkhorn/Hazard coal, in contrast, is inconclusive and additional data are needed before a definite determination can be made.

Crowley, S.S.; Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A.; Finkelman, R.B.; Kolb, K.C.; Belkin, H.E.

1996-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Occupational Medicine in Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Departmental requirements provide for support of both Federal and contractor employees with respect to crisis intervention, assessment, short-term counseling, case management, management consultation, education, and training (and the promotion thereof), and prevention. These include services for all behavioral problems, ensuring that medical evaluations are obtained before or as part of psychiatric evaluations to determine whether behavioral problems are caused by medical conditions. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. 1. Employee Assistance Programs 2. Substance Abuse Programs 1. Employee Assistance Programs Federal Employees Federal Employee Health Services: Occupational Medicine, Employee Assistance, and Workers' Compensation Programs (DOE O 341.1A, 2007)

78

Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Applications Forceful Fluid: Scientists Discover a Starchy Substance with Oily Applications February 16, 2011 - 5:14pm Addthis At left, highly turbulent behavior as water flows into (clear) oil. At right, all turbulence is suppressed by using cornstarch. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Public Domain At left, highly turbulent behavior as water flows into (clear) oil. At right, all turbulence is suppressed by using cornstarch. | Department of Energy Photo | Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Public Domain Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science Bachelor kitchens are rarely known for their cleanliness. One reason is

79

Microsoft Word - LLNLControlledSubstancesFinal Report Cover 02032011 ws  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Controlled Management of Controlled Substances at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory INS-O-11-01 February 2011 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 10, 2011 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, LIVERMORE SITE OFFICE FROM: Sandra D. Bruce Assistant Inspector General for Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Management of Controlled Substances at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" BACKGROUND As part of its national defense mission, the Department of Energy's (Department) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) actively engages in scientific, engineering, and environmental research activities. Livermore is managed and operated under contract by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the National Nuclear Security Administration

80

Approaches for Establishing Predicted-No-Effect Concentrations for Population-Level Ecological Risk Assessment in the Context of Chemical Substances Management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Approaches for Establishing Predicted-No-Effect Concentrations for Population-Level Ecological Risk Assessment in the Context of Chemical Substances Management ... Research Center for Chemical Risk Management, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 16-1 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki Prefecture 305-8569, Japan ... The results of our case study demonstrate that it has three useful implications for performing PLERA in the context of chemical risk management:? (1) the approach shown here is a practical way of establishing a target value for population-level impacts; (2) it is able to exploit currently available toxicity test data; and (3) it provides useful information on how to design future toxicity tests for PLERA. ...

Bin-le Lin; Akihiro Tokai; Junko Nakanishi

2005-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Toxic congener-specific analysis of PCBs: assessment of toxicity in equivalents of TCDD  

SciTech Connect

High resolution capillary gas chromatographic analysis of the polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) present in snapping turtle eggs, provided quantitative data on selected toxic congeners. The concentrations of these congeners have been converted into equivalent toxic concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD). The toxic equivalent factors (TEFs), necessary to effect this transformation were derived from EC/sub 50/ values (half the concentration of the toxic congener required to produce the maximum effect) for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) induction associated with the corresponding toxic PCB congener or isomer. Summation of the resulting toxic equivalents provided a composite assessment of the toxicity of the PCB mixture in terms of an equivalent concentration of TCDD.

Olafsson, P.G.; Bryan, A.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Growth-Promoting Substances in Agriculture and Horticulture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... March 16, the results of recent work on Growth-promoting Substances in Agriculture and Horticulture"were presented and discussed. Selective weed control was not included, this aspect having been ... in which the extreme tips of roots and shoots were shown to be receptive to light and gravity, led him to conclude that some influence was transmitted from these extremities ...

1949-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Mechanism of toxicity formation and spatial distribution in activated sludge treating synthetic effluent containing bisphenol A (BPA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic sludge toxicity is a critical issue for sludge land applications. To investigate sludge organic toxicity formation and spatial distribution properties, sludge was acclimated using synthetic effluent containing various bisphenol A (BPA) concentrations in sequential aerobic activated sludge reactors (SBRs). Acute sludge toxicity, which was characterized by the inhibition rate of the luminescent bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum, was the focus of this study. The original influent COD of the SBR was approximately 300mg/L; the sludge retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) were controlled at 20d and 12h, respectively. The results indicated that a positive correlation existed between sludge toxicity and the influent BPA concentration. Furthermore, the toxicity was centralized in the intracellular and inner sections of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) in sludge flocs. BPA concentrations were controlled at 2.5mg/L, 5.0mg/L, 7.5mg/L and 20mg/L; the sludge toxicities, measured by comparing the control SBR with the blank, were 2.99%, 4.05%, 6.99% and 10.64%, respectively, at the end of 28-day operation. In the 12-h SBR treatment process, aqueous and sludge phase BPA was completely removed within 2h. However, the maximum sludge toxicity appeared in the 8th hour. The DGGE analysis suggested that the existence of BPA in wastewater increased bacterial diversity in activated sludge. However, the bacterial similarity between sludge in \\{SBRs\\} decreased with increasing BPA concentration. Lastly, the bacterial similarity between blank sludge and control sludge of 20mg/L BPA was 0.47.

Jianguo Zhao; Xiurong Chen; Fengkai Lin; Na Yang; Hua Huang; Jun Zhao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy Metals: The Next Generation of Personal Exposure Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy...

85

Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins...

86

Example of a Risk-Based Disposal Approval: Solidification of Hanford Site Transuranic Waste  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site requested, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 10 approved, a Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 (TSCA) risk-based disposal approval (RBDA) for solidifying approximately four cubic meters of waste from a specific area of one of the K East Basin: the North Loadout Pit (NLOP). The NLOP waste is a highly radioactive sludge that contained polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) regulated under TSCA. The prescribed disposal method for liquid PCB waste under TSCA regulations is either thermal treatment or decontamination. Due to the radioactive nature of the waste, however, neither thermal treatment nor decontamination was a viable option. As a result, the proposed treatment consisted of solidifying the material to comply with waste acceptance criteria at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, or possibly the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at the Hanford Site, depending on the resulting transuranic (TRU) content of the stabilized waste. The RBDA evaluated environmental risks associated with potential airborne PCBs. In addition, the RBDA made use of waste management controls already in place at the treatment unit. The treatment unit, the T Plant Complex, is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA)-permitted facility used for storing and treating radioactive waste. The EPA found that the proposed activities did not pose an unreasonable risk to human health or the environment. Treatment took place from October 26, 2005 to June 9, 2006, and 332 208-liter (55-gallon) containers of solidified waste were produced. All treated drums assayed to date are TRU and will be disposed at WIPP. (authors)

Barnes, B.M.; Hyatt, J.E.; Martin, P.W.; Prignano, A.L. [Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Environmental toxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wildlife tissues were collected from four National Priority List Superfund sites within the United States. In general, chemical analysis was not always predictive of mixture toxicity. Although biodegradation reduced the concentration of total...

Gillespie, Annika Margaret

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles, their origin, activity, and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public he...

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in people who work in pulp and paper mills, at hazardous waste sites, municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, and those involved in production, use, and disposal of chlorinated pesticides and herbicides. The most toxic of the PCDDs, 2...

Naspinski, Christine S.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface  

SciTech Connect

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

91

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Updated 10/2012 Alcohol/Substance Abuse Treatment OP/IOP/PHP*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Updated 10/2012 Alcohol/Substance Abuse Treatment OP/IOP/PHP* Please note patient or family member, some limitations with Medicare 4 Adult locations with OP, IOP, and sometimes PHP 1) Plainville 2) New-OP, IOP, PHP; Primary Substance Abuse-OP, IOP; Senior Program > 55y.o., alcohol only substance, take

Oliver, Douglas L.

93

International aspects of restrictions of ozone-depleting substances  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes international efforts to protect stratospheric ozone. Also included in this report is a discussion of activities in other countries to meet restrictions in the production and use of ozone-depleting substances. Finally, there is a brief presentation of trade and international competitiveness issues relating to the transition to alternatives for the regulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons. The stratosphere knows no international borders. Just as the impact of reduced stratospheric ozone will be felt internationally, so protection of the ozone layer is properly an international effort. Unilateral action, even by a country that produces and used large quantities of ozone-depleting substances, will not remedy the problem of ozone depletion if other countries do not follow suit. 32 refs., 7 tabs.

McDonald, S.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E. Management of exposure to oxygen toxicity myself using the good ole' FORTRAN programming language, I found that incorporating oxygen toxicity for others. Background Two oxygen toxicity parameters are typically "tracked" in technical diving

Read, Charles

95

Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ly alter grazing behavior. To minimize losses to toxic plants, producers should learn how to identify the toxic plants, use good graz- ing and livestock management practices, and take measures to control the plants when necessary. Know which plants... are toxic The first step in managing for toxic plants is being able to identify them. Ranchers must be able to: Identify plants that are toxic to livestock in their area Understand what makes them poisonous Recognize the symptoms produced when live...

Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Separation of a target substance from a fluid or mixture using encapsulated sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for separating a target substance from a fluid or mixture. Capsules having a coating and stripping solvents encapsulated in the capsules are provided. The coating is permeable to the target substance. The capsules having a coating and stripping solvents encapsulated in the capsules are exposed to the fluid or mixture. The target substance migrates through the coating and is taken up by the stripping solvents. The target substance is separated from the fluid or mixture by driving off the target substance from the capsules.

Aines, Roger D; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Bourcier, William L; Lewis, Jennifer A; Duoss, Eric B; Vericella, John J

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: NOAEL versus LOAEL  

SciTech Connect

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by debating which toxicity value should be used for setting threshold criteria. Should the lowest observable effect level (LOAEL) be used or is it more appropriate to use the no observable effect level (NOAEL)? What are the short-comings of using either of these point estimates? Should a ``benchmark`` approach, similar to that proposed for human health risk assessments, be used instead, where an EC{sub 5} or EC{sub 10} and associated confidence limits are determined and then divided by a safety factor? How should knowledge of the slope of the dose-response curve be incorporated into determination of toxicity threshold values?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

U.S. Department of Energy Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0290-D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B-1 B-1 APPENDIX B FACILITY DESCRIPTION INFORMATION The following descriptions are taken from BNFL-5232-RCRA-01, Rev. 0, Hazardous Waste Management Act/Toxic Substances Control Act (HWMA/TSCA) permit application for the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) facility. B-1 Nonthermal Treatment Operations Waste containers within the nonthermal treatment areas are managed in a manner to prevent container rupture or leakage and to minimize exposure of AMWTP facility personnel. Operating standards used in conducting nonthermal treatment activities include: * Wastes slated for direct supercompaction have been identified by item description codes, generator- supplied information, and real-time radiography examination. Other wastes for supercompaction and macroencapsulation are sorted, segregated, and size reduced in the pretreatment lines prior to

100

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DETERMINATION! National Nuclear Security Administration/Kansas City Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETERMINATION! DETERMINATION! National Nuclear Security Administration/Kansas City Site Office A. Description of Proposed Action: (lor 2 sentences; include title, general activities, location, timeframe) Kansas City Plant - Project 1615 - Building 16 PCB Decontamination: Areas within Building 16 that exhibit PCB contamination above the 10 ug/l00cm2 exposure threshold, as defined by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (40 CFR Part 761), would be addressed under this project. February 2014 thru September 2014. B. Number and Title of the Categorical Exclusion Being Applied: (See text in 10 CFR 1021, Subpart D.) B 1.17 - Removal of polychlorinated biphenyl-containing items from buildings, other above ground locations. C. Regulatory Requirements in 10 CFR 1021.410 (b): (See full text in regulation.)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

FULLER, R.K.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

102

Radiation dose assessment methodology and preliminary dose estimates to support US Department of Energy radiation control criteria for regulated treatment and disposal of hazardous wastes and materials  

SciTech Connect

This report provides unit dose to concentration levels that may be used to develop control criteria for radionuclide activity in hazardous waste; if implemented, these criteria would be developed to provide an adequate level of public and worker health protection, for wastes regulated under U.S, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements (as derived from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] and/or the Toxic Substances Control Act [TSCA]). Thus, DOE and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission can fulfill their obligation to protect the public from radiation by ensuring that such wastes are appropriately managed, while simultaneously reducing the current level of dual regulation. In terms of health protection, dual regulation of very small quantities of radionuclides provides no benefit.

Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Rhoads, K.; Jarvis, M.F.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste  

SciTech Connect

Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,Extension CommunicationsSpecialistTheTexasA&MUniversitySystem. Cover design byRhondaKappler, ExtensionCommercial Artist Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants Allan McGinty and Rick Machen* More than 100 species of toxic plants in- fest Texas rangelands. These plants... and Sons: New York, N.Y. Lane, M. A., M. H. Ralphs, J. D. Olsen, F. D. Provenza and J. A. Pfister. 1990. ?Conditioned taste aversion: potentialfor reducing cattle loss to larkspur.? Journal ofRangeManagement. 43:127-131. McGinty, Allan and Tommy G. Welch...

McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Toxic effects of excess cloned centromeres.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitosis. We conclude that an excess of centromeres is toxic and...Yeast transformations. The lithium acetate method (19) was used...modifications. Cells were treated with lithium acetate at a cell concentration...and mixed with a twofold excess of similarly treated strain...

B Futcher; J Carbon

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

108

Investigation of single-substance horizontal two-phase flow  

SciTech Connect

Despite the abundance of work in the field of two-phase flow, it seems as though a consensus has not been reached on some of the fundamental points. Although exceptions exist, adequate physical interpretation of the flow seems to be hindered either by complexity of analysis or, in the opposite extreme, the trend toward limited-range analysis and correlations. The dissertation presents the derivation of basic conservation equations for the phases. The combined equations are used to examine the phenomenon of slip and its practical limitations, the Fanno line for single-substance flow and the effect of slip on choking. Equations for critical mass flux in the presence of slip are derived. The Mach, Reynolds and Froude numbers based on conditions at flashing are introduced as the characteristic parameters, and the importance of compressibility in single-substance two-phase flow is discussed. Experimental measurements of pressure change and void fraction for flow in the highly compressible range (.5 < Ma < 1) are presented. The working fluid is Refrigerant R-114, at room temperature, in a test section of diameter 5 cm and length 8 m. The effect of the Froude and Mach numbers is examined. The experimental facility is operated intermittently with running times of approximately two minutes and is instrumented for rapid measurements using a computer data acquisition and control system. A description of the facility and procedure is provided.

Dickinson, D.A.; Maeder, P.F.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity due Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic mode-of-action Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute testis toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity results Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... not cause overt fetal or maternal toxicity, but not rats...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic encephalopathy Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute renal toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - acutely toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute urinary toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

120

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program chemicals of concern that may impact the estuary's ecosystem. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE identified weak associations between mortality and bulk-phase chlordane and silver concentrations at Redwood

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

122

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - adolescent substance users Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of New Mexico Collection: Biology and Medicine 8 High rates of substance use in French youths 13707 High prevalence rates of tobacco, alcohol and drug use in...

124

Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

125

Research priorities for mobile air toxics  

SciTech Connect

The Health Effects Institute, a cooperative effort of the auto industry and the EPA, whose mission is to provide health effects information to ensure that motor vehicle emissions do not pose unreasonable risks, recently undertook a project to define priorities for research that would decrease uncertainties in risk assessments for mobile air toxics. At a workshop held in December 1992, scientists from academia, industry, and government worked to identify uncertainties in understanding the potential risk of exposure to mobile air toxics, including methanol, an important potential alternate fuel. Although cancer risk was the primary concern regarding most compounds, there was also much discussion of non-cancer effects of potential importance. Participants discussed research priorities for scientific issues that apply across all compound groups, such as dosimetry, high-to-low dose extrapolation, exposure assessment, and molecular biology approaches.

Not Available

1993-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Quantitative structureactivity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: Wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

Karel Chroust; Martina Pavlov; Zbyn?k Prokop; Jan Mendel; Kate?ina Bokov; Zden?k Kubt; Veronika Zaj??kov; Ji?? Damborsk

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

BACTOX, a Rapid Bioassay That Uses Protozoa To Assess the Toxicity of Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...well-recognized standard for toxicity testing (, , , ). The purpose of the BACTOX test is the detection of the overall toxicity of surreptitious strains which synthesize toxic secondary metabolites (toxicants) and which may constitute a biohazard. Its purpose is...

Wolfram Schlimme; Marcello Marchiani; Kurt Hanselmann; Bernard Jenni

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles their origin activity and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public health concerns related to this sometimes-strange new science of nano while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to tiny particles via dust storms volcanic ash and other natural processes and that our bodily systems are well adapted to protect us from these potentially harmful intruders. The reticuloendothelial system in particular actively neutralizes and eliminates foreign matter in the body including viruses and nonbiological particles. Particles originating from human activities have existed for millennia e.g. smoke from combustion and lint from garments but the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation has profoundly increased anthropogenic particulate pollution. Significantly technological advancement has also changed the character of particulate pollution increasing the proportion of nanometer-sized particles-nanoparticles-and expanding the variety of chemical compositions. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between particulate air pollution levels respiratory and cardiovascular diseases various cancers and mortality. Adverse effects of nanoparticles on human health depend on individual factors such as genetics and existing disease as well as exposure and nanoparticle chemistry size shape agglomeration state and electromagnetic properties. Animal and human studies show that inhaled nanoparticles are less efficiently removed than larger particles by the macrophage clearance mechanisms in the lungs causing lung damage and that nanoparticles can translocate through the circulatory lymphatic and nervous systems to many tissues and organs including the brain. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size smaller than cells and cellular organelles allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures disrupting their normal function. Examples of toxic effects include tissue inflammation and altered cellular redox balance toward oxidation causing abnormal function or cell death. The manipulation of matter at the scale of atoms nanotechnology is creating many new materials with characteristics not always easily predicted from current knowledge. Within the nearly limitless diversity of these materials some happen to be toxic to biological systems others are relatively benign while others confer health benefits. Some of these materials have desirable characteristics for industrial applications as nanostructured materials often exhibit beneficial properties from UV absorbance in sunscreen to oil-less lubrication of motors. A rational science-based approach is needed to minimize harm caused by these materials while supporting continued study and appropriate industrial development. As current knowledge of the toxicology of bulk materials may not suffice in reliably predicting toxic forms of nanoparticles ongoing and expanded study of nanotoxicity will be necessary. For nanotechnologies with clearly associated health risks intelligent design of materials and devices is needed to derive the benefits of these new technologies while limiting adverse health impacts. Human exposure to toxic nanoparticles can be reduced through identifying creation-exposure pathways of toxins a study that may someday soon unravel the mysteries of diseases such as Parkinsons and Alzheimers. Reduction in fossil fuel combustion would have a large impact on global human exposure to nanoparticles as would limiting deforestation and desertification. While nanotoxicity is a relatively new concept to science this review reveals the result of lifes long history of evolution in the presence of nanoparticles and how the human body in particular has adapted to defend itself against nanoparticulate intruders.

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Genetics of addictions: strategies for addressing heterogeneity and polygenicity of substance use disorders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...per year (Home Office 2007, Internet communication, http://www...have influence on substance abuse, but are also involved in the...problematic substance use, abuse and dependence (McGue et al...most susceptibility to alcohol abuse are those with both genetic...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Disposition of toxic PCB congeners in snapping turtle eggs: expressed as toxic equivalents of TCDD  

SciTech Connect

Studies of snapping turtles, taken from the region of the Upper Hudson River, in New York State, revealed exceedingly high levels of PCBs in the adipose tissue. There is evidence to suggest that large reserves of fat provide protection against chlorinated hydrocarbon toxicity. Such storage may protect snapping turtle eggs from disposition of toxic PCB congeners and account for the apparent absence of reports regarding detrimental effects on the hatchability of eggs from turtles living in the vicinity of the upper Hudson River. The present study was undertaken to determine if indeed these eggs are protected against disposition of toxic PCB congeners by the presence of large reserves of fat. Although tissue volumes play an important role in determining the initial site of disposition, the major factor controlling the elimination of these compounds involves metabolism. For simple halogenated benzenes as well as for more complex halogenated biphenyls, oxidative metabolism catalyzed by P-448, occurs primarily at the site of two adjacent unsubstituted carbon atoms via arene oxide formation leading to the formation of water soluble metabolites. Toxicological studies have demonstrated that the most toxic PCB congeners, isosteriomers of tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), require no metabolic activation. These compounds have chlorine atoms in the meta and para positions of both rings. It may be concluded that the structures of PCB congeners and isomers which favor induction of cytochrome P-448 are also those which are toxic and resist metabolism. It is the objective of the present study to determine if the heavy fat bodies of the female turtle provide a sufficiently large sink to retain the toxic congeners and prevent their incorporation into the eggs.

Bryan, A.M.; Stone, W.B.; Olafsson, P.G.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cross-functional environmental initiatives : addressing Restriction of Hazardous Substance (RoHS) technical challenges at Sun Microsystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European Union (EU) passed the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive, effective January 2006, banning the sale of electronics equipment containing lead and five other hazardous substances into EU countries. ...

Greenlaw, Tamara

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Use of Remotely Sensed Bioelectric Action Potentials to Evaluate Episodic Toxicity Events and Ambient Toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from storm water runoff is very difficult. The research reported here describes a non-invasive, or minimally invasive, system that measures in real-time or near real-time, clam gape. Clams have been shown to change gape in the presence of toxicants i...

Waller, W. Tom; Acevedo, Miguel F.; Allen, H. J.; Schwalm, F. U.

136

Photodynamic Toxicity of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Tissue Culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fixture containing two fluorescent light bulbs, GE daylight-type...conventional, commercial fluorescent light. All experiments...as, for example, fluorescent dyes, which can elicit...substances has previously led to the postulation...

Yoshiyuki Morimura; Paul Kotin; and Hans L. Falk

1964-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Investigations of Sediment Elutriate Toxicity at Three Estuarine Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations of Sediment Elutriate Toxicity at Three Estuarine Stations in San Francisco Bay.............................................................................................. 8 Sediment-Water Interface Exposures................................................................................. 9 August 1997 Sediment-Water Interface Exposures

138

ANDERSON, DONALD M. Bloom dynamics of toxic Alexandrium ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

icity becomes dangerous. This is a particularly important feature, as the toxicity of ..... for certain marine biotoxins. Mass. Dep. Public Health. Final. Rep. 140 p.

139

Salicylate Toxicity from Ingestion and Continued Dermal Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of salicylate dermal absorption and toxicity. REFERENCESand Continued Dermal Absorption Rachel L. Chin, MD*, Kent R.bases in the percutaneous absorption of salicylates II. J

Chin, Rachel L; Olson, Kent R; Dempsey, Delia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessment of metal content and toxicity of leachates from teapots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metallic teapots traditionally used in Morocco were investigated for release of toxic metals from the teapots and their toxicity, as determined by MetPAD, a bacterial toxicity test that is specific for heavy metal toxicity. Our data show that some teapots were non-toxic while a few others were highly toxic, as shown by MetPAD. Tea addition reduced somewhat heavy metal toxicity due possibly to the complexing ability of tea. Chemical analysis of teapot leachates showed that some contained zinc and copper. Teapot No. 5, which showed the highest toxicity, also displayed the highest Zn concentration (7.39 mg/l), confirming the toxicity data. Based on estimates of tea consumption in Morocco, we showed that the extra daily burden of Zn ranged from 1.75 to 4.2 mg/day, assuming the maximum zinc concentration of 7.4 mg/l, as found in our study. This represents 3.58% of the LOAEL for zinc of 50 mg/day and would not be important as compared to other sources of zinc intake.

Ali Boularbah; Gabriel Bitton; J.L Morel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Copper Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay-Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducing the toxicity of copper that continues to leach fromothers to characterize copper bioaccumulation from distinctreview of total dissolved copper and its chemical speciation

Buck, Kristen N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Assessing interactions between nutrients and toxicity : influences of nitrogen and phosphorus on triclosan toxicity to the aquatic macrophyte "lemna gibba".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present study, influences of nutrient availability on triclosan toxicity to a model aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba were explored. Triclosan effective concentrations varied by (more)

Fulton, Barry A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment  

SciTech Connect

Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Combustion toxics: Available data and additional needs  

SciTech Connect

With the continuing expansion of air pollution regulations there is an increasing awareness of the potential need to assess the emissions and impact of trace compounds from combustion sources in refineries and chemical plants. It has been found that these trace compounds may be emitted as the result of incomplete fuel combustion, formation of new compounds during combustion, or the presence of inorganics (e.g., metals) in the fuel. Emission factors based on field data from these sources have recently been published by both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The emission factors indicate that a large number of trace compounds may be emitted from combustion sources including volatiles, semi-volatiles, PAHs, metals, and dioxins/furans. Some of these trace compounds have been classified as hazardous or toxic. A review of the EPA and API published data sets indicates that, while there is some overlap, many gaps exist in specific source and emission types. Where gaps exist, there is a lack of confirmation for the reported emission factor. Comparison of the EPA and API emission factors for gas and fuel oil fired boilers, however, indicates reasonable agreement for several metals and some PAHs where the data overlap. EPA, however, has sampled for many more metals than API and several EPA factors for PAHs are significantly higher than reported by API. Additionally tests may be warranted where there is insufficient overlap. Much additional work needs to be done to provide reliable factors which can be used to estimate trace toxic emissions from combustion. Many gaps and inconsistencies exist in the emission factors database and changes to existing factors are expected as the database is expanded.

Siegell, J.H.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances (a) In general The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and on-going medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of the exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such empIoyment. (b) Implementation of program ( I ) The Secretary shall, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Health and Human Services, issue regulations under which the Secretary shall implement the program. Such regulations shall, to the extent practicable, provide for a process to- (A) identify the hazardous substances and radioactive substances to which

146

Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 50 CHAPTER 42 SUBCHAPTER VI Part C 5 2733 Program to monitor Department of Energy workers exposed to hazardous and radioactive substances (a) In general The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and on-going medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of the exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such empIoyment. (b) Implementation of program ( I ) The Secretary shall, with the concurrence of the Secretary of Health and Human Services, issue regulations under which the Secretary shall implement the program. Such regulations shall, to the extent practicable, provide for a process to- (A) identify the hazardous substances and radioactive substances to which

147

10 CFR 707 - Contractor Workplace Substance Abuse Program at DOE Sites |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR 707 - Contractor Workplace Substance Abuse Program at DOE 10 CFR 707 - Contractor Workplace Substance Abuse Program at DOE Sites 10 CFR 707 - Contractor Workplace Substance Abuse Program at DOE Sites 10 CFR 707, Federal Register, July 22, 1992 Amendment to 10 CFR 707, January 23, 2008 Executive Order 12564 10 CFR 707 Safety Advisory Implementation Assistance Frequently Asked Questions Implementation Dates 10 CFR 707 Public Forums - Video Conference Presentations Rulemaking Request for Information July 30, 2010 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Economic Assessment Questionnaire Policy Memorandum Secretary of Energy's Decision Memorandum Regarding Drug Testing for DOE Positions That Require Access Authorizations, September 14, 2007 Tools Department of Health and Human Services: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's web site link(Click "Federal

148

The NGO's Dilemma: How to Influence Firms to Replace a Potentially Hazardous Substance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a nongovernmental organization's (NGO's) decisions when it attempts to remove a potentially hazardous substance from commercial use in a market with competing firms. Specifically, we determine under what market ...

Kraft, Tim

149

Effects of a Youth Substance Use Prevention Program on Stealing, Fighting, and Weapon Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a sample of sixth graders in 11 public schools in a large Southwestern city, this longitudinal study examined how a model substance use prevention program, keepin it REAL..., that was implemented in 7th g...

Tanya Nieri; Jacob Apkarian; Stephen Kulis

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Stone cold clean & dry : a substance abuse rehab center In Manhattan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joseph Califano, founder and president of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University, declares drug an alcohol abuse the causes and contributor to "just about every intractable problem ...

Hagen-Cazes, Charlie Byrd

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Toxic Heavy Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored for this section. #12;Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 219 Common Features--Toxicity of the Heavy Metals Objectives. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution problem. Heavy metals

Short, Daniel

152

VINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The "irreversible effects threshold" is the maximum concentration of pollutant in the air for a given exposure timeVINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING URBAN DEVELOPMENT OR LAND of vinyl Chloride , the french procedure to set acute toxicity thresholds in the context of controlling

Boyer, Edmond

153

Chronic toxicity evaluation of simulated DWPF effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia  

SciTech Connect

A 7-Day Full Series Chronic Toxicity test was conducted April 13--20, 1990, for the Savannah River Site to assess the chronic toxicity of Simulated defense waste processing facility (DWPF) effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The simulated effluented consisted of Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Formate, and Corros. Inib.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Use of terrestrial toxicity tests for Superfund site assessments  

SciTech Connect

Most risk assessment efforts that evaluate risk from hazardous waste sites have focused on potential human health effects. Concern for potential ecological risk has become a prominent factor in these assessments. The potential impact on all components of ecological systems at risk (including the human component) has prompted the regulatory community to take a more comprehensive approach to risk assessments, incorporating terrestrial toxicity testing. Terrestrial toxicity testing ultimately strengthens the overall risk assessment since responses of feral animals in their natural habitats have important implications in human health. Many biological indicators of stress in animals can be extrapolated to human health as well. Reliance on terrestrial toxicity testing for hazardous waste sites provides both a priori toxicity tests of single chemicals (generally conducted in a laboratory setting), or site-specific testing of extant contamination. Using bioassays of toxicity of environmental samples or in situ testing. Appropriate toxicity tests with representative chemicals and chemical bioavailability, on appropriate species will greatly enhance the information gained and widen mitigation options. Risk managers will be better able to integrate and evaluate toxicity information for the entire system at risk, including the human component. The authors present several matrices that relate chemical action, anticipated toxic effects, and possible terrestrial effects that can be used to provide more comprehensive and ecologically realistic risk assessments at hazardous waste sites.

