National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for true fir hemlock

  1. HEMLOCK

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-25

    HEMLOCK (Heterogeneous Ensemble Machine Learning Open Classification Kit) is a software tool for constructing, evaluating, and applying heterogeneous ensemble data models for use in solving supervised machine learning problems. Specifically, the main class of problems targeted by HEMLOCK is the problem of multiple-class classification (also called labeling or categorization) of data with continuous or discrete features. HEMLOCK consists of various data readers, machine learning algorithms, model combination and comparison routines, evaluation methods for model performancemore » testing, and interfaces to external, state-of-the-art machine learning software libraries.« less

  2. AmeriFlux US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha2 Harvard Forest Hemlock Site. Site Description - The forest surrounding the Hemlock site has remained pristine with two exceptions. In the early to mid-1700s, European settlers cleared the majority of the forest for agricultural purposes. Selective harvesting of hemlock and chestnut trees occurred up until the early 1900s, when the chestnut blight killed all of the chestnut trees. In the current forest, about 83% of the total basal area of trees is hemlock. The remainder is equally divided between eastern white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and deciduous species, including red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and black birch (Betula lenta). A very thick organic layer (10-20 cm or more) covers the soil surface, and highly decayed coarse woody debris is abundant.

  3. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  4. TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TrueWind Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: TrueWind Solutions Place: Albany, NY Website: www.awstruepower.com References: TrueWind Solutions1 Information About...

  5. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-11-10

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  6. AmeriFlux US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Law, Bev [Oregon State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site. Site Description - The Marys River Fir site is part of the "Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon and Northern California (ORCA)". Located in the western region of Oregon the Marys River site represents the western extent of the climate gradient that spans eastward into the semi-arid basin of central Oregon. The sites that make up the eastern extent of the ORCA climate gradient is the Metolius site network (US-Me1, US-ME2, US-ME4, US-Me5) all of which are part of the TERRA PNW project at Oregon State University.

  7. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  8. Make this summer New Mexico True

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Make this summer New Mexico true Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Make this summer New Mexico true Take a break from work and school to explore our parks and outdoor playgrounds. June 2, 2016 A visitor to Bandelier National Monument climbs a series of ladders to reach the park's Alcove House. Photo: NPS A visitor to Bandelier National Monument climbs a series of ladders

  9. True: Order (2015-SE-42049) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    True: Order (2015-SE-42049) True: Order (2015-SE-42049) February 4, 2016 DOE ordered True Manufacturing Co., Inc., to pay a $36,400 civil penalty after finding True had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 182 units of True commercial refrigerator basic models TCGG-72 and TCGG-72-S, which did not meet the application energy conservation standard. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and True. Federal law subjects manufacturers and

  10. True: Order (2015-CE-42049) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE ordered True Manufacturing Co., Inc., to pay a 36,400 civil penalty after finding ... Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those ...

  11. Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules solarbridge logo2.jpg -- This project is inactive -- This project, led by SolarBridge Technologies, is developing an innovative alternating-current photovoltaic (ACPV) module that consists of an integrated "Universal PV-Dock" and a high-reliability, low-cost, high-efficiency microinverter to substantially reduce balance of system (BOS) costs in residential and

  12. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 ?m and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ? (?L){sub 100} {sub ?m}/(?L) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  13. Aromatics and phenols from catalytic pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets in microwave with ZSM-5 as a catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Bu, Quan; Liang, Jing; Wei, Yi; Liu, Yupeng; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Chen, Shulin; Tang, Juming; Zhang, Qin; Ruan, Roger

    2012-11-04

    Microwave assisted catalytic pyrolysis was investigated to convert Douglas fir pellets to bio-oils by a ZSM-5 Zeolite catalyst. A central composite experimental design (CCD) was used to optimize the catalytic pyrolysis process. The effects of reaction time, temperature and catalyst to biomass ratio on the bio-oil, syngas, and biochar yields were determined. GC/MS analysis results showed that the bio-oil contained a series of important and useful chemical compounds. Phenols, guaiacols, and aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant compounds which were about 50-82 % in bio-oil depending on the pyrolysis conditions. Comparison between the bio-oils from microwave pyrolysis with and without catalyst showed that the catalyst increased the content of aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols. A reaction pathway was proposed for microwave assisted catalyst pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets.

  14. Energy Input and Quality of Pellets Made from Steam-Exploded Douglas Fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Bi, X.T.; Lim, C. Jim; Melin, Staffan

    2011-01-01

    Ground softwood Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) was treated with pressurized saturated steam at 200-220 C (1.6-2.4 MPa) for 5-10 min in a sealed container. The contents of the container were released to the atmosphere for a sudden decompression. The steam-exploded wood particles were dried to 10% moisture content and pelletized in a single-piston-cylinder system. The pellets were characterized for their mechanical strength, chemical composition, and moisture sorption. The steamtreated wood required 12-81% more energy to compact into pellets than the untreated wood. Pellets made from steam-treated wood had a breaking strength 1.4-3.3 times the strength of pellets made from untreated wood. Steam-treated pellets had a reduced equilibrium moisture content of 2-4% and a reduced expansion after pelletization. There was a slight increase in the high heating value from 18.94 to 20.09 MJ/kg for the treated samples. Steam-treated pellets exhibited a higher lengthwise rigidity compared to untreated pellets.

  15. 2016 Race to Zero Competition: True North Design Team Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    True North Design Eastern Pine Project Summary Eastern Pine is a multi-unit residential building that is located in Toronto, Canada. The building has seven units that are designed for young adults and families that require close proximity to the downtown core at an affordable price. Eastern Pine has meet the low energy criteria of PHIUS and is renewable ready. Relevance of Project to the Goals of the Competition Eastern Pine exemplifies the spirit of urban sustainability. Eastern Pine

  16. The path from Hoshin Kanri to True North.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galaviz, Maria Esther; McCaughey, Kathleen G.

    2010-08-01

    This year completed our 5th cycle of Hoshin Kanri. It has provided a way to summarize our annual strategic planning outcome in a simple format,and a great means to communicate it to employees. It has increased everyone's understanding of the Center's vision and true north. Every employee understands how their work contributes to the Center's success. It has increased focus and alignment in the organization and has increased ESat results with regards to improved alighment. It has tripled the number of shipments and increased productivity by 175% in 7 years.

  17. Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho: Succession and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R.; Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-04-01

    The report describes a taxonomic system for classifying plant succession in the Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho. A total of 10 potential tree layer types, 35 shrub types, and 45 herb layer types are categorized. Diagonostic keys based on indicator species assist field identification of the types. Discussion of management implications includes pocket gopher populations, success of planted and natural tree seedlings, big-game and livestock forage preferences, and responses of major shrub and herb layer species to disturbances.

  18. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  19. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam This brief details how to calculate the true cost of steam, which is important for monitoring and managing energy use in a plant, evaluating proposed design changes to the generation or distribution infrastructure and the process itself, and for continuing to identify competitive advantages through steam system and plant efficiency improvements. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam (September 2003) (484.93 KB)

  20. Steam Technical Brief: How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This BestPractice Steam Technical Brief helps you calculate the true cost of steam. Knowing the correct cost is important for many reasons and all of them have to do with improving the company's bottom line.

  1. True Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting Program technology fact sheet on LEDs and the relationship between CCT, CRI, optical safety, material degradation, and photobiological stimulation

  2. Characterization of the products and comparison of the product yields from the flash pyrolysis of fir wood in hydrogen and helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    A seasoned sawdust of Douglas Fir wood was flash pyrolyzed in an entrained tubular reactor in the presence of hydrogen and helium at short residence times (less than 4 sec) at temperatures varying from 600/sup 0/ to 1000/sup 0/C and pressures of 50 to 500 psi. A significant quantity of gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons and CO were produced. The liquid products were characterized via GC/MS and Pyrolysis Mass Spectrometry. The composition of the liquid products and the influence of the processing conditions on the product yields are discussed. 2 references, 13 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Commissioning of the Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator: A multi-institutional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Bellon, M.; Wen, N.; Zhao, B.; Chetty, I. J.; Foster, R.; Speiser, M.; Solberg, T.; Altunbas, C.; Westerly, D.; Miften, M.; Altman, M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Latest generation linear accelerators (linacs), i.e., TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and its stereotactic counterpart, TrueBeam STx, have several unique features, including high-dose-rate flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon modes, reengineered electron modes with new scattering foil geometries, updated imaging hardware/software, and a novel control system. An evaluation of five TrueBeam linacs at three different institutions has been performed and this work reports on the commissioning experience. Methods: Acceptance and commissioning data were analyzed for five TrueBeam linacs equipped with 120 leaf (5 mm width) MLCs at three different institutions. Dosimetric data and mechanical parameters were compared. These included measurements of photon beam profiles (6X, 6XFFF, 10X, 10XFFF, 15X), photon and electron percent depth dose (PDD) curves (6, 9, 12 MeV), relative photon output factors (Scp), electron cone factors, mechanical isocenter accuracy, MLC transmission, and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG). End-to-end testing and IMRT commissioning were also conducted. Results: Gantry/collimator isocentricity measurements were similar (0.27-0.28 mm), with overall couch/gantry/collimator values of 0.46-0.68 mm across the three institutions. Dosimetric data showed good agreement between machines. The average MLC DLGs for 6, 10, and 15 MV photons were 1.33 {+-} 0.23, 1.57 {+-} 0.24, and 1.61 {+-} 0.26 mm, respectively. 6XFFF and 10XFFF modes had average DLGs of 1.16 {+-} 0.22 and 1.44 {+-} 0.30 mm, respectively. MLC transmission showed minimal variation across the three institutions, with the standard deviation <0.2% for all linacs. Photon and electron PDDs were comparable for all energies. 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beam quality, %dd(10){sub x} varied less than 0.3% for all linacs. Output factors (Scp) and electron cone factors agreed within 0.27%, on average; largest variations were observed for small field sizes (1.2% coefficient of variation, 10 MV, 2

  4. Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide Extensive calculations revealed that the calcium-iridium-oxygen compound CaIrO3 is a Slater-type insulator, putting to rest the debate of whether the insulating nature of the metal oxide is Mott-type or Slater-type. While both types are insulators, the insulating properties in Mott types arise from electron repulsion while in Slater types magnetic ordering plays a prominent role. Through a series of calculations, the team described the types of

  5. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  6. True coincidence summing corrections for an extended energy range HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venegas-Argumedo, Y.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    True coincidence summing (TCS) effect for natural radioactive families of U-238 and Th-232 represents a problem when an environmental sample with a close source-detector geometry measurement is performed. By using a certified multi-nuclide standard source to calibrate an energy extended range (XtRa) HPGe detector, it is possible to obtain an intensity spectrum slightly affected by the TCS effect with energies from 46 to 1836 keV. In this work, the equations and some other considerations required to calculate the TCS correction factor for isotopes of natural radioactive chains are described. It is projected a validation of the calibration, performed with the IAEA-CU-2006-03 samples (soil and water)

  7. Principles underlying the method of determining the true potentials on cathodically protected underground steel pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marec, J.C.