Williams, B.A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 6 were identified as significant contributors to national emissions of hazardous air pollutants EPA Mobile Source Air Toxics Rules March 2001 rule relied on existing control programs (Tier 2March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis for FHWA Projects Jeff Houk FHWA Resource Center

Minnesota, University of

156

Terrorism, civil war and related violence and substance use disorder morbidity and mortality: A global analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractIntroduction The purpose of this study is to examine associations between deaths owing to terrorism, civil war, and one-sided violence from 19942000 and substance use disorder disability-adjusted life years (DALYs). Methods The relationship between terrorism, and related violence and substance use disorder morbidity and mortality among World Health Organization Member States in 2002, controlling for adult per capita alcohol consumption, illicit drug use, and economic variables at baseline in 1994. Results Deaths as a result of terrorism and related violence were related to substance use disorder DALYs: a 1.0% increase in deaths as a result of terrorism, war and one-sided violence was associated with an increase of between 0.10% and 0.12% in alcohol and drug use disorder DALYs. Associations were greater among males and 1544year-old. Conclusion Terrorism, war and one-sided violence may influence morbidity and mortality attributable to substance use disorders in the longer-term suggests that more attention to be given to rapid assessment and treatment of substance use disorders in conflict-affected populations with due consideration of gender and age differences that may impact treatment outcomes in these settings. Priorities should be established to rebuild substance abuse treatment infrastructures and treat the many physical and mental comorbid disorders.

Bradley T. Kerridge; Maria R. Khan; Jrgen Rehm; Amir Sapkota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Tools for Policy Making Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: October 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines air toxics as pollutants that are known or suspected to cause serious health effects. Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act established 189 chemicals as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants. Large uncertainties still exist regarding exposure, risks, and sources and there has been a heavy reliance on inventories and modeling to determine sources and risks. In January 2002, Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) embarked on a project to investigate air toxics in Allegheny County. This

158

REGULATORY STRATEGIES TO MINIMIZE GENERATION OF REGULATED WASTES FROM CLEANUP, CONTINUED USE OR DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR FACILITIES CONTAMINATED WITH POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) - 11198  

SciTech Connect

Disposal costs for liquid PCB radioactive waste are among the highest of any category of regulated waste. The high cost is driven by the fact that disposal options are extremely limited. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) regulations require most liquids with PCBs at concentration of {ge} 50 parts-per-million to be disposed by incineration or equivalent destructive treatment. Disposal fees can be as high as $200 per gallon. This figure does not include packaging and the cost to transport the waste to the disposal facility, or the waste generator's labor costs for managing the waste prior to shipment. Minimizing the generation of liquid radioactive PCB waste is therefore a significant waste management challenge. PCB spill cleanups often generate large volumes of waste. That is because the removal of PCBs typically requires the liberal use of industrial solvents followed by a thorough rinsing process. In a nuclear facility, the cleanup process may be complicated by the presence of radiation and other occupational hazards. Building design and construction features, e.g., the presence of open grating or trenches, may also complicate cleanup. In addition to the technical challenges associated with spill cleanup, selection of the appropriate regulatory requirements and approach may be challenging. The TSCA regulations include three different sections relating to the cleanup of PCB contamination or spills. EPA has also promulgated a separate guidance policy for fresh PCB spills that is published as Subpart G of 40 CFR 761 although it is not an actual regulation. Applicability is based on the circumstances of each contamination event or situation. Other laws or regulations may also apply. Identification of the allowable regulatory options is important. Effective communication with stakeholders, particularly regulators, is just as important. Depending on the regulatory path that is taken, cleanup may necessitate the generation of large quantities of regulated waste. Allowable options must be evaluated carefully in order to reduce compliance risks, protect personnel, limit potential negative impacts on facility operations, and minimize the generation of wastes subject to TSCA. This paper will identify critical factors in selecting the appropriate TSCA regulatory path in order to minimize the generation of radioactive PCB waste and reduce negative impacts to facilities. The importance of communicating pertinent technical issues with facility staff, regulatory personnel, and subsequently, the public, will be discussed. Key points will be illustrated by examples from five former production reactors at the DOE Savannah River Site. In these reactors a polyurethane sealant was used to seal piping penetrations in the biological shield walls. During the intense neutron bombardment that occurred during reactor operation, the sealant broke down into a thick, viscous material that seeped out of the piping penetrations over adjacent equipment and walls. Some of the walls were painted with a PCB product. PCBs from the paint migrated into the degraded sealant, creating PCB 'spill areas' in some of these facilities. The regulatory cleanup approach selected for each facility was based on its operational status, e.g., active, inactive or undergoing decommissioning. The selected strategies served to greatly minimize the generation of radioactive liquid PCB waste. It is expected that this information would be useful to other DOE sites, DOD facilities, and commercial nuclear facilities constructed prior to the 1979 TSCA ban on most manufacturing and uses of PCBs.

Lowry, N.

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute silver toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membrane of Rainbow Trout Gills Summary: that are the primary site for acute heavy metal toxicity (Mc- Donald and Wood, 1993). The toxic action of silver... and chloride...

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute copper toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with additional metals analyses. Because copper concentrations were within the range toxic to bivalves and sample... -six hour acute toxicity tests were conducted using...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic regulations Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control... -volatile organic compound TAC toxic air contaminant TCA trichloroethane TCE...

162

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute cadmium toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cortisol levels were... -113 1. Introduction Cadmium (Cd) is a widely distributed heavy metal, toxic to terrestrial and aquatic... of the toxicant are acutely lethal, the rise in...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics volume Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed to remove the acutely toxic chemicals before the air is discharged into the environment. Acutely... Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic...

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute organ toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toxicity between chemicals and between organisms... . They are examples of known pollutants, albeit ones listed as having low-to-moderate acute toxicities, purposely... to...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute systemic toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

12... that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. -...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute skin toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... skin Reproductive effects of not seen with glycols...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic potency Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. -...

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute methanol toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... ) to acetaldehyde to acetate to acetyl CoA Methanol ...

170

Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J. [CUNY Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Community & Preventative Medicine

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

173

Incomplete Mixing, Intermittency and Fluctuating Toxic Load Measurements in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incomplete Mixing, Intermittency and Fluctuating Toxic Load Measurements in Incomplete Mixing, Intermittency and Fluctuating Toxic Load Measurements in Indoor Plumes Speaker(s): David J. Wilson Date: October 19, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Why have people been able to get away with ignoring intermittency (periods of zero concentration or zero turbulent temperature difference) in heat and mass transfer for the past century? Why is intermittency crucially important in toxic load estimates for biological exposure? We will explore how a simple back-of-the-envelope model can be constructed for the respiration toxicology of concentration fluctuations at a fixed receptor (for example; your lungs). This simple model will show the origin of the toxic load exponent n=2.0 for concentration C in L=Cnt. An extensive set of

174

Fate of Toxic Potato Glycoalkaloids in a Potato Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The toxic glycoalkaloids, ?-solanine and ?-chaconine, are present in all parts of the potato plant and are possibly transferred to the terrestrial environment. The amounts of glycoalkaloids in plant, soil, and groundwater were followed in a potato field ...

Pia H. Jensen; Bjarne W. Strobel; Hans Christian B. Hansen; Ole Stig Jacobsen

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment  

SciTech Connect

Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity.107 references.

Bitton, G.; Koopman, B. (Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Neuro-reproductive toxicities of 1-bromopropane and 2-bromopropane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Male reproductive toxicities of 2-bromopropane are summarized in Table1. The inhalation study (Ichihara et al. 1996, 1997) using Wistar rats showed exposure to 2-bromopropane decreased epididymal sperm count and...

Gaku Ichihara

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Process Technology has placed a prototype of its patented, electrically heated, packed-bed air toxics oxidizer at a northern California chemical plant. This thermal oxidizer is capable of handling a wide range of chlorinated and non...

Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

178

Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected paving asphalts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED PAVING ASPHALTS A Theis CARLOS LUIS MENDEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Adt, M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Safety Engineering TOXIC SPECIES EMISSIONS FROM CONTROLLED COMBUSTION OF SELECTED PAVING ASPHALTS A Thesis by CARLOS LUIS MENDEZ Submitted to Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment...

Mendez, Carlos Luis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes ... Ocean incineration of toxic wastes has been under study for some time, and EPA has authorized test burns as far back as 1974. ... (where more than 6000 people showed up), and Mobile, Ala., where the issues of transporting the waste safely to the burn site and what advantages ocean incineration has over land incineration were hotly debated. ...

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Identification of toxic components in beechwood and petroleum creosotes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1989 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Approved as to style and content by: Ay(hn Akger (Co-Chairman of Committee) T. Rick Irvin (Co...

Okaygun, Mehmet S.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quantification of the Interaction of Tc with Dissolved Boom Clay Humic Substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To elucidate the Tc geochemical behavior in reducing environments relevant to geological disposal and in the presence of humic substances (HS), experiments were set up that resulted for the first time in the determination of an interaction constant for Tc with dissolved humic substances. ... A number of lab-scale Boom Clay (a possible geological underground High-Level Radioactive Waste storage site in Mol, Belgium) batch experiments were set up, combining both different initial Tc(VII) concentrations and different solid/liquid ratios. ... Appendix:? Reactions and Stability Constants for Tc in a Reducing Environment ...

A. Maes; C. Bruggeman; K. Geraedts; J. Vancluysen

2003-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

182

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics emission Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

emission Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air toxics emission...

183

February 2013 EA Report Brown Bagger 1 The Impact of Substance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Young people in particular don't under- stand the danger in abusing OTC or prescription drugsFebruary 2013 EA Report Brown Bagger 1 Brown Bagger The Impact of Substance Abuse on the Workplace someone you care about is abusing a drug, it is difficult to watch this individual destroy relationships

Oliver, Douglas L.

184

Type II Transformation -Regeneration 2 Media -1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add ( )  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type II Transformation - Regeneration 2 Media - 1 Liter Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add. bialaphos stock 10mg/ml 1mg/L 100ul/L Pour into 100x25mm Petri dishes in hood. 1L=30 plates. Dry plates lids

Raizada, Manish N.

185

Further Evidence for an Alteration in the Structure of a Polarographically Reducible Substance in Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...completely. The lower phase (alcohol, * This...were mixed, the phases allowed to separate...substance in the lower phase of the last separatory...organs. TABLE I BEHAVIOR OF THE REDUCIBLE...possibility of a carbo hydrate was suggested. Therefore...carcinoma is @60m@sand is pH independent...

Christopher Carruthers and Valentina Suntzeff

1950-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Social Welfare Policy and Public Assistance for Low-Income Substance Abusers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

income and health care benefits for many low- income substance abusers. This paper examines payee, and to continued disability reviews in exchange for monthly cash assistance and health care Welfare Reform Legislation on the Economic Security of Former Supplemental Security Income Drug Addiction

de Lijser, Peter

187

Is it possible to observe a suppressing of $?$-decay caused by an atomic substance - plasma transition ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is supposed that $\\beta$-decay can be slightly suppressed at an atomic substance - plasma transition under a plasma electron gas action. The estimation shows that this effect can give a relative difference of the decay amount on a level of $10^{-4}$.

B. V. Vasiliev

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

Funding Opportunity: Superfund Hazardous Substance Research and Training Program (P42)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-users. Eligibility Information Only one application per accredited institution of higher education will be accepted) partnerships with government agencies, (3) technology transfer, and (4) information dissemination to other end and technologies to detect hazardous substances in the environment; and (4) basic biological, chemical

Suzuki, Masatsugu

189

Intelligent emissions controller for substance injection in the post-primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The control of emissions from fossil-fired boilers wherein an injection of substances above the primary combustion zone employs multi-layer feedforward artificial neural networks for modeling static nonlinear relationships between the distribution of injected substances into the upper region of the furnace and the emissions exiting the furnace. Multivariable nonlinear constrained optimization algorithms use the mathematical expressions from the artificial neural networks to provide the optimal substance distribution that minimizes emission levels for a given total substance injection rate. Based upon the optimal operating conditions from the optimization algorithms, the incremental substance cost per unit of emissions reduction, and the open-market price per unit of emissions reduction, the intelligent emissions controller allows for the determination of whether it is more cost-effective to achieve additional increments in emission reduction through the injection of additional substance or through the purchase of emission credits on the open market. This is of particular interest to fossil-fired electrical power plant operators. The intelligent emission controller is particularly adapted for determining the economical control of such pollutants as oxides of nitrogen (NO.sub.x) and carbon monoxide (CO) emitted by fossil-fired boilers by the selective introduction of multiple inputs of substances (such as natural gas, ammonia, oil, water-oil emulsion, coal-water slurry and/or urea, and combinations of these substances) above the primary combustion zone of fossil-fired boilers.

Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL); Feldman, Earl E. (Willowbrook, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL); Glickert, Roger W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

CONNECTICUT CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE NUMBER The State Department of Consumer Protection mandates that all residents/fellows (with or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 54 CONNECTICUT CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE NUMBER The State Department of Consumer Protection of Connecticut must be registered in order to prescribe any controlled substance to any patient. After the initial registration, all residents/fellows will be notified by the State of Connecticut when

Oliver, Douglas L.

191

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Title Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Salminen, Justin, Nicolas Papaiconomou, Anand R. Kumar, Jong-Min Lee, John B. Kerr, John S. Newman, and John M. Prausnitz Journal Fluid Phase Equilibria Volume 261 Pagination 421-426 Keywords hydrophobic, ionic liquids, piperidinium, properties, pyrrolidinium, safety, toxicity Abstract Some properties are reported for hydrophobic ionic liquids (IL) containing 1-methyl-1-propyl pyrrolidinium [MPPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl pyrrolidinium [MBPyrro]+, 1-methyl-1-propyl piperidinium [MPPip]+, 1-methyl-1-butyl piperidinium [MBPip]+, 1-methyl-1-octyl pyrrolidinium [MOPyrro]+ and 1-methyl-1-octyl piperidinium [MOPip]+ cations. These liquids provide new alternatives to pyridinium and imidazolium ILs. High thermal stability of an ionic liquid increases safety in applications like rechargeable lithium-ion batteries and other electrochemical devices. Thermal properties, ionic conductivities, viscosities, and mutual solubilities with water are reported. In addition, toxicities of selected ionic liquids have been measured using a human cancer cell line. The ILs studied here are sparingly soluble in water but hygroscopic. We show some structure-property relationships that may help to design green solvents for specific applications. While ionic liquids are claimed to be environmentally benign solvents, as yet few data have been published to support these claims.

192

Increased intrapulmonary retention of radiolabeled neutrophils in early oxygen toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Sequential lung injuries, such as oxygen toxicity followed by septicemia, are common during the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). As these forms of vascular injury may be mediated in part by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), aberrant interactions between PMN and previously injured pulmonary endothelium are of both theoretical interest and clinical importance. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that early oxygen toxicity at a dose that injuries pulmonary endothelium relatively selectively alters intrapulmonary neutrophil kinetics. Unanesthetized rats breathing 1.0 atmospheres oxygen for 36 h showed ultrastructural endothelial damage but no edema, injury, or neutrophilic inflammation by histologic criteria. However, in these oxygen-toxic animals, whereas initial accumulation of radiolabeled PMN in lungs was normal, washout of PMN was abnormal at 120 min after infusion, at which point the pulmonary retention of radiolabeled PMN in the lungs of oxygen-treated animals was significantly higher than in control animals (139% of control, p less than 0.0096). Features of our methodology, including avoidance of osmotic stress and use of paired control animals, appear to have greatly enhanced the sensitivity of radiolabeled neutrophils for detecting a subtle abnormality of neutrophil-endothelial interactions. Our studies in the oxygen toxicity model provide the first demonstration in vivo of abnormal intrapulmonary neutrophil kinetics in early oxygen toxicity prior to the onset of histologic evidence of lung injury or inflammation.

Rinaldo, J.E.; English, D.; Levine, J.; Stiller, R.; Henson, J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reducing Toxic Exposure In Buildings: Application of Computational Fluid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Toxic Exposure In Buildings: Application of Computational Fluid Reducing Toxic Exposure In Buildings: Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Speaker(s): Buvana Jayaraman Date: December 8, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 I investigate three applications related to toxic exposure in buildings and demonstrate the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to address important issues: 1. Improving containment of airborne hazardous materials in an existing room containing a downdraft table. CFD is used to find a ventilation configuration that ensures better containment of the hazardous material and hence improved worker safety. 2. Modeling gas transport in a large indoor space. The goal of this study is to understand how the level of detail of the CFD model affects its accuracy. Comparison of predictions with experimental data will be presented. 3. Understanding

194

List of Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins Acrylonitr ile Aniline Arsenic and its compounds Benzene Benzo(a)pyrene Beryllium Boric acid (Boron) Cadmium and its compounds Carbon monoxide Chlordecone (Kepone) Chloroform Chloroprene Dibromochloropropane (DBCP) Dichlorobenzene 1,1-Dichloroethane Dichloromethane Dioxane Epichlorohydrin Ethylene Dibromide Ethylene Dichloride Ethylene Oxide Fluorocarbons Formaldehyde Formamides Lead (Organic) Manganese and its compounds Mercury and its compounds (Inorganic) Methyl n-butyl ketone Methyl chloroform Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) Nitrogen Dioxide Ozone Platinum and its compounds Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) Polychlorinated bipenyls (PCB) Selenium and its compounds Styrene Tellurium and its compounds Tetr achloroethylene

195

New low toxicity corrosion inhibitors for industrial cleaning operations  

SciTech Connect

Inhibitors are routinely employed in chemical cleaning solvents used for removing scale from electrical power plants and industrial equipment since these cleaning solvents are corrosive to metal surfaces. This paper discusses the development of three new inhibitors developed for the use in hydrochloric acid, ammoniated EDTA or citric acid chemical cleaning solutions. Synthesis procedures used in the production of Mannich derivatives employed in the inhibitors were optimized for maximum corrosion resistance and reduced toxicity. All auxiliary ingredients used in the formulation of final inhibitor products were chosen to give the lowest possible toxicity of these products.

Lindert, A.; Johnston, W.G. [Henkel Surface Technologies, Madison Heights, MI (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The toxicity of two crude oils and kerosine to cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE TOXICITY OF TWO CRUDE OILS AND KEROSINE TO CATTLE A Thesis by LOYD DOUGLAS ROWE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major... Subject: Veterinary Toxicology THE TOXICITY OF TWO CRUDE OILS AND KEROSINE TO CATTLE A Thesis by LOYD DOUGLAS ROWE Approved as to style and content by: i (Chairman of Committee) J (Head of De rtment) (Member) (Me er) December 1972 ABSTRACT...

Rowe, Loyd Douglas

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Annual site environmental report for calendar year 1999  

SciTech Connect

Many State and Federal environmental protection laws and regulations apply to Western. Western facilities are within the jurisdiction of six Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regions and 17 states. Western's environmental policy statement directs employees to prevent, control, and abate environmental pollution at their facilities, and when possible, enhance the environment. To help assure conformance with all regulatory requirements, and to achieve its pollution prevention goals and objectives, Western is developing an Environmental Management System (EMS). One of the major regulatory impacts on Western continues to be the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) that regulates the use of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Western's policy is to eliminate PCBs from its system wherever economically and operationally possible. This will lessen the impact of PCB regulations on operations and the impact of PCBs on the environment. Executive Order 12856 requires Federal Agencies to comply with the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA). As with other DOE elements, Western has been complying with EPCRA since before the Executive Order was issued. To summarize, in 1999, Western's Regional offices implemented programs to notify State and local emergency response entities in accordance with Section 311 and 312 of EPCRA. Chemical inventories indicate that Western does not manufacture, process, or otherwise use reportable quantities of EPCRA Section 313 chemicals so Toxic Release reports were not required.

NONE

2000-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Triclosan: environmental exposure, toxicity and mechanisms of action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Triclosan: environmental exposure, toxicity and mechanisms of action Andrea B. Dann and Alice Hontela* ABSTRACT: Triclosan [5chloro2(2,4dichlorophenoxy)phenol; TCS] is a broad spectrum antibacterial been shown to be effective. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Keywords: triclosan; irgasan

Hontela, Alice

200

INVENTORY -EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVENTORY - EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department: Principal Investigator: SARA Reporter) 75-71-8 Dielectric Oil 64742-53-6 Emetine Dihydrochloride 316-42-7 Formaldehyde 50-00-0 Fuel Oil, #2 (Inside) 68476-30-2 Fuel Oil, #4 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #4 (Underground) 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #6 68553

Entekhabi, Dara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Toxic Inhalation Fatalities of US Construction Workers, 1990 to 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

space standard could save lives, particularly among water, sewer, and utility line industry workers. (J numbers of fatalities. The majority of these deaths occurred in confined spaces. Water, sewer, and utility line workers are at increased risk for poisoning fatality. Toxic inhalation fatalities

Illinois at Chicago, University of

202

A Wily Recruiter in the Battle Against Toxic ? Amyloid Aggregation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recruiter in the battle against toxic beta amyloid aggregation. | Comment News | 0 Amyloid beta-Peptides 0 Ligands 0 Piperidines 0 SLF-CR compound 573-58-0 Congo Red EC 5.2.1.- Tacrolimus Binding Proteins | Amyloid beta-Peptides chemistry metabolism...

Ingrid Wickelgren

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Environmental toxicants and autism spectrum disorders: a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), solvents, toxic waste sites, air pollutants and heavy metals, with the strongest evidence found for air pollutants and pesticides. Gestational exposure to methylmercury (through fish retrospective case­control, ecological or prospective cohort studies, although a few had weaker study designs

Cai, Long

204

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests leaching tests. The wood preservatives included chromated copper arsenate (CCA), alkaline copper quaternary, copper boron azole, copper citrate, and copper dimeth- yldithiocarbamate. An unpreserved wood sample

Florida, University of

205

System And Method For Identifying, Reporting, And Evaluating Presence Of Substance  

SciTech Connect

A system and method for identifying, reporting, and evaluating a presence of a solid, liquid, gas, or other substance of interest, particularly a dangerous, hazardous, or otherwise threatening chemical, biological, or radioactive substance. The system comprises one or more substantially automated, location self-aware remote sensing units; a control unit; and one or more data processing and storage servers. Data is collected by the remote sensing units and transmitted to the control unit; the control unit generates and uploads a report incorporating the data to the servers; and thereafter the report is available for review by a hierarchy of responsive and evaluative authorities via a wide area network. The evaluative authorities include a group of relevant experts who may be widely or even globally distributed.

Smith, Maurice (Kansas City, MO); Lusby, Michael (Kansas City, MO); Hook, Arthur Van (Lake Lotawana, MO); Cook, Charles J. (Raytown, MO); Wenski, Edward G. (Lenexa, KS); Solyom, David (Overland Park, KS)

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics formation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 40 Substance and perceptions of environmental impacts of Summary: dioxins in the feed and to minimizase formation on cooling. MACT: Air Pollution Control...

207

Toxic effects of Triclosan on the detoxification system and breeding of Daphnia magna  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The toxic effects of different concentrations of Triclosan (TCS) (1128?g/L)...Daphnia magna (D. magna) were investigated by acute (48h) and chronic (21-day) toxicity tests. The response of antioxidase system a...

Ying Peng; Ying Luo; Xiang-Ping Nie; Wei Liao; Yu-Feng Yang

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - apap toxicity unexpectedly Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toxicity unexpectedly Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: apap toxicity unexpectedly Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The use of human and...

209

A human pluripotent stem cell platform for assessing developmental neural toxicity screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current methods of testing chemicals for developmental neural toxicity include animal testing...in vitro...testing using cultured primary cells or cell lines. Here, we review the current state of neural toxicity ...

Zhonggang Hou; Jue Zhang; Michael P Schwartz; Ron Stewart

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - amyloid beta toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toxicity Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amyloid beta toxicity Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Development of Novel Small-Size Peptides...

211

The role of antioxidant enzymes in adaptive responses to environmental toxicants in vascular disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human exposure to environmental toxicants is known to contribute to the development of vascular disease. Inhalation of environmental toxicants induces inflammation and oxidative stress in the vascular system a...

Seung Eun Lee; Yong Seek Park

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - agent toxicity testing Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

toxicity testing Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: agent toxicity testing Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Acclimation. (1) Steady-state...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic radiation Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of California at San Diego Collection: Engineering 24 doi:10.1016j.ijrobp.2004.04.014 FRACTIONATION AND LATE RECTAL TOXICITY Summary: , et al. Interim report of toxicity...

214

Geochemistry, toxicity, and sorption properties of contaminated sediments and pore waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemistry, toxicity, and sorption properties of contaminated sediments and pore waters from two chemistry, sorption properties, and toxicity were determined on several samples. Metal concentrations and desorption experiments for Cu, Zn, and Cd on composite sediment samples demonstrated typical sorption

215

Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances Reduce Ag+ Nanoparticles and Antagonize Bactericidal Activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to cope with Ag+ are poorly understood, previous work with other toxic heavy metals suggests, carboxyl, and phenol), EPS can effectively bind heavy metal cations (such as Cu2+ , Pb2+ , and Zn2 Bactericidal Activity Fuxing Kang, Pedro J. Alvarez, and Dongqiang Zhu*, State Key Laboratory of Pollution

Alvarez, Pedro J.

216

Histo-Blood Group Antigen-Like Substances of Human Enteric Bacteria as Specific Adsorbents for Human Noroviruses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Antigen-Like Substances of Human Enteric Bacteria as Specific Adsorbents for Human Noroviruses Takayuki Miura a Daisuke Sano a Atsushi...The interactions between enteric viruses and environmental adsorbents were previously shown to have no binding specificity (41...

Takayuki Miura; Daisuke Sano; Atsushi Suenaga; Takeshi Yoshimura; Miyu Fuzawa; Toyoko Nakagomi; Osamu Nakagomi; Satoshi Okabe

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Type II Transformation -Callus Initiation Media N6 1-100-25 +Ag Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add ()  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type II Transformation - Callus Initiation Media N6 1-100-25 +Ag Solution Substance []stock25mm Petri Dishes in hood. 1L=30 plates. Dry lids on in hood 3days in darkness or quick cool upside

Raizada, Manish N.

218

Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in material selection processes for sustainable design andselection process for developing a sustainable materialintegrated sustainable material selection process of toxic

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Physicochemical properties and toxicities of hydrophobic piperidinium and pyrrolidinium ionic liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

may help to design green solvents for specific applications.liquids as new, green, and non-toxic solvents. However,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Spatial and temporal variations in toxicity in an urban-runoff treatment marsh  

SciTech Connect

Toxicity tests have not been widely used to assess the performance of urban-runoff treatment facilities. In the present study, Ceriodaphnia dubia toxicity tests were used to quantify toxicity of urban runoff at Crandall Creek and the downstream Demonstration Urban Stormwater Treatment (DUST) March in Fremont, California. Acute toxicity, expressed as the median time to lethality (LT50) for C. dubia, was used to compare the relative intensities of toxicity in the system. During or shortly after storm events, horizontal and vertical gradients in LT50 and electrical conductivity were observed, with high correlation between the two parameters. Toxicity diminished as time passed after the storm. The performance of the DUST Marsh as a treatment facility was evaluated for three aspects: detection, dilution, and toxicity removal. The authors found that toxic storm water generated by small- to medium-sized storms was contained in the marsh. Toxicity was greatly reduced upon dilution of storm water with pre-existing marsh water, and mixing of the water column increased the rate of toxicity diminution. Toxicity reduction, above and beyond that attributable to dilution, was evident in the marsh. Results of this study demonstrates the potential use of toxicity assessments as an integral component of marsh design and management.

Katznelson, R.; Jewell, W.T.; Anderson, S.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-Two-Three Punch Clobbers Toxic Algae, Restores Fremont Lake Final Report Fremont Lake #20 Water-two-three punch to knockout toxic algae and restore water quality in Nebraska's numerous sandpit lakes. "It seems to help rid the too-often toxic algae prone Fremont State Lakes of the oily green scum that can close them

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

222

Potential risks of metal toxicity in contaminated sediments of Dele river in Northern France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water-metal concentrations in the sediment allowed us to highlight the extent of toxicity caused by Cd for freshwater ecosystems. As for risks of toxicity from pore waters, metal concentrations reached their maxima to accumulate in sediments at the bottom of the water column; and if toxic levels are reached, metals can affect

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

Technologies for environmental cleanup: Toxic and hazardous waste management  

SciTech Connect

This is the second in a series of EUROCOURSES conducted under the title, ``Technologies for Environmental Cleanup.`` To date, the series consist of the following courses: 1992, soils and groundwater; 1993, Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management. The 1993 course focuses on recent technological developments in the United States and Europe in the areas of waste management policies and regulations, characterization and monitoring of waste, waste minimization and recycling strategies, thermal treatment technologies, photolytic degradation processes, bioremediation processes, medical waste treatment, waste stabilization processes, catalytic organic destruction technologies, risk analyses, and data bases and information networks. It is intended that this course ill serve as a resource of state-of-the-art technologies and methodologies for the environmental protection manager involved in decisions concerning the management of toxic and hazardous waste.

Ragaini, R.C.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The subchronic toxicity of Roridin A in sheep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zealand, have also undergcme acute and ~nic trials. Lambs fed extracts from ~rothecium sp. in an acute trial, exhibited anorexia, severe depression, ~1 ~, and scouring. Upon death, necropsies revealed the gastric ccaapartmentalization of excemive... was cavered with wool breaks or bare spots. Neurolagical signs were exhibited by animals f24 and f47. On days 16 and 17 of the trial, both animals exhibited signs of a severe toxic crisis. 'Ihe animals were ataxic and refused to remain standing. Hi...

Thormahlen, Keller Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

226

Factors affecting toxicity and efficacy of polymeric nanomedicines  

SciTech Connect

Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine. The purpose of this article is to review common characteristics of polymeric nanomedicines with respect to passive targeting. We consider several biodegradable polymeric nanomedicines that are between 1 and 100 nm in size, and discuss the impact of this technology on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and targeting. The degree of toxicity of polymeric nanomedicines is strongly influenced by the biological conditions of the local environment, which influence the rate of degradation or release of polymeric nanomedicines. The dissemination of polymeric nanomedicines in vivo depends on the capillary network, which can provide differential access to normal and tumor cells. The accumulation of nanomedicines in the microlymphatics depends upon retention time in the blood and extracellular compartments, as well as the type of capillary endothelium surrounding specific tissues. Finally, the toxicity or efficacy of intact nanomedicines is also dependent upon tissue type, i.e., non-endocrine or endocrine tissue, spleen, or lymphatics, as well as tumor type.

Igarashi, Eiki [NanoCarrier Co., Ltd., Chiba 277-0882 (Japan)], E-mail: igarashi@nanocarrier.co.jp

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Results of acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted at SRS NPDES outfalls, July--October 1991  

SciTech Connect

Acute (48 hour LC50) and chronic (7-day reproductive impairment) toxicity tests were conducted on Ceriodaphnia dubia in water collected from 53 NPDES outfalls. All tests were conducted at the in-stream waste concentration. only 12 of the 53 outfalls showed no evidence of toxicity. Twenty-eight of the outfalls were acutely toxic, often producing 100% mortality during the first day of exposure. Fourteen outfalls had no discharge at the time of sampling and could not be tested. Three outfalls were not tested because their toxicity has been adequately characterized in other investigations. Elevated concentrations of total residual chlorine are suspected to be responsible for the observed toxicity of many NPDES outfalls, particularly the sanitary wastewater treatment plants. Chemical data from previous studies indicate that metals may also be present in toxic concentrations at many outfalls. Toxicity identification and reduction options are discussed.

Specht, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessment of soil pollution based on total petroleum hydrocarbons and individual oil substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Different oil products like gasoline, diesel or heavy oils can cause soil contamination. The assessment of soils exposed to oil products can be conducted through the comparison between a measured concentration and an intervention value (IV). Several national policies include the IV based on the so called total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) measure. However, the TPH assessment does not indicate the individual substances that may produce contamination. The soil quality assessment can be improved by including common hazardous compounds as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and aromatic volatile hydrocarbons like benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX). This study, focused on 62 samples collected from different sites throughout The Netherlands, evaluates TPH, PAH and BTEX concentrations in soils. Several indices of pollution are defined for the assessment of individual variables (TPH, PAH, B, T, E, and X) and multivariables (MV, BTEX), allowing us to group the pollutants and simplify the methodology. TPH and PAH concentrations above the IV are mainly found in medium and heavy oil products such as diesel and heavy oil. On the other hand, unacceptable BTEX concentrations are reached in soils contaminated with gasoline and kerosene. The TPH assessment suggests the need for further action to include lighter products. The application of multivariable indices allows us to include these products in the soil quality assessment without changing the IV for TPH. This work provides useful information about the soil quality assessment methodology of oil products in soils, focussing the analysis into the substances that mainly cause the risk.

J. Pinedo; R. Ibez; J.P.A. Lijzen; . Irabien

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

How humic substances dominate mercury geochemistry in contaminated floodplain soils and sediments  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of mercury (Hg) and humic substances (hs) was studied in floodplain topsoils and surface sediments of the contaminated German river Elbe. An intimate coupling exists between the geochemical cycles of Hg and organic carbon (OC) in this ecosystem. Humic substances exert a dominant influence on several important parallel geochemical pathways of Hg, including binding, transformation, and transport processes. Significant differences exist between the Hg-hs associations in floodplains and sediments. Both humic acids (ha) and fulvic acids (fa) contribute to Hg binding in the sediments. In contrast, ultrafiltration experiments proved that Hg in the floodplain soils is almost exclusively bound to very large humic acids (ha) with a nominal molecular weight (MW) > 300,000. Successive cation and anion exchange experiments demonstrated that those Hg-ha complexes are inert toward competition by other cations, and also apparently predominantly electroneutral. Speciation transformation reactions in the solid phase were investigated by sequential extraction and thermal release experiments. Upon addition of Hg model compounds to a sediment matrix, all species were transformed to the same new speciation pattern, regardless of their original speciation. The accompanying alterations in availability and solubility were partially due to interconversion between the different Hg redox states, including Hg(I). Simultaneously, partial transformation of added Hg{sup 2+} into volatile Hg compounds (35% in 10 d) was observed. Finally, Hg association with water-soluble ha continuously increased downstream, indicating that hs play a key role in both lateral and longitudinal Hg transport in the Elbe ecosystem.

Wallschlaeger, D.; Desai, M.V.M.; Spengler, M.; Windmoeller, C.C.; Wilken, R.D. [GKSS Forschungszentrum GmbH, Geesthacht (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Chemische Analytik

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda)  

SciTech Connect

Stormwater runoff from highways and commercial, industrial, and residential areas contains a wide spectrum of pollutants including heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, sediment, and nutrients. Recent efforts to reduce the impacts of urbanization on natural wetlands and other receiving waters have included the construction of stormwater treatment ponds and wetlands. These systems provide flood control and improve water quality through settling, adsorption, and precipitation of pollutants removing up to 95% of metals, nutrients and sediment before discharged from the site. The design of stormwater ponds to provide habitat for aquatic wildlife has prompted concern over the potential exposure of aquatic organisms to these contaminants. Aquatic sediments concentrate a wide array of organic and inorganic pollutants. Although water quality criteria may not be exceeded, organisms living in or near the sediments may be adversely affected. The availability of chemicals in sediments depends strongly on the prevailing chemistry. Physical conditions of the sediment and water quality characteristics including pH, redox potential and hardness, also influence contaminant availability. Studies have shown that heavy metals and nutrients carried by runoff concentrate in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Although several investigations have assessed the toxicity of sediments in streams receiving urban runoff, there have been few studies of the toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to aquatic organisms. This study was part of a large-scale assessment of the contaminant hazards of stormwater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments and water from stormwater ponds over a 10-d period to juvenile Hyalella azteca. Bioassay results were related to concentrations of acid volatile sulfides and metals of the tested sediments. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

Karouna-Renier, N.K. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States); [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sparling, D.W. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Subchronic toxicity of croton oil (Croton tiglium L.) to sheep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Charles F. Hall (Member) J. D. cCrady (Head of Department) December 1983 ABSTRACT Subchronic Toxicity of Croton Oil (Croton ti lium L. ) to Sheep (December 1983) Roger B. Harvey, B. S. , Texas A&M University; D. V. M. , Texas A&M University... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. E. M. Bailey, Jr. Croton oil (Croton ~ti lium L. ) was administered daily via stomach tube to 12 clinically healthy Rambouillet crossbred sheep (2 ewes, 2 wethers per group for 3 groups), 1 to 4 years of age for 60...

Harvey, Roger Bruce

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Toxicity of the isolated tannin from Quercus havardi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

present. Rabbits were then fed tannic acid at a level of 1 g/kg of . body weiglt for 40 days which produced symptoms similar to those found in aqueous extracts. From this work, they concluded that the tannins were the toxic principle in the aqueous... 18 5, 6, and 7 tabulate the results. Ellagic acid has been reported present in a number of ~ercus species and a small scale extraction of shin oak with hot water was made in an effort to isolate ellagic acid from the plant. Ellagic acid...

Pigeon, Robert F

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

NETL: IEP - Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization The goal of the proposed effort is to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements on the management of CCBs. Supporting objectives are to 1) determine the release potential of selected air toxic elements, including mercury and arsenic, from CCBs under specific environmental conditions; 2) increase the database of information on mercury and other air toxic element releases for CCBs; 3) develop comparative laboratory and field data; and 4) develop appropriate laboratory and field protocols. The specific mechanisms of air toxic element releases to be evaluated will be leaching releases, vapor releases to the atmosphere, and biologically induced leaching and vapor releases.

235

Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solution and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal. 18 figures.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

236

Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solutin and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland J. (Wading River, NY); Gillow, Jeffrey B. (Valley Cottage, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Toxicity potential of compounds found in parenteral solutions with rubber stoppers  

SciTech Connect

Leached stopper components found in parenteral solutions produced by several manufacturers were identified and quantitated. Their toxicity potential was determined by comparing the types and quantities of the leached components with known toxicity levels and/or harmful effects. Toxicity potentials for benzaldehyde, 2-butoxyethanol, cyclohexanone, ethylbenzene, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene are listed. Breakdown products of dextrose (furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural), which may also have harmful effects, were quantitated.

Danielson, J.W. (Sterility Analysis Research Center, Food and Drug Administration, Minneapolis, MI (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Results of Hazardous and Mixed Waste Excavation from the Chemical Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the excavation of a 1.9-acre hazardous and mixed waste landfill operated for 23 years at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Excavation of the landfill was completed in 2 1/2 years without a single serious accident or injury. Approximately 50,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with volatile and semi-volatile organics, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds, and radioactive constituents was removed. In addition, over 400 cubic yards of buried debris was removed, including bulk debris, unknown chemicals, compressed gas cylinders, thermal and chemical batteries, explosive and ordnance debris, pyrophoric materials and biohazardous waste. Removal of these wastes included negotiation of multiple regulations and guidances encompassed in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and risk assessment methodology. RCRA concepts that were addressed include the area of contamination, permit modification, emergency treatment provision, and listed waste designation. These regulatory decisions enabled the project to overcome logistical and programmatic needs such as increased operational area, the ability to implement process improvements while maintaining a record of decisions and approvals.

Young, S. G.; Schofield, D. P.; Kwiecinski, D.; Edgmon, C. L.; Methvin, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Basic Engineering Research for D and D of R Reactor Storage Pond Sludge: Electrokinetics, Carbon Dioxide Extraction, and Supercritical Water Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D and D operations at DOE sites across the country. The standard process for destruction of MLLW is incineration, which has an uncertain future. The extraction and destruction of PCBs from MLLW was the subject of this research Supercritical Fluid Extraction (SFE) with carbon dioxide with 5% ethanol as cosolvent and Supercritical Waster Oxidation (SCWO) were the processes studied in depth. The solid matrix for experimental extraction studies was Toxi-dry, a commonly used absorbent made from plant material. PCB surrogates were 1.2,4-trichlorobenzene (TCB) and 2-chlorobiphenyl (2CBP). Extraction pressures of 2,000 and 4,000 psi and temperatures of 40 and 80 C were studied. Higher extraction efficiencies were observed with cosolvent and at high temperature, but pressure little effect. SCWO treatment of the treatment of the PCB surrogates resulted in their destruction below detection limits.

Michael A. Matthews; David A. Bruce,; Thomas A. Davis; Mark C. Thies; John W. Weidner; Ralph E. White

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Biennial Environmental Compliance Report  

SciTech Connect

This Biennial Environmental Compliance Report (BECR) documents compliance with environmental regulations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility designed and authorized for the safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste. This BECR covers the reporting period from April 1, 2004, to March 31, 2006. As required by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (LWA) (Public Law [Pub. L.] 102-579, as amended by Pub. L. 104-201), the BECR documents United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) compliance with regulations and permits issued pursuant to the following: (1) Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, Subpart A, "Environmental Standards for Management and Storage"; (2) Clean Air Act (CAA) (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 7401, et seq.); (3) Solid Waste Disposal Act (SWDA) (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992, et seq.); (4) Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) (42 U.S.C. 300f, et seq.); (5) Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) (15 U.S.C. 2601, et seq.); (6) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.); and all other federal and state of New Mexico laws pertaining to public health and safety or the environment.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Treatment of Mixed Waste with GeoMelt In-Container Vitrification  

SciTech Connect

AMEC's GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} has been used to treat diverse types of mixed low-level radioactive waste. ICV is effective in the treatment of mixed wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. The GeoMelt vitrification process destroys organic compounds and immobilizes metals and radionuclides in an extremely durable glass waste form. The process is flexible allowing for treatment of aqueous, oily, and solid mixed waste, including contaminated soil. In 2004, ICV was used to treat mixed radioactive waste sludge containing PCBs generated from a commercial cleanup project regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and to treat contaminated soil from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The Rocky Flats soil contained cadmium, PCBs, and depleted uranium. In 2005, AMEC completed a treatability demonstration of the ICV technology on Mock High Explosive from Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes results from these mixed waste treatment projects. (authors)

Finucane, K.G.; Campbell, B.E. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc., 1135 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

3-Dimensional Reconstruction and Modeling of BActerial Extracellular Polymeric Substances (EPS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R 3-Dimen Substanc Project s EMSL L Alice Do Microsco Co-inves Matthew Environm Bacterial (EPS) pla cellular p cell infec mineral s EPS's ch directly i heavy me fragile, h macromo in elucida immediat process t based, hi such as e method o scale ima near-to-n without a collapse processin EMSL ac Tecnai T 2006. We temperatu capability (CryoTE material Research an nsional Reco ces (EPS) start date: S Lead Investi ohnalkova opy group, E stigators: w Marshall mental Micro l extracellula ay essential processes suc ction, and ba substrates. In hemical react influence the etals and rad highly hydrat olecules pres ation of its s te collapse d hat is a prere igh resolutio electron micr of Cryo-elect aging of the native structu artifact cause after losing ng and dehyd cquired a dev T-12 (FEI) w e built upon

243

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Single Substance Organic Redox Flow Battery - Paul Rasmussen, Vinazene  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charging Mechanism Charging Mechanism The Z compound, as described in Vinazene Patent 8,080,327, undergoes the following half reactions during charging: Z Z + + e - E 0 = -1.3V Z + e -  Z - E 0 = -1.5V _____________________ 2Z  Z - + Z + E 0 = -2.8V A Single Substance Organic Redox Flow Battery -+- -+- Components Compound Z Tetraethylammonium Tetrafluoroborate (TEA-BF 4 ) Maintains Electroneutrality Acetonitrile (MeCN) Dielectric and Transport medium Abstract Abundant energy, in the exajoule range, is available everyday from solar and wind flux. However, green sources of this energy are subject to intermittent and/or periodic fluctuations. Mitigation of supply obstacles is possible through the use of cost effective and dispatchable energy storage methods. During Phase I of this SBIR

244

Enhancement of sludge reduction and methane production by removing extracellular polymeric substances from waste activated sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The management of waste activated sludge (WAS) recycling is a concern that affects the development of the future low-carbon society, particularly sludge reduction and biomass utilization. In this study, we investigated the effect of removing extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which play important roles in the adhesion and flocculation of WAS, on increased sludge disintegration, thereby enhancing sludge reduction and methane production by anaerobic digestion. EPS removal from WAS by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) significantly enhanced sludge reduction, i.e., 495% compared with 271% of the control at the end the digestion process. Methane production was also improved in WAS without EPS by 8881109 CH4?molg?1 dry-weight of sludge. Microbial activity was determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and real-time polymerase chain reaction, which showed that the hydrolysis and acetogenesis stages were enhanced by pretreatment with 2% EDTA, with a larger methanogenic community and better methane production.

Minh Tuan Nguyen; Nazlina Haiza Mohd Yasin; Toshiki Miyazaki; Toshinari Maeda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Mathematical model of the seismic electromagnetic signals (SEMS) in non crystalline substances  

SciTech Connect

The mathematical model of seismic electromagnetic waves in non crystalline substances is developed and the solutions are discussed to show the possibility of improving the electromagnetic waves especially the electric field. The shear stress of the medium in fourth order tensor gives the equation of motion. Analytic methods are selected for the solutions written in Hansen vector form. From the simulated SEMS, the frequency of seismic waves has significant effects to the SEMS propagating characteristics. EM waves transform into SEMS or energized seismic waves. Traveling distance increases once the frequency of the seismic waves increases from 100% to 1000%. SEMS with greater seismic frequency will give seismic alike waves but greater energy is embedded by EM waves and hence further distance the waves travel.

Dennis, L. C. C.; Yahya, N.; Daud, H.; Shafie, A. [Electromagnetic cluster, Universiti Teknologi Petronas, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

Brominated Flame Retardants in Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment:? Substance Flows in a Recycling Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental Management, GEO Partner AG, Baumackerstrasse 24, 8050 Zurich, Switzerland, Products and Chemicals Division, Agency for Environmental Protection and Energy of the Canton Basel-Landschaft, Rheinstrasse 29, 4410 Liestal, Switzerland, Institut Bachema AG, Rtistrasse 22, 8952 Schlieren, Switzerland, IMMARK AG, Bahnstrasse 142, 8105 Regensdorf, Switzerland, and Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute for Materials Science and Technology, berlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dbendorf, Switzerland ... It includes small household appliances (e.g., toasters and vacuum cleaners), office and communication appliances (e.g., personal computers and monitors, printers, phones, and fax and photocopy machines), entertainment electronics (e.g., television (TV) sets, videos, camcorders, radios, HiFis, and portable compact disk (CD players), and small size E&E equipment (e.g., plugs and mobile phones). ... A research group in Japan modeled time-series substance flow analysis for PBDEs and TBBPA in waste TV sets. ...

Leo S. Morf; Josef Tremp; Rolf Gloor; Yvonne Huber; Markus Stengele; Markus Zennegg

2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

247

A Schematic Method for Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the material selection process for sustainable design andfrom the perspectives of sustainable process design andinte- grated sustainable material selection process of toxic

Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute acetaminophen toxicity Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Carolina State University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 59 Triclosan: environmental exposure, toxicity and mechanisms of action Summary: indicate that...

249

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetaminophen toxicity evidence Sample...  

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Medicine, University of Maryland at College Park Collection: Biology and Medicine 70 Triclosan: environmental exposure, toxicity and mechanisms of action Summary: Triclosan:...

250

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics sources Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

251

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics regulatory Sample Search Results  

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Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

252

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics control Sample Search Results  

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Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air toxics control Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title:...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics compliance Sample Search Results  

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Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics releases Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Cu) and lead (Pb) (typically) Toxic chemical release reporting... standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July ... Source: Wechsler, Risa H. - Kavli...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - acetaminophen apap toxicity Sample Search...  

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(APAP), bromobenzene (BB), and 4... with the toxicity of many electrophiles, and the identification of relevant in vivo protein targets is a desirable... derivative of teucrin...

256

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous toxic metals Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including selected metals, PAHs and organochlorine pesticides. While toxicity identification... evaluations (TIEs) suggest that metals are the primary cause of sediment...

257

E-Print Network 3.0 - aflatoxin b1 toxicity Sample Search Results  

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potent toxic and carcinogenic fungal metabolites... CROP ROTATION INFLUENCES AFLATOXIN PRODUCING POTENTIAL OF ASPERGILLUS COMMUNITIES IN SOUTH TEXAS... Tucson, AZ Abstract...

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient water toxicity Sample Search Results  

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The most Summary: waters of the toxicity test beakers. Immediate collection and analysis of interstitial water... was necessary. Others have recommended interstitial waters...

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute acrolein toxicity Sample Search Results  

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and Ecology 43 Anal cancer IMRT A multi-institutional acute gastrointestinal toxicity analysis of anal cancer Summary: Anal cancer IMRT A multi-institutional acute gastrointestinal...

260

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity assessment Sample Search...  

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Before the Senate Committee on Small Business Summary: . They are examples of known pollutants, albeit ones listed as having low-to-moderate acute toxicities, purposely......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute aquatic toxicity Sample Search Results  

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Summary: ., 1999) and subsequently the rest of the food chain. The acute toxicity of pollutants to rotifers... , suggesting a simi- lar underlying mechanism in each group. No acute...

262

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic response Sample Search Results  

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Before the Senate Committee on Small Business Summary: . They are examples of known pollutants, albeit ones listed as having low-to-moderate acute toxicities, purposely......

263

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity sensitivity Sample Search...  

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Before the Senate Committee on Small Business Summary: . They are examples of known pollutants, albeit ones listed as having low-to-moderate acute toxicities, purposely......

264

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal toxicity testing Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: differentiated toxic from nontoxic sam- ples. It is suggested that the RIA test in its present state is useful... administration into appropriate animals....

265

Contribution of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (Glomus Intraradices) Fungus with Tomato Plants grown under Copper Toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the toxic effect of copper. Therefore additionalpotassium, calcium, iron and copper from soil particles, anddifferent concentration of copper. Total protein content

Malekzadeh, Parviz; Khara, Jalil; Farshian, Shadi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

THE PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE This book contains the substance of the course of lectures which I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE PREFACE This book contains the substance of the course that there is no "philosophy of science", but only the philosophies of certain scientists. But in so far as we recognize, there is an ascertainable present-day philosophy of physical science. It is the philosophy to which those who follow

267

From Solution to the Gas Phase: Factors That Influence Kinetic Trapping of Substance P in the Gas Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From Solution to the Gas Phase: Factors That Influence Kinetic Trapping of Substance P in the Gas, and David H. Russell*, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843, United of gas-phase, solvent-free biomolecule ions provide a means to investigate conformational preferences

Clemmer, David E.

268

Interaction Between Toxic Metals and Complex Biofilm/Mineral/Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights highlights title by Alexis S. Templeton, Thomas P. Trainor, and Gordon E. Brown, Jr., Stanford University Sorption reactions on particle surfaces can dramatically affect the speciation, cycling and bioavailability of essential micronutrients (i.e. PO43-, Cu, Zn etc.) and toxic metals and metalloids (i.e. Pb, Hg, Se, As) in soils and aquatic environments. Considerable attention has been focused on understanding metal sorption reactions at a molecular/mechanistic level and the effects of metal concentration, pH, ionic strength, and complexing ligands on the ways in which metal ions bind to the surfaces of common mineral phases such as Fe-, Mn- and Al-(hydr)oxides and clays. However, a significant fraction of mineral surfaces in natural environments are extensively colonized by microbial organisms, which can also be potent sorbents for metals due to the large number of reactive functional groups that decorate the cell walls and outer membranes of bacterial surfaces.

269

Method and apparatus for diagnosis of lead toxicity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved methods and apparatus for in vivo measurement of the skeletal lead burden of a patient and for diagnosis of lead toxicity are disclosed. The apparatus comprises an x-ray tube emitting soft low energy x-rays from a silver anode, a polarizer for polarizing the emitted x-rays, and a detector for detecting photons fluoresced from atoms in the patient's tibia upon irradiation by the polarized x-rays. The fluoresced photons are spectrally analyzed to determine their energy distribution. Peaks indicating the presence of lead are identified if the patient has relatively high bone lead content. The data may be compared to data recorded with respect to a similar test performed on patients having also had the conventional EDTA chelation tests performed thereon in order to correlate the test results with respect to a particular patient to the conventionally accepted EDTA chelation test.

Rosen, John F. (Riverside, CT); Slatkin, Daniel N. (Bayside, NY); Wielopolski, Lucian (Shirley, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Toxicity of depleted uranium on isolated rat kidney mitochondria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background Kidney is known as the most sensitive target organ for depleted uranium (DU) toxicity in comparison to other organs. Although the oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage induced by DU has been well investigated, the precise mechanism of DU-induced nephrotoxicity has not been thoroughly recognized yet. Methods Kidney mitochondria were obtained using differential centrifugation from Wistar rats and mitochondrial toxicity endpoints were then determined in both in vivo and in vitro uranyl acetate (UA) exposure cases. Results Single injection of UA (0, 0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg, i.p.) caused a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels. Isolated mitochondria from the UA-treated rat kidney showed a marked elevation in oxidative stress accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse as compared to control group. Incubation of isolated kidney mitochondria with UA (50, 100 and 200?M) manifested that UA can disrupt the electron transfer chain at complex II and III that leads to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione oxidation. Disturbances in oxidative phosphorylation were also demonstrated through decreased ATP concentration and ATP/ADP ratio in UA-treated mitochondria. In addition, UA induced a significant damage in mitochondrial outer membrane. Moreover, MMP collapse, mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were observed following the UA treatment in isolated mitochondria. General significance Both our in vivo and in vitro results showed that UA-induced nephrotoxicity is linked to the impairment of electron transfer chain especially at complex II and III which leads to subsequent oxidative stress.

Fatemeh Shaki; Mir-Jamal Hosseini; Mahmoud Ghazi-Khansari; Jalal Pourahmad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 Federal Register 91 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 151 / Friday, August 6, 2010 / Notices correction mechanism ensures the accuracy of the Inventory without imposing an unreasonable burden on the chemical industry. Without the Inventory correction mechanism, a company that submitted incorrect information would have to file a pre- manufacture notification (PMN) under TSCA section 5 to place the correct chemical substance on the Inventory whenever the previously reported substance is found to be misidentified. This would impose a much greater burden on both EPA and the submitter than the existing correction mechanism. This information collection applies to reporting and recordkeeping activities associated with the correction of misreported chemical substances found

272

Chronic toxicity evaluation of simulated DWPF effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A 7-Day Full Series Chronic Toxicity test was conducted April 13--20, 1990, for the Savannah River Site to assess the chronic toxicity of Simulated defense waste processing facility (DWPF) effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The simulated effluented consisted of Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Formate, and Corros. Inib.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

UNDERSTANDING THE GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANT EXPOSURE: CHERNOBYL AS A MODEL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNDERSTANDING THE GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANT EXPOSURE: CHERNOBYL AS A MODEL to Chernobyl radiation. Our results suggest that genetic diversity in radioactive regions of Ukraine to elucidate the effects of toxicant exposure. Keywords--Chernobyl Bank vole Population genetics Comparative

Baker, Robert J.

274

ACCELERATED COMMUNICATION Aspects of Dioxin Toxicity Are Mediated by Interleukin 1-Like  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACCELERATED COMMUNICATION Aspects of Dioxin Toxicity Are Mediated by Interleukin 1-Like Cytokines, 2005 ABSTRACT Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin) re- sults in a broad spectrum of toxic effects. Most, if not all, of these responses are dependent upon the binding of dioxin to the aryl

Bradfield, Christopher A.

275

Development of dioxin toxicity evaluation method in human milk by enzyme-linked immunosorbent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development of dioxin toxicity evaluation method in human milk by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay Co. Ltd., Tokyo 105-8528, Japan b Dioxin Research Group, Saitama Institute of Public Health, Saitama, the development of a toxicity evaluation method for dioxins in human milk by enzyme-linked im- munosorbent assay

Hammock, Bruce D.

276

Assessing the effect of metal speciation on lead toxicity to Vicia faba pigment contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lead is a highly toxic heavy metal, but its putative toxicity with respect to its speciation remains to unveil. In this study, Pb-induced toxicity to Vicia faba pigment contents was assessed against Pb speciation and accumulation. After a culture period of three weeks, V. faba seedlings were exposed to 5?M of lead nitrate alone or chelated by citric acid (CA) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The plants were treated for 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24h in nutrient solution. Exposure to Pb-5 caused increased production of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and decrease in V. faba chlorophyll contents during 24h. Lead-induced oxidative stress and toxicity to chlorophyll contents varied with the speciation of Pb. Addition of EDTA to Pb solution alleviated Pb-induced oxidative stress and toxicity to V. faba pigments by decreasing Pb accumulation in V. faba leaves. However, addition of citric acid to Pb did not affect Pb accumulation or toxicity to V. faba leaves. It is proposed that metal speciation plays an important role in Pb toxicity to V. faba pigment. Moreover, organic ligands vary greatly in terms of their ability to modify Pb phytoaccumulation and toxicity.

Muhammad Shahid; Camille Dumat; Bertrand Pourrut; Muhammad Sabir; Eric Pinelli

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Toxic potential of non-ortho and mono-ortho coplanar PCBs in commercial PCB preparations: 2,3,7,8-T/sub 4/ CDD Toxicity Equivalence Factors Approach  

SciTech Connect

Identification of highly toxic polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in commercial PCBs has contributed to the belief that they play a major role in the PCB toxicity. However, Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies have indicated that PCB congeners with chlorine substitution at both para and two or more meta positions resemble 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (T/sub 4/CDD) in their biologic and toxic effects due to their coplanarity. The relative toxic potential of these PCB isomers in wild animals such as Forster's tern, marine mammals and Snapping turtle has been emphasized. Some members of these toxic congeners were also identified and quantitated in commercial PCBs. However, there is no serious effort to evaluate the toxic potential of these PCB congeners in commercial PCB mixtures. Hence an isomer-specific toxic evaluation was attempted in those mixtures to understand the chemical factors behind their toxicity.