    1998-12-31

    ON potentials taken at the ground surface of cathodically protected underground pipelines are plagued with errors due to numerous factors, in particular the gradient of the potential in the ground. The method most commonly used today to partially correct these errors is the measurement of OFF potentials. This method, however, does not allow one to obtain readings of potentials that reflect, under all circumstances, the actual level of polarization of the pipeline metal in contact with the soil. This is the case, for example, when stray currents are present or when pipelines are buried in high resistance soils. The erroneous measurement of potentials can have serious long-term consequences since corrosion can occur on structures that are not within a safe range of corrosion protection levels. The Centre Technique Operationnel (Technical Operations Centre) of Gaz de France has developed a new method for measuring potentials based on the modeling of the change in potential as a function of rectifier output current. This method allows one to obtain potentials that are close to true values in the majority of cases and is one of the means of diagnosing a network`s corrosion potential.

  8. SU-E-T-585: Commissioning of Electron Monte Carlo in Eclipse Treatment Planning System for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X; Lasio, G; Zhou, J; Lin, M; Yi, B; Guerrero, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) for TrueBeam Linacs, including the evaluation of dose calculation accuracy for small fields and oblique beams and comparison with the existing eMC model for Clinacs. Methods: Electron beam percent-depth-dose (PDDs) and profiles with and without applicators, as well as output factors, were measured from two Varian TrueBeam machines. Measured data were compared against the Varian TrueBeam Representative Beam Data (VTBRBD). The selected data set was transferred into Eclipse for beam configuration. Dose calculation accuracy from eMC was evaluated for open fields, small cut-out fields, and oblique beams at different incident angles. The TrueBeam data was compared to the existing Clinac data and eMC model to evaluate the differences among Linac types. Results: Our measured data indicated that electron beam PDDs from our TrueBeam machines are well matched to those from our Varian Clinac machines, but in-air profiles, cone factors and open-filed output factors are significantly different. The data from our two TrueBeam machines were well represented by the VTBRBD. Variations of TrueBeam PDDs and profiles were within the 2% /2mm criteria for all energies, and the output factors for fields with and without applicators all agree within 2%. Obliquity factor for two clinically relevant applicator sizes (1010 and 1515 cm{sup 2}) and three oblique angles (15, 30, and 45 degree) were measured for nominal R100, R90, and R80 of each electron beam energy. Comparisons of calculations using eMC of obliquity factors and cut-out factors versus measurements will be presented. Conclusion: eMC algorithm in Eclipse TPS can be configured using the VTBRBD. Significant differences between TrueBeam and Clinacs were found in in-air profiles and open field output factors. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated for a wide range of cut-out factors and oblique incidence.

  9. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  10. Reveal the True Biology: Exploiting Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing for Improved Microbial Assembly and Methylome Analysis ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Turner, Steve [Pacific Biosciences

    2013-03-22

    Steve Turner's talk "Reveal the True Biology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  11. P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries in true quaternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    The coefficients of P-odd, P-even, and T -odd asymmetries for a third and a fourth prescission particle emitted in the true quaternary fission of nuclei that was induced by polarized cold neutrons were studied on the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory. By using non-evaporation (nonadiabatic) mechanisms of light-particle emission, these coefficients were compared with the analogous coefficients for prescission third particles emitted in the ternary fission of nuclei.

  12. SU-E-T-386: A Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Framework for Electron Beams On Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Sawkey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The design of the linac head is different for TrueBeam than Clinac, and there are differences in measured dose distributions in water phantoms between TrueBeam and Clinac for electron beams. Therefore, MC models for Clinac may not be applied directly to the Truebeam linac. The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation framework for electron beams on Varian TrueBeam with phase space files provided by Varian. Methods: The particle histories from the phase space file were used as input for the down-stream simulation including jaws, applicators, and water phantom. MC packages BEAMnrc/DOSYXZnrc were used. The down-stream beam components were modeled according to manufacturer specifications and the dose distributions were compared with the measured data of standard cones. The measurements were performed in a water phantom with a p-type electron field diode (diameter 0.2cm) and ion chamber (CC13). Depth dose and orthogonal profiles at depths defined by R{sub 1} {sub 0} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, Rp were compared. Results: Preliminary results for a 16 MeV phase space and 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator are presented. Simulations were run for a statistical uncertainty of <2% at depth of maximum dose for a voxel resolution of 0.5x0.5x0.2cm{sup 2}. Dose and range differences for the PDD profiles were within 2% and 1 mm, respectively. Dose differences within the central 80% of the beam width for the orthogonal profiles at depth of maximum dose were less than 2% for the 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator, respectively. Conclusion: Varian electron phase space files simulations are in agreement with measured commissioning data. These phase space files can be used in the simulation of TrueBeam linacs, and will provide reproducibility across publications. Analyses for all electron energies and standard applicators are under way and results will be included in the presentation.

  13. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  14. Probabilities for the emission of light particles and their energy and angular distributions for true quaternary nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    On the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the features of true quaternary nuclear fission are studied by treating this fission process as a sequence of three processes following one another in the course of time. The first two processes are the escape of the first and then the second of the two light particles emitted from the neck of a fissioning nucleus because of a nonadiabatic character of the collective deformation motion of this nucleus. Finally, the third process is the separation of the fissioning nucleus into two rather heavy fission fragments. The differences that arise in the emission probabilities and in the angular and energy distributions upon going over from the first emitted to the second emitted prescission third and fourth particles are analyzed by invoking experimental data on the spontaneous and thermalneutron-induced fission of nuclei, and it is shown that these differences are caused by the changes both in the geometric configuration of the fissioning nucleus and in the shell structure of its neck after the first prescission particle is emitted from it.

  15. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic Scintillation and Other Stereotactic Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Wang, X; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor (OF) measurements with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for small fields made by the high-definition multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the TrueBeam STx system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new small volume near-water equivalent and energy independent PSD manufactured by Standard Imaging, Inc. All measurements were performed in an IBA Blue Phantom water tank. Square MLC-shaped fields with sides ranging from 0.5 cm to 2 cm and jawshaped fields with sides ranging from 1 cm to 40 cm were measured using an SAD setup at 10 cm depth. Dose profile and percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were also taken under the same conditions for MLC fields 0.5×0.5 and 1×1 cm2 in size with jaws at 2×2cm2. The CC01 and W1 were vertically mounted. Results: OFs measured with the W1 for jaw only square fields were consistent with the ones measured with a Farmers PTW TN33013 ion chamber (1.8% maximum deviation). OF and penumbra measurement results are presented below. PDDs measured for all detectors are within 1.5% for the 0.5×0.5 cm2 and within 1% for the 1×1 cm2 MLC fields.Output factors:MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 0.555 0.541 0.5851.0cm 0.716 0.702 0.7331.5cm 0.779 0.761 0.7772.0cm 0.804 0.785 0.796Penumbras (mm):MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 2.7 2.9 2.51.0cm 3.0 3.4 2. Conclusion: OFs measured for small MLC fields were consistent with the ones measured with the other stereotactic detectors. Measured penumbras are consistent with detector size. The Exradin W1 PSD is an excellent choice for characterizing MLC-shaped small beam dosimetry used for stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field

  16. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux-gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C.

    2014-05-13

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes and variances above, within and beneath a tall closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime subcanopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at time scales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime subcanopy heat flux cospectra. The daytime momentum flux cospectra inside the canopy and in the subcanopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of a mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of themore » momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the subcanopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed mean wind speed profile. In the canopy at night at the smallest resolved scales, we find relatively large momentum fluxes (compared to at larger scales), and increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing time scale, consistent with very small eddies likely generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum but not heat. We find unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the canopy. The flux-gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the subcanopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately; however, single source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the subcanopy and above-canopy layers. Modeled sensible heat fluxes above dark warm closed canopies are likely underestimated using typical values of the Stanton number.« less

  17. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  18. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux–gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-09-16

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes, variances, and the bulk transfer parameterization for sensible heat above, within, and beneath a tall closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime sub-canopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at timescales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime sub-canopy heat flux co-spectra. The daytime momentum flux co-spectra in the upper bole space and in the sub-canopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of amore » mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of the momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the sub-canopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed sub-canopy secondary wind speed maximum. For the smallest resolved scales in the canopy at nighttime, we find increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing timescale, consistent with very small eddies possibly generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum, but not heat. Unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy were observed, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the very dense canopy. The flux–gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately in spite of the very small fluxes on the order of a few W m−2 in the sub-canopy. However, single-source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers. While sub-canopy Stanton numbers agreed well with values typically reported

  19. Integrated computer simulation on FIR FEL dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furukawa, H.; Kuruma, S.; Imasaki, K.

    1995-12-31

    An integrated computer simulation code has been developed to analyze the RF-Linac FEL dynamics. First, the simulation code on the electron beam acceleration and transport processes in RF-Linac: (LUNA) has been developed to analyze the characteristics of the electron beam in RF-Linac and to optimize the parameters of RF-Linac. Second, a space-time dependent 3D FEL simulation code (Shipout) has been developed. The RF-Linac FEL total simulations have been performed by using the electron beam data from LUNA in Shipout. The number of particles using in a RF-Linac FEL total simulation is approximately 1000. The CPU time for the simulation of 1 round trip is about 1.5 minutes. At ILT/ILE, Osaka, a 8.5MeV RF-Linac with a photo-cathode RF-gun is used for FEL oscillation experiments. By using 2 cm wiggler, the FEL oscillation in the wavelength approximately 46 {mu}m are investigated. By the simulations using LUNA with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the pulse shape and the energy spectra of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac has sharp rise-up and it slowly decays as a function of time. By the RF-linac FEL total simulations with the parameters of an ILT/ILE experiment, the dependencies of the start up of the FEL oscillations on the pulse shape of the electron beam at the end of the linac are estimated. The coherent spontaneous emission effects and the quick start up of FEL oscillations have been observed by the RF-Linac FEL total simulations.