Kannan, N.; Tanabe, S.; Tatsukawa, R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Risk evaluation of green components to hazardous substance using FMEA and FAHP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study utilized the failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) to analyze the risks of green components in compliance with the European Union (EU) the Restriction of Hazardous Substance (RoHS) directive in the incoming quality control (IQC) stage, which is based on a case of an OEM/ODM electronic manufacturer in Taiwan. There are three indices of FMEA in this work: the occurrence (O) that can be learned from the testing report; the likelihood of being detected (D) that refers to the difficulty of detection; and severity (S) that can be quantified from the declaration statement and the frequency of green component used by project. The fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP) was applied to determine the relative weightings of four factors, then a green component risk priority number (GC-RPN) can be calculated for each one of the components, which are provided by the suppliers to identify and manage the risks that may be derived from them. Numerical results indicated that through the use of the proposed approach, the detected rate of the high risk green components can at least be improved to 20% while the GC-RPN is above 7, and the highest risk green components can be increased by 46.2% within the GC-RPN between 9 and 10.

Allen H. Hu; Chia-Wei Hsu; Tsai-Chi Kuo; Wei-Cheng Wu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms: Characterization by Infrared Spectroscopy and Proteomics  

SciTech Connect

This study characterizes the composition of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to provide insight into potential interactions of EPS with redox-active metals and radionuclides. Both bound and loosely associated EPS were extracted from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms prepared using a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (HfMBR). FTIR spectra revealed the presence of proteins, polysaccharides, nucleic acids, membrane lipids, and fatty acids in both bound and loosely associated EPS. Using a global proteomic approach, a total of 58 extracellular and outer membrane proteins were identified in the EPS. These included homologues of multiple S. oneidensis MR-1 proteins that potentially contribute to key physiological biofilm processes, such as biofilm-promoting protein BpfA, surface-associated serine protease, nucleotidases (CpdB and UshA), an extracellular lipase, and oligopeptidases (PtrB and a M13 family oligopeptidase lipoprotein). In addition, 20 redox proteins were found in extracted EPS. Among the detected redox proteins were the homologues of two S. oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes, MtrC and OmcA, which have been implicated in extracellular electron transfer. Given their detection in the EPS of Shewanella sp. HRCR 1 biofilms, c-type cytochromes may contribute to the possible redox activity of the biofilm matrix and play important roles in extracellular electron transfer reactions.

Cao, Bin; Shi, Liang; Brown, Roslyn N.; Xiong, Yijia; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Lipton, Mary S.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

2011-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quantum Otto heat engine based on a multiferroic chain working substance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a quantum Otto engine operating on the basis of a helical spin- 1/2 multiferroic chain with strongly coupled magnetic and ferroelectric order parameters. The presence of a finite spin chirality in the working substance enables steering of the cycle by an external electric field that couples to the electric polarization. We observe a direct connection between the chirality, the entanglement and the efficiency of the engine. An electric-field dependent threshold temperature is identified above which the pair correlations in the system, as quantified by the thermal entanglement, diminish. In contrast to the pair correlations, the collective many-body thermal entanglement is less sensitive to the electric field, and in the high temperature limit converges to a constant value. We also discuss the correlations between the threshold temperature of the pair entanglement, the spin chirality and the minimum of the fidelities in relation to the electric and magnetic fields. The efficiency of the quantum Otto cycle shows a saturation plateau with increasing electric field amplitude.

Maryam Azimi; Levan Chotorlishvili; Sunil K. Mishra; Temo Vekua; Wolfgang Hbner; Jamal Berakdar

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

The exposuredamage approach in the quantification of occupational risk in workplaces involving dangerous substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work proposes a new approach for the quantification of occupational risk overcoming the limitations of the common qualitative methodologies widely used by industry and authorities. The proposed methodological approach has been developed at the Technical University of Crete and is based on the principles of quantitative risk assessment (QRA) for the control of major-accident hazards involving dangerous substances. It aims at establishing a systematic risk analysis tool for the quantitative assessment of occupational risk. The index of individual occupational risk is introduced as a probability function of four variables, normalized over actual working time: the frequency of an active hazard, the probability of an employee being present at a work-place, the extent of distinct consequence zones and the employee vulnerability. The methodology has been applied to several industrial environments and has verified its potentiality to provide documented support on important decisions on occupational (health and safety) improving measures related to process safety conditions, job management, protective systems, consequence mitigation measures and personal protective measures.

G.A. Papadakis; A.A. Chalkidou

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Dangerous Substances and Processes: Consideration of the Subject within the Educational Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The education and training associated with Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) is a tool for the systematic forming and developing of science and professional knowledge and skills. The field of OHS aims at decreasing the accident and injury rate, making use of risk assessment and precautionary measures in terms of progressive arrangements from practice, education and the development of understanding. These factors lead to a complex improvement in welfare, an increase in the culture of work and school preparation. The evaluation of the dangers and risks associated with various types of chemical materials and chemical mixtures needs to be understood, together with the situations in which and why they are dangerous. The risks may exist when they are in the form of side products, such as in the form of waste materials within production technologies and processes. That is why it is essential to know the dangers involved and to keep the rules that ensure safe working with chemical materials and mixtures. The paper shows how important the discipline of dangerous substances and processes is in education and in the training process of future graduates in the Bachelor degree programme in Occupational Health and Safety in the Workplace.

Melnia Feszterov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Evaluation of artificially-weathered standard fuel oil toxicity by marine invertebrate embryogenesis bioassays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathering of petroleum spilled in the marine environment may not only change its physical and chemical properties but also its effects on the marine ecosystem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) obtained from a standard fuel oil following an environmentally realistic simulated weathering process for a period of 80d. Experimental flasks with 40gL?1 of fuel oil were incubated at 18C with a 14hlight:10hdark photoperiod and a photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) intensity of 70?Em?2s?1. Samples were taken at four weathering periods: 24h, 7, 21 and 80d. WAF toxicity was tested using the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) and mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) embryolarval bioassays and the aromatic hydrocarbons levels (AH) in the WAF were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In contrast with the classic assumption of toxicity decrease with oil weathering, the present study shows a progressive increase in WAF toxicity with weathering, being the EC50 after 80d eightfold lower than the EC50 at day1, whereas AH concentration slightly decreased. In the long term, inoculation of WAF with bacteria from a hydrocarbon chronically-polluted harbor slightly reduced toxicity. The differences in toxicity between fresh and weathered fuels could not be explained on the basis of the total AH content and the formation of oxidized derivatives is suggested to explain this toxicity increase.

Juan Bellas; Liliana Saco-lvarez; scar Nieto; Josep Mara Bayona; Joan Albaigs; Ricardo Beiras

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nanoparticle toxicity by the gastrointestinal route: evidence and knowledge gaps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The increasing interest in nanoparticles for advanced technologies, consumer products, and biomedical applications has led to great excitement about potential benefits but also concern over the potential for adverse human health effects. The gastrointestinal tract represents a likely route of entry for many nanomaterials, both directly through intentional ingestion or indirectly via nanoparticle dissolution from food containers or by secondary ingestion of inhaled particles. Additionally, increased utilisation of nanoparticles may lead to increased environmental contamination and unintentional ingestion via water, food animals, or fish. The gastrointestinal tract is a site of complex, symbiotic interactions between host cells and the resident microbiome. Accordingly, evaluation of nanoparticles must take into consideration not only absorption and extraintestinal organ accumulation but also the potential for altered gut microbes and the effects of this perturbation on the host. The existing literature was evaluated for evidence of toxicity based on these considerations. Focus was placed on three categories of nanomaterials: nanometals and metal oxides, carbon-based nanoparticles, and polymer/dendrimers with emphasis on those particles of greatest relevance to gastrointestinal exposures.

Ingrid L. Bergin; Frank A. Witzmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Tubular structured hierarchical mesoporous titania material derived from natural cellulosic substances and application as photocatalyst for degradation of methylene blue  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Bio-inspired, tubular structured hierarchical mesoporous titania material with high photocatalytic activity under UV light was fabricated employing natural cellulosic substance (cotton) as hard template and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant as soft template using a one-pot sol-gel method. Highlights: {yields} Tubular structured mesoporous titania material was fabricated by sol-gel method. {yields} The titania material faithfully recorded the hierarchical structure of the template substrate (cotton). {yields} The titania material exhibited high photocatalytic activity in decomposition of methylene blue. -- Abstract: Bio-inspired, tubular structured hierarchical mesoporous titania material was designed and fabricated employing natural cellulosic substance (cotton) as hard template and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) surfactant as soft template by one-pot sol-gel method. The tubular structured hierarchical mesoporous titania material processes large specific surface area (40.23 m{sup 2}/g) and shows high photocatalytic activity in the photodegradation of methylene blue under UV light irradiation.

Huang, Haiqing [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, Jiangxi 344000 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Fuzhou, Jiangxi 344000 (China); Liu, Xiaoyan [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Huang, Jianguo, E-mail: jghuang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

SciTech Connect

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

288

Evaluation of lithium as a toxicant and the modifying effect of sodium  

SciTech Connect

Routine compliance tests conducted for a groundwater treatment facility at the Y-12 Plant on the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, showed that the effluent was acutely toxic to Ceriodaphnia dubia and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larvae. An evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that increased toxicity coincided with increased concentrations of lithium. Lithium is a light, strong metal that is used in DOE operations, including fusion weapons and fission reactors. Little has been published about lithium toxicity. Toxicity tests were conducted with fathead minnows and C. dubia using lithium chloride and lithium tetraborate. Dilute mineral water (DMW) or the receiving stream water (East Fork Poplar Creek) was used as the dilution water in the toxicity evaluation. A concentration of 1 mg Li/L in DMW reduced the survival of both test species; 0.5 mg Li/L in DMW reduced C. dubia reproduction and minnow growth. Sodium appears to influence the toxicity of Li; the metal was six times more toxic in the low-sodium DMW than in stream water containing 30 mg Na/L. Tests with LiCl in combination with NaCl and NA{sub 2}SO{sub 4} demonstrated that the presence of sodium reduced the toxicity of Li to C. dubia. In laboratory tests with a snail (Elimia clavaeformis) common on the ORR, the feeding rate declined in 0.15 mg Li/L. Because Li has also been demonstrated to be toxic to several plant species, tests with LiCi were also conducted using buttercrunch lettuce (Lactuca saliva). The EC{sub 50} for seed growth after 8 d incubation was 37.5 mg Li/L. These findings are significant because of widespread industrial use and potential accumulation of Li in soils.

Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; O`Reilly, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

The toxic levels of Microcide, a chlorine compound, for selected fishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE TOXIC LEVELS OF M)CROCIDE, A CHLORINE COMPOUND, FOR SELECTED FISHES A Thesis by Michael A. Champ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A=M University in partial fultillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... The Toxic Levels of MICROCIDE, A Chlorine Compound, For Selected Fishes. (May' 1969) Micha I A. Champ, B. S. , Texas AsM University Directed by: Dr. W. J. Clark Levels of MICROCIDE toxicity were established for selected fishes, using the City of College...

Champ, Michael Augustus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

290

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Proteomic analysis of rat cerebral cortex following subchronic acrolein toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Acrolein, a member of reactive ?,?-unsaturated aldehydes, is a major environmental pollutant. Acrolein is also produced endogenously as a toxic by-product of lipid peroxidation. Because of high reactivity, acrolein may mediate oxidative damages to cells and tissues. It has been shown to be involved in a wide variety of pathological states including pulmonary, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we employed proteomics approach to investigate the effects of subchronic oral exposures to 3 mg/kg of acrolein on protein expression profile in the brain of rats. Moreover effects of acrolein on malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and reduced glutathione (GSH) content were investigated. Our results revealed that treatment with acrolein changed levels of several proteins in diverse physiological process including energy metabolism, cell communication and transport, response to stimulus and metabolic process. Interestingly, several differentially over-expressed proteins, including ?-synuclein, enolase and calcineurin, are known to be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases. Changes in the levels of some proteins were confirmed by Western blot. Moreover, acrolein increases the level of MDA, as a lipid peroxidation biomarker and decreased GSH concentrations, as a non-enzyme antioxidant in the brain of acrolein treated rats. These findings suggested that acrolein induces the oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and so that may contribute to the pathophysiology of neurological disorders. - Highlights: Acrolein intoxication increased lipid peroxidation and deplete GSH in rat brain. Effect of acrolein on protein levels of cerebral cortex was analyzed by 2DE-PAGE. Levels of a number of proteins with different biological functions were increased.

Rashedinia, Marzieh; Lari, Parisa [Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abnous, Khalil, E-mail: Abnouskh@mums.ac.r [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinzadeh, Hossein, E-mail: Hosseinzadehh@mums.ac.ir [Pharmaceutical Research Center, Department of Pharmacodynamics and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About It Speaker(s): Arlene Blum Date: November 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Fisk Polystyrene, polyisocyanurate, and polyurethane are insulation materials that increase energy efficiency and whose use in buildings, especially energy efficient buildings, is growing rapidly. At the same time, the flame retardants currently in use with these materials are often chemicals that are known to be toxic or have not been adequately evaluated for their impact on human health and the environment. For example, all polystyrene foam insulation used in buildings is treated with HBCD, a persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic flame retardant. The impacts of exposure to

293

TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory Dataset Summary Description TRI.NET ("T-R-I-dot-net") is a new application developed by EPA to help you analyze Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) information. This application is capable of easily and quickly performing complex queries to help you understand TRI information. It is especially useful for analysts who need a highly interactive environment in order to refine their queries and analyses in an efficient and productive way. TRI.NET makes heavy use of mashups using the latest mapping technologies to help visualize where TRI releases are occurring.

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity histopathology Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P.O. Box 5786 Summary: ; Fungal culture 3 ; Histopathology 4 ; Neospora IFA 5 ; Toxic heavy metal screen 6 ; Toxoplasma gondii MAT... Parvovirus-2 FA 4 ; Histopathology 5 ; (2)...

295

Toxicity of oiled wetland sediments influenced by natural and enhanced bioremediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluated were inorganic nutrients and inorganic nutrients plus an alternate electron acceptor. The effects of treatments on sediment toxicity and mutagenicity were assessed using Microtox 100% and Solid-phase Tests and amphipod, cytochrome P450 Reporter...

Mueller, Danica Christine

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effect of Chemical Speciation on Toxicity of Mercury to Escherichia coli Biofilms and Planktonic Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Chemical Speciation on Toxicity of Mercury to Escherichia coli Biofilms and Planktonic Cells ... charged forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl3-/HgCl42-) induced less light prodn. ...

Isaac Najera; Chu-Ching Lin; Golenaz Adeli Kohbodi; Jennifer A. Jay

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Toxicity Is Mediated by a Dynamin-Dependent Protein-Trafficking Pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ARTICLE PATHOGENESIS AND IMMUNITY Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Toxicity Is Mediated...Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Ebola virus infection causes a highly lethal...effects, the molecular events that underlie Ebola virus cytopathicity are poorly understood...

Nancy J. Sullivan; Mary Peterson; Zhi-yong Yang; Wing-pui Kong; Heinricus Duckers; Elizabeth Nabel; Gary J. Nabel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Engineered nanomaterials: knowledge gaps in fate, exposure, toxicity, and future directions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to identify current knowledge gaps in fate, exposure, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), highlight research gaps, and suggest future research directions. Humans and other living organisms are exposed to ENMs during ...

Arun Kumar, Prashant Kumar, Ananthitha Anandan, Teresa F. Fernandes, Godwin A. Ayoko, George Biskos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

A review on sources, toxicity and remediation technologies for removing arsenic from drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Arsenic is a natural element found in the environment in organic and inorganic forms. The inorganic form is much more toxic and is found in ground water, surface water and many foods. This form is responsible ...

Ankita Basu; Debabrata Saha; Rumpa Saha; Tuhin Ghosh

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics index Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

calcium and sulfate as causes of toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia in a hard rock mining... Received in revised form 2 June 2010 Accepted 8 June 2010 Available online 10 July...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Testing for toxic effects of prey on zooplankton using sole versus ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Testing for toxic effects of prey on zooplankton using sole versus mixed diets. Colin, Sean P., Hans G. Dam. Limnol. Oceanogr., 47(5), 2002, 1430-1437 | DOI:...

302

Hydrogen oxidation in soils as a possible toxic-effects indicator  

SciTech Connect

Efficient soil bioassays are needed in a screening array to determine the toxicities of industrial products and wastes. Hydrogen consumption is a common soil microbiological process that we evaluated as a possible soil indicator of toxic effects. Elemental tritium was used as a tracer to determine the H/sub 2/ oxidation rates in soils. The H/sub 2/ bioassay can be completed within 24 h using liquid scintillation counting of the tritium tracer. This test was used to evaluate the effects of known toxic chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, herbicides, and air pollutants), as well as a variety of suspected environmentally harmful compounds (e.g., waste waters, particulates, and sludges from industrial processes) on H/sub 2/ oxidation in soils. This bioassay responded to test compounds at concentrations shown to be toxic in other soil microbiological investigations.

Rogers, R.D. (U.S. EPA, Las Vegas); McFarlane, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute bowel toxicity Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diseases responsible for the death of people are directly linked to our diets and food Summary: (s) of exposure is critical in assessing the acute toxicity of a pesticide...

304

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics provisions Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Collection: Physics 64 Assembly Bill No. 118 CHAPTER 750 Summary: air pollutants and air toxics. (j) This act will be implemented in a manner to ensure the fair......

305

Toxicity of Fuel Oil Water Accommodated Fractions on Two Marine Microalgae, Skeletonema costatum and Chlorela spp  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the acute toxicity of four fuel oils including F120, F180, F380 and No.-20 was evaluated by exposing the marine microalgae Chlorela spp. (Chlorophyta) and Skeletonema costatum (Bacillariophyta) in ...

Min Chao; Xinqiang Shen; Fengxia Lun

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Biosensor Control of Acute Total Toxicity of Water and Soil Polluted by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article a short analysis of total toxicity of different samples of water and soil (obtained from some Azerbaijan mud bobbling volcanoes, region of oil production, railway lines, Dnieper river and prepa...

Nikolay F. Starodub

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Relative Contribution of Greenhouse Gases and Ozone-Depleting Substances to Temperature Trends in the Stratosphere: A ChemistryClimate Model Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temperature of the stratosphere has decreased over the past several decades. Two causes contribute to that decrease: well-mixed greenhouse gases (GHGs) and ozone-depleting substances (ODSs). This paper addresses the attribution of temperature ...

Richard S. Stolarski; Anne R. Douglass; Paul A. Newman; Steven Pawson; Mark R. Schoeberl

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of optimal concentrations of asphalt-tar substances and wax on the rheological characteristics of high-viscosity petroleum during transport in large pipelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the optimum ratio of asphalt-tar substances to wax is independent of temperature and pressure in transport of high-viscosity petroleum through pipelines.

A. M. Shammazov

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Mental, neurological, and substance use problems among refugees in primary health care: analysis of the Health Information System in 90 refugee camps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In refugees from 90 camps, there are low rates of primary care visits for emotional disorders and substance use compared with epilepsy, despite contrasting prevalence rates, suggesting these problems may be unattended by refugee health services.

Jeremy C Kane; Peter Ventevogel; Paul Spiegel; Judith K Bass; Mark van Ommeren; Wietse A Tol

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

310

Evaluation of Daphnia ambigua for Routine Aquatic Toxicity Testing at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Short-term whole effluent toxicity testing, which is currently a requirement of the U.S. EPA`s National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), commonly uses the cladoceran species Ceriodaphnia dubia. Despite the advantages to using a common test species to model the toxic effects of effluents, it could be argued that toxicity test results would be more meaningful if a wider variety of test organisms were commonly used. One particular argument against C. dubia is that tests conducted with this species do not always reflect local, site-specific conditions. The careful selection and use of an indigenous test species would produce a more realistic model of local instream effects and would account for regional differences in water quality. Permitted effluent discharges from Savannah River Site (SRS), a government weapons facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, require toxicity testing with C. dubia. However, water quality in these receiving streams is markedly different (lower pH and hardness) from standard laboratory water used for the culturing and testing of C. dubia, and it has been shown that this receiving water presents varying degrees of toxicity to C. dubia. Based on these results, it is possible that toxic effects observed during an effluent study could be the result of test organism stress from the dilution water and not the effects of SRS effluents. Therefore, this study addressed the substitution of C. dubia with an indigenous cladoceran species, Daphnia ambigua for routine regulatory testing at SRS. Given the indigenous nature of this species, combined with the fact that it has been successfully cultured by other investigators, D. ambigua was ideal for consideration as a replacement for C. dubia, but further study of the overall success and sensitivity of laboratory-reared D. ambigua was required. This investigation determined that D. ambigua could be laboratory cultured with only minimal changes to established regulatory protocol and that the life-cycle characteristics of this species were conducive to traditional acute and chronic aquatic toxicity test methods. Acute toxicity tests showed that when comparing LC50 values for C. dubia and D. ambigua, D. ambigua was less sensitive to some toxicants (sodium chloride, copper sulfate, and sodium lauryl sulfate) while more sensitive to others (chlorpyrifos). Results of chronic tests with copper sulfate and sodium chloride resulted in the same NOEC/LOEC values for both species. When exposed to unaltered SRS stream water, C. dubia demonstrated a `toxic` response for two of the three streams tested, while reproduction for D. ambigua was higher in all stream samples. Acute toxicity tests with sodium chloride in stream water, generally followed the sensitivity trend noted in tests conducted with regular laboratory water.

Specht, W.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Harmon, S.M. [University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone on rats and human by gel entrapped hepatocytes  

SciTech Connect

Troglitazone, despite passing preclinical trials on animals, was shortly withdrawn from market due to its severe hepatotoxicity in clinic. As rat hepatocyte monolayer consistently showed sensitive troglitazone toxicity as human hepatocyte monolayer in contrast to the species-specific toxicity in vivo, this paper utilized both hepatocytes in three-dimensional culture of gel entrapment to reflect the species difference on hepatotoxicity. Rat hepatocytes in gel entrapment did not show obvious cellular damage even under a long-term exposure for 21 days while gel entrapped human hepatocytes significantly displayed oxidative stress, steatosis, mitochondrial damage and cell death at a short exposure for 4 days. As a result, the detected species-specific toxicity of troglitazone between gel entrapped rat and human hepatocytes consisted well with the situation in vivo but was in a sharp contrast to the performance of two hepatocytes by monolayer culture. Such contradictory toxicity of rat hepatocytes between monolayer and gel entrapment culture could be explained by the fact that troglitazone was cleared more rapidly in gel entrapment than in monolayer culture. Similarly, the differential clearance of troglitazone in rat and human might also explain its species-specific toxicity. Therefore, gel entrapment of hepatocytes might serve as a platform for evaluation of drug toxicity at early stage of drug development by reducing costs, increasing the likelihood of clinical success and limiting human exposure to unsafe drugs. -- Highlights: ? Species-specific toxicity of troglitazone reflected by rat/human hepatocytes ? 3D hepatocytes in 21 days long-term culture used for drug hepatotoxicity ? Oversensitive toxicity in hepatocyte monolayer by slow troglitazone clearance.

Shen, Chong [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Meng, Qin, E-mail: mengq@zju.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zhang, Guoliang [Institute of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 310012 (China)] [Institute of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Zhejiang 310012 (China)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ammonia inhalation toxicity in cats: a study of acute and chronic respiratory dysfunction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AMMONIA INHALATION TOXICITY IN CATS A STUDY OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION A Thesis by KENNETH TRAVIS DODD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Veterinary Physiology AMMONIA INHALATION TOXICITY IN CATS A STUDY OF ACUTE AND CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION A Thesis by KENNETH TRAVIS DODD Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

Dodd, Kenneth Travis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

The quantification of oxygen toxicity by the technique of cellulose acetate electrophoresis of rat serum proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE QUANTIFICATION OF OXYGEN TOXICITY BY THE TECHNIQUE OF CELLULOSE ACETATE ELECTROPHORESIS OF RAT SERUM PROTEINS A Thesis by MARCIA WAGNER BARKER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&ii University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Biology THE QUANTIFICATION OF OXYGEN TOXICITY BY THE TECHNIQUE OF CELLULOSE ACETATE ELECTROPHORESIS OF RAT SERUM PROTEINS A Thesis by MARCIA WAGNER BARKER Approved...

Barker, Marcia Wagner

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Smoke and toxic species analyses from combustion of guayule bagasse modified fiberboards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The determination of particle size distribution. 3. The identification of heavy metals in the smoke and ash phases. 4. The identification of other major smoke components. These tests will also be performed on normal, untreated fiberboard samples so... and untreated fiberboards were less than 10 microns in size and were, therefore, respirable to humans. Toxic species identification through the use of the gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy identified no unusually toxic chemical species within the smoke...

Paris, Lisa Danielle

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Toxicity of azinphosmethyl and chlordimeform to parasitoid Bracon mellotor say: lethal, reproductive, and behavioral effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOXICITY OF AZINPHOSMETHYL AND CHLORDIMEFORM TO PARASITOID BRACON MELLITOR SAY: LETHAL, REPRODUCTIVE, AND BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS A Thesis by PATTI JANE O' BRIEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8 M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Entomology TOXICITY OF AZINPHOSMETHYL AND CHLORDIMEFORM TO PARAS I TO ID BRACON MELI. ITOR SAY: LETHAL, REPRODUCTIVE, AND BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS A Thesis by PATT I JANE 0 ' BRIEN...

O'Brien, Patti Jane

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The effect of climatic factors on the toxicity of certain organic insecticides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? k3 Laboratory and Field Cage Experiments - 1950 1# Results of cage toxicity tests for boll weevil control con? ducted in the laboratory, greenhouse and field using insec? ticides indicated applied as sprays and dusts in experiment 1 at College... Station, Texas ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? 78 2* Results of cage toxicity tests for boll weevil control conducted in the laboratory using insecticides indicated applied as sprays in experiment 2 at College Station, T e x a...

Mistric, Walter Joseph

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

317

Multiple-Drug Toxicity Caused by the Coadministration of 4-Methylmethcathinone (Mephedrone) and Heroin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Reproducibility of Results Substance Abuse Detection Young Adult An accidental...Mephedrone can be found for sale on the internet as a re- search chemical or plant...2009 and is considered a rare drug of abuse. However, in July 2009, a DEA Microgram......

Amber J. Dickson; Shawn P. Vorce; Barry Levine; Marilyn R. Past

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect

For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Chest Wall Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Malignant Lesions of the Lung and Liver  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To quantify the frequency of rib fracture and chest wall (CW) pain and identify the dose-volume parameters that predict CW toxicity after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: The records of patients treated with SBRT between 2000 and 2008 were reviewed, and toxicity was scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 for pain and rib fracture. Dosimetric data for CW and rib were analyzed and related to the frequency of toxicity. The risks of CW toxicity were then further characterized according to the median effective concentration (EC{sub 50}) dose-response model. Results: A total of 347 lesions were treated with a median follow-up of 19 months. Frequency of Grade I and higher CW pain and/or fracture for CW vs. non-CW lesions was 21% vs. 4%, respectively (p < 0.0001). A dose of 50 Gy was the cutoff for maximum dose (Dmax) to CW and rib above which there was a significant increase in the frequency of any grade pain and fracture (p = 0.03 and p = 0.025, respectively). Volume of CW receiving 15 Gy - 40 Gy was highly predictive of toxicity (R{sup 2} > 0.9). According to the EC{sub 50} model, 5 cc and 15 cc of CW receiving 40 Gy predict a 10% and 30% risk of CW toxicity, respectively. Conclusion: Adequate tumor coverage remains the primary objective when treating lung or liver lesions with SBRT. To minimize toxicity when treating lesions in close proximity to the CW, Dmax of the CW and/or ribs should remain <50 Gy, and <5 cc of CW should receive {>=}40 Gy.

Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Henderson, Mark A.; Barriger, Robert B.; Shapiro, Ronald H.; Brabham, Jeffrey G.; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R.; Fakiris, Achilles J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

BASIC ENGINEERING RESEARCH FOR D&D OF R REACTOR STORAGE POND SLUDGE: ELECTROKINETICS, CARBON DIOXIDE EXTRACTION, AND SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of mixed low level waste (MLLW) that fall under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) exist and will continue to be generated during D&D operations at DOE sites across the country. Currently, the volume of these wastes is approximately 23,500 m3, and the majority of these wastes (i.e., almost 19,000 m3) consist of PCBs and PCB-contaminated materials. Further, additional PCB-contaminated waste will be generated during D&D operations in the future. The standard process for destruction of this waste is incineration, which generates secondary waste that must be disposed, and the TSCA incinerator at Oak Ridge has an uncertain future. Beyond incineration, no proposed process for the recovery and/or destruction of these persistent pollutants has emerged as the preferred choice for DOE cleanup. The main objective of the project was to investigate and develop a deeper understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic reactions involved in the extraction and destruction of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from low-level mixed waste solid matrices in order to provide data that would permit the design of a combined-cycle extraction/destruction process. The specific research objectives were to investigate benign dense-fluid extraction with either carbon dioxide (USC) or hot water (CU), followed by destruction of the extracted PCBs via either electrochemical (USC) or hydrothermal (CU) oxidation. Two key advantages of the process are that it isolates and concentrates the PCBs from the solid matrices (thereby reducing waste volume greatly and removing the remaining low-level mixed waste from TSCA control), and little, if any, secondary solvent or solid wastes are generated. This project was a collaborative effort involving the University of South Carolina (USC), Clemson University (CU), and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) (including the Savannah River Technology Center, Facilities Decommissioning Division and Regulatory Compliance). T he project was directed and coordinated by the South Carolina Universities Research and Education Foundation (SCUREF), a consortium of the four public research universities in South Carolina. The original plan was to investigate two PCB extraction processes (supercritical carbon dioxide and hot, pressurized water) and two PCB destruction processes (electrochemical oxidation and hydrothermal oxidation). However, at approximately the mid-point of the three year project, it was decided to focus on the more promising extraction process (supercritical carbon dioxide) and the more promising destruction process (supercritical water oxidation). This decision was taken because the investigation of two processes simultaneously by each university was stretching resources too thin, and because the electrochemical oxidation process needed more concentrated research before it would be ready for application to PCB destruction. The solid matrix chosen for experimental work was Toxi-dry, a commonly used adsorbent made from plant material that is used in cleanup of spills and/or liquid solvents. The Toxi-dry was supplied by the research team member from the Facilities Decommissioning Division, WSRC. This adsorbent is a major component of job control waste.

Matthews, Michael A.; Bruce,David; Davis,Thomas; Thies, Mark; Weidner, John; White, Ralph

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Role of soil in Rhizobacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Our surrounding is filled up with a large number of toxicants in different forms. They contaminate our water, land and atmosphere where we live. Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes. Phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals could be carried out by using specific metallophytes. Green plants are the lungs of nature with unique ability to purifying impure air by photosynthesis and remove or minimize heavy metals toxicity from soil and water ecosystem by absorption, accumulation and biotransformation process. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal toxicity in contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from Rhizosphere of plants growing metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. Index Terms- Environmental, heavy metal toxicity,

Rajendra Prasad Bharti; Abhilasha Shri Vastava; Kishor Soni; Asha Tiwari; Shivbhanu More

323

The toxicity of oil and chemically dispersed oil to the seagrass Thalassia testudinum  

SciTech Connect

Turtle grass beds, a valuable natural resource, are diminishing throughout the tropics because of damage from dredging, boats, and other factors. The toxicity of chemical dispersants and crude oil to turtle grass was determined in the laboratory to assess the potential for damage from spills occurring in the field. Studies of water-soluble fractions (WSF) of crude oil in static bioassays showed that a chemical dispersant (Corexit 9527) increased the amount of total oil in water more than 50-fold. The toxicity of chemically dispersed oil was assessed by conventional (96-h 50% lethal concentration) methods in static systems, and the results were compared with toxicity measurements where the system was flushed after 12 h. Prudhoe Bay crude WSF was more toxic than dispersed oil or dispersant alone, possibly because of the large component of benzene, toluene, and C-2 benzene. The percentage of green (chlorophyllous) leaves was useful as evidence of toxicity. The importance of anatomical features such as recessed meristem and abundant leaf sheaths in protecting the growing region from waterborne pollutants was evident.

Baca, B.J.; Getter, C.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AIR TOXICS AIR TOXICS -. EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center Prepared Under Burns and Roe Services Corporation Contract No. DE-AC22-94PC92100 .Subtask 44.02 July 1996 SUMMARY OF AIR TOXICS EMISSIONS TESTING AT SIXTEEN . . UTILITY POWER PLANTS Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center . Prepared by Adrian Radziwon and Edward Winter Burns and Roe Services Corporation Terence J. McManus, Oak Ridge Associated Universities July 1996 TABLE OF CONTERlW SECTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................... 1 Background . : .................. 1 Objectives .................... 1 Report Structure ................. 3 Uncertainties ................... 3 SECTION 2.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ................. 7

325

Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form | U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » April 2013 Scientists Discover how Bacteria Convert Mercury to Toxic Form Two genes responsible for mercury methylation identified. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

326

Developmental toxicity of diesel exhaust: A review of studies in experimental animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diesel exhaust (DE) is a complex mixture of combustion products of diesel fuel, including gases and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), commonly known as soot, that contains many toxic air contaminants. Studies of pre- and postnatal exposure to DE or \\{DEPs\\} have revealed changes in growth, sexual development, hormone levels, spermatogenesis, weights of the reproductive and accessory organs, behavior, monoaminergic system, expression of immune-related genes, histopathology of the testes and brain, susceptibility to allergies, and inflammatory and genotoxic endpoints in rodent offspring. Changes in gene expression for gonadal development were also observed after exposure to DE. As for the causative agent for the developmental toxicity of DE, \\{DEPs\\} and the gaseous phase, conflicting findings were reported. Although this paper provides initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of DE including the gaseous phase and DEPs, further studies using relevant concentrations closely reflecting expected levels of human exposure are needed.

Makoto Ema; Masato Naya; Masao Horimoto; Haruhisa Kato

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Comparative toxicity of several sulphurs to two species of spider mites attacking cotton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and color as furnished by the Texas Gulf Sulphur Co. 12 Laboratory toxicity tests for control of T. desertorum using acaricides as indicated SuemeLry of data presented in Table 2 24 Analysis of variance of the data presented in Table 2 and 3 on control... and color as furnished by the Texas Gulf Sulphur Co. 12 Laboratory toxicity tests for control of T. desertorum using acaricides as indicated SuemeLry of data presented in Table 2 24 Analysis of variance of the data presented in Table 2 and 3 on control...

Arrese, Luis Humberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

1997 toxic chemical release inventory -- Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313  

SciTech Connect

Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid.

Zaloudek, D.E.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low \\{NOAELs\\} and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert for possible effects on fertility (or early embryonic development), the biological significance of which can be ascertained in a littering (e.g. 2-generation) study. From the chemicals reviewed it would appear that where there are no alerts from a repeat-dose toxicity study, a pre-natal developmental toxicity study and sex steroid receptor binding assays, there exists a low priority for animal studies to address the fertility endpoint. The ability for these types of tests to provide alerts for effects on fertility is clearly dependent on the mode of action of the toxicant in question. Further work should therefore be performed to determine the failure rate of this type of approach when applied to a larger group of chemicals with diverse modes of action.

M.P. Dent

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in Hydra attenuata and in rat whole embryo culture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A?TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE A Thesis by MARION CAROL BECKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Toxicology TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A1TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE by MARION CAROL BECKER Approved as to style and content by: Stephen H. S (Ca...

Becker, Marion Carol

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Biocides in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids: A Critical Review of Their Usage, Mobility, Degradation, and Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To enable assessment of the potential environmental and health impacts of the biocides used in hydraulic fracturing fluids, we review their relevant pathways of environmental contamination, environmental mobility, stability and chemical behavior in a variety of natural environments, and toxicity. ... In Frackings Wake: New Rules Are Needed to Protect Our Health and Environment From Contaminated Wastewater, NRDC Document D:12-05-A; Natural Resources Defense Council (NDRC): New York, 2012; pp 1 113. ... Henderson, N. D. Environmental Impact and Toxic Effects of DDAC; Environmental Protection Division, BC Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 1992. ...

Genevieve A. Kahrilas; Jens Blotevogel; Philip S. Stewart; Thomas Borch

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

Case 35-2014 A 31-Year-Old Woman with Fevers, Chest Pain, and a History of HCV Infection and Substance-Use Disorder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...recognize that caring for such patients only when they are in the hospital or during outpatient visits is insufficient. Like patients with disorders such as congestive heart failure and diabetes, patients with substance-use disorders benefit from carefully coordinated, continuous care. Through the use... A 31-year-old woman with substance-use disorder was admitted to this hospital because of fevers and chest pain. CT of the chest revealed multiple thick-walled nodular opacities throughout both lungs. Diagnostic tests were performed, and management decisions were made.

Wakeman S.E.Ghoshhajra B.B.Dudzinski D.M.Wilens T.Slavin P.L.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Inhibition of systemic onset of post-transcriptional gene silencing by non-toxic concentrations of cadmium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clearing virus (TVCV), is inhibited by treating the host plants with non-toxic levels of the heavy metal±plant interactions. To better understand this process, the heavy metal cadmium was identi®ed as a speci®c inhibitor of cadmium do not represent a general property of toxic metal ions because two other such elements

Citovsky, Vitaly

334

Single-step multiplex detection of toxic metal ions by Au nanowires-on-chip sensor using reporter elimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-step multiplex detection of toxic metal ions by Au nanowires-on-chip sensor using reporter sensitively detect multiple toxic metal ions. Most importantly, the reporter elimination method simplified by using this sensor. 1. Introduction Heavy metal ions such as mercury (Hg2+ ), silver (Ag+ ), and lead (Pb

Kim, Bongsoo

335

Relationship between Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms and Haplotypes in DPYD and Toxicity and Efficacy of Capecitabine in Advanced Colorectal Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...associated with grade 2 to 3 hand-foot syndrome, any grade 3 to 4...are cases. Thus, statistical power is increased without facing...toxicities Genotype Diarrhea Hand-foot syndrome Any (non)hematologic...Diarrhea 39 59 23 75 Hand-foot syndrome 44 62 47 59 Any toxicity...

Maarten J. Deenen; Jolien Tol; Artur M Burylo; Valerie D. Doodeman; Anthonius de Boer; Andrew Vincent; Henk-Jan Guchelaar; Paul H.M. Smits; Jos H. Beijnen; Cornelis J.A. Punt; Jan H.M. Schellens; and Annemieke Cats

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Identification of Zebrafish ARNT1 Homologs: 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Toxicity in the Developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of Zebrafish ARNT1 Homologs: 2,3,7,8- Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Toxicity,3,7,8- tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) developmental toxicity, it is essential to know which proteins are involved proteins in mediating these responses. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins are lipophilic, persis- tent

Tullos, Desiree

337

Nucleating Substance(S) in Human Saliva  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... HC1 and analysed on an amino-acid analyser (courtesy of Wm. Shoemaker, Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago).

RALPH G. EILBERG; DAVID GOULD; ALBERT E. SOBEL

1965-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor S. Anand * K. D. S...Mumbai 400085, India The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a new power...PHWR. INTRODUCTION The Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR)(1, 2), currently......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Functionalized Quantum Dots for Biosensing and Bioimaging and Concerns on Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In addition, recent concerns on the potential toxic effects of QDs are described as a general guidance for the development on QD formulations in future studies. ... (54) By using this delivery method, individual kinesin motor proteins in HeLa cells were imaged by bioconjugated QDs at single molecule resolution. ... Tracking Individual Kinesin Motors in Living Cells Using Single Quantum-Dot Imaging ...

Yucheng Wang; Rui Hu; Guimiao Lin; Indrajit Roy; Ken-Tye Yong

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Identification and treatment of lithium as the primary toxicant in a groundwater treatment facility effluent  

SciTech Connect

{sup 6}Li is used in manufacturing nuclear weapons, shielding, and reactor control rods. Li compounds have been used at DOE facilities and Li-contaminated waste has historically been land disposed. Seep water from burial grounds near Y-12 contain small amounts of chlorinated hydrocarbons, traces of PCBs, and 10-19 mg/L Li. Seep treatment consists of oil-water separation, filtration, air stripping, and carbon adsorption. Routine biomonitoring tests using fathead minnows and {ital Ceriodaphnia}{ital dubia} are conducted. Evaluation of suspected contaminants revealed that toxicity was most likely due to Li. Laboratory tests showed that 1 mg Li/L reduced the survival of both species; 0.5 mg Li/L reduced {ital Ceriodaphnia} reproduction and minnow growth. However, the toxicity was greatly reduced in presence of sodium (up to 4 mg Li/L, Na can fully negate the toxic effect of Li). Because of the low Na level discharged from the treatment facility, Li removal from the ground water was desired. SuperLig{reg_sign} columns were used (Li-selective organic macrocycle bonded to silica gel). Bench-scale tests showed that the material was very effective for removing Li from the effluent, reducing the toxicity.

Kszos, L.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Crow, K.R. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Novel wear resistant and low toxicity dental obturation materials Miriam Estvez a,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Novel wear resistant and low toxicity dental obturation materials Miriam Estévez a,b , Susana of commercial dental materials. The new materials provide scratch resistance as well as good adhesion to dentin and Optimized Materials (LAPOM), Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, PO

North Texas, University of

342

TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS As water quality has improved over the past three decades in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T TOXICITY OF SEDIMENTS Overview As water quality has improved over the past three decades in North America, diffuse sources of pollution such as storm- water runoff and sediments are now recognized as long-term, widespread pollutant sources to aquatic systems. Substantial impacts on the ecosystem from sediment

343

Bioavailability of Sediment-Associated Toxic Organic Contaminants Primary Investigator: Peter Landrum -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioavailability of Sediment-Associated Toxic Organic Contaminants Primary Investigator: Peter the bioavailability of sediment-associated organic contaminants to benthic organisms. In this past year, specific measurements of desorption for three Lake Michigan sediments and measurements of concentrations in Diporeia

344

Toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 3700 gallons/batch  

SciTech Connect

In July, 1991, Reactor Materials increased the supernate treatment concentration in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility from 2700 gallons of supernate per 36000 gallon dilute wastewater batch to 3700 gallons/batch. This report summarizes the toxicity testing on the effluents of the increased treatment rate.(JL)

Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Diener, G.A.

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

345

Toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 3700 gallons/batch. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

In July, 1991, Reactor Materials increased the supernate treatment concentration in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility from 2700 gallons of supernate per 36000 gallon dilute wastewater batch to 3700 gallons/batch. This report summarizes the toxicity testing on the effluents of the increased treatment rate.(JL)

Pickett, J.B.; Martin, H.L.; Diener, G.A.

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

Paraquat toxicity. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxic effects of the herbicide paraquat on humans and animals. Topics include clinical and pathological findings, biochemical mechanisms, effects of oxygen, pulmonary effects of exposure, and effects on freshwater and marine organisms. The contamination of marijuana plants with paraquat is also considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Radio-toxicity of spent fuel of the advanced heavy water reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......during their short/long term-storage is investigated in...radio-toxicity of radioactive waste is widely regarded...exchangers of the spent fuel storage bay. The decay power...VVER type reactors at long-term storage. Radiat. Prot. Dosim......

S. Anand; K. D. S. Singh; V. K. Sharma

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Engineering metal ion coordination to regulate amyloid fibril assembly and toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering metal ion coordination to regulate amyloid fibril assembly and toxicity Jijun Dong13 and H14 implicated in A -metal ion binding, we show that Cu2 forms complexes with A (13 fibrils. These results establish that the N-terminal region of A can access different metal-ion

Scott, Robert A.

350

(Published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research) Potentially toxic element fractionation in technosoils using two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research) Potentially toxic element fractionation elements (Zn, Pb, Cd, As, and Sb) in contaminated technosoils of two former smelting and mining areas using. Surface soils were samples from a waste landfill contaminated with Zn, Pb, and Cd located at Mortagne

Boyer, Edmond

351

Effect of temperature on the release of intentionally and non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: Chemical analysis and potential toxicity Cristina Bach a used for the bottling of drinking water is polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Since migra- tion can

Short, Daniel

352

Interfacial reactions between humic-like substances and lateritic clay: Application to the preparation of geomimetic materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms responsible for the strengthening of geomimetic materials, especially the chemical bonding between clay and humic substances. The mineral matter is lateritic clay which mainly consists in kaolinite, goethite, hematite and quartz. The other starting products are fulvic acid (FA) and lime. The preparation of these geomimetic materials is inspired from the natural stabilization of soils by humic substances occurring over thousands of years. The present process involves acidic and alkaline reactions followed by a curing period of 18days at 60C under a water saturated atmosphere. The acceleration of the strengthening process usually observed in soils makes this an original process for treatment of soils. The consolidation of the geomimetic materials could result from two major phenomena: (i) chemical bonding at the interface between the clay particles and iron compounds and the functional groups of the fulvic acid, (ii) a partial dissolution of the clay grains followed by the precipitation of the cementitious phases, namely calcium silicate hydrates, calcium aluminate hydrates and mixed calcium silicum and aluminum hydrates. Indeed, the decrease of the BET specific area of the lateritic clay after 24h of reaction with FA added to the structural reorganization observed between 900 and 1000C in the geomimetic material, and to the results of adsorption measurements, confirm the formation of organo-ferric complexes [1]. The presence of iron oxides in clay, in the form of goethite, appears to be another parameter in favor of a ligand exchange process and the creation of binding bridges between FA and the mineral matter. Indeed all faces of goethite are likely to be involved in complexation reactions whereas in lateritic clay only lateral faces could be involved [2]. The results of the adsorption experiments realized at a local scale will improve our understandings about the process of adsorption of FA on lateritic clays and its involvement in the strengthening process of materials.

Herve Goure-Doubi; Cline Martias; Gisle Laure Lecomte-Nana; Benot Nait-Ali; Agns Smith; Elsa Thune; Nicolas Villandier; Vincent Gloaguen; Marilyne Soubrand; Lon koffi Konan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to juvenile blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus) and Juvenile Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus)  

SciTech Connect

Large quantitites of estuarine and marine water are treated with chlorine to prevent condenser system fouling at power plants. Chlorine and its residual by-products, however, are toxic to many forms of aquatic life. Ozone is one alternative oxidant which has proven to be an effective biocide and disinfectant in many fresh water applications. Ozonation of estuarine and marine waters, however, may produce residual compounds similar to those produced by chlorination. This study was initiated to provide baseline information on the toxicity of ozonated estuarine water to two representative estuarine species. The blue crab, Callinectes sapidus Rathbun, and the Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus Latrobe, were selected because of their wide distribution and commercial importance. The toxicity of ozone has been compared with chlorine toxicity data from the literature in an effort to examine possible similarities in toxicity.

Richardson, L.B.; Burton, D.T.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Acute toxicity of toluene, hexane, xylene, and benzene to the rotifers Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus plicatilis  

SciTech Connect

A large number of studies on the biological effects of oil pollution in the aquatic environment deal with the effects of whole crude or refined oils or their water-soluble fractions. However, low boiling, aromatic hydrocarbons, which are probably the most toxic constituents of oil, have until now not been examined in sufficient detail. Toluene, benzene and xylene, constitute a major component of various oils. They may be readily lost by weathering but are toxic in waters that are relatively stagnant and are chronically polluted. Korn et al. have stated that toluene is more toxic than many other hydrocarbons such as benzene, though the latter are more water-soluble. Report of the effects of exposure to organic solvents like hexane or toluene are still limited although organic solvents are a well-known group of neurointoxicants. Various benzene derivates continue to be used as chemical intermediates, solvents, pesticides, so on, in spite of incomplete knowledge of their chronic toxicity. The majority of toxicity studies about the effects of pollution on aquatic organisms under controlled conditions have used either fish or the cladoceran Daphnia magna and there are few studies reported using rotifers. The effects of herbicides on population variables of laboratory rotifer cultures have been investigated. Rotifers are one of the main sources of zooplankton production and they have an important ecological significance in the aquatic environment. The present work was designed to investigate the effect of short-term exposure to some petroleum derivates which might be expected to occur immediately under an oil-slick, on freshwater and brackish environment rotifers. 18 refs., 1 tab.

Ferrando, M.D.; Andreu-Moliner, E. (Univ. of Valencia (Spain))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles  

SciTech Connect

Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ? Intratracheal instillation of WNiCo and WNiFe induces lung inflammation in rats. ? WNiCo and WNiFe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ? WNiCo induces a greater oxidative burst response than WNiFe in lung macrophages.

Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Results of Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIE`S) conducted on the A-01 outfall and its contributory waste streams, July 1996--February 1997  

SciTech Connect

Toxicity tests were conducted at nine locations during the summer of 1996. The results indicated that A-01B, A-01C, A-03, A-04, A-05 and A-01 were toxic to the test species, Ceriodaphnia dubia, while A-01A, A-06, and WE-01 were not toxic. Beginning in August 1996, Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIE`s) were initiated on all toxic outfalls in order to identify the toxicants responsible for the observed toxicity. A complete TIE was performed on A-01 because it is the regulatory compliance point for all of the combined waste streams that were tested. Only the portions of a TIE that are related to metal and chlorine toxicity were performed on the remaining locations because existing data indicated that metals and chlorine were present in potentially toxic quantities at these locations, and there was no evidence that other toxicants would be expected to be present in toxic amounts. The results of the TIE`s indicate that metals are responsible for most of the toxicity at all of the outfalls that were toxic and that chlorine contributed to the toxicity at two of the outfalls. Specifically, the toxicity at A-01B, A-01C, and A-01 was due to copper; the toxicity at A-03 was due to primarily to copper, although zinc also contributed to the toxicity; the toxicity at A-04 was due primarily to copper, with residual chlorine and zinc contributing to the toxicity; and the toxicity at A-05 was due primarily to copper, with residual chlorine contributing to the toxicity. A-03 was the most toxic outfall, with 100% mortality occurring at concentrations as low as 12.5% effluent. A-03 was found to have concentrations of copper, lead, and zinc that exceeded EPA water quality criteria by approximately two orders of magnitude. The metal concentrations at A-01 and WE-01, which is located approximately 0.5 miles downstream from A-01 were similar. However, A-01 was toxic, while WE-01 was not.

Specht, W.L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Type II Transformation -Callus Selection Media N6 2-0-0+3mg/L Bialaphos Solution Substance []stock/MW Final Add ()  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Type II Transformation - Callus Selection Media N6 2-0-0+3mg/L Bialaphos Solution Substance []stock in hood. 1L=30 plates. Dry lids on in hood 3days or quick cool upside down, tilted on lid for 1-2 hours

Raizada, Manish N.

358

{open_quotes}Fine particulate control and air toxics{close_quotes}  

SciTech Connect

Tables 1-4 give an overview of current TSP control capabilities of fabric filters on some applications. Very little data is available as to the control of PM{sub 10} and under. Most air toxic limitations will require much higher control as can be seen in Tables 5 and 6. The control of most air toxics is definitely related to the control of TSP and PM{sub 10}, however it appears that meeting current limits of TSP do not ensure meeting the desired air toxic limits. Since TSP is desired to be used as a surrogate and is all that is routinely monitored through opacity or other stack CEM systems, lower TSP limits would have to be met which opens the question of how accurate we can monitor TSP or PM{sub 10} on a continuous basis. Tables 3 and 4 provide some insight as to the uniformity of TSP results between identical operating units and over time at two NSW installation. Except for the 9/10/91 test, the baghouses were inspected for failing bags prior to testing. Tables 7 and 8 show the impact of TSP and air toxic metals of a plant upset. In this case it took up to one day for the emissions to return to normal following a 30 minute complete shutdown of the incinerator and three baghouse systems being tested. Table 9 describes the impact of broken bags on emissions for a typical size baghouse. As emission levels become tighter in attempts to control air toxics, response to broken bags will take on new importance. More importantly, system design changes to promote longer bag life and better emission monitoring will be needed. Once continuous monitoring of outlet particulate is required, the industry will be challenged. Until then it will be business as usual with designs aimed at passing a one time or yearly stack test with the baghouse primed for peak performance. This won`t do much to protect the environment from air toxics to the proposed units.

Chang, R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Greiner, G.P. [ETS International, Inc., Roanoke, VA (United States); Harrison, W. [Southern Company Services, Birmingham, AL (United States); Nichols, G.B. [Southern Research Institute, Birmingham, AL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Feasibility and Acute Toxicity of Hypofractionated Radiation in Large-breasted Patients  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of and acute toxicity associated with hypofractionated whole breast radiation (HypoRT) after breast-conserving surgery in patients excluded from or underrepresented in randomized trials comparing HypoRT with conventional fractionation schedules. Methods and Materials: A review was conducted of all patients consecutively treated with HypoRT at University of Chicago. All patients were treated to 42.56 Gy in 2.66 Gy daily fractions in either the prone or supine position. Planning was performed in most cases using wedges and large segments or a 'field-in-field' technique. Breast volume was estimated using volumetric measurements of the planning target volume (PTV). Dosimetric parameters of heterogeneity (V105, V107, V110, and maximum dose) were recorded for each treatment plan. Acute toxicity was scored for each treated breast. Results: Between 2006 and 2010, 78 patients were treated to 80 breasts using HypoRT. Most women were overweight or obese (78.7%), with a median body mass index of 29.2 kg/m{sup 2}. Median breast volume was 1,351 mL. Of the 80 treated breasts, the maximum acute skin toxicity was mild erythema or hyperpigmentation in 70.0% (56/80), dry desquamation in 21.25% (17/80), and focal moist desquamation in 8.75% (7/80). Maximum acute toxicity occurred after the completion of radiation in 31.9% of patients. Separation >25 cm was not associated with increased toxicity. Breast volume was the only patient factor significantly associated with moist desquamation on multivariable analysis (p = 0.01). Patients with breast volume >2,500 mL experienced focal moist desquamation in 27.2% of cases compared with 6.34% in patients with breast volume <2,500 mL (p = 0.03). Conclusions: HypoRT is feasible and safe in patients with separation >25 cm and in patients with large breast volume when employing modern planning and positioning techniques. We recommend counseling regarding expected increases in skin toxicity in women with a PTV volume >2,500 mL.

Dorn, Paige L., E-mail: pdorn@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL (United States); Corbin, Kimberly S.; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Hasan, Yasmin; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Hospitals, Chicago, IL (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Field demonstration of a full-scale in situ thermal desorption system for the remediation of soil containing PCBS and other hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A field demonstration of a full-sale, innovative and cost-effective remediation system using in situ thermal description (ISTD) was conducted at a state Superfund site in the northeastern United States in early 1996. The Demonstration was performed as part of the regulatory process to obtain a nationwide Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) permit for the remediation of soils containing PCBs at concentrations up to 5,000 ppm. An area of approximately 4800 square feet was remediated during six applications of an in situ Thermal Blanket covering an area of 800 square feet. Each application utilized five 160 square foot, electrically heated, 100-kilowatt modules. The Thermal Blanket heaters were operated at temperatures as high as 925 C. The modules contain 10 in. of vermiculite insulation to reduce upward heat losses to less than 10% of total power. The modules are covered with an impermeable silicone sheet and the in situ process is run at negative pressure to collect contaminants, prevent contaminant migration and eliminate odors. Off-gas emissions are controlled by a vapor extraction system comprised of a cyclonic separator for particulate removal, a flameless thermal oxidizer for destruction of residual contaminants, and a carbon polishing unit. Treatment times ranged from slightly more than 24 hours to treat the upper six inches to approximately four days to treat soil 12 to 18 inches deep. Temperature profiles and remedial efficiency are consistent with results from a computer thermal simulator. Post-treatment soil samples demonstrated the capability to achieve stringent soil cleanup levels of less than 2 ppm for PCBs while concurrently meeting ambient air quality standards with respect to air emissions and worker exposure limits. The Thermal Blanket is less intrusive than other permanent remedies and produces less noise, generates less dust and has a minimum of other impacts on the surrounding community.

Sheldon, R.B.; Iben, I.E.T.; Edelstein, W.A. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

K Basin sludge polychlorinated biphenyl removal technology assessment  

SciTech Connect

The two Hanford K Basins are water-filled concrete pools that contain over 2,100 metric tons of N Reactor fuel elements stored in aluminum or stainless steel canisters. During the time the fuel has been stored, approximately 50 m3 of heterogeneous solid material have accumulated in the basins. This material, referred to as sludge, is a mixture of fuel corrosion products, metallic bits of spent fuel and zirconium clad iron and metal corrosion products and silica from migrating sands. Some of the sludges also contain PCBs. The congener group of PCBs was identified as Aroclor 1254. The maximum concentration of sludge PCBS was found to be 140 ppm (as settled wet basis). However, the distribution of the PCBs is non-uniform throughout the sludge (i.e., there are regions of high and low concentrations and places where no PCBs are present). Higher concentrations could be present at various locations. Aroclors 1016/1242, 1221, 1248, 1254, and 1260 were identified and quantified in K West (KW) Canister sludge. In some of these samples, the concentration of 1260 was higher than 1254. The sludge requires pre-treatment to meet tank farm waste acceptance criteria, Among the numerous requirements, the sludge should be retreated so that it does not contain regulated levels of Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) compounds. Because of their stable chemistry and relative insolubility in water, PCBs are difficult to treat. They also resist degradation from heat and electrical charges. This stability has resulted in environmental persistence which has prompted the development of a variety of new cleanup processes including supercritical processes, advanced oxidation, dehalogenation and others. Hopefully, most of the new processes are discussed herein. Information on new processes are being received and will be evaluated in a future revision.

Ashworth, S.C.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Short-term methods for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving water to freshwater organisms. Third edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes four short-term (four- to seven-day) methods for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to three freshwater species: The fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas, a daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and a green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum. The methods include single and multiple concentration static renewal and non-renewal toxicity tests for effluents and receiving waters. Also included are guidelines on laboratory safety, quality assurance, facilities, equipment and supplies; dilution water; effluent and receiving water sample collection, preservation, shipping, and holding; test conditions; toxicity test data analysis; report preparation; and organism culturing, holding, and handling.

Lewis, P.A.; Klemm, D.J.; Lazorchak, J.M.; Norberg-King, T.J.; Peltier, W.H.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Base catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals. [Final report, September 4, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

There are vast amounts of toxic and hazardous chemicals, which have pervaded our environment during the past fifty years, leaving us with serious, crucial problems of remediation and disposal. The accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ``dioxins`` and pesticides in soil sediments and living systems is a serious problem that is receiving considerable attention concerning the cancer-causing nature of these synthetic compounds.US EPA scientists developed in 1989 and 1990 two novel chemical Processes to effect the dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, PCP and other pollutants in soil, sludge, sediment and liquids. This improved technology employs hydrogen as a nucleophile to replace halogens on halogenated compounds. Hydrogen as nucleophile is not influenced by steric hinderance as with other nucleophile where complete dehalogenation of organohalogens can be achieved. This report discusses catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals.