  20. Method and apparatus for identifying conductive objects by monitoring the true resistive component of impedance change in a coil system caused by the object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, William D.; Capots, Larry H.; George, James P.; Janik, Richard

    1981-01-01

    The type of conductor, its property, and if a metal, its type and cross-sectional area can be obtained from measurements made at different frequencies for the amount of unbalance created in a previously balanced stable coil detection system. The true resistive component is accurately measured and thus reflects only the voltage loss attributable to eddy currents caused by introduction of the test sample to the coil system. This voltage divided by corresponding applied frequency gives a curve which peaks at a frequency dependent upon type of conductor. For a metal this peak frequency is proportional to the samples resistivity divided by its cross-sectional area.

  1. Investigating the limits of PET/CT imaging at very low true count rates and high random fractions in ion-beam therapy monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurz, Christopher Bauer, Julia; Conti, Maurizio; Guérin, Laura; Eriksson, Lars; Parodi, Katia

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a tighter conformation of the applied dose to arbitrarily shaped tumor volumes with respect to photons, but is more sensitive to uncertainties in the radiotherapeutic treatment chain. Consequently, an independent verification of the applied treatment is highly desirable. For this purpose, the irradiation-induced β{sup +}-emitter distribution within the patient is detected shortly after irradiation by a commercial full-ring positron emission tomography/x-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner installed next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). A major challenge to this approach is posed by the small number of detected coincidences. This contribution aims at characterizing the performance of the used PET/CT device and identifying the best-performing reconstruction algorithm under the particular statistical conditions of PET-based treatment monitoring. Moreover, this study addresses the impact of radiation background from the intrinsically radioactive lutetium-oxyorthosilicate (LSO)-based detectors at low counts. Methods: The authors have acquired 30 subsequent PET scans of a cylindrical phantom emulating a patientlike activity pattern and spanning the entire patient counting regime in terms of true coincidences and random fractions (RFs). Accuracy and precision of activity quantification, image noise, and geometrical fidelity of the scanner have been investigated for various reconstruction algorithms and settings in order to identify a practical, well-suited reconstruction scheme for PET-based treatment verification. Truncated listmode data have been utilized for separating the effects of small true count numbers and high RFs on the reconstructed images. A corresponding simulation study enabled extending the results to an even wider range of counting statistics and to additionally investigate the impact of scatter coincidences. Eventually, the recommended

  2. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of TrueBeam flattening-filter-free beams using Varian phase-space files: Comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belosi, Maria F.; Fogliata, Antonella E-mail: afc@iosi.ch; Cozzi, Luca; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Krauss, Harald; Khamphan, Catherine; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Puxeu, Josep; Fedele, David; Mancosu, Pietro; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-space files for Monte Carlo simulation of the Varian TrueBeam beams have been made available by Varian. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the distributed phase-space files for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, against experimental measurements from ten TrueBeam Linacs. Methods: The phase-space files have been used as input in PRIMO, a recently released Monte Carlo program based on thePENELOPE code. Simulations of 6 and 10 MV FFF were computed in a virtual water phantom for field sizes 3 × 3, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} using 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} voxels and for 20 × 20 and 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} with 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3} voxels. The particles contained in the initial phase-space files were transported downstream to a plane just above the phantom surface, where a subsequent phase-space file was tallied. Particles were transported downstream this second phase-space file to the water phantom. Experimental data consisted of depth doses and profiles at five different depths acquired at SSD = 100 cm (seven datasets) and SSD = 90 cm (three datasets). Simulations and experimental data were compared in terms of dose difference. Gamma analysis was also performed using 1%, 1 mm and 2%, 2 mm criteria of dose-difference and distance-to-agreement, respectively. Additionally, the parameters characterizing the dose profiles of unflattened beams were evaluated for both measurements and simulations. Results: Analysis of depth dose curves showed that dose differences increased with increasing field size and depth; this effect might be partly motivated due to an underestimation of the primary beam energy used to compute the phase-space files. Average dose differences reached 1% for the largest field size. Lateral profiles presented dose differences well within 1% for fields up to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, while the discrepancy increased toward 2% in the 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} cases. Gamma analysis resulted in an agreement of 100% when a 2%, 2 mm criterion

  4. SU-E-T-128: Dosimetric Evaluation of MLC Modeling in Pinnacle V9.2 for Varian TrueBeam STx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otageri, P; Grant, E; Maricle, S; Mathews, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of MLC modeling after commissioning the Varian TrueBeam LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2. Methods: Stepand-shoot IMRT QAs were investigated when we observed our measured absolute dose results using ion chamber (Capintec PR-05P) were uncharacteristically low; about 45% compared to doses calculated by Pinnacle{sup 3} (Phillips, Madison, WI). This problem was predominant for large and highly modulated head and neck (HN) treatments. Intuitively we knew this had to be related to shortcomings in the MLC modeling in Pinnacle. Using film QA we were able to iteratively adjust the MLC parameters. We confirmed results by re-testing five failed IMRT QA patients; and ion chamber measurements were verified in Quasar anthropomorphic phantom. Results: After commissioning the LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2, the MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X were 2.0%, 1.7% and 2.0%, respectively, and additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies was 0.5%. These parameters were obtained from profiles scanned with an Edge detector (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) during machine commissioning. A Verification testing with radiographic EDR2 film (Kodak, Rochester, NY) measurement was performed by creating a closed MLC leaf pattern and analyzing using RIT software (RIT, Colorado Springs, CO). This reduced MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X to 0.7%, 0.9% and 0.9%, respectively; while increasing additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies to 1.0%. Conclusion: Radiographic film measurements were used to correct MLC transmission values for step and shoot IMRT fields used in Pinnacle version 9.2. After adjusting the MLC parameters to correlate with the film QA, there was still very good agreement between the Pinnacle model and commissioning data. Using the same QA methodology, we were also able to improve the beam models for the Varian C-series linacs, Novalis-Tx, and TrueBeam M-120 linacs.

  5. SU-E-T-71: Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of a Commercial Monte Carlo Electron Dose Calculation Model (eMC) for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheu, R; Tseng, T; Powers, A; Lo, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide commissioning and acceptance test data of the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo model (eMC v.11) for TrueBeam linac. We also investigated the uncertainties in beam model parameters and dose calculation results for different geometric configurations. Methods: For beam commissioning, PTW CC13 thimble chamber and IBA Blue Phantom2 were used to collect PDD and dose profiles in air. Cone factors were measured with a parallel plate chamber (PTW N23342) in solid water. GafChromic EBT3 films were used for dose calculation verifications to compare with parallel plate chamber results in the following test geometries: oblique incident, extended distance, small cutouts, elongated cutouts, irregular surface, and heterogeneous layers. Results: Four electron energies (6e, 9e, 12e, and 15e) and five cones (66, 1010, 1515, 2020, and 2525) with standard cutouts were calculated for different grid sizes (1, 1.5,2, and 2.5 mm) and compared with chamber measurements. The results showed calculations performed with a coarse grid size underestimated the absolute dose. The underestimation decreased as energy increased. For 6e, the underestimation (max 3.3 %) was greater than the statistical uncertainty level (3%) and was systematically observed for all cone sizes. By using a 1mm grid size, all the calculation results agreed with measurements within 5% for all test configurations. The calculations took 21s and 46s for 6e and 15e (2.5mm grid size) respectively distributed on 4 calculation servants. Conclusion: In general, commissioning the eMC dose calculation model on TrueBeam is straightforward and thedose calculation is in good agreement with measurements for all test cases. Monte Carlo dose calculation provides more accurate results which improves treatment planning quality. However, the normal acceptable grid size (2.5mm) would cause systematic underestimation in absolute dose calculation for lower energies, such as 6e. Users need to be cautious in this

  6. Quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Quadrupole effects, shake-up, Shirley background, and relative sensitivity factors from a database of true x-ray photoelectron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seah, M. P.; Gilmore, I. S.

    2006-05-01

    An analysis is provided of the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) intensities measured in the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) XPS database for 46 solid elements. This present analysis does not change our previous conclusions concerning the excellent correlation between experimental intensities, following deconvolving the spectra with angle-averaged reflection electron energy loss data, and the theoretical intensities involving the dipole approximation using Scofield's cross sections. Here, more recent calculations for cross sections by Trzhaskovskaya et al. involving quadrupole terms are evaluated and it is shown that their cross sections diverge from the experimental database results by up to a factor of 5. The quadrupole angular terms lead to small corrections that are close to our measurement limit but do appear to be supported in the present analysis. Measurements of the extent of shake-up for the 46 elements broadly agree with the calculations of Yarzhemsky et al. but not in detail. The predicted constancy in the shake-up contribution by Yarzhemsky et al. implies that the use of the Shirley background will lead to a peak area that is a constant fraction of the true peak area including the shake-up intensities. However, the measured variability of the shake-up contribution makes the Shirley background invalid for quantification except for situations where the sensitivity factors are from reference samples similar to those being analyzed.

  7. TH-C-12A-12: Veritas: An Open Source Tool to Facilitate User Interaction with TrueBeam Developer Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, P; Lewis, J; Etmektzoglou, T; Svatos, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To address the challenges of creating delivery trajectories and imaging sequences with TrueBeam Developer Mode, a new open-source graphical XML builder, Veritas, has been developed, tested and made freely available. Veritas eliminates most of the need to understand the underlying schema and write XML scripts, by providing a graphical menu for each control point specifying the state of 30 mechanical/dose axes. All capabilities of Developer Mode are accessible in Veritas. Methods: Veritas was designed using QT Designer, a ‘what-you-is-what-you-get’ (WYSIWIG) tool for building graphical user interfaces (GUI). Different components of the GUI are integrated using QT's signals and slots mechanism. Functionalities are added using PySide, an open source, cross platform Python binding for the QT framework. The XML code generated is immediately visible, making it an interactive learning tool. A user starts from an anonymized DICOM file or XML example and introduces delivery modifications, or begins their experiment from scratch, then uses the GUI to modify control points as desired. The software automatically generates XML plans following the appropriate schema. Results: Veritas was tested by generating and delivering two XML plans at Brigham and Women's Hospital. The first example was created to irradiate the letter ‘B’ with a narrow MV beam using dynamic couch movements. The second was created to acquire 4D CBCT projections for four minutes. The delivery of the letter ‘B’ was observed using a 2D array of ionization chambers. Both deliveries were generated quickly in Veritas by non-expert Developer Mode users. Conclusion: We introduced a new open source tool Veritas for generating XML plans (delivery trajectories and imaging sequences). Veritas makes Developer Mode more accessible by reducing the learning curve for quick translation of research ideas into XML plans. Veritas is an open source initiative, creating the possibility for future developments

  8. A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    2013-05-31

    This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

  9. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    One of the best parts of the season - next to presents of course - is the hint of evergreen in the air. Yet the sweet smell doesn't last. It fades into forgotten corners, along ...