Rogers, C.J.; Kornel, A.; Sparks, H.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Regulation: EPA sued for undercounting toxic emissions at refineries, chemical plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several community organizations have filed a lawsuit to force the Environmental Protection Agency to review the way it measures toxic air pollution from oil refineries and petrochemical plants along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. ... Recent independent studies at Marathon Oil, Shell, and BP refineries measured actual emissions at levels 10 to 100 times higher than estimates based on the methods facilities currently use to report their releases, the suit says. ...

GLENN HESS

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

365

Toxicity of ammonia to larvae of the freshwater shrimp, Macrobrachium rosenbergii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to larval and juvenile shrimps (Armstrong et al. , 1976; Wickins, 1976) and to fish (Russo et al. , 1974", Smith and Williams, 1974", Smith and Russo' 1975; Crawford and Allen, 1977; Thurston et al. , 1978; Wedemeyer and Yasutake, 1978) and can.... Although the toxicity of ammonia to freshwater shrimp larvae has been reported by Armstrong et al. (1978), other aspects require further investigation before a reliable estimate of safe concentrations can be esta'blished. This study, which examines...

Llobrera, Jose Alvarez

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The toxicity of several organic phosphorus compounds to cotton insects and spider mites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by operating a spray gun air-tank assembly, which was mounted on a stand* The cone nozzles could be adjusted to give adequate coverage of the plants. The spray gun con? sisted of 2 nozzles, a small copper tank and a regulated air supply. The spray.......................................................... 79 Bibliography........................................................81 Page TABLES Table Page 1? Results of laboratory cage toxicity tests for boll weevil control using insecticides indicated applied as sprays in experiment 1 at College S t a...

Fuller, Freeman Miree

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

Toxicity of herbicides. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning occupational surveys, clinical investigations, and laboratory analyses pertaining to the toxic effects of herbicides. Topics include terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem responses, regulatory aspects, transport and metabolism, and registration standards and procedures. The detection of specific compounds and their effects on selected species are also discussed. (Contains a minimum of 205 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Toxic species emissions from controlled combustion of selected automotive rubber components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the types of anti-pollution control methods utilized on the incinerator. B. Smoke Analysis An Arapahoe smoke chamber was used to generate smoke for this research, in accordance with ASTM D4100, Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Smoke... the criteria pollutants, incinerators also emit small amounts of trace organics and trace metals, which are classified as toxic pollutants. Trace organics such as dioxins (polychlorinated p-dibenzodioxins-PCDDs) and furans (polychlorinated dibenzofurans...

Shalkowski, Mark Henry

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay  

SciTech Connect

The National Research Council has outlined the need for non-mammalian toxicological models to test the potential health effects of a large number of chemicals while also reducing the use of traditional animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive alternative model because of its well-characterized and evolutionarily conserved biology, low cost, and ability to be used in high-throughput screening. A high-throughput method is described for quantifying the reproductive capacity of C. elegans exposed to chemicals for 48 h from the last larval stage (L4) to adulthood using a COPAS Biosort. Initially, the effects of exposure conditions that could influence reproduction were defined. Concentrations of DMSO vehicle {<=} 1% did not affect reproduction. Previous studies indicated that C. elegans may be influenced by exposure to low pH conditions. At pHs greater than 4.5, C. elegans reproduction was not affected; however below this pH there was a significant decrease in the number of offspring. Cadmium chloride was chosen as a model toxicant to verify that automated measurements were comparable to those of traditional observational studies. EC{sub 50} values for cadmium for automated measurements (176-192 {mu}M) were comparable to those previously reported for a 72-h exposure using manual counting (151 {mu}M). The toxicity of seven test toxicants on C. elegans reproduction was highly correlative with rodent lethality suggesting that this assay may be useful in predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals in other organisms.

Boyd, Windy A. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); McBride, Sandra J.; Rice, Julie R.; Snyder, Daniel W. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Freedman, Jonathan H., E-mail: freedma1@niehs.nih.go [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Identifying Biomarkers and Mechanisms of Toxic Metal Stress with Global Proteomics  

SciTech Connect

Hg is a wide-spread contaminant in the environment and is toxic in all of its various forms. Data suggest that RHg+ and Hg2+ are toxic in two ways. At low levels, Hg species appear to disrupt membrane-bound respiration causing a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that further damage the cell. At higher Hg concentrations, RHg+ and Hg2+ may form adducts with cysteine- and selenocysteine-containing proteins in all cellular compartments resulting in their inactivation. Although these mechansims for toxicity are generally accepted, the most sensitive targets associated with these mechanisms are not well understood. In this collaborative project involving three laboratories at three institutions, the overall goal was to develop of a mass spectrometry-based global proteomics methodology that could be used to identify Hg-adducted (and ideally, ROS-damaged) proteins in order to address these types of questions. The two objectives of this overall collaborative project were (1) to identify, quantify, and compare ROS- and Hg-damaged proteins in cells treated with various Hg species and concentrations to test this model for two mechanisms of Hg toxicity, and (2) to define the cellular roles of the ubiquitous bacterial mercury resistance (mer) locus with regards to how the proteins of this pathway interact to protect other cell proteins from Hg damage. The specific objectives and accomplishments of the Miller lab in this project included: (1) Development of algorithms for analysis of the Hg-proteomic mass spectrometry data to identify mercury adducted peptides and other trends in the data. (2) Investigation of the role of mer operon proteins in scavenging Hg(II) from other mer pathway proteins as a means of protecting cellular proteins from damage.

Miller, Susan M.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

Evaluation of toxicity and biodegradability of choline chloride based deep eutectic solvents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have been dramatically expanding in popularity as a new generation of environmentally friendly solvents with possible applications in various industrial fields, but their ecological footprint has not yet been thoroughly investigated. In the present study, three choline chloride-based \\{DESs\\} with glucose, glycerol and oxalic acid as hydrogen bond donors were evaluated for in vitro toxicity using fish and human cell line, phytotoxicity using wheat and biodegradability using wastewater microorganisms through closed bottle test. Obtained in vitro toxicity data on cell lines indicate that choline chloride: glucose and choline chloride:glycerol possess low cytotoxicity (EC50>10mM for both cell lines) while choline chloride:oxalic acid possess moderate cytotoxicity (EC50 value 1.64mM and 4.19mM for fish and human cell line, respectively). Results on phytotoxicity imply that tested \\{DESs\\} are non-toxic with seed germination EC50 values higher than 5000mgl?1. All tested \\{DESs\\} were classified as?readily biodegradable? based on their high levels of mineralization (6896%). These findings indicate that \\{DESs\\} have a green profile and a good prospect for a wider use in the field of green technologies.

Kristina Radoevi?; Marina Cvjetko Bubalo; Vinje Gaurina Sr?ek; Dijana Grgas; Tibela Landeka Dragi?evi?; Ivana Radoj?i? Redovnikovi?

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

Diebold, J.P. [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A plant growth-promoting bacterium that decreases nickel toxicity in seedlings  

SciTech Connect

A plant growth-promoting bacterium, Kluyvera ascorbata SUD165, that contained high levels of heavy metals was isolated from soil collected near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The bacterium was resistant to the toxic effects of Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, and CrO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, produced a siderophore(s), and displayed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity. Canola seeds inoculated with this bacterium and then grown under gnotobiotic conditions in the presence of high concentrations of nickel chloride were partially protected against nickel toxicity. In addition, protection by the bacterium against nickel toxicity was evident in pot experiments with canola and tomato seeds. The presence of K. ascorbata SUD165 had no measurable influence on the amount of nickel accumulated per milligram (dry weight) of either roots or shoots of canola plants. Therefore, the bacterial plant growth-promoting effect in the presence of nickel was probably not attributable to the reduction of nickel uptake by seedlings. Rather, it may reflect the ability of the bacterium to lower the level of stress ethylene induced by the nickel.

Burd, G.I.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Toxicity of tire wear particle leachate to the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tire wear particles filed from the treads of end-of-life vehicle tires have been added to sea water to examine the release of Zn and the toxicity of the resulting leachate and dilutions thereof to the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca. Zinc release appeared to be diffusion-controlled, with a conditional rate constant of 5.4?g[L(h)1/2]?1, and about 1.6% of total Zn was released after 120h incubation. Exposure to increasing concentrations of leachate resulted in a non-linear reduction in the efficiency of photochemical energy conversion of U. lactuca and, with the exception of the undiluted leachate, increasing accumulation of Zn. Phototoxicity was significantly lower on exposure to equivalent concentrations of Zn added as Zn(NO3)2, suggesting that organic components of leachate are largely responsible for the overall toxicity to the alga. Given the ubiquity and abundance of TWP in urban coastal sediments, the generation, biogeochemistry and toxicity of tire leachate in the marine setting merit further attention.

Andrew Turner; Lynsey Rice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Concentration and toxicity of sea-surface contaminants in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

The Marine Research Laboratory conducted studies during CY 1985 to evaluate the effects of sea-surface contamination on the reproductive success of a valued marine species. Microlayer and bulk water samples were collected from a rural bay, central Puget Sound, and three urban bays and analyzed for a number of metal and organic contaminants as well as for densities of neuston and plankton organisms. Fertilized neustonic eggs of sand sole (Psettichthys melanostictus) were exposed to the same microlayer samples during their first week of embryonic and larval development. Also, we evaluated the effects of microlayer extracts on the growth of trout cell cultures. Compared to rural sites, urban bays generally contained lower densities of neustonic flatfish eggs during the spawning season. Also, in contrast to the rural sites or the one central Puget Sound site, approximately half of the urban bay microlayer samples resulted in significant increases in embryo mortality (up to 100%), kyphosis (bent spine abnormalities) in hatched larvae, increased anaphase aberrations in developing embryos, and decreased trout cell growth. The toxic samples generally contained high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic and/or chlorinated hydrocarbons and/or potentially toxic metals. In some cases, concentrations of contaminants on the sea surface exceeded water-quality criteria by several orders of magnitude. Several samples of subsurface bulk water collected below highly contaminated surfaces showed no detectable contamination or toxicity.

Hardy, J.T.; Crecelius, E.A.; Kocan, R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The reversibility of the glutathionyl-quercetin adduct spreads oxidized quercetin-induced toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Quercetin is one of the most prominent dietary antioxidants. During its antioxidant activity, quercetin becomes oxidized into its o-quinone/quinone methide QQ. QQ is toxic since it instantaneously reacts with thiols of, e.g., proteins. In cells, QQ will initially form an adduct with glutathione (GSH), giving GSQ. We have found that GSQ is not stable; it dissociates continuously into GSH and QQ with a half life of 2 min. Surprisingly, GSQ incubated with 2-mercapto-ethanol (MSH), a far less reactive thiol, results in the conversion of GSQ into the MSH-adduct MSQ. A similar conversion of GSQ into relatively stable protein thiol-quercetin adducts is expected. With the dithiol dihydrolipoic acid (L(SH){sub 2}), quercetin is formed out of GSQ. These results indicate that GSQ acts as transport and storage of QQ. In that way, the initially highly focussed toxicity of QQ is dispersed by the formation of GSQ that finally spreads QQ-induced toxicity, probably even over cells.

Boots, Agnes W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: a.boots@farmaco.unimaas.nl; Balk, Jiska M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Bast, Aalt [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands); Haenen, Guido R.M.M. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Maastricht, P.O. Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht (Netherlands)

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of stress at dosing on organophosphate and heavy metal toxicity  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews recent studies assessing the effect of well-defined, severe, transient stress at dosing on two classical models of toxicity. These are the acute (anticholinesterase) toxicity seen following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos, and the nephrotoxicity elicited by the heavy metal depleted uranium, in rats. Stress was induced by periods of restraint and forced swimming in days to weeks preceding toxicant exposure. Forced swimming was far more stressful, as measured by marked, if transient, elevation of plasma corticosterone. This form of stress was administered immediately prior to administration of chlorpyrifos or depleted uranium. Chlorpyrifos (single 60 mg/kg subcutaneously) elicited marked inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase 4-day post-dosing. Depleted uranium (single intramuscular doses of 0.1, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg uranium) elicited dose-dependent increase in kidney concentration of the metal, with associated injury to proximal tubular epithelium and increases in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine during the 30-day post-dosing period. Stress at dosing had no effect on these toxicologic endpoints.

Jortner, Bernard S. [Laboratory for Neurotoxicity Studies, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, 1 Duck Pond Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0442 (United States)], E-mail: bjortner@vt.edu

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Study of chemical toxicity of low-level wastes. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of fuel-cycle wastes is reasonably well known. By comparison, there is little information on the chemical composition of non-fuel cycle wastes. Such non-fuel cycle wastes come from a variety of sources - industrial, chemical, and medical. Because of the paucity of information, it is difficult to define the chemical characteristics and to evaluate potential hazards of non-fuel cycle wastes as a result of chemical toxicity. This report provides an assessment of the chemical toxicity of low-level radioactive wastes based on literature reviews, preparation of bibliographies and monographs, and application of a variety of methodologies either being currently applied or being proposed for relative hazard assessments. The report relies primarily on data from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky waste disposal site. While there are differences between humid and dry sites, the findings are believed to be generally applicable to evaluating the chemical toxicity of wastes at all low-level radioactive waste burial sites.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Study of chemical toxicity of low-level wastes. Volume 2. Monographs  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition of fuel-cycle wastes is reasonably well known. By comparison, there is little information on the chemical composition of non-fuel cycle wastes. Such non-fuel cycle wastes come from a variety of sources - industrial, chemical, and medical. Because of the paucity of information, it is difficult to define the chemical characteristics and to evaluate potential hazards of non-fuel cycle wastes as a result of chemical toxicity. This report provides an assessment of the chemical toxicity of low-level radioactive wastes based on literature reviews, preparation of bibliographies and monographs, and application of a variety of methodologies either being currently applied or being proposed for relative hazard assessments. The report relies primarily on data from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky waste disposal site. While there are differences between humid and dry sites, the findings are believed to be generally applicable to evaluating the chemical toxicity of wastes at all low-level radioactive waste burial sites.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Restraint stress exacerbates alcohol-induced reproductive toxicity in male rats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cumulative exposure to multiple stresses may lead to aggravating the toxicity of each stress, qualitatively or quantitatively altering biological responses because of toxicological interaction. In this study, we intended to determine the possible effects of restraint stress on reproductive toxicity due to ethanol usage in male rats. Early pubertal male Wistar rats were subjected to either restraint stress (5h/day) or alcohol intoxication (2mg/kg body weight) or both for 60 days. Body weights of control and experimental rats were similar during the 60 days of this study. Testes were harvested, weighed, and prepared for enzyme assays, and cauda epididymides were isolated for the determination of density, motility, and viability of stored spermatozoa. Restraint stress or alcohol treatment significantly reduced testis weight and caused significant reductions in steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis. Mean density, motility, and viability of stored spermatozoa were reduced in experimental rats. Plasma testosterone concentrations in rats subjected to restraint stress or alcohol were decreased compared with those of controls, concomitant with increased concentrations of LH and FSH in experimental rats. These data suggest that sub-chronic exposure to restraint stress or alcohol contribute to reduce testicular and epididymal function in exposed rats. The study also suggests that restraint stress exacerbates alcohol-induced reproductive toxicity inrats.

P. Hari Priya; B.P. Girish; P. Sreenivasula Reddy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Possible approach to cleaning 'problematic' LRW with large contents of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances  

SciTech Connect

A general structural scheme for cleaning 'problematic' liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) containing a large amount of suspended particles, oils and other organic substances has been proposed. The technological scheme includes two main stages: 1) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and the larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration, 2) purification of radioactive waters from radionuclides by membrane-sorption to the levels of radiation safety norms applied. The filtration stage is considered as a three-step process of 'problematic' LRW treatment including: 1) 'problematic' LRW extraction from storage tanks with a robot type device intended for washing out the bottom sediment (slurry), 2) separation of suspended particles, oil product emulsions and larger part of colloidal particles from LRW by filtration through porous or gauze diaphragms of 0.1 to 10 {mu}m pores (cells) in size, 3) concentration of separated slurry up to 100-200 g/l. Two main options of the membrane-sorption technologies, AQUA-EXPRESS and Reverse Osmosis, for LRW purification have been considered. Two possible options of porous or gauze diaphragms productivity and lifetime increase between their surface regenerations have been shown: 1) possibility of an oxidizer introduction into initial LRW, 2) possibility to rotate a filtering element (disk or cylinder type). (authors)

Ilin, V.; Karlin, Yu.; Laurson, A.; Volkov, Eu.; Dmitriev, S. [Moscow Scientific Industrial Association 'Radon' (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Assessment of the acute toxicity of triclosan and methyl triclosan in wastewater based on the bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, the contributions of triclosan and its metabolite methyl triclosan to the overall acute toxicity of wastewater...Vibrio fischeri.... The protocol used in this paper involved various steps. First, th...

Marinella Farr; Daniela Asperger; Lina Kantiani

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The androgen receptor independent mechanism of toxicity of the novel anti-tumor agent 11[beta]-dichloro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspired by the toxicity mechanism of cisplatin in testicular cancer, a series of bi-functional genotoxicants has been designed that supplement their DNA damaging properties with the ability to interact with tumor specific ...

Fedele?, Bogdan I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Do trace metals (chromium, copper, and nickel) influence toxicity of diesel fuel for free-living marine nematodes?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to test the hypotheses that (1) free-living marine nematodes respond in a differential way to diesel fuel if it is combined with three trace ... (2) the magnitude of toxicity of di...

Amor Hedfi; Fehmi Boufahja; Manel Ben Ali

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Studies on toxicity of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles to microalgae species: Scenedesmus sp. and Chlorella sp.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In view of increasing commercial applications of metal oxide nanoparticles their toxicity assessment becomes important. Alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles have wide range of applications in industrial as well as perso...

I. Mohammed Sadiq; Sunandan Pakrashi; N. Chandrasekaran

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Oxidative stress mediated toxicity exerted by ethanol-inducible CYP2E1  

SciTech Connect

Induction of CYP2E1 by ethanol is one of the central pathways by which ethanol generates a state of oxidative stress in hepatocytes. To study the biochemical and toxicological actions of CYP2E1, our laboratory established HepG2 cell lines which constitutively overexpress CYP2E1 and characterized these cells with respect to ethanol toxicity. Addition of ethanol or an unsaturated fatty acid such as arachidonic acid or iron was toxic to the CYP2E1-expressing cells but not control cells. This toxicity was associated with elevated lipid peroxidation and could be prevented by antioxidants and inhibitors of CYP2E1. Apoptosis occurred in the CYP2E1-expressing cells exposed to ethanol, arachidonic acid, or iron. Removal of GSH caused a loss of viability in the CYP2E1-expressing cells even in the absence of added toxin or pro-oxidant. This was associated with mitochondrial damage and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Low concentrations of iron and arachidonic acid synergistically interacted with CYP2E1 to produce cell toxicity, suggesting these nutrients may act as priming or sensitizing agents to alcohol-induced liver injury. Surprisingly, CYP2E1-expressing cells had elevated GSH levels, due to transcriptional activation of glutamate cysteine ligase. Similarly, levels of catalase, alpha-, and microsomal glutathione transferase were also increased, suggesting that upregulation of these antioxidant genes may reflect an adaptive mechanism to remove CYP2E1-derived oxidants. Using co-cultures, interaction between CYP2E1-derived diffusible mediators to activate collagen production in hepatic stellate cells was found. While it is likely that several mechanisms contribute to alcohol-induced liver injury, the linkage between CYP2E1-dependent oxidative stress, mitochondrial injury, stellate cell activation, and GSH homeostasis may contribute to the toxic action of ethanol on the liver. HepG2 cell lines overexpressing CYP2E1 may be a valuable model to characterize the biochemical and toxicological properties of CYP2E1.

Wu Defeng [Department of Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Box 1603, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Cederbaum, Arthur I. [Department of Pharmacology and Biological Chemistry, Box 1603, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029 (United States)]. E-mail: arthur.cederbaum@mssm.edu

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Toxicity assessment of water and sediment elutriates from fixed-station ambient water quality network stations, 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989  

SciTech Connect

Toxicity biomonitoring of water column and sediment toxicity was conducted at six fixed network stations from 1986 through 1989. Stations were located on the Holston River, Bear Creek (Pickwick Reservoir), Hiwassee River, Emory River, Nolichucky River, and French Broad River at locations chosen to represent those sub-basins. Tests evaluated acute and chronic responses of larval fathead minnow survival and growth and Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction to water and sediment elutriates collected from these sites. Samples were collected once each year during summer. Neither water nor sediment elutriates from the French Broad River were toxic during the study period. Water column toxicity (chronic) occurred in Bear Creek in 1986 and in the Nolichucky River in 1987. Sediment elutriate toxicity occurred once during the study period in the Emory (1987) and Nolichucky (1988) Rivers. Sediments from the Holston and Hiwassee Rivers were toxic two times each. Hiwassee River sediment exhibited >1.3 chronic toxicity units in 1987 and 1989 (were toxic at the lowest dilution tested). Holston River sediment toxicity occurred during the most recent two years of testing. Results from the Holston and Hiwassee Rivers may indicate a toxics problem in the sub-basin. No acute toxicity occurred during the study. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

Moses, J.; Wade, D.C.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Methylmercury-induced toxicity is mediated by enhanced intracellular calcium through activation of phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C  

SciTech Connect

Methylmercury (MeHg) is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant to which humans can be exposed by ingestion of contaminated food. MeHg has been suggested to exert its toxicity through its high reactivity to thiols, generation of arachidonic acid and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and elevation of free intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}). However, the precise mechanism has not been fully defined. Here we show that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is a critical pathway for MeHg-induced toxicity in MDCK cells. D609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC, significantly reversed the toxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner with concomitant inhibition of the diacylglycerol (DAG) generation and the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-breakdown. MeHg activated the group IV cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}) and acidic form of sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) downstream of PC-PLC, but these enzymes as well as protein kinase C (PKC) were not linked to the toxicity by MeHg. Furthermore, MeHg produced ROS, which did not affect the toxicity. Addition of EGTA to culture media resulted in partial decrease of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and partially blocked the toxicity. In contrast, when the cells were treated with MeHg in the presence of Ca{sup 2+} in the culture media, D609 completely prevented cell death with parallel decrease in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Our results demonstrated that MeHg-induced toxicity was linked to elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} through activation of PC-PLC, but not attributable to the signaling pathways such as cPLA{sub 2}, A-SMase, and PKC, or to the generation of ROS.

Kang, Mi Sun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ju Yeon [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ji Heui [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Hyung Jun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kwang Mook [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Chin, Mi-Reyoung [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Chang-Kiu [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bonventre, Joseph V. [Renal Unit, Brigham Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Jung, Sung Yun [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Kyong [Department of Environmental and Health Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 221 Huksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: proteinlab@hanmail.net

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Plant oils and mineral oils: effects as insecticide additives and direct toxicity to Heliothis virescens (F.) and Musca domestica L.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis by GERMAIN OCHOU OCHOU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Entomology PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis...

Ochou, Germain Ochou

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Beam Path Toxicities to Non-Target Structures During Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Background: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams traverse nontarget normal structures not irradiated during three-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) for head and neck cancer (HNC). This study estimates the doses and toxicities to nontarget structures during IMRT. Materials and Methods: Oropharyngeal cancer IMRT and 3D-CRT cases were reviewed. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to evaluate radiation dose to the lip, cochlea, brainstem, occipital scalp, and segments of the mandible. Toxicity rates were compared for 3D-CRT, IMRT alone, or IMRT with concurrent cisplatin. Descriptive statistics and exploratory recursive partitioning analysis were used to estimate dose 'breakpoints' associated with observed toxicities. Results: A total of 160 patients were evaluated for toxicity; 60 had detailed DVH evaluation and 15 had 3D-CRT plan comparison. Comparing IMRT with 3D-CRT, there was significant (p {<=} 0.002) nonparametric differential dose to all clinically significant structures of interest. Thirty percent of IMRT patients had headaches and 40% had occipital scalp alopecia. A total of 76% and 38% of patients treated with IMRT alone had nausea and vomiting, compared with 99% and 68%, respectively, of those with concurrent cisplatin. IMRT had a markedly distinct toxicity profile than 3D-CRT. In recursive partitioning analysis, National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria adverse effects 3.0 nausea and vomiting, scalp alopecia and anterior mucositis were associated with reconstructed mean brainstem dose >36 Gy, occipital scalp dose >30 Gy, and anterior mandible dose >34 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Dose reduction to specified structures during IMRT implies an increased beam path dose to alternate nontarget structures that may result in clinical toxicities that were uncommon with previous, less conformal approaches. These findings have implications for IMRT treatment planning and research, toxicity assessment, and multidisciplinary patient management.

Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: dirosenthal@mdanderson.org; Chambers, Mark S. [Department of Dental Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Fuller, Clifton D. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Division of Radiological Sciences/Department of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Rebueno, Neal; Garcia, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Morrison, William H.; Ang, K. Kian; Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Nitzschia pungens Grunow f. multiseries Hasle: growth phases and toxicity of clonal cultures isolated from Galveston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NITZSCHIA PUNGE1VS GRUNOW F. MULTISERIES HASLE: GROWTH PHASES AND TOXICITY OF CLONAL CULTURES ISOLATED FROM GALVESTON, TEXAS A Thesis by MAUREEN ELIZABETH REAP Submitted to the Once of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Oceanography NITZSCHIA PUNGENS GRUNOW F. MUITISERIES HASLE: GROWTH PHASES AND TOXICITY OF CLONAL CULTURES ISOLATED FROM GALVESTON) TEXAS A Thesis by MAUREEN...

Reap, Maureen Elizabeth

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

395

Quality of Life and Toxicity From Passively Scattered and Spot-Scanning Proton Beam Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report quality of life (QOL)/toxicity in men treated with proton beam therapy for localized prostate cancer and to compare outcomes between passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and spot-scanning proton therapy (SSPT). Methods and Materials: Men with localized prostate cancer enrolled on a prospective QOL protocol with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up were reviewed. Comparative groups were defined by technique (PSPT vs SSPT). Patients completed Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires at baseline and every 3-6 months after proton beam therapy. Clinically meaningful differences in QOL were defined as ?0.5 baseline standard deviation. The cumulative incidence of modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ?2 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity and argon plasma coagulation were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: A total of 226 men received PSPT, and 65 received SSPT. Both PSPT and SSPT resulted in statistically significant changes in sexual, urinary, and bowel Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite summary scores. Only bowel summary, function, and bother resulted in clinically meaningful decrements beyond treatment completion. The decrement in bowel QOL persisted through 24-month follow-up. Cumulative grade ?2 GU and GI toxicity at 24 months were 13.4% and 9.6%, respectively. There was 1 grade 3 GI toxicity (PSPT group) and no other grade ?3 GI or GU toxicity. Argon plasma coagulation application was infrequent (PSPT 4.4% vs SSPT 1.5%; P=.21). No statistically significant differences were appreciated between PSPT and SSPT regarding toxicity or QOL. Conclusion: Both PSPT and SSPT confer low rates of grade ?2 GI or GU toxicity, with preservation of meaningful sexual and urinary QOL at 24 months. A modest, yet clinically meaningful, decrement in bowel QOL was seen throughout follow-up. No toxicity or QOL differences between PSPT and SSPT were identified. Long-term comparative results in a larger patient cohort are warranted.

Pugh, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quyhn Nhu; Mathai, Benson [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhu, X. Ron; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Amos, Richard A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mahmood, Usama; Kuban, Deborah A.; Frank, Steven J.; Hoffman, Karen E.; McGuire, Sean E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lee, Andrew K., E-mail: aklee@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) modulates the toxicity of mixed organophosphorus compounds  

SciTech Connect

A transgenic mouse model of the human hPON1{sub Q192R} polymorphism was used to address the role of paraoxonase (PON1) in modulating toxicity associated with exposure to mixtures of organophosphorus (OP) compounds. Chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), diazoxon (DZO), and paraoxon (PO) are potent inhibitors of carboxylesterases (CaE). We hypothesized that a prior exposure to these OPs would increase sensitivity to malaoxon (MO), a CaE substrate, and the degree of the effect would vary among PON1 genotypes if the OP was a physiologically significant PON1 substrate in vivo. CPO and DZO are detoxified by PON1. For CPO hydrolysis, hPON1{sub R192} has a higher catalytic efficiency than hPON1{sub Q192}. For DZO hydrolysis, the two alloforms have nearly equal catalytic efficiencies. For PO hydrolysis, the catalytic efficiency of PON1 is too low to be physiologically relevant. When wild-type mice were exposed dermally to CPO, DZO, or PO followed 4-h later by increasing doses of MO, toxicity was increased compared to mice receiving MO alone, presumably due to CaE inhibition. Potentiation of MO toxicity by CPO and DZO was greater in PON1{sup -/-} mice, which have greatly reduced capacity to detoxify CPO or DZO. Potentiation by CPO was more pronounced in hPON1{sub Q192} mice than in hPON1{sub R192} mice due to the decreased efficiency of hPON1{sub Q192} for detoxifying CPO. Potentiation by DZO was similar in hPON1{sub Q192} and hPON1{sub R192} mice, which are equally efficient at hydrolyzing DZO. Potentiation by PO was equivalent among all four genotypes. These results indicate that PON1 status can have a major influence on CaE-mediated detoxication of OP compounds.