  10. True Electric LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56298 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  11. Nothing is too wonderful to be true

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, P.

    1994-12-31

    This time of ours is brimming with plausible and attractive fiction, special effects, dramatic advocacy replacing well-weighed evidence, beliefs held because they appeal. Here is a major public issue. If we do not find some way to improve the level of public discourse, democracy cannot for a long time endure. There has to be a typical suspension of final judgment, an appeal to weigh the evidence, to seek more, and to reflect. In that spirit the author discusses three topics which represent different styles of gaining knowledge, different processes for the pursuit of scientific research, yet all are part of science and of the teaching of science. We d ourselves a great disservice if we press the reform of science education, badly needed, solely as a task for our K-12 teachers. The universities also need to look at themselves. The teaching of non-science majors, lawyers, legislators, business people, etc., is quite poor and is one of the major areas of needed reform within the universities. Will these people try to build something of a new structure in the schools for something they disliked? Science education needs to be a positive experience for all students.

  12. TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Current chemical process controls use few in-situ sensors, relying instead on analytic techniques that require sample conditioning and transport, and significant turnaround time. With few...

  13. True Color Tube Borescope Inspection System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-08-07

    The overall purpose of TCTBIS is to determine the quality of the inside surface of a tube. This is done by acquiring multiple images along the inside of a tube and converting these images into one unwrapped image of the inside of a tube. This resultant image is the same as if you had slit a tube length-wise, flattened it out, and then taken a picture of it. What is unique about this system ismore » that the picture is acquired in a non-destructive manner. TCTBIS also analyzes the unwrapped images for oxidation, foreign particles, and surface imperfections, scratches.« less

  14. Microsoft Word - TR11-18.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Scattered plants of poison hemlock occur throughout the site, and the primary infestations ... hemlock, which consisted of spraying the plants with herbicide, cutting the plants, ...

  15. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (22,44,1010cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours

  16. AmeriFlux US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bible, Ken; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site. Site Description - Wind River Field Station flux tower site is located in the T.T. Munger Research Area of the Wind River Ranger District in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Protected since 1926, the T.T. Munger Research Natural Area (RNA) is administered by the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station and Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The Douglas-fir/western hemlock dominant stand is approximately 500 years old and represents end points of several ecological gradients including age, biomass, structural complexity, and density of the dominant overstory species. A complete stand replacement fire, approximately 450-500 years ago, resulted in the initial establishment. No significant disturbances have occurred since the fire aside from those confined to small groups of single trees, such as overturn from high wind activity and mechanical damage from winter precipitation.

  17. Microsoft Word - Tad True QER Testimony (2).docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Originally conceived and commercially contracted in 2010, we proposed to build a new crude oil pipeline along an existing corridor established by a recently completed natural gas ...

  18. An AC magnetohydrodynamic micropump: towards a true integrated microfluidic system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A P; Lemoff, A V; McConaghy, C F; Miles, R R

    1999-03-01

    An AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump has been demonstrated in which the Lorentz force is used to propel an electrolytic solution along a microchannel etched in silicon. This micropump has no moving parts, produces a continuous (not pulsatile) flow, and is compatible with solutions containing biological specimens. micropump, using the Lorentz force as the pumping mechanism for biological analysis. The AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) micropump investigated produces a continuous flow and allows for complex microchannel design.

  19. Physicists show trilayer metal oxide's true stripes | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source of the single-crystal La4Ni3O8 compound (top left) reveal a charge stripe superlattice with a tripled unit cell (top right). Studies of the superlattice peaks (below) demonstrate an eclipsed stacking of the stripes within the trilayer. (Image by Mitchell et al.) X-rays at the Advanced Photon Source of the single-crystal La4Ni3O8 compound (top left) reveal a charge stripe superlattice with a tripled unit cell (top right). Studies of the

  20. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  1. Hydro Power to Make the American Dream Come True

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  2. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... For that, we need a better method for steam cost accounting. How To Calculate The T1 rue ... if the consumption of low-pressure steam, at 12 pounds per square inch gauge (psig), in ...

  3. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was Shirley Oden Cox, retiree from Y-12. Shirley came to Oak Ridge when her dad, William Lewis (Bill) Oden, moved his wife and two children to here in September, 1944 to take a...

  4. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  5. Crayola's True Color Shines Through: Green | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Pennsylvania awarded 9.5 million of SEP funds through the Green Energy Works Solar program to eight other projects. With the help of the Recovery Act funds, the state has more ...

  6. Characterization and possible origins of isolated douglas fir stands on the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, J.R.

    1995-09-01

    The floristic composition of several isolated stands of Pseudotsuga menziesii on the Colorado Plateau is compared. All occurred between 1700-2000 meters, which was about 300-500 meters below typical lower limits for the species. Most stands showed evidence of reproduction and recruitment. A small widespread group of species existed that was common to all stands, but beta diversity was high. A preliminary analysis of possible origins of the stands suggested that they are relictual from the late Wisconsin or early Holocene. Bird-dispersed species were less prevalent than expected compared with existing high elevation conifer forests. These stands represent important resources for Quaternary research, but are extremely vulnerable to human-caused disturbances. It is recommended that they be provided protection from disturbance through appropriate management activities of the various land management agencies.

  7. Final Report fir DE-SC0005507 (A1618): The Development of an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number ...

  8. Geological and Geothermal Investigation of the Lower Wind River Valley, Southwestern Washington Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berri, Dulcy A.; Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    The Wind River Valley, on the west slope of the Cascade Range, is a northwest-trending drainage that joins the Columbia River near Carson, Washington. The region has been heavily dissected by fluvial and glacial erosion. Ridges have sharp crests and deep subsidiary valleys typical of a mature topography, with a total relief of as much as 900 m. The region is vegetated by fir and hemlock, as well as dense, brushy ground-cover and undergrowth. The lower 8 km of the valley is privately owned and moderately populated. The upper reaches lies within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and include several campgrounds and day parks, the Carson National Fish Hatchery, and the Wind River Ranger Station and Wind River Nursery of the US Forest Service. Logging activity is light due to the rugged terrain, and consequently, most valley slopes are not accessible by vehicle. The realization that a potential for significant geothermal resources exists in the Wind River area was brought about by earlier exploration activities. Geologic mapping and interpretation was needed to facilitate further exploration of the resource by providing a knowledge of possible geologic controls on the geothermal system. This report presents the detailed geology of the lower Wind River valley with emphasis on those factors that bear significantly on development of a geothermal resource.

  9. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Wells

    2008-11-30

    PolyFuel has developed state-of-the-art portable fuel cell technology for the portable computing market. A novel approach to passive water recycling within the MEA has led to significant system simplification and size reduction. Miniature stack technology with very high area utilization and minimalist seals has been developed. A highly integrated balance of plant with very low parasitic losses has been constructed around the new stack design. Demonstration prototype systems integrated with laptop computers have been shown in recent months to leading OEM computer manufacturers. PolyFuel intends to provide this technology to its customers as a reference design as a means of accelerating the commercialization of portable fuel cell technology. The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

  10. U-028: Microsoft Windows win32k.sys TrueType Font Parsing Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in Microsoft Windows, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

  11. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution GS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GS < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  12. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution AV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AV < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  13. TRUE COLORS: LEDS AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CCT, CRI, OPTICAL SAFETY, MATERIAL DEGRADATION, AND PHOTOBIOLOGICAL STIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-08-30

    This document analyzes the optical, material, and photobiological hazards of LED light sources compared to conventional light sources. It documents that LEDs generally produce the same amount of blue light, which is the primary contributor to the risks, as other sources at the same CCT. Duv may have some effect on the amount of blue light, but CRI does not.

  14. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new...

  15. CONSTRAINING THE TRUE NATURE OF AN EXOTIC BINARY IN THE CORE OF NGC 6624

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalessandro, Emanuele; Pallanca, Cristina; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Lanzoni, Barbara; Castiglione, Claudia; Vignali, Cristian; Fiorentino, Giuliana

    2014-04-01

    We report on the identification of the optical counterpart to Star1, the exotic object serendipitously discovered by Deutsch et al. in the core of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 6624. Star1 has been classified by Deutsch et al. as either a quiescent cataclysmic variable or a low-mass X-ray binary. Deutsch et al. proposed StarA as a possible optical counterpart to this object. We used high-resolution images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope to perform a variability analysis of the stars close to the nominal position of Star1. While no variability was detected for StarA, we found another star, referred to here as COM{sub S}tar1, showing a clear sinusoidal light modulation with amplitude Δm {sub F435W} ∼ 0.7 mag and an orbital period of P {sub orb} ∼ 98 minutes. The shape of the light curve is likely caused by strong irradiation by the primary heating of one hemisphere of the companion, thus suggesting a quite hot primary.

  16. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Paul

    2012-05-01

    IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a one-box process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactor's behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and fabricated a full-scale CMS membrane and module for the proposed application. This full-scale membrane element is a 3" diameter with 30"L, composed of ~85 single CMS membrane tubes. The membrane tubes and bundles have demonstrated satisfactory thermal, hydrothermal, thermal cycling and chemical stabilities under an environment simulating the temperature, pressure and contaminant levels encountered in our proposed process. More importantly, the membrane module packed with the CMS bundle was tested for over 30 pressure cycles between ambient pressure and >300 -600 psi at 200 to 300°C without mechanical degradation. Finally, internal baffles have been designed and installed to improve flow distribution within the module, which delivered 90% separation efficiency in comparison with the efficiency achieved with single membrane tubes. In summary, the full-scale CMS membrane element and module have been successfully developed and tested satisfactorily for our proposed one-box application; a test quantity of elements/modules have been fabricated for field testing. Multiple field tests have been performed under this project at National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The separation efficiency and performance stability of our full-scale membrane elements have been verified in testing conducted for times ranging from 100 to >250 hours of continuous exposure to coal/biomass gasifier off-gas for hydrogen enrichment with no gas pre-treatment for contaminants removal. In particular, "tar-like" contaminants were effectively rejected by the membrane with no evidence of fouling. In addition, testing was conducted using a hybrid membrane system, i.e., the CMS membrane in conjunction with the palladium membrane, to demonstrate that 99+% H{sub 2} purity and a high degree of CO{sub 2} capture could be achieved. In summary, the stability and performance of the full-scale hydrogen selective CMS membrane/module has been verified in multiple field tests in the presence of coal/biomass gasifier off-gas under this project. A promising process scheme has been developed for power generation and/or hydrogen coproduction with CCS based upon our proposed "one-box" process. Our preliminary economic analysis indicates about 10% reduction in the required electricity selling price and ~40% cost reduction in CCS on per ton CO{sub 2} can be achieved in comparison with the base case involving conventional WGS with a two-stage Selexsol® for CCS. Long term field tests (e.g., >1,000 hrs) with the incorporation of the catalyst for the WGS membrane reactor and more in-depth analysis of the process scheme are recommended for the future study.

  17. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Free-space beams circulate in a White cell, overlapping in space to minimize volume. The 18 mirrors are slow-tool diamond turned on two substrates, one at each end, to streamline ...

  18. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true,? part 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part 2 Last week we introduced Shirley Cox and began a two-part series on her career at Y-12 leading up to the recommendation that the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility...

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slice True-Up 101 pptx.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ted Barham, Janice Johnson and many others Content Organized and Presented by Craig Larson Slice History A Review of Subscription and RD(Regional Dialogue) Slice distinctions...

  20. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIHNCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: "Water-Equivalent Plastic...

  1. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution 2X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  2. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  3. Root Diseases and Exotic Ecosystems: Implications for Long-Term Site Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otrosina, W. J.; Garbelotto, M.

    1997-09-01

    Management activities and various land uses have taken place recently that have dramatically altered edaphic and environmental conditions under which forest tree species and ecosystems have evolved. Sequoia giganteum stands, fire suppression in this fire dependent ecosystem has resulted in increased mortality due to Heterobasidion annosum. On hypothesis is that fire suppression results in increased encroachment of true firs, easily infected by S-group Heterobasidion annosum, thereby transferring the disease via root contacts with S. giganteum. Existence of a hybrid with S and P ISG's of H. annosum may be evidence for anthropogenic influences on evolutionary pathways in this pathogen.

  4. Dry-deposition measurements of sulfur dioxide to a spruce-fir forest in the Black Forest: a data report. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMillen, R.T.; Matt, D.R.; Hicks, B.B.; Womack, J.D.

    1987-02-01

    Measurements of dry deposition of SO/sub 2/ are reported for a forested site in the Black Forest of West Germany. The measurements were made using the eddy-correlation method about 10 meters above the top of a spruce forest that was already affected by Waldsterben. These measurements were conducted as one component of TULLA, a large sulfur mass-balance experiment. The dry-deposition measurements were successful during times when SO/sub 2/ concentrations were greater than 5 micro grams/cu m.

  5. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. I. MULTI-WAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY AND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-03-15

    We present an IRAC 3.6+4.5 {mu}m selected catalog in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS) containing photometry from the ultraviolet to the far-infrared and stellar parameters derived from the analysis of the multi-wavelength data. In this paper, we describe the method used to build coherent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for all the sources. In a forthcoming companion paper, we analyze those SEDs to obtain robust estimations of stellar parameters such as photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates. The catalog comprises 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 mag (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey in the EGS) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. For approximately 16% of this sample, we are able to deconvolve the IRAC data to obtain robust fluxes for the multiple counterparts found in ground-based optical images. Typically, the SEDs of the IRAC sources in our catalog count with more than 15 photometric data points, spanning from the ultraviolet wavelengths probed by GALEX to the far-infrared observed by Spitzer, and going through ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared data taken with 2-8 m class telescopes. Approximately 95% and 90% of all IRAC sources are detected in the deepest optical and near-infrared bands. These fractions are reduced to 85% and 70% for S/N > 5 detections in each band. Only 10% of the sources in the catalog have optical spectroscopy and redshift estimations. Almost 20% and 2% of the sources are detected by MIPS at 24 and 70 {mu}m, respectively. We also cross-correlate our catalog with public X-ray and radio catalogs. Finally, we present the Rainbow Navigator public Web interface utility, designed to browse all the data products resulting from this work, including images, spectra, photometry, and stellar parameters.

  6. UV-TO-FIR ANALYSIS OF SPITZER/IRAC SOURCES IN THE EXTENDED GROTH STRIP. II. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS, STELLAR MASSES, AND STAR FORMATION RATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barro, G.; Perez-Gonzalez, P. G.; Gallego, J.; Villar, V.; Zamorano, J.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Kajisawa, M.; Yamada, T.; Miyazaki, S.

    2011-04-01

    Based on the ultraviolet to far-infrared photometry already compiled and presented in a companion paper (Paper I), we present a detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of nearly 80,000 IRAC 3.6 + 4.5 {mu}m selected galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip. We estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and star formation rates (SFRs) separately for each galaxy in this large sample. The catalog includes 76,936 sources with [3.6] {<=} 23.75 (85% completeness level of the IRAC survey) over 0.48 deg{sup 2}. The typical photometric redshift accuracy is {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.034, with a catastrophic outlier fraction of just 2%. We quantify the systematics introduced by the use of different stellar population synthesis libraries and initial mass functions in the calculation of stellar masses. We find systematic offsets ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 dex, with a typical scatter of 0.3 dex. We also provide UV- and IR-based SFRs for all sample galaxies, based on several sets of dust emission templates and SFR indicators. We evaluate the systematic differences and goodness of the different SFR estimations using the deep FIDEL 70 {mu}m data available in the Extended Groth Strip. Typical random uncertainties of the IR-bases SFRs are a factor of two, with non-negligible systematic effects at z {approx}> 1.5 observed when only MIPS 24 {mu}m data are available. All data products (SEDs, postage stamps from imaging data, and different estimations of the photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and SFRs of each galaxy) described in this and the companion paper are publicly available, and they can be accessed through our the Web interface utility Rainbow-navigator.

  7. Strangeness suppression of qq¯ creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D’Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garçon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ΛK+, pπ0, and nπ+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq¯ creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq¯ pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  8. True uniaxial compressive strengths of rock or coal specimens are independent of diameter-to-length ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, C.O.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that part of the compressive strength of a test specimen of rock or coal in the laboratory or a pillar in a mine comes from physical property strength and, in part, from the constraint provided by the loading stresses. Much confusion in pillar design comes from assigning the total strength change to geometry, as evidenced by the many pillar design equations with width to height as the primary variable. In tests by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, compressive strengths for cylindrical specimens of limestone, marble, sandstone, and coal were independent of the specimen test geometry when the end friction was removed. A conventional uniaxial compressive strength test between two steel platens is actually a uniaxial force and not a uniaxial stress test. The biaxial or triaxial state of stress for much of the test volume changes with the geometry of the test specimen. By removing the end friction supplied by the steel platens to the specimen, a more nearly uniaxial stress state independent of the specimen geometry is produced in the specimen. Pillar design is a constraint and physical property problem rather than a geometry problem. Roof and floor constraint are major factors in pillar design and strength.

  9. STEPS TOWARD UNVEILING THE TRUE POPULATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: PHOTOMETRIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Evan E.; Impey, Christopher D.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2013-04-01

    Using a physically motivated, model-based active galactic nucleus (AGN) characterization technique, we fit a large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs with known spectroscopic redshifts from the Cosmic Evolution Survey field. We identify accretion disks in the spectral energy distributions of broad- and narrow-line AGNs, and infer the presence or absence of host galaxy light in the SEDs. Based on infrared and UV excess AGN selection techniques, our method involves fitting a given SED with a model consisting of three components: infrared power-law emission, optical-UV accretion disk emission, and host galaxy emission. Each component can be varied in relative contribution, and a reduced chi-square minimization routine is used to determine the optimum parameters for each object. Using this technique, both broad- and narrow-line AGNs fall within well-defined and plausible bounds on the physical parameters of the model, allowing trends with luminosity and redshift to be determined. In particular, based on our sample of spectroscopically confirmed AGNs, we find that approximately 95% of the broad-line AGNs and 50% of the narrow-line AGNs in our sample show evidence of an accretion disk, with maximum disk temperatures ranging from 1 to 10 eV. Because this fitting technique relies only on photometry, we hope to apply it in future work to the characterization and eventually the selection of fainter AGNs than are accessible in wide-field spectroscopic surveys, and thus probe a population of less luminous and/or higher redshift objects without prior redshift or X-ray data. With the abundant availability of photometric data from large surveys, the ultimate goal is to use this technique to create large samples that will complement and complete AGN catalogs selected by X-ray emission alone.

  10. True uniaxial compressive strengths of rock or coal specimens are independent of diameter-to-length ratios. Report of Investigations/1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock, C.O.

    1990-01-01

    Part of the compressive strength of a test specimen of rock or coal in the laboratory or a pillar in a mine comes from physical property strength and, in part, from the constraint provided by the loading stresses. Much confusion in pillar design comes from assigning the total strength change to geometry, as evidenced by the many pillar design equations with width to height as the primary variable. In tests by the U.S. Bureau of Mines, compressive strengths for cylindrical specimens of limestone, marble, sandstone, and coal were independent of the specimen test geometry when the end friction was removed. A conventional uniaxial compressive strength test between two steel platens is actually a uniaxial force and not a uniaxial stress test. The biaxial or triaxial state of stress for much of the test volume changes with the geometry of the test specimen. By removing the end friction supplied by the steel platens to the specimen, a more nearly uniaxial stress state independent of the specimen geometry is produced in the specimen. Pillar design is a constraint and physical property problem rather than a geometry problem. Roof and floor constraint are major factors in pillar design and strength.

  11. Could what that ESCO sales rep said really be true? Savings realization rates in ESPC versus bid-to-spec projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Philip; Earni, Shankar; Williams, Charles

    2014-08-11

    Claims that savings realization is greater in energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are rampant at least among energy service company representatives and other ESPC cheerleaders. But hard supporting evidence for these claims has been virtually non-existent. The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program uses its Compliance Tracking System (CTS) database to document the performance of federal buildings and projects towards meeting various federal energy-saving goals. This paper focuses on preliminary analysis from CTS to understand and compare the performance of federal ESPCs with projects that have been implemented with more conventional government appropriations funding. The authors have found preliminary evidence using CTS that shows markedly higher savings realization rates among ESPC projects than appropriations-funded ones. There are numerous caveats to the data comparison that clamor for further study, but the difference is still intriguing. If borne out, this finding will provide concrete support to the idea that ESPCs guarantees and measurement and verification, long touted by energy service companies (ESCOs) as offering savings assurance, may truly yield substantial benefits. If ESPCs actually do perform better (i.e., have higher realization rates and savings persistence) than conventional bid-to-spec projects, the perceived premium for conducting them may look like a very good deal after all.

  12. Property:EIA/861/NercMro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Brainerd Public Utilities + true + Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm + true + Brown County Rural Elec Assn + true + Burke-Divide Electric Coop Inc + true + Butler County...