Jansen, Karen L. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cole, Toby B.; Park, Sarah S. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Medicine (Div. of Medical Genetics), University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Furlong, Clement E. [Department of Medicine (Div. of Medical Genetics), University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)], E-mail: clem@u.washington.edu; Costa, Lucio G. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Guidance Document Carcinogenic Substances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mustard gas (bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) Formaldehyde (gas) Vinyl chloride Acetaldehyde Carbon tetrachloride 1,4-Dioxane Chloroform Ethyl carbamate (uret 3-Chloro-2-methylpropene Hexamethylphosphor 1

398

Characterization of air toxics from a laboratory coal-fired combustor  

SciTech Connect

Emissions of hazardous air pollutants from coal combustion were studied in a laboratory-scale combustion facility, with emphasis on fine particles in three size ranges of less than 7.5 {mu}m diameter. Vapors were also measured. Substances under study included organic compounds, anions, elements, and radionuclides. Fly ash was generated by firing a bituminous coal in a combuster for 40 h at each of two coal feed rates. Flue gas was sampled under two conditions. Results for organic compounds, anions, and elements show a dependence on particle size consistent with published power plant data. Accumulation of material onto surface layers was inferred from differences in chemical composition between the plume simulating dilution sampler and hot flue samples. Extracts of organic particulate material were fractionated into different polarity fractions and analyzed by GC/MS. In Phase II, these laboratory results will be compared to emissions from a full-scale power plant burning the same coal.

NONE

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

399

Detection of toxic factors after gamma-irradiation in vitro and in vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

its effects in the living organism. Thus, ths irradiation of pure chemlcai compounds was usecl as a first step in order to understand the stf??cts oi' irradiation in vivo. Studies of Daniel and Park (5, 6) showed that toxic factors wnlcn cause... source of gamma-irradiation. The doss rats in this study vaa constant TGG r/minute. The dose rate vas calibrated by a sliver aotixated phosphate glass dosimetry. Different, levels of irradiation vers achiewsd by expoairg the samples to ths irradiation...

Shihabi, Zakariya Kamel

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Risk assessment of toxic pollutants from fossil fuel power plants: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development and application of a methodology for assessing the control costs and chronic health risks of toxic pollutant emissions from coal-fired electric power plants. The approach emphasizes surface water discharges and pollution, but incorporates emissions to air, water, soil, and groundwater and transfers of pollutants between these media. The components of the general framework include (1) pollutant emission characterization, (2) environmental transport and fate analysis, (3) population exposure calculation, and (4) quantitative health risk assessment. The report provides a basic overview of the approach, discusses each component in detail, and describes its application to an hypothetical, simplified case study. 234 refs., 32 figs., 32 tabs.

Bolten, J.G.; Morrison, P.F.; Solomon, K.A.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

IMRT for Sinonasal Tumors Minimizes Severe Late Ocular Toxicity and Preserves Disease Control and Survival  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report late ocular (primary endpoint) and other toxicity, disease control, and survival (secondary endpoints) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2009, 130 patients with nonmetastatic sinonasal tumors were treated with IMRT at Ghent University Hospital. Prescription doses were 70 Gy (n = 117) and 60-66 Gy (n = 13) at 2 Gy per fraction over 6-7 weeks. Most patients had adenocarcinoma (n = 82) and squamous cell carcinoma (n = 23). One hundred and one (101) patients were treated postoperatively. Of 17 patients with recurrent tumors, 9 were reirradiated. T-stages were T1-2 (n = 39), T3 (n = 21), T4a (n = 38), and T4b (n = 22). Esthesioneuroblastoma was staged as Kadish A, B, and C in 1, 3, and 6 cases, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 52, range 15-121 months. There was no radiation-induced blindness in 86 patients available for late toxicity assessment ({>=}6 month follow-up). We observed late Grade 3 tearing in 10 patients, which reduced to Grade 1-2 in 5 patients and Grade 3 visual impairment because of radiation-induced ipsilateral retinopathy and neovascular glaucoma in 1 patient. There was no severe dry eye syndrome. The worst grade of late ocular toxicity was Grade 3 (n = 11), Grade 2 (n = 31), Grade 1 (n = 33), and Grade 0 (n = 11). Brain necrosis and osteoradionecrosis occurred in 6 and 1 patients, respectively. Actuarial 5-year local control and overall survival were 59% and 52%, respectively. On multivariate analysis local control was negatively affected by cribriform plate and brain invasion (p = 0.044 and 0.029, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.009); overall survival was negatively affected by cribriform plate and orbit invasion (p = 0.04 and <0.001, respectively) and absence of surgery (p = 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT for sinonasal tumors allowed delivering high doses to targets at minimized ocular toxicity, while maintaining disease control and survival. Avoidance of severe dry eye syndrome and radiation-induced blindness suggests IMRT as a standard treatment for sinonasal tumors.

Duprez, Frederic, E-mail: frederic.duprez@ugent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Madani, Indira; Morbee, Lieve [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Bonte, Katrien; Deron, Philippe; Domjan, Vilmos [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Boterberg, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

An empirical analysis of exposure-based regulation to abate toxic air pollution  

SciTech Connect

Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments requires the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate 189 air toxics, including emissions from by-product coke ovens. Economists criticize the inefficiency of uniform standards, but Title III makes no provision for flexible regulatory instruments. Environmental health scientists suggest that population exposure, not necessarily ambient air quality, should motivate environmental air pollution policies. Using an engineering-economic model of the United States steel industry, we estimate that an exposure-based policy can achieve the same level of public health as coke oven emissions standards and can reduce compliance costs by up to 60.0%. 18 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Marakovits, D.M.; Considine, T.J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Acute and chronic toxicity of uranium compounds to Ceriodaphnia-Daphnia dubia  

SciTech Connect

A study to determine the acute and chronic toxicity of uranyl nitrate, hydrogen uranyl phosphate, and uranium dioxide to the organism Ceriodaphnia dubia was conducted. The toxicity tests were conducted by two independent environmental consulting laboratories. Part of the emphasis for this determination was based on concerns expressed by SCDHEC, which was concerned that a safety factor of 100 must be applied to the previous 1986 acute toxicity result of 0.22 mg/L for Daphnia pulex, This would have resulted in the LETF release limits being based on an instream concentration of 0.0022 mg/L uranium. The NPDES Permit renewal application to SCDHEC utilized the results of this study and recommended that the LETF release limit for uranium be based an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. This is based on the fact that the uranium releases from the M-Area LETF will be in the hydrogen uranyl phosphate form, or a uranyl phosphate complex at the pH (6--10) of the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility effluent stream, and at the pH of the receiving stream (5.5 to 7.0). Based on the chronic toxicity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate, a lower uranium concentration limit for the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility outfall vs. the existing NPDES permit was recommended: The current NPDES permit ``Guideline`` for uranium at outfall M-004 is 0.500 mg/L average and 1.0 mg/L maximum, at a design flowrate of 60 gpm. It was recommended that the uranium concentration at the M-004 outfall be reduced to 0.28 mg/L average, and 0.56 mg/L, maximum, and to reduce the design flowrate to 30 gpm. The 0.28 mg/L concentration will provide an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. The 0.28 mg/L concentration at M-004 is based on the combined flows from A-014, A-015, and A-011 outfalls (since 1985) of 1840 gpm (2.65 MGD) and was the flow rate which was utilized in the 1988 NPDES permit renewal application.

Pickett, J.B.; Specht, W.L.; Keyes, J.L.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Toxicant-disease-environment interactions associated with suppression of immune system, growth, and reproduction. [PCB  

SciTech Connect

The effects of marginal malnourishment, infections, and environmental chemicals on growth and reproductive success in Swiss-Webster white mice and wild deer mice were studied with fractional factorial designs. Interaction effects were discovered. For example, malnourished mice were more sensitive to virus exposure and environmental chemicals (a plant growth regulator or polychlorinated biphenyls). Since several commercial plant growth regulators also appear to suppress the immune system, these results cast doubt on the adequacy of current toxicity testing procedures in which factors are studied individually and not in combination.

Porter, W.P.; Hinsdill, R.; Fairbrother, A.; Olson, L.J.; Jaeger, J.; Yuill, T.; Bisgaard, S.; Hunter, W.G.; Nolan, K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optimized procedures for extractioin, purification and characterization of exopolymeric substances (eps) from two bacteria (sagittula stellata and pseudomonas fluorescens biovar ii) with relevance to the study of actinide binding in aquatic environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of marine bacterium Sagittula stellata and soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Biovar II, were extracted by six methods referred to the bibliography, efficacies of which were compared based on the EPS...

Xu, Chen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Theory of diffusion and sorption of various substances through a biporous sorbent membrane for the case of a constant concentration difference at its boundaries and a linear sorption isotherm. I. Case of an exponential kinetic function for the microporous zones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical solution has been obtained for the passage of the sorbed substance through a membrane of a biporous sorbent for the case of constant concentration differences of the sorptive on its boundaries and a...

V. I. Ulin; P. P. Zolotarev; A. I. Pilipenko

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells  

SciTech Connect

Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ? We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ? The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ? CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ? Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ? We also identified ER stress as an early effector of CsA toxicity.

Sarr, Eduard, E-mail: eduard.sarro@vhir.org [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain) [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Jacobs-Cach, Conxita, E-mail: conxita.jacobs@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain)] [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Itarte, Emilio, E-mail: emili.itarte@uab.es [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)] [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Meseguer, Anna, E-mail: ana.meseguer@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain) [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Toxicity of ionic liquids to Clostridium sp. and effects on uranium biosorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Hazardous Materials 264 (2014) 246- 253 of Hazardous Materials 264 (2014) 246- 253 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Hazardous Materials j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e : w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / j h a z m a t Toxicity of ionic liquids to Clostridium sp. and effects on uranium biosorption C. Zhang a,b,∗ , S.V. Malhotra b,1 , A.J. Francis c,d a College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin, China 300071 b Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07104 USA c Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 USA d Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 South Korea h i g h l i g h t s * Three ILs showed varying degrees of toxicity to Clostridium sp.

409

ER stress is the initial response to polyglutamine toxicity in PC12 cells  

SciTech Connect

Persistent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) cause neuronal cell death. However, the relationship between these two phenomena remains controversial. In our current study, we have utilized an expanded polyglutamine fusion protein (polyQ81) expression system in PC12 cells to further examine the involvement of ER stress and UPS impairment in cell death. The expression of polyQ81-induced ER stress and cell death. PolyQ81 also induced the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and caspase-3 and an increase in polyubiquitin immunoreactivity, suggesting UPS impairment. ER stress was induced prior to the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. Low doses of lactacystin had almost similar effects on cell viability and on the activation of JNK and caspase-3 between normal cells and polyQ81-expressing cells. These results suggest that ER stress mediates polyglutamine toxicity prior to UPS impairment during the initial stages of these toxic effects.

Nakayama, Hitoshi [Department of Pharmacology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan)], E-mail: hitoshin@naramed-u.ac.jp; Hamada, Masashi [Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering and High Technology Research Center (HRC), Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Fujikake, Nobuhiro; Nagai, Yoshitaka [Division of Clinical Genetics, Department of Medical Genetics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Zhao, Jing [Department of Pharmacology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Hatano, Osamu [Department of Anatomy, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Shimoke, Koji [Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering and High Technology Research Center (HRC), Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Isosaki, Minoru; Yoshizumi, Masanori [Department of Pharmacology, Nara Medical University School of Medicine, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ikeuchi, Toshihiko [Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials and Bioengineering and High Technology Research Center (HRC), Kansai University, Suita, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

Acidity and aluminum toxicity caused by iron oxidation around anode bars  

SciTech Connect

Soil acidity and aluminum toxicity are serious environmental problems often found in humid temperate and tropical regions or in areas with acid rain. Iron oxidation in soils can also cause high concentrations of H{sup +}, which, in turn, causes an increase of Al{sup 3+} in the soil solution. To examine this problem, a study was undertaken to discover the cause of crop damage in crops planted over buried anode bars. Anode bars are part of an impressed current cathodic protection system for pipelines near Decatur, Illinois. Soil samples were collected from the problem site and from a non-problem site for comparison. Results showed that Fe oxidation around anode bars at the problem site is stimulated by electric current, a situation that results in high concentrations of H{sup +} and reduces soil pH to less than 3.0. Under the low pH condition, the content of available Al is very high, and therefore, the soil solution becomes toxic for soybean roots. Exchangeable Al was 360 to 700 ppm in soil immediately adjacent to anode bars but only 3 ppm in the soil midway between anode bars. The damage to the plants, such as reduced vegetative growth and lowered seed yield, developed in a circular pattern over the anode bars. Factors contributing to the problem were soil Fe content, rectifier voltage, and soil drainage.

Shen, S. [Dept. of Agriculture, Wyndmoor, PA (United States). ARS Eastern Regional Research Center] [Dept. of Agriculture, Wyndmoor, PA (United States). ARS Eastern Regional Research Center; Pepper, G.E.; Hassett, J.J.; Stucki, J.W. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)] [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Creosote-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of cresols (i.e., m-, o- and p-cresol isomers) from a population of creosote-treated utility wood poles and crossarms by application of the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The TCLP was promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in March 1990 (55FR 11798). Data generated in this study indicate that creosote-treated utility poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of total cresols and other semi-volatile organic compounds, from wood subjected to TCLP analysis, were an order of magnitude or more below their current Toxicity Characteristic (TC) regulatory levels. The wood analyzed in this study consisted of 54 samples of wood poles and 6 crossarms. Subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and the resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of cresols and other semi-volatile compounds.

Horn, M.E. (Environmental Management Services, Waupaca, WI (United States)); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation  

SciTech Connect

Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

Outeiro, Tiago Fleming [Alzheimer's Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, MGH, Harvard Medical School, CNY 114, 16th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Klucken, Jochen [Alzheimer's Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, MGH, Harvard Medical School, CNY 114, 16th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Strathearn, Katherine E. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091 (United States); Liu Fang [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091 (United States); Nguyen, Paul [Alzheimer's Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, MGH, Harvard Medical School, CNY 114, 16th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); Rochet, Jean-Christophe [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2091 (United States); Hyman, Bradley T. [Alzheimer's Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, MGH, Harvard Medical School, CNY 114, 16th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States); McLean, Pamela J. [Alzheimer's Research Unit, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease, MGH, Harvard Medical School, CNY 114, 16th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129 (United States)]. E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

413

Mechanisms of carbon nanotube-induced toxicity: Focus on oxidative stress  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnologies are emerging as highly promising technologies in many sectors in the society. However, the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials also raises concerns about inadvertent exposure to these materials and the potential for adverse effects on human health and the environment. Despite several years of intensive investigations, a common paradigm for the understanding of nanoparticle-induced toxicity remains to be firmly established. Here, the so-called oxidative stress paradigm is scrutinized. Does oxidative stress represent a secondary event resulting inevitably from disruption of biochemical processes and the demise of the cell, or a specific, non-random event that plays a role in the induction of cellular damage e.g. apoptosis? The answer to this question will have important ramifications for the development of strategies for mitigation of adverse effects of nanoparticles. Recent examples of global lipidomics studies of nanoparticle-induced tissue damage are discussed along with proteomics and transcriptomics approaches to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the complex and interrelated molecular changes in cells and tissues exposed to nanoparticles. We also discuss instances of non-oxidative stress-mediated cellular damage resulting from direct physical interference of nanomaterials with cellular structures. -- Highlights: ? CNT induced non-random oxidative stress associated with apoptosis. ? Non-oxidative mechanisms for cellular toxicity of carbon nanotubes. ? Biodegradation of CNT by cells of innate immune system. ? Omics-based biomarkers of CNT exposures.

Shvedova, Anna A., E-mail: ats1@cdc.gov [Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Pietroiusti, Antonio [Department of Biopathology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Biopathology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Fadeel, Bengt [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden) [Division of Molecular Toxicology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kagan, Valerian E. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. [Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Toxic chemical release inventory reporting: Questions and answers (Qs&As)  

SciTech Connect

On September 22, 1992, the Secretary of Energy directed the Department to participate in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) 33/50 Pollution Prevention Program and to initiate Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) reporting, pursuant to Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) issued interim guidance on March 4, 1993, entitled ``Toxic Chemical Release Inventory and 33/50 Pollution Prevention Program`` that provided instructions on implementing the Secretarial directive. As stated in the interim guidance, all DOE sites not currently reporting under EPCRA Section 313, which meet the criteria for DOE TRI reporting, will initiate reporting of all TRI chemical releases and transfers for the 1993 calendar year with the annual report due to EPA, States and a courtesy copy to EH-20 by July 1, 1994. All other DOE sites which currently report under EPCRA Section 313 will also follow the criteria for DOE TRI reporting.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Duodenal and Other Gastrointestinal Toxicity in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer Treated With Extended-Field Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Paraaortic Lymph Nodes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To characterize the rates of acute and late duodenal and other gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities among patients treated for cervical and endometrial cancers with extended-field intensity modulated radiation therapy (EF-IMRT) to the paraaortic nodes and to analyze dose-volume relationships of GI toxicities. Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients with endometrial or cervical cancer underwent EF-IMRT to the paraaortic nodes, of whom 46 met the inclusion criteria for GI toxicity and 45 for duodenal toxicity analysis. The median prescribed dose to the paraaortic nodes was 54 Gy (range, 41.4-65 Gy). The 4 duodenal segments, whole duodenum, small bowel loops, peritoneum, and peritoneum plus retroperitoneal segments of colon were contoured retrospectively, and dosimetric analysis was performed to identify dose-volume relationships to grade ?3 acute (<90 day) and late (?90 day) GI toxicity. Results: Only 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced acute grade ?3 GI toxicity and 3/46 patients (6.5%) experienced late grade ?3 GI toxicity. The median dose administered to these 6 patients was 50.4 Gy. One of 12 patients who received 63 to 65 Gy at the level of the renal hilum experienced grade 3 GI toxicity. Dosimetric analysis of patients with and without toxicity revealed no differences between the mean absolute or fractional volumes at any 5-Gy interval between 5 Gy and the maximum dose. None of the patients experienced duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Treatment of paraaortic nodes with IMRT is associated with low rates of GI toxicities and no duodenal-specific toxicity, including patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. This technique may allow sufficient dose sparing of the bowel to enable safe dose escalation to at least 65 Gy.

Poorvu, Philip D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sadow, Cheryl A. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Townamchai, Kanokpis; Damato, Antonio L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N., E-mail: aviswanathan@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Toxicity of South Louisiana Crude Oil, Alaskan North Slope Crude Oil, and Dispersant COREXIT 9500 to Gulf Killifish, White Shrimp, and Eastern Oyster.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To address public concern over potential ecological effects on commercially and ecologically important species following use of dispersants during oil spill response efforts, toxicity data (more)

Liu, Bo

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Structure-activity relationship of antioxidants for inhibitors of linoleic acid hydroperoxide-induced toxicity in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Structure-activity relationship of antioxidants for the protective effects on linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-induced toxicity were examined in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. ?-Tocopherol,...

Takao Kaneko; Naomichi Baba; Mitsuyoshi Matsuo

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

News Briefs: The U.S. chemical industry's Responsible Care program "has not encouraged pollution prevention or greater public access to information about toxic threats,"  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

News Briefs: The U.S. chemical industry's Responsible Care program "has not encouraged pollution prevention or greater public access to information about toxic threats," ...

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tsca toxic substances" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, section 313 toxic chemical release inventory reporting forms for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Forms and the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Certification Statement Form A(s) for chlorine for 1996 for the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The reporting forms contain information on the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Y-12 Plant and Johnson Controls Water Treatment Plant operational releases for specific toxic chemicals to the air, water, and land in addition to transfers to off-site disposal locations in CY 1996. Personnel from U.S. West reported no usage of the specified toxic chemicals in CY 1996; therefore, no Form R or Form A reporting data are included for U.S. West.

Evans, R.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Investigating Sources of Toxicity in Stormwater: Algae Mortality in Runoff Upstream of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A source evaluation case study is presented for observations of algae toxicity in an intermittent stream passing through the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory near Livermore, California. A five-step procedure is discussed to determine the cause of water toxicity problems and to determine appropriate environmental management practices. Using this approach, an upstream electrical transfer station was identified as the probable source of herbicides causing the toxicity. In addition, an analytical solution for solute transport in overland flow was used to estimate the application level of 40 Kg/ha. Finally, this source investigation demonstrates that pesticides can impact stream water quality regardless of application within levels suggested on manufacturer labels. Environmental managers need to ensure that pesticides that could harm aquatic organisms (including algae) not be used within close proximity to streams or storm drainages and that application timing should be considered for environmental protection.

Campbell, C G; Folks, K; Mathews, S; Martinelli, R

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fractionation of Fulvic Acid by Iron and Aluminum OxidesInfluence on Copper Toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kathleen S. Smith *, James F. Ranville *, Emily K. Lesher , Daniel J. Diedrich ?, Diane M. McKnight ?, and Ruth M. Sofield # ... De Schamphelaere et al.(29) reported that DOM from different sources differ in their ability to decrease acute Cu toxicity to the freshwater-water flea Daphnia magna, and Stoiber et al.(55) report variable Cu uptake by the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii when different humic acids were present in the exposure media. ... The effect, per unit of HA, on chronic toxicity was very similar for soft and medium water but less in hard water. ...

Kathleen S. Smith; James F. Ranville; Emily K. Lesher; Daniel J. Diedrich; Diane M. McKnight; Ruth M. Sofield

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Further studies on the properties of organic and inorganic growth promoting substances in distillers dried solubles for the chick and poult  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efiaited the sama growth response as did the d1stillcrs dried sol'ubles contx ol, Combs et. ~, (1950) obtained four unidentified, , substances which promoted x. apid gxowth in chicks ~ These fractiCQ were separated from ref1ned liver paste dialysate.... 6, HC s tract oi dls 11 s ubas a x Dis? tillars dried solublaa ash was prepared by ignition over an open flame followed by aching in a muffle furnace at 600 C ~ un til a constant weight vas obtained, The distillsrs dx iad sol ublas ash...

Svacha, Richard Lincoln

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood poles and crossarms: Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) results  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative database on leachable concentrations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from a population of treated utility wood poles and crossarms as obtained by the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). An ancillary objective was to carefully document a subsampling method in preparing wood samples for tests by the TCLP. Data obtained in this study indicate that PCP-treated utility wood poles and crossarms are non-hazardous. Measured concentrations of PCP and other organic compounds subject to TCLP analysis were an order of magnitude or more below TC limits in 47 samples of wood derived from three different sections of 13 utility wood poles and from 9 crossarms. Wedge shaped subsamples, removed from full cross sectional slices of poles and crossarms, were prepared according to EPA procedures, subjected to the TCLP, and resultant leachates analyzed for the presence of PCP. 4 refs., 3 figs., 10 tab.

Horn, M.E. (Environmental Management Services, Waupaca, WI (USA)); Holcombe, L.; Owens, J.B. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

Kwint, Margriet [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van den [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose, E-mail: j.belderbos@nki.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced combustor design concepts to control NO{sub x} and air toxics. Quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

The University of Utah, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Reaction Engineering International (REI) and ABB/Combustion Engineering have joined together in this research proposal to develop fundamental understanding regarding the impact of fuel and combustion changes on ignition stability and flame characteristics because these critically affect: NO{sub x} emissions, carbon burnout, and emissions of air toxics; existing laboratory and bench scale facilities are being used to generate critical missing data which will be used to improve the NO{sub x} and carbon burnout submodels in comprehensive combustion simulation tools currently being used by industrial boiler manufacturers. To ensure effective and timely transfer of This technology, a major manufacturer (ABB) and a combustion model supplier (REI) have been included as part of the team from the early conception of the proposal. ABB/Combustion Engineering is providing needed fundamental data on the extent of volatile evolution from commercial coals as well as background information on current design needs in industrial practice. MIT is responsible for the development of an improved char nitrogen oxidation model which will ultimately be incorporated into an enhanced NO{sup x} submodel. Reaction Engineering International is providing the lead engineering staff for the experimental studies and an overall industrial focus for the work based on their use of the combustion simulation tools for a wide variety of industries. The University of Utah is conducting bench scale experimentation to (1) investigate alternative methods for enhancing flame stability to reduce NO{sub x} emissions and (2) characterize air toxic emissions under ultralow NO{sub x} conditions. Accomplishments for this quarter are presented to the solid sampling system and char nitrogen modeling.

Pershing, D.W.; Lighty, J.; Veranth, J. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Coll. of Engineering; Sarofim, A.; Goel, S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

428

New insight into artifactual phenomena during in vitro toxicity assessment of engineered nanoparticles: study of TNF-adsorption on alumina oxide nanoparticle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nanoparticles: study of TNF- adsorption on alumina oxide nanoparticle Mélanie Pailleuxa,b , Delphine Boudarda Biomolecules can be adsorbed on nanoparticles (NP) and degraded during in vitro toxicity assays: boehmite nanoparticles; toxicity; TNF- adsorption; TNF- degradation; correction curve hal-00799129,version1

Boyer, Edmond

429

Arabidopsis Thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-Like1 (CPL1) Mediates Responses to Iron Deficiency and Cadmium Toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, accumulation of the heavy-metal cadmium (Cd) in plants is toxic and it is absorbed by the roots due to the low selectivity of metal transporters such as AtIRT1. In this dissertation, CPL1 was also shown to regulate the transcriptional responses to Cd...

Aksoy, Emre

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs widely in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lead in Your Drinking Water Lead (Pb) is an extremely toxic heavy metal that unfortunately occurs of metallic lead in the soil (4) Drinking water ­ water as it leaves the treatment plant has no lead;Common metals used for the supply pipe are lead, copper and galvanized iron. Also in the system

Maynard, J. Barry

431

When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

Michel, Howard E.

432

Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally adapted Poecilia mexicana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toxic hydrogen sulphide and dark caves: pronounced male life-history divergence among locally-mail: ruedigerriesch@web.de ª 2 0 1 0 T H E A U T H O R S . J . E V O L . B I O L . 2 4 ( 2 0 1 1 ) 5 9 6 ­ 6 0 6 596 J

Schlupp, Ingo

433

Toxicity of Water Samples Collected in the Vicinity of F and H Seepage Basin 1990-1995  

SciTech Connect

Water and contaminants from the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins outcrop as shallow groundwater seeps down gradient from the basins. In 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, and 1995, toxicity tests were performed on water collected from a number of these seeps, as well as from several locations in Fourmile Branch and several uncontaminated reference locations.

Specht, W.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bowers, B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

www.manufacturing.gatech.edu The fire, smoke and toxicity (FST) factors of composite materials are becoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Conventional methods to improve fire resistance of polymeric composite materials are expensive due to the high fireshield skins Industry Benefits New class of lightweight, low-cost, fire-resistant materials meetingwww.manufacturing.gatech.edu The fire, smoke and toxicity (FST) factors of composite materials

Das, Suman

436

A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

Sen, Ayusman

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Failure to find aversive marking of toxic foods by Norway rats BENNETT G. GALEF, JR, SHANNON PRETTY & ELAINE E. WHISKIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Failure to find aversive marking of toxic foods by Norway rats BENNETT G. GALEF, JR, SHANNON PRETTY in an area soiled by demonstrators that had not learned to avoid the food, the naive rats ate an equal amount rats to learn socially to avoid foods in areas that conspecifics soil after becoming ill. ? 2006

Galef Jr., Bennett G.

438

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 20072012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 20072010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 20102012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish cell line (RTgill-W1)--towards water toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic system with integrated electroosmotic pumps, concentration gradient generator and fish that incorporates electroosmotic pumps, a concentration gradient generator and a fish cell line (rainbow trout gill concentration distribution of toxicant in a cell test chamber, (2) an electroosmotic (EO) pump chip

Le Roy, Robert J.

440

Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: fiorino.claudio@hsr.it; Alongi, Filippo [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Istituto di Bioimaging e Fisiologia Molecolare-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Unita Operativa Supporto, Cefalu (Italy); Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio [Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy); Calandrino, Riccardo [Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (Italy)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 67 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (8990%) and CPF (7883%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (8891%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (3550%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. Functional signs were only noted with parathion. Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Use of Axillary Deodorant and Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity During Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To prospectively determine the effect of deodorant use on acute skin toxicity and quality of life during breast radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Before breast RT, 84 patients were randomly assigned to the deodorant group (n = 40) or the no-deodorant group (n = 44). The patients were stratified by axillary RT and previous chemotherapy. Toxicity evaluations were always performed by the principal investigator, who was unaware of the group assignment, at the end of RT and 2 weeks after completion using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute skin toxicity criteria. Symptoms of acute skin toxicity (i.e., discomfort, pain, pruritus, sweating) and quality of life were self-evaluated. For each criterion, the point estimate of rate difference with the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit was computed. To claim noninferiority owing to deodorant use, the 95% one-sided upper confidence limit had to be lower than the noninferiority margin, fixed to 12.8%. Results: In the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, Grade 2 axillary radiodermatitis occurred in 23% vs. 30%, respectively, satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .019). Grade 2 breast radiodermatitis occurred in 30% vs. 34% of the deodorant vs. no-deodorant groups, respectively, also satisfying the statistical criteria for noninferiority (p = .049). Similar results were observed for the self-reported evaluations. The deodorant group reported less sweating (18% vs. 39%, p = .032). No Grade 3 or 4 radiodermatitis was observed. Conclusion: According to our noninferiority margin definition, the occurrence of skin toxicity and its related symptoms were statistically equivalent in both groups. No evidence was found to prohibit deodorant use (notwithstanding the use of an antiperspirant with aluminum) during RT for breast cancer.