  13. Property:EIA/861/IsoNy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc. + true + M Major Energy Electric Services + true + N NOCO Electric + true + NRG Power Marketing LLC + true + National Grid Generation, LLC + true + (previous 25) (next...

  14. Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Agway Energy Services, LLC + true + Aiken Electric Coop Inc + true + Aitkin Public Utilities Comm + true + Ajo Improvement Co + true + (previous 25) (next 25)...

  15. Benefits of Biofuel Production and Use in Colorado

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Primary product: Clean biomass cookstoves Feedstock: Multiple (woody crops: coconut, fir, oak, and wood pellets) Location: Fort Collins Stage: University of Colorado and C2B2 ...

  16. Effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on three dimensional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... for MST's major diag- nostics, including Thomson scattering, 39 far infrared (FIR) interferometrypolarimetry, 40 and soft-x-ray (SXR) tomogra- phy. 41,42 The importance of ...

  17. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He3(e,e'd) Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  18. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of γγπ+π-,π0π0 and K¯K below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  19. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He?3(e?,e'd) Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  20. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

  1. Property:NrelPartner | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1366 Technologies + true + 3 3M + true + A A.O. Smith + true + A123Systems + true + AAON + true + AQUA Products + true + AVL Powertrain...

  2. Property:IsDOELab | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Argonne National Laboratory + true + B Brookhaven National Laboratory + true + L Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) + true + Lawrence Livermore National...

  3. Property:GreenButtonPlannedCompliant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Generating Company + true + Ameren Energy Marketing + true + Appalachian Power Co + true + Atlantic City Electric Co + true + B Barton...

  4. Property:EIA/861/IsoMiso | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Bremen Electric Light & Power Co + true + Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm + true + Butler Rural Electric Coop Inc + true + C Cannelton Utilities + true + Carroll County REMC +...

  5. Property:GreenButtonCompliant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Northern States Power Co - Wisconsin (Michigan) + true + O Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC + true + P PacifiCorp + true + (previous 25) (next 25) Retrieved from...

  6. Property:EIA/861/NercSerc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop + true + Beauregard Electric Coop, Inc + true + Benton County + true + Berkeley Electric Coop Inc + true + (previous 25) (next 25) Retrieved from "http:...

  7. Property:EIA/861/ActivityRetailMarketing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + B BP Energy Company + true + Beaver City Corporation (Utility Company) + true + Blue Star Energy Services + true + Bluerock Energy, Inc. + true + Board of Water Electric &...

  8. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    electronics Data is xor-ed with clock - Equalizing filter is difficult to design ... (FIR) filter - 25MHz sampling rate * The clock and data recovery block, which is also ...

  9. AmeriFlux US-UMB Univ. of Mich. Biological Station

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University; Gough, Christopher [Virginia Commonwealth University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-UMB Univ. of Mich. Biological Station. Site Description - The UMBS site is located within a protected forest owned by the University of Michigan. Arboreal composition of the forest consists of mid-aged northern hardwoods, conifer understory, aspen, and old growth hemlock. Logging of local white pines began in 1879. In successive years, several other species were harvested. Logging was discontinued in 1980 when the land became protected under the private ownership of the University of Michigan. Patchy low- to high-intensity wildfires occurred yearly from 1880 - 1920, essentially burning the entire region.

  10. AmeriFlux US-Ha1 Harvard Forest EMS Tower (HFR1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Ha1 Harvard Forest EMS Tower (HFR1). Site Description - The Harvard Forest tower is on land owned by Harvard University. The site is designated as an LTER site. Most of the surrounding area was cleared for agrigulture during European settlement in 1600-1700. The site has been regrowing since before 1900 (based on tree ring chronologies) and is now predominantly red oak and red maple, with patches of mature hemlock stand and individual white pine. Overstory trees were uprooted by hurricane in 1938. Climate measurements have been made at Harvard Forest since 1964.

  11. Property:EIA/861/ActivityBuyingDistribution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Utility Company) + true + City of Hill City, Kansas (Utility Company) + true + City of Hope, North Dakota (Utility Company) + true + City of Kansas City, Kansas (Utility Company)...

  12. Property:EIA/861/IsoCa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services + true + C City & County of San Francisco (Utility Company) + true + City of Alameda, California (Utility Company) + true + City of Anaheim, California (Utility Company)...

  13. Cross section for bb¯ production via dielectrons in d + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Bhom, J. H.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chen, C. -H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H. -Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E. -J.; Kim, Y. -J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kleinjan, D.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J. -C.; Pereira, H.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhou, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report a measurement of e⁺e⁻ pairs from semileptonic heavy-flavor decays in d+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV. Thus, exploring the mass and transverse-momentum dependence of the yield, the bottom decay contribution can be isolated from charm, and quantified by comparison to PYTHIA and MC@NLO simulations. The resulting bb-production cross section is σdAubb=1.37±0.28(stat)±0.46(syst) mb, which is equivalent to a nucleon-nucleon cross section of σNNbb =3.4 ± 0.8(stat)±1.1(syst) µb.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of forward-backward asymmetry and top polarization in dilepton final states from tt¯ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simultaneous measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry and the top-quark polarization in tt¯ production in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector. To reconstruct the distributions of kinematic observables we employ a matrix element technique that calculates the likelihood of the possible tt¯ kinematic configurations. After accounting for the presence of background events and for calibration effects, we obtain a forward-backward asymmetry of Att¯=(15.0±6.4(stat)±4.9(syst))% and a top-quark polarization times spin analyzing power in the beam basis of κP=(7.2±10.5(stat)±4.2(syst))%, with a correlation of -56% between the measurements. If we constrain the forward-backward asymmetry to its expected standard model value, we obtain a measurement of the top polarization ofκP=(11.3±9.1(stat)±1.9(syst))%. If we constrain the top polarization to its expected standard model value, we measure a forward-backward asymmetry of Att¯=(17.5±5.6(stat)±3.1(syst))%. A combination with the D0 Att¯ measurement in the lepton+jets final state yields an asymmetry of Att¯=(11.8±2.5(stat)±1.3(syst))%. Within their respective uncertainties, all these results are consistent with the standard model expectations.

  15. Flash pyrolysis of biomass with reactive and nonreactive gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1982-10-01

    Studies were done on the flash pyrolysis of Douglas fir wood in the presence of reactive and nonreactive gases including hydrogen, methane, and helium. Pyrolysis and gasification of the wood particles was done in one step, without catalysts. Almost complete (98%) gasification of the carbon in Douglas fir wood was achieved at 1000/sup 0/C and 500-psi hydrogen pressure. The reaction products were methane, ethane, ethylene, carbon monoxide, BTX, and water. Flash hydropyrolysis produced a large yield of hydrocarbon gases (up to 78% C) comprising methane and ethane. High yields of ethylene (up to 21% C) and BTX (up to 12% C) were obtained via methane pyrolysis of fir wood; a free-radical mechanism is proposed to explain the enhanced yield of ethylene in a methane atmosphere.

  16. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  17. ALMA observation of 158 μm [C II] line and dust continuum of a z = 7 normally star-forming galaxy in the epoch of reionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ota, Kazuaki; Walter, Fabian; Da Cunha, Elisabete; González-López, Jorge; Decarli, Roberto; Hodge, Jacqueline A.; Ohta, Kouji; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Nagai, Hiroshi; Iye, Masanori; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Carilli, Chris L.; Egami, Eiichi; Jiang, Linhua; Riechers, Dominik A.; Bertoldi, Frank; Cox, Pierre; Neri, Roberto; Weiss, Axel

    2014-09-01

    We present ALMA observations of the [C II] line and far-infrared (FIR) continuum of a normally star-forming galaxy in the reionization epoch, the z = 6.96 Lyα emitter (LAE) IOK-1. Probing to sensitivities of σ{sub line} = 240 μJy beam{sup –1} (40 km s{sup –1} channel) and σ{sub cont} = 21 μJy beam{sup –1}, we found the galaxy undetected in both [C II] and continuum. Comparison of ultraviolet (UV)-FIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of IOK-1, including our ALMA limit, with those of several types of local galaxies (including the effects of the cosmic microwave background, CMB, on the FIR continuum) suggests that IOK-1 is similar to local dwarf/irregular galaxies in SED shape rather than highly dusty/obscured galaxies. Moreover, our 3σ FIR continuum limit, corrected for CMB effects, implies intrinsic dust mass M {sub dust} < 6.4 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉}, FIR luminosity L {sub FIR} < 3.7 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} (42.5-122.5 μm), total IR luminosity L {sub IR} < 5.7 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} (8-1000 μm), and dust-obscured star formation rate (SFR) < 10 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, if we assume that IOK-1 has a dust temperature and emissivity index typical of local dwarf galaxies. This SFR is 2.4 times lower than one estimated from the UV continuum, suggesting that <29% of the star formation is obscured by dust. Meanwhile, our 3σ [C II] flux limit translates into [C II] luminosity, L {sub [C} {sub II]} < 3.4 × 10{sup 7} L {sub ☉}. Locations of IOK-1 and previously observed LAEs on the L {sub [C} {sub II]} versus SFR and L {sub [C} {sub II]}/L {sub FIR} versus L {sub FIR} diagrams imply that LAEs in the reionization epoch have significantly lower gas and dust enrichment than AGN-powered systems and starbursts at similar/lower redshifts, as well as local star-forming galaxies.

  18. Optical layout and mechanical structure of polarimeter-interferometer system for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q. Jie, Y. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Shen, J. S.; An, Z. H.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Li, G. S.; Zhu, X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.

    2014-11-15

    A Far-InfaRed (FIR) three-wave POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system for measurement current density profile and electron density profile is under development for the EAST tokamak. The FIR beams are transmitted from the laser room to the optical tower adjacent to EAST via ?20 m overmoded dielectric waveguide and then divided into 5 horizontal chords. The optical arrangement was designed using ZEMAX, which provides information on the beam spot size and energy distribution throughout the optical system. ZEMAX calculations used to optimize the optical layout design are combined with the mechanical design from CATIA, providing a 3D visualization of the entire POINT system.