Theberge, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.theberge.1@ulaval.c [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, QB (Canada); Harel, Francois [Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Quebec, QB (Canada); Dagnault, Anne [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, QB (Canada); Centre de Recherche de L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, L'Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l'Universite Laval, Quebec, QB (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics  

SciTech Connect

Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States)] [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States)] [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States) [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Assessment of diurnal systemic dose of agrochemicals in regulatory toxicity testing An integrated approach without additional animal use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated toxicokinetics (TK) data provide information on the rate, extent and duration of systemic exposure across doses, species, strains, gender, and life stages within a toxicology program. While routine for pharmaceuticals, TK assessments of non-pharmaceuticals are still relatively rare, and have never before been included in a full range of guideline studies for a new agrochemical. In order to better understand the relationship between diurnal systemic dose (AUC24h) and toxicity of agrochemicals, TK analyses in the study animals is now included in all short- (excluding acute), medium- and long-term guideline mammalian toxicity studies including reproduction/developmental tests. This paper describes a detailed procedure for the implementation of TK in short-, medium- and long-term regulatory toxicity studies, without the use of satellite animals, conducted on three agrochemicals (X11422208, 2,4-D and X574175). In these studies, kinetically-derived maximum doses (KMD) from short-term studies instead of, or along with, maximum tolerated doses (MTD) were used for the selection of the high dose in subsequent longer-term studies. In addition to leveraging TK data to guide dose level selection, the integrated program was also used to select the most appropriate method of oral administration (i.e., gavage versus dietary) of test materials for rat and rabbit developmental toxicity studies. The integrated TK data obtained across toxicity studies (without the use of additional/satellite animals) provided data critical to understanding differences in response across doses, species, strains, sexes, and life stages. Such data should also be useful in mode of action studies and to improve human risk assessments.

Shakil A. Saghir; Michael J. Bartels; David L. Rick; Alene T. McCoy; Reza J. Rasoulpour; Robert G. Ellis-Hutchings; M. Sue Marty; Claire Terry; Jason P. Bailey; Richard Billington; James S. Bus

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Building Toxic Metal Characterization and Decontamination Report: Area 6, Building 914  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to outline the toxic metal characterization and decontamination efforts in Area 6, Building 914. This includes the initial building inspection, the hotspot sampling, results/findings, building cleanup, and the verification sampling. Building 914 is a steel light frame building that was constructed in 1992. It is about 16,454 square feet, and five employees are assigned to this building. According to the building's floor plan blueprints, it could be inferred that this building was once a Wiremen/Lineman shop. In 2002-2004, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office embarked on a broad characterization of beryllium (Be) surface concentrations throughout the North Las Vegas Facility, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), and ancillary facilities like the Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, etc. Building 914 was part of this characterization. The results of the 2002 study illustrated that the metal housekeeping limits were within acceptable limits and from a Be standpoint, the building was determined to be fit for occupancy. On March 2, 2011, based on a request from Building 914 users, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) Industrial Hygiene (IH) collected bulk samples from the southwest corner of Building 914 at heights above 6 feet where black dust had been noticed on this particular wall. IH conducted surface swipe sampling of the area and analyzed the samples for toxic metals, namely, beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and manganese (Mn). The sample results indicated values two to four times above the housekeeping threshold for Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Mn. Subsequently, the facility was closed and posted; the necessary personnel were notified; and controls were instituted for ingress and egress of the building. On March 17, 2011, IH performed an extensive sampling event involving the entire warehouse in accordance with NSTec Organization Procedure OP-P250.004, Sampling Procedures. Analysis of the results from this exercise illustrated that toxic metal contamination was ubiquitous throughout the warehouse section of this building but did not extend into the office, restroom, and break room areas. On March 22, 2011, a planning meeting was held with Environment, Safety, Health & Quality management; Operations & Infrastructure (O&I) mangement; Facility Management; Occupational Medicine; O&I Operations; and IH. After a brief discussion concerning the salient facts of the surface sample results, it was agreed that the facility and its contents required cleaning. The facility would then be re-sampled to verify cleanliness and suitability for re-occupancy. On April 18, 2011, warehouse cleanup activites began. On July 5, 2011, upon receipt of the results from the last cleaned section, the cleanup operations were concluded. The building was statistically determined to be clean; thus, it could be reoccupied and the warehouse operations could resume immediately.

NSTec Industrial Hygiene

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Freshwater dispersion stability of PAA-stabilised cerium oxide nanoparticles and toxicity towards Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An aqueous dispersion of poly (acrylic acid)-stabilised cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (PAA-CeO2) was evaluated for its stability in a range of freshwater ecotoxicity media (MHRW, TG 201 and M7), with and without natural organic matter (NOM). In a 15day dispersion stability study, PAA-CeO2 did not undergo significant aggregation in any media type. Zeta potential varied between media types and was influenced by PAA-CeO2 concentration, but remained constant over 15days. NOM had no influence on PAA-CeO2 aggregation or zeta potential. The ecotoxicity of the PAA-CeO2 dispersion was investigated in 72h algal growth inhibition tests using the freshwater microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. PAA-CeO2 EC50 values for growth inhibition (GI; 0.024mg/L) were 23 orders of magnitude lower than pristine CeO2 EC50 values reported in the literature. The concentration of dissolved cerium (Ce3+/Ce4+) in PAA-CeO2 exposure suspensions was very low, ranging between 0.5 and 5.6?g/L. Free PAA concentration in the exposure solutions (0.00960.0384mg/L) was significantly lower than the EC10 growth inhibition (47.7mg/L) value of pure PAA, indicating that free PAA did not contribute to the observed toxicity. Elemental analysis indicated that up to 38% of the total Cerium becomes directly associated with the algal cells during the 72h exposure. TOF-SIMS analysis of algal cell wall compounds indicated three different modes of action, including a significant oxidative stress response to PAA-CeO2 exposure. In contrast to pristine CeO2 nanoparticles, which rapidly aggregate in standard ecotoxicity media, PAA-stabilised CeO2 nanoparticles remain dispersed and available to water column species. Interaction of PAA with cell wall components, which could be responsible for the observed biomarker alterations, could not be excluded. This study indicates that the increased dispersion stability of PAA-CeO2 leads to an increase in toxicity compared to pristine non-stabilised forms.

Andy Booth; Trond Strseth; Dag Altin; Andrea Fornara; Anwar Ahniyaz; Harald Jungnickel; Peter Laux; Andreas Luch; Lisbet Srensen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Paso del Norte pilot border study of ozone precursors and air toxics  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive monitoring program for ozone precursors and air toxics in the Paso del Norte border area is planned by the U.S. EPA for the Summer of 1996. A pilot study was carried out in October 1995 in the Paso del Norte area (El Paso, Texas, Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, and Sunland Park, New Mexico) to test the appropriateness of proposed sampling and analysis methods and to provide preliminary data to be used for planning the Summer 1996 study. Two monitoring sites were selected, one in Ciudad Juarez, and one in the El Paso area. Samples were collected every second day from October 21 to October 31, from 0300 to 0900 hr using stainless steel canisters (for VOC in the C{sub 2}-C{sub 12} range), Tenax-TA solid adsorbent cartridges (for C{sub 8}-C{sub 20} hydrocarbons). DNPH impregnated C{sub 18} Sep-Pack cartridges (for carbonyl compounds) and Teflon impregnated glass fiber filters followed by PUF/YAD/PUF {open_quotes}sandwich{close_quotes} cartridges (for SVOC). This paper discusses the data set obtained from the analyses of these samples. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Zielinska, B.; Sheetz, L.; Harshfield, G. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Aspects of nitrogen dioxide toxicity in environmental urban concentrations in human nasal epithelium  

SciTech Connect

Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) as part of urban exhaust pollution are widely discussed as potential hazards to human health. This study focuses on toxic effects of NO{sub 2} in realistic environmental concentrations with respect to the current limit values in a human target tissue of volatile xenobiotics, the epithelium of the upper aerodigestive tract. Nasal epithelial cells of 10 patients were cultured as an air-liquid interface and exposed to 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2}, 0.1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 1 ppm NO{sub 2}, 10 ppm NO{sub 2} and synthetic air for half an hour. After exposure, genotoxicity was evaluated by the alkaline single-cell microgel electophoresis (Comet) assay and by induction of micronuclei in the micronucleus test. Depression of proliferation and cytotoxic effects were determined using the micronucleus assay and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. The experiments revealed genotoxic effects by DNA fragmentation starting at 0.01 ppm NO{sub 2} in the Comet assay, but no micronucleus inductions, no changes in proliferation, no signs of necrosis or apoptosis in the micronucleus assay, nor did the trypan blue exclusion assay show any changes in viability. The present data reveal a possible genotoxicity of NO{sub 2} in urban concentrations in a screening test. However, permanent DNA damage as indicated by the induction of micronuclei was not observed. Further research should elucidate the effects of prolonged exposure.

Koehler, C.; Ginzkey, C.; Friehs, G.; Hackenberg, S.; Froelich, K.; Scherzed, A.; Burghartz, M.; Kessler, M. [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Kleinsasser, N., E-mail: Kleinsasser_N@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.d [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery, University of Wuerzburg (Germany)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Modeling marrow damage from response data: Morphallaxis from radiation biology to benzene toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Consensus principles from radiation biology were used to describe a generic set of nonlinear, first-order differential equations for modeling of toxicity-induced compensatory cell kinetics in terms of sublethal injury, repair, direct killing, killing of cells with unrepaired sublethal injury, and repopulation. This cellular model was linked to a probit model of hematopoietic mortality that describes death from infection and/or hemorrhage between {approximately} 5 and 30 days. Mortality data from 27 experiments with 851 doseresponse groups, in which doses were protracted by rate and/or fractionation, were used to simultaneously estimate all rate constants by maximum-likelihood methods. Data used represented 18,940 test animals distributed according to: (mice, 12,827); (rats, 2,925); (sheep, 1,676); (swine, 829); (dogs, 479); and (burros, 204). Although a long-term, repopulating hematopoietic stem cell is ancestral to all lineages needed to restore normal homeostasis, the dose-response data from the protracted irradiations indicate clearly that the particular lineage that is ``critical`` to hematopoietic recovery does not resemble stem-like cells with regard to radiosensitivity and repopulation rates. Instead, the weakest link in the chain of hematopoiesis was found to have an intrinsic radioresistance equal to or greater than stromal cells and to repopulate at the same rates. Model validation has been achieved by predicting the LD{sub 50} and/or fractional group mortality in 38 protracted-dose experiments (rats and mice) that were not used in the fitting of model coefficients.

Jones, T.D.; Morris, M.D.; Hasan, J.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Toxic effects of low doses of Bisphenol-A on human placental cells  

SciTech Connect

Humans are exposed daily to a great number of xenobiotics and their metabolites present as pollutants. Bisphenol-A (BPA) is extensively used in a broad range of products including baby bottles, food-storage containers, medical equipment, and consumer electronics. Thus, BPA is the most common monomer for polycarbonates intended for food contact. Levels of this industrial product are found in maternal blood, amniotic fluid, follicular fluid, placental tissue, umbilical cord blood, and maternal urine. In this study, we investigated toxic effects of BPA concentrations close to levels found in serum of pregnant women on human cytotrophoblasts (CTB). These cells were isolated from fresh placentas and exposed to BPA for 24 h. Our results showed that very low doses of BPA induce apoptosis (2 to 3 times) as assessed using M30 antibody immunofluorescent detection, and necrosis (1.3 to 1.7 times) as assessed through the cytosolic Adenylate Kinase (AK) activity after cell membrane damage. We also showed that BPA increased significantly the tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) gene expression and protein excretion as measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA luminescent test, respectively. Moreover, we observed that induction of AK activation and TNF-alpha gene expression require lower levels of BPA than apoptosis or TNF-alpha protein excretion. Our findings suggest that exposure of placental cells to low doses of BPA may cause detrimental effects, leading in vivo to adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, prematurity and pregnancy loss.

Benachour, Nora [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Aris, Aziz, E-mail: aziz.aris@usherbrooke.c [Laboratory of Research in Reproductive and Gestational Health, Quebec (Canada); Department of Obstetrics-Gynecology, University of Sherbrooke Hospital Centre, Quebec (Canada)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Assessing the Renal Toxicity of Capstone Depleted Uranium Oxides and Other Uranium Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The primary target for uranium toxicity is the kidney. The most frequently used guideline for uranium kidney burdens is the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) value of 3 g U/g kidney, a value that is based largely upon chronic studies in animals. In the present effort, we have developed a risk model equation to assess potential outcomes of acute uranium exposure. Twenty-seven previously published case studies in which workers were acutely exposed to soluble compounds of uranium (as a result of workplace accidents) were analyzed. Kidney burdens of uranium for these individuals were determined based on uranium in the urine, and correlated with health effects observed over a period of up to 38 years. Based upon the severity of health effects, each individual was assigned a score (- to +++) and then placed into an Effect Group. A discriminant analysis was used to build a model equation to predict the Effect Group based on the amount of uranium in the kidneys. The model equation was able to predict the Effect Group with 85% accuracy. The risk model was used to predict the Effect Group for Soldiers exposed to DU as a result of friendly fire incidents during the 1991 Gulf War. This model equation can also be used to predict the Effect Group of new cases in which acute exposures to uranium have occurred.

Roszell, Laurie E.; Hahn, Fletcher; Lee, Robyn B.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

452

Coupled problem of point force and generalized point source of diffusive substance or heat at the surface of semi-infinite transversely isotropic material  

SciTech Connect

For a three-dimensional semi-infinite transversely isotropic material, Green's functions (that give the full set of coupled fields due to the arbitrarily oriented point force and concentrated generalized point source, that represents either the diffusive chemical substance concentration or heat applied at the boundary of the half-space) are derived in elementary functions in a simple way, using methods of the potential theory. In the course of the analysis we derived the general solution of the field equations, represented in terms of four harmonic potential functions, which may also be relevant to other problems of chemical concentration or heat diffusion. These solutions constitute generalization of Boussinesq's and Cerruti s problems of elasticity for the chemically diffusive and/or thermoelastic materials.

Karapetian, E. [Suffolk University, Boston; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society  

SciTech Connect

The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ?N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ?N NMR. Liquid state ?N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (H?N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Short-term methods for estimating the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving water to marine and estuarine organisms. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual describes six short-term (one hour to nine days) estuarine and marine methods for measuring the chronic toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to five species; the sheepshead minnow, Cyprinodon variegatus; the inland silverside, Menidia beryllina; the mysid, Mysidopsis bahia; the sea urchin, Arbacia punctualata; and the red macroalga, Champia parvula. The methods include single and multiple concentration static renewal and static nonrenewal toxicity tests for effluents and receiving waters. Also included are guidelines on laboratory safety, quality assurance, facilities, and equipment and supplies; dilution water; effluent and receiving water sample collection, preservation, shipping, and holding; test conditions; toxicity test data analysis; report preparation; and organism culturing, holding, and handling.

Klemm, D.J.; Morrison, G.E.; Norberg-King, T.J.; Peltier, W.H.; Heber, M.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Combined modality therapy for HIV-infected patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the anus: Outcomes and toxicities  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We report toxicity and survival data of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men with anal carcinoma treated with combined modality therapy (CMT) of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on the records of 17 HIV-positive patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma treated with CMT at our institution between 1991 and 2004. Radiotherapy consisted of 30.6 to 45 Gy to the pelvis, total dose of 50.4 to 59.4 Gy to initial gross disease, at 1.8 Gy/fraction. Chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil and either mitomycin C or cisplatin. The mean follow-up was 25.6 months (median, 15.6 months; range, 4.6-106 months). Results: Significant acute skin and hematologic toxicity developed in 8 of 17 and 9 of 17 patients, respectively. One patient died 12 days after treatment of progressive disease and sepsis. Significant late toxic sequelae developed in 3 patients: 1 anorectal ulcer, 2 dermatologic (perianal ulceration, hemorrhagic perineal sores and suspected fissure). Fourteen of 15 patients with Stage I-III disease had a complete response; 2 complete responders subsequently had a relapse in the anorectum. For all patients, actuarial 18-month survival was 67%. For patients with Stage I-III disease, survival at last follow-up by low CD4 count (<200) vs. high count (>200) was 4 of 7 vs. 7 of 8, respectively; significant acute toxicities developed in 4 of 8 vs. 6 of 9, respectively. Conclusion: For HIV patients with anal carcinoma, CMT yields reasonable local control with significant acute complications. Survival is lower than in the general population, attributable more to the underlying infection than to the malignancy.

Edelman, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)]. E-mail: scotte@radonc.emory.org; Johnstone, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dosimetric and Late Radiation Toxicity Comparison Between Iodine-125 Brachytherapy and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Juxtapapillary Choroidal Melanoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To compare the dose distributions and late radiation toxicities for {sup 125}I brachytherapy (IBT) and stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) in the treatment of juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma. Methods: Ninety-four consecutive patients with juxtapapillary melanoma were reviewed: 30 have been treated with IBT and 64 with SRT. Iodine-125 brachytherapy cases were modeled with plaque simulator software for dosimetric analysis. The SRT dosimetric data were obtained from the Radionics XKnife RT3 software. Mean doses at predetermined intraocular points were calculated. Kaplan-Meier estimates determined the actuarial rates of late toxicities, and the logrank test compared the estimates. Results: The median follow-up was 46 months in both cohorts. The 2 cohorts were balanced with respect to pretreatment clinical and tumor characteristics. Comparisons of radiation toxicity rates between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded actuarial rates at 50 months for cataracts of 62% and 75% (P=.1), for neovascular glaucoma 8% and 47% (P=.002), for radiation retinopathy 59% and 89% (P=.0001), and for radiation papillopathy 39% and 74% (P=.003), respectively. Dosimetric comparisons between the IBT and SRT cohorts yielded mean doses of 12.8 and 14.1 Gy (P=.56) for the lens center, 17.6 and 19.7 Gy (P=.44) for the lens posterior pole, 13.9 and 10.8 Gy (P=.30) for the ciliary body, 61.9 and 69.7 Gy (P=.03) for optic disc center, and 48.9 and 60.1 Gy (P<.0001) for retina at 5-mm distance from tumor margin, respectively. Conclusions: Late radiation-induced toxicities were greater with SRT, which is secondary to the high-dose exposure inherent to the technique as compared with IBT. When technically feasible, IBT is preferred to treat juxtapapillary choroidal melanoma.

Krema, Hatem, E-mail: htmkrm19@yahoo.com [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Heydarian, Mostafa [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Beiki-Ardakani, Akbar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Weisbrod, Daniel [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Ocular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xu, Wei [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Laperriere, Normand J.; Sahgal, Arjun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital/University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Role of aggregation conditions and presence of small heat shock proteins on abeta structure, stability and toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of them ? memantine, an N-methyl-D-asparate (NMDA) antagonist - is thought to work by blocking the action of the neurotransmitter glutamate.(Religa and Winblad 2003; Farlow 2004) Glutamate is used in areas of the brain affected by AD, and excess... glutamate is toxic to neurons. Memantine is for the treatment of moderate to severe AD, (Religa and Winblad 2003) whereas the other drugs approved are for mild to moderate AD. (Birks et al. 2000...

Lee, Sung Mun

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Long-Term Outcomes and Toxicity of Concurrent Paclitaxel and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To report the long-term outcomes and toxicity of a regimen of infusion paclitaxel delivered concurrently with radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 1999, 35 patients with nonmetastatic, Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with three cycles of paclitaxel as a 120-h continuous infusion beginning on Days 1, 21, and 42, concurrent with radiotherapy. The initial 16 patients received 105 mg/m{sup 2}/cycle, and the subsequent 19 patients received 120 mg/m{sup 2}/cycle. External beam radiotherapy was delivered to a dose of 70.2-72 Gy at five fractions weekly. Patients were followed to evaluate the disease outcomes and late toxicity of this regimen. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 56.5 months. The median survival was 56.5 months, and the median time to local recurrence was not reached. Of the 35 patients, 15 (43%) developed hypothyroidism. Of the 33 patients who underwent percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement, 11 were percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube dependent until death or their last follow-up visit. Also, 5 patients (14%) required a tracheostomy until death, and 3 (9%) developed a severe esophageal stricture. All evaluated long-term survivors exhibited salivary hypofunction. Fibrosis in the radiation field occurred in 24 patients (69%). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that concurrent chemoradiotherapy with a 120-h infusion of paclitaxel provides long-term local control and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Xerostomia, hypothyroidism, esophageal and pharyngeal complications, and subcutaneous fibrosis were common long-term toxicities; however, the vast majority of toxicities were grade 1 or 2.

Citrin, Deborah [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Mansueti, John; Likhacheva, Anna; Sciuto, Linda [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Albert, Paul S. [Biometric Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rudy, Susan F. [Head and Neck Surgery Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cooley-Zgela, Theresa [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cotrim, Ana [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Solomon, Beth [Speech Language Pathology Section, Rehabilitation Medicine Department, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Head and Neck Oncology Program, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Russo, Angelo [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Morris, John C. [Metabolism Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Herscher, Laurie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, MD (United States); Smith, Sharon [Radiation Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] (and others)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

NOx, FINE PARTICLE AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT  

SciTech Connect

This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and coal. The objective is to determine the relationship between (1) fraction sludge in the sludge/coal mixture, and (2) combustion conditions on (a) NOx concentrations in the exhaust, (b) the size segregated fine and ultra-fine particle composition in the exhaust, and (c) the partitioning of toxic metals between vapor and condenses phases, within the process. The proposed study will be conducted in concert with an existing ongoing research on toxic metal partitioning mechanisms for very well characterized pulverized coals alone. Both high NOx and low NOx combustion conditions will be investigated (unstaged and staged combustion). Tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} control, NO{sub x} control, and inorganic fine particle and toxic metal emissions will be determined. Previous research results have demonstrated that the inhalation of coal/MSS ash particles cause an increase in lung permeability than coal ash particles alone. Elemental analysis of the coal/MSS ash particles showed that Zn was more abundant in these ash particles than the ash particles of coal ash alone.

Jost O.L. Wendt

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Rapid bioassessment methods for assessing vegetation toxicity at the Savannah River Site - germination tests and root elongation trials  

SciTech Connect

Plants form the basis of all ecosystems including wetlands. Although they are the most abundant life form and are the primary producers for all other organisms, they have received the least attention when it comes to environmental matters. Higher plants have rarely been used in ecotoxicity testing and may not respond in the same manner as algae, which have been used more frequently. The introduction of hazardous waste materials into wetland areas has the potential to alter and damage the ecological processes in these ecosystems. Measuring the impact of these contaminants on higher plants is therefore important and needs further research. Higher plants are useful for detecting both herbicidal toxicity and heavy metal toxicity. For phytotoxicity tests to be practical they must be simple, inexpensive, yet sensitive to a variety of contaminants. A difference between seed germination and root elongation tests is that seed germination tests measure toxicity associated with soils directly, while root elongation tests consider the indirect effects of water-soluble constituents that may be present in site samples.

Specht, W.L.; Klaine, S.J.; Hook, D.D. [and others

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Evaluation of 90-day oral rat toxicity studies on the food additive, gum ghatti  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gum ghatti, a polysaccharide of natural origin, is used in foods as a thickening, gelling, emulsifying and stabilizing agent. In a 90-day toxicity study following Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Guideline #408, male and female SpragueDawley rats were exposed to 0 (control), 0.5, 1.5 and 5% gum ghatti in AIN-93M basal diet. Expected changes included increased full and empty cecal weights in 5% groups. Incidentally 2/10 females from the 5% gum ghatti group had a single colon ulcer with associated acute inflammation. In a second 90-day study increased cecal weights were present in SpragueDawley females exposed to 5% gum ghatti in AIN-93M and NIH-07 basal diets. A single colon ulcer with associated acute inflammation occurred in 1/20 control females given AIN-93M basal diet. The colon ulcers were considered a sporadic change possibly attributable to AIN-93M basal diet. In the second study a few statistically significant alterations in clinical chemistry were considered sporadic and unrelated to treatment. Feed consumption among treated and control groups was similar for each sex. Gum ghatti intake at the 5% dietary level ranged from 3044 to 3825mg/kg body weight/day. The 5% dietary administration was a NOAEL in both studies. \\{NOAELs\\} for males and females in the first study were 3044 and 3309mg/kg/day, respectively. \\{NOAELs\\} for females in the second study were 3670 and 3825mg/kg/day for AIN-93M and NIH-07 diets, respectively.

Robert R. Maronpot; Jeffrey Davis; Glenda Moser; Dipak K. Giri; Shim-mo Hayashi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Localized Immunotherapy via Liposome-Anchored Anti-CD137 + IL-2 Prevents Lethal Toxicity and Elicits Local and Systemic Antitumor Immunity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immunostimulatory agonists such as anti-CD137 and interleukin (IL)-2 have elicited potent antitumor immune responses in preclinical studies, but their clinical use is limited by inflammatory toxicities that result upon ...

Kwong, Brandon

463

Dump fire leaves toxic air, sludge A fire which burned for four days at a landfill site in Thessaloniki, sending thick black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dump fire leaves toxic air, sludge A fire which burned for four days at a landfill site to break. This led to sludge flowing into some nearby houses. Authorities are due to begin the cleanup

Columbia University

464

Development of a Set of Nomograms to Predict Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Toxicity for Prostate Cancer 3D-CRT  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To predict acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Subjective Objective Signs Management and Analysis/Late Effect of Normal Tissue (SOMA/LENT) toxicities of the lower gastrointestinal (LGI) syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using a tool (nomogram) that takes into account clinical and dosimetric variables that proved to be significant in the Italian Association for Radiation Oncology (AIRO) Group on Prostate Cancer (AIROPROS) 0102 trial. Methods and Materials: Acute rectal toxicity was scored in 1,132 patients by using both the RTOG/EORTC scoring system and a 10-item self-assessed questionnaire. Correlation between clinical variables/dose-volume histogram constraints and rectal toxicity was investigated by means of multivariate logistic analyses. Multivariate logistic analyses results were used to create nomograms predicting the symptoms of acute LGI syndrome. Results: Mean rectal dose was a strong predictor of Grade 2-3 RTOG/EORTC acute LGI toxicity (p 0.0004; odds ratio (OR) = 1.035), together with hemorrhoids (p = 0.02; OR 1.51), use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p = 0.02; OR = 0.63), and androgen deprivation (AD) (p = 0.04; OR = 0.65). Diabetes (p = 0.34; OR 1.28) and pelvic node irradiation (p = 0.11; OR = 1.56) were significant variables to adjust toxicity prediction. Bleeding was related to hemorrhoids (p = 0.02; OR = 173), AD (p = 0.17; OR = 0.67), and mean rectal dose (p 0.009; OR = 1.024). Stool frequency was related to seminal vesicle irradiation (p = 0.07; OR = 6.46), AD administered for more than 3 months (p = 0.002; OR = 0.32), and the percent volume of rectum receiving more than 60 Gy (V60Gy) V60 (p = 0.02; OR = 1.02). Severe fecal incontinence depended on seminal vesicle irradiation (p = 0.14; OR = 4.5) and V70 (p = 0.033; OR 1.029). Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the first set of nomograms available in the literature specific to symptoms of LGI syndrome and provides clinicians with a tailored probability of the specific outcome. Validation of the tool is in progress.

Valdagni, Riccardo [Prostate Programme, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy); Rancati, Tiziana [Prostate Programme, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano (Italy)], E-mail: tiziana.rancati@istitutotumori.mi.it; Fiorino, Claudio [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale San Raffaele, Milano (Italy); Fellin, Gianni [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Santa Chiara, Trento (Italy); Magli, Alessandro [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Baccolini, Michela [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale Villa Maria Cecilia, Lugo (Italy); Bianchi, Carla [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy); Cagna, Emanuela [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Greco, Carlo [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro (Italy); Mauro, Flora A. [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale Villa Maria Cecilia, Lugo (Italy); Monti, Angelo F. [Department of Medical Physics, Ospedale Sant' Anna, Como (Italy); Munoz, Fernando [Department of Radiotherapy, Istituto per la Ricerca e la Cura del Cancro, Candiolo (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Department of Medical Physics, Istituto per la Ricerca e la Cura del Cancro, Candiolo (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, A.S.O. Ordine Mauriziano, Torino (Italy); Franzone, Paola [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale SS. Antonio e Biagio, Alessandria (Italy); Vavassori, Vittorio [Department of Radiotherapy, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese (Italy)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

p ro g r a m m e The aim of the Non-Toxic Environment Programme is to give an overall picture of Sweden's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Sweden's environmental status in relation to the occurrence and impact of hazardous substances Concentrations of mercury in fish and soil are markedly elevated in Sweden as a consequence of international.slu.se/environ/nontoxic A coherent body of knowledge on pesticides SLU is pre-eminent in Sweden when it comes to knowledge about

466

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton  

SciTech Connect

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Cytokine gene expression and activation of NF-{kappa}B in aniline-induced splenic toxicity  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to aniline results in selective toxicity to the spleen, leading to a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats, and fibrosis appears to be an important initiating preneoplastic lesion of the spleen. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which aniline leads to fibrogenic response is not well understood. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen. We hypothesized that aniline-induced oxidative stress in the spleen causes transcriptional up-regulation of fibrogenic cytokines via activation of redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). To test this hypothesis, male SD rats were treated with 0.5 mmol/kg/day aniline hydrochloride via drinking water for 30 days. Cytokine mRNAs were measured by real-time quantitative PCR, while cytokine release was determined in the supernatants of the cultured splenocytes using specific ELISAs. IL-1{alpha}, IL-6, and TNF-{alpha} mRNA levels showed 6.9-, 2.9-, and 2.6-fol