  19. Study of e+e-pp¯π0 in the vicinity of the ψ(3770)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M.  N.; Ai, X.  C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D.  J.; An, F.  F.; An, Q.; Bai, J.  Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J.  V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J.  M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R.  A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G.  F.; Cetin, S.  A.; Chang, J.  F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.  S.; Chen, J.  C.; Chen, M.  L.; Chen, S.  J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.  R.; Chen, Y.  B.; Cheng, H.  P.; Chu, X.  K.; Chu, Y.  P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H.  L.; Dai, J.  P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z.  Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W.  M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L.  Y.; Dong, M.  Y.; Du, S.  X.; Fan, J.  Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S.  S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C.  Q.; Fu, C.  D.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W.  X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M.  H.; Gu, Y.  T.; Guan, Y.  H.; Guo, A.  Q.; Guo, L.  B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.  P.; Han, Y.  L.; Harris, F.  A.; He, K.  L.; He, M.; He, Z.  Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y.  K.; Hou, Z.  L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H.  M.; Hu, J.  F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G.  M.; Huang, G.  S.; Huang, H.  P.; Huang, J.  S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X.  T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C.  S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q.  P.; Ji, X.  B.; Ji, X.  L.; Jiang, L.  L.; Jiang, L.  W.; Jiang, X.  S.; Jiao, J.  B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D.  P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X.  L.; Kang, X.  S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kühn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.  S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C.  H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D.  M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.  B.; Li, J.  C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P.  R.; Li, Q.  J.; Li, T.; Li, W.  D.; Li, W.  G.; Li, X.  L.; Li, X.  N.; Li, X.  Q.; Li, Z.  B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y.  F.; Liang, Y.  T.; Lin, D.  X.; Liu, B.  J.; Liu, C.  L.; Liu, C.  X.; Liu, F.  H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H.  B.; Liu, H.  H.; Liu, H.  M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.  P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.  Y.; Liu, P.  L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S.  B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.  B.; Liu, Z.  A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X.  C.; Lu, G.  R.; Lu, H.  J.; Lu, H.  L.; Lu, J.  G.; Lu, X.  R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y.  P.; Luo, C.  L.; Luo, M.  X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.  L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F.  C.; Ma, H.  L.; Ma, Q.  M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X.  Y.; Maas, F.  E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q.  A.; Mao, Y.  J.; Mao, Z.  P.; Messchendorp, J.  G.; Min, J.; Min, T.  J.; Mitchell, R.  E.; Mo, X.  H.; Mo, Y.  J.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N.  Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I.  B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X.  Y.; Olsen, S.  L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H.  P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J.  L.; Ping, R.  G.; Poling, R.; Q., N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C.  F.; Qin, L.  Q.; Qin, X.  S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z.  H.; Qiu, J.  F.; Rashid, K.  H.; Redmer, C.  F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X.  D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C.  P.; Shen, X.  Y.; Sheng, H.  Y.; Shepherd, M.  R.; Song, W.  M.; Song, X.  Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G.  X.; Sun, J.  F.; Sun, S.  S.; Sun, Y.  J.; Sun, Y.  Z.; Sun, Z.  J.; Sun, Z.  T.; Tang, C.  J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E.  H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G.  S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.  Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.  L.; Wang, L.  S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.  L.; Wang, Q.  J.; Wang, S.  G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.  F.; Wang, Y.  D.; Wang, Y.  F.; Wang, Y.  Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.  G.; Wang, Z.  H.; Wang, Z.  Y.; Wei, D.  H.; Wei, J.  B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S.  P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L.  H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.  G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z.  J.; Xie, Y.  G.; Xiu, Q.  L.; Xu, G.  F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q.  J.; Xu, Q.  N.; Xu, X.  P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W.  B.; Yan, W.  C.; Yan, Y.  H.; Yang, H.  X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.  X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M.  H.; Yu, B.  X.; Yu, C.  X.; Yu, H.  W.; Yu, J.  S.; Yu, S.  P.; Yuan, C.  Z.; Yuan, W.  L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A.  A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S.  L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B.  X.; Zhang, B.  Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C.  B.; Zhang, C.  C.; Zhang, D.  H.; Zhang, H.  H.; Zhang, H.  Y.; Zhang, J.  J.; Zhang, J.  Q.; Zhang, J.  W.; Zhang, J.  Y.; Zhang, J.  Z.; Zhang, S.  H.; Zhang, X.  J.; Zhang, X.  Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.  H.; Zhang, Z.  H.; Zhang, Z.  P.; Zhang, Z.  Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M.  G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q.  W.; Zhao, S.  J.; Zhao, T.  C.; Zhao, X.  H.; Zhao, Y.  B.; Zhao, Z.  G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J.  P.; Zheng, Y.  H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X.  K.; Zhou, X.  R.; Zhou, X.  Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K.  J.; Zhu, X.  L.; Zhu, Y.  C.; Zhu, Y.  S.; Zhu, Z.  A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B.  S.; Zou, J.  H.

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-→pp¯π0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at √s=3.773 GeV, at s√=3.650 GeV, and during a ψ(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp¯π0 in the vicinity of the ψ(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ψ(3770)→pp¯π0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5σ are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ψ(3770)→pp¯π0 are 33.8±1.8±2.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimated cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section σ(pp¯→ψ(3770)π0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned P¯ANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 122±10 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.

  20. AmeriFlux US-Syv Sylvania Wilderness Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desai, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Syv Sylvania Wilderness Area. Site Description - Old growth forest consisting primarily of sugar maple and eastern hemlock. Note that a small lake to the north and data analyses suggest that wind direction screening is appropriate (see Desai, A.R., Bolstad, P.V., Cook, B.D., Davis, K.J., and Carey, E.V., 2005. Comparing net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide between an old-growth and mature forest in the upper midwest, USA. Ag. For. Met. 128(1-2): 33-55 (doi: 10.1016/j.agrformet.2004). Site was chosen to represent an end member representative of the upland forests in the WLEF tall tower flux footprint. (Note, however, that old growth forests are not found within the WLEF tall tower flux footprint.)

  1. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  2. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state inB0?J/?K-?+decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  3. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle in pp¯Z/γ*e+e- Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2θeff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp¯→Z/γ*→e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2θeff=0.23147±0.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  4. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle inpp¯Z/γ*e+e-Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.  M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.  S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.  P.; Alexeev, G.  D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D.  V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.  F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.  B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.  C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.  E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.  B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.  P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.  C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.  M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.  W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.  E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.  J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.  P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.  T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.  F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.  V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.  D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.  N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.  E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.  H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.  A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.  E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.  D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.  W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.  M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.  P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.  D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.  D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.  L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.  S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.  S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.  W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.  N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.  M.; Kozelov, A.  V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V.  A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.  S.; Lee, S.  W.; Lee, W.  M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.  Z.; Lim, J.  K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.  V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.  L.; Maciel, A.  K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.  L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.  L.; Meijer, M.  M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.  G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.  K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.  A.; Negret, J.  P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.  T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.  K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V.  M.; Popov, A.  V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.  N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M.  P.; Santos, A.  S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R.  D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A.  A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.  R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.  A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.  V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.  M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.  W.; Vasilyev, I.  A.; Verkheev, A.  Y.; Vertogradov, L.  S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H.  D.; Wang, M.  H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M.  R. J.; Wilson, G.  W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D.  R.; Wyatt, T.  R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y.  A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S.  W.; Yu, J.  M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.  G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2θeff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp¯→Z/γ*→e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2θeff=0.23147±0.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  5. Coupled ππ, KK¯ scattering in P-wave and the ρ resonance from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering in $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $m_\\pi = 236$ MeV in a cubic volume of $\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $\\pi\\pi$, $K\\overline{K}$ and $q\\bar{q}$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $\\pi\\pi$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $\\rho$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $K\\overline{K}$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.

  6. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the fir+ hamrd dmn d-l- with BCZ' C. mot 4-0 b. krpti io Rind* l;.r, Fienhar,thQ plant nana@, told ua thut tha kao WOr@ taW6mWt e&W+ xmt;i P6 sot thi: pwiblo tblle rffeatar of...

  7. October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002 - September 2002 (CRAC 2 period) October 2001 - March 2002 (CRAC 1 period) Final LB CRAC True-Ups for FY 2006 True-Up for CRAC 9 Period: June 14, 2006 Workshop True-Up for...

  8. Star formation relations and CO spectral line energy distributions across the J-ladder and redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greve, T. R.; Leonidaki, I.; Xilouris, E. M.; Wei, A.; Henkel, C.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Van der Werf, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Daz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E.; Harris, A.; Naylor, D. A.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present FIR [50-300 ?m]CO luminosity relations (i.e., log L{sub FIR}=?log L{sub CO}{sup ?}+?) for the full CO rotational ladder from J = 1-0 up to J = 13-12 for a sample of 62 local (z ? 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; L {sub IR[8-1000} {sub ?m]} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 submillimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations, and sufficiently well-sampled FIR/submillimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs), so that accurate FIR luminosities can be determined. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIRCO luminosity relations toward the high-IR-luminosity end, while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-J/high-J CO line data (J = 5-4 and higher) that was available prior to Herschel. This new data set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIRCO luminosity relations (i.e., ? ? 1) for J = 1-0 up to J = 5-4, with a nearly constant normalization (? ? 2). In the simplest physical scenario, this is expected from the (also) linear FIR(molecular line) relations recently found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However, from J = 6-5 and up to the J = 13-12 transition, we find an increasingly sublinear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (?100 K) and dense (>10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star-formation-powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova-driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for this component. The global CO

  9. Tuesday, December 23, 2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    True: Order (2015-SE-42049) True: Order (2015-SE-42049) February 4, 2016 DOE ordered True Manufacturing Co., Inc., to pay a $36,400 civil penalty after finding True had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 182 units of True commercial refrigerator basic models TCGG-72 and TCGG-72-S, which did not meet the application energy conservation standard. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and True. Federal law subjects manufacturers and

  10. Agenda: INFRASTRUCTURE SITING | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the National Audubon Society, Policy Advisor Central Flyway, Audubon Rockies Michael Olsen, Senior Director, Statoil North America Tad True, Vice President, The True Companies ...

  11. HerMES: Spectral energy distributions of submillimeter galaxies at z > 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.-S.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Clements, D. L.; Dai, Y.; Fazio, G. G.; Bock, J. J.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A. J.; Wang, L.; Page, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Riechers, D.; Roseboom, I.; and others

    2014-03-20

    We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z > 4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at λ{sub rest} < 3.5 μm, a hot dust component peaking at λ{sub rest} ∼ 5 μm, and cold dust component which becomes significant for λ{sub rest} > 50 μm. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350 μm. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40-80 K, and their L {sub FIR} ∼ 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉} qualifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around (q) = 2.2 indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24 μm detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5 μm luminosity of Log{sub 10}(L {sub 4.5}/L {sub ☉}) = 11 ∼ 11.5. Their L {sub 4.5}/L {sub FIR} ratios are very similar to those of starburst-dominated SMGs at z ∼ 2. The L {sub CO} – L {sub FIR} relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at z ∼ 2. We conclude that SMGs at z > 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR but otherwise very similar to those at z ∼ 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.

  12. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  13. Search for CP Violation in B0 - B¯0 Mixing Using Partial Reconstruction of B0D*-X+ν and a Kaon Tag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lee, M. J.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Dey, B.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Bougher, J.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Anulli, F.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindemann, D.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wang, W. F.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Villanueva-Perez, P.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2013-09-01

    We present results of a search for CP violation in B0-B¯0 mixing with the BABAR detector. We select a sample of B0→D*-Xℓ+ν decays with a partial reconstruction method and use kaon tagging to assess the flavor of the other B meson in the event. We determine the CP violating asymmetry ACP≡[N(B0B0)-N(B¯00)]/[N(B0B0)+N(B¯00)]=(0.06±0.17+0.38-0.32)%, corresponding to ΔCP=1-|q/p|=(0.29±0.84+1.88-1.61)×10-3.

  14. Measurement of the I=1/2 Kπ S -wave amplitude from Dalitz plot analyses of ηcKK¯π in two-photon interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Pennington, M. R.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2016-01-01

    We study the processes γγ→K0SK±π and γγ→K+K-π0 using a data sample of 519 fb-1 recorded with the BABAR detector operating at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at center-of-mass energies at and near the Υ(nS) (n=2, 3, 4) resonances. We observe ηc decays to both final states and perform Dalitz plot analyses using a model-independent partial wave analysis technique. This allows a model-independent measurement of the mass-dependence of the I=1/2 Kπ S-wave amplitude and phase. A comparison between the present measurement and those from previous experiments indicates similar behavior for the phase up to a mass of 1.5 GeV/c2. In contrast, the amplitudes show very marked differences. The data require the presence of a new a0(1950) resonance with parameters m=1931±14±22 MeV/c2 and Γ=271±22±29 MeV.

  15. Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

    2012-01-31

    The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the

  16. AmeriFlux US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Bar Bartlett Experimental Forest. Site Description - The Bartlett Experimental Forest (448170 N, 71830 W) is located within the White Mountains National Forest in north-central New Hampshire, USA. The 1050 ha forest extends across an elevational range from 200 to 900 m a.s.l. It was established in 1931 and is managed by the USDA Forest Service Northeastern Research Station in Durham, NH. The climate is humid continental with short, cool summers (mean July temperature, 19.8C) and long, cold winters (mean January temperature, 9.8C). Annual precipitation averages 130 cm and is distributed evenly throughout the year. Soils are developed from glacial till and are predominantly shallow, well-drained spodosols. At lowto mid-elevation, vegetation is dominated by northern hardwoods (American beech, Fagus grandifolia; sugar maple, Acer saccharum; yellow birch, Betula alleghaniensis; with some red maple, Acer rubrum and paper birch, Betula papyrifera). Conifers (eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis; eastern white pine, Pinus strobus; red spruce, Picea rubens) are occasionally found intermixed with the more abundant deciduous species but are generally confined to the highest (red spruce) and lowest (hemlock and pine) elevations. In 2003, the site was adopted as a NASA North American Carbon Program (NACP) Tier-2 field research and validation site. A 26.5 m high tower was installed in a low-elevation northern hardwood stand in November, 2003, for the purpose of making eddy covariance measurements of the forest–atmosphere exchange of CO2, H2O and radiant energy. Continuous flux and meteorological measurements began in January, 2004, and are ongoing. Average canopy height in the vicinity of the tower is approximately 20–22 m. In the tower footprint, the forest is predominantly classified into red maple, sugar maple, and American beech forest types. Leaf area index in the vicinity of the tower is 3.6 as measured

  17. A far-infrared spectroscopic survey of intermediate redshift (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Farrah, D.; Pearson, C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Perez Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Thatte, N.; Scott, D.; Valtchanov, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2014-11-20

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground-based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 ? z ? 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}). With these measurements, we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [C II] 157.7 ?m, as well as the molecular gas of z ? 0.3 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [C II] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow an L {sub C} {sub II}L {sub FIR} relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high- z active-galactic-nucleus-dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratio and the far-IR color L {sub 60}/L {sub 100} observed in the local universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterized by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L {sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} or L {sub IR}/M{sub H{sub 2}}), and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star-forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the present day and z

  18. Aurora Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  19. Cove Fort Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  20. Thermo Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  1. Ulupalakua Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  2. Kelsey South Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  3. Criterion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  4. Tuscarora I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  5. Pilot Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  6. Gerlach Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  7. Silver Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  8. Hot Pot Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  9. Airforce Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  10. Pumpernickel Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  11. Linden Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  12. Dynapower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  13. Whirlwind Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  14. Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (2) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  15. DeArmand Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  16. High Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  17. Mahogany Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  18. Newberry I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  19. Orita I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  20. GV1 Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  1. Akutan Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  2. Olene Gap Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  3. Lovelock Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  4. Alum Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  5. Truckee Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  6. Trail Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  7. Tucson, Arizona: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 4, 2016 DOE ordered True Manufacturing Co., Inc., to pay a $36,400 civil penalty after finding True had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 182 units of True commercial refrigerator basic models TCGG-72 and TCGG-72-S, which did not meet the application energy conservation standard. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and True. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties

  8. Observations of summer roosting and foraging behavior of a hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) in southern New Hampshire.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veillieux, J. P.; Moosman, P. R.; Reynolds, D. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Walston, L. J.; Environmental Science Division; Franklin Pierce Univ.; Fitchburg State Coll.; St. Paul's School

    2009-01-01

    Few data are available that describe the roosting and foraging ecology of the Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and no such data are available for the northeastern United States. We captured a juvenile Hoary Bat in south-central New Hampshire during July of 2007 and monitored its roosting behavior for ten days and its foraging behavior for one night. The bat roosted with two other bats, which we presumed were its mother and sibling. These bats roosted exclusively in Tsuga canadensis (Eastern Hemlock Tree) and tended to roost near tree tops in the forest canopy. The radiotagged bat used at least six roost trees and changed roost location eight times during the ten-day observation period. Although roost-tree fidelity was low, all roost trees were located within a maximum circular area of 0.5 ha. The bat foraged over an estimated 156-ha area of mostly forest habitat (68%), with additional open habitats (15%) and wetlands (17%). These data are the first observations of roosting and foraging behaviors by the Hoary Bat in the northeastern region of its geographic range.

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF SUPERNOVA REMNANTS ON THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD SEEN AT 20-600 μm WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakićević, Maša; Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl; Roman-Duval, Julia; Seale, Jonathan; Bot, Caroline; Babler, Brian; Bolatto, Alberto; Engelbracht, Chad; Misselt, Karl; Montiel, Edward; Filipović, Miroslav; Hony, Sacha; Okumura, K.; Panuzzo, Pasquale; Sauvage, Marc; Patat, Ferdinando; Sonneborn, George; and others

    2015-01-20

    We present the analysis of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and their influence on the environment at far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter wavelengths. We use new observations obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory and archival data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to make the first FIR atlas of these objects. The SNRs are not clearly discernible at FIR wavelengths; however, their influence becomes apparent in maps of dust mass and dust temperature, which we constructed by fitting a modified blackbody to the observed spectral energy distribution in each sightline. Most of the dust that is seen is pre-existing interstellar dust in which SNRs leave imprints. The temperature maps clearly reveal SNRs heating surrounding dust, while the mass maps indicate the removal of 3.7{sub −2.5}{sup +7.5} M {sub ☉} of dust per SNR. This agrees with the calculations by others that significant amounts of dust are sputtered by SNRs. Under the assumption that dust is sputtered and not merely pushed away, we estimate a dust destruction rate in the LMC of 0.037{sub −0.025}{sup +0.075} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} due to SNRs, yielding an average lifetime for interstellar dust of 2{sub −1.3}{sup +4.0}×10{sup 7} yr. We conclude that sputtering of dust by SNRs may be an important ingredient in models of galactic evolution, that supernovae may destroy more dust than they produce, and that they therefore may not be net producers of long lived dust in galaxies.

  10. THE PHYSICS OF THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION. I. CALORIMETRY, CONSPIRACY, AND IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot

    2010-07-01

    The far-infrared (FIR) and radio luminosities of star-forming galaxies are linearly correlated over a very wide range in star formation rate, from normal spirals like the Milky Way to the most intense starbursts. Using one-zone models of cosmic ray (CR) injection, cooling, and escape in star-forming galaxies, we attempt to reproduce the observed FIR-radio correlation (FRC) over its entire span. The normalization and linearity of the FRC, together with constraints on the CR population in the Milky Way, have strong implications for the CR and magnetic energy densities in star-forming galaxies. We show that for consistency with the FRC, {approx}2% of the kinetic energy from supernova explosions must go into high-energy primary CR electrons and that {approx}10%-20% must go into high-energy primary CR protons. Secondary electrons and positrons are likely comparable to or dominate primary electrons in dense starburst galaxies. We discuss the implications of our models for the magnetic field strengths of starbursts, the detectability of starbursts by Fermi, and CR feedback. Overall, our models indicate that both CR protons and electrons escape from low surface density galaxies, but lose most of their energy before escaping dense starbursts. The FRC is caused by a combination of the efficient cooling of CR electrons (calorimetry) in starbursts and a conspiracy of several factors. For lower surface density galaxies, the decreasing radio emission caused by CR escape is balanced by the decreasing FIR emission caused by the low effective UV dust opacity. In starbursts, bremsstrahlung, ionization, and inverse Compton cooling decrease the radio emission, but they are countered by secondary electrons/positrons and the dependence of synchrotron frequency on energy, both of which increase the radio emission. Our conclusions hold for a broad range of variations in our fiducial model, such as those including winds, different magnetic field strengths, and different diffusive escape

  11. On the origin of a sunquake during the 2014 March 29 X1 flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judge, Philip G.; Kleint, Lucia; Donea, Alina; Dalda, Alberto Sainz; Fletcher, Lyndsay E-mail: lucia.kleint@fhnw.ch E-mail: asdalda@stanford.edu

    2014-12-01

    Helioseismic data from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager instrument have revealed a sunquake associated with the X1 flare SOL2014-03-29T17:48 in active region NOAA 12017. We try to discover if acoustic-like impulses or actions of the Lorentz force caused the sunquake. We analyze spectropolarimetric data obtained with the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Fortunately, the FIRS slit crossed the flare kernel close to the acoustic source during the impulsive phase. The infrared FIRS data remain unsaturated throughout the flare. Stokes profiles of lines of Si I 1082.7 nm and He I 1083.0 nm are analyzed. At the flare footpoint, the Si I 1082.7 nm core intensity increases by a factor of several, and the IR continuum increases by 4% ± 1%. Remarkably, the Si I core resembles the classical Ca II K line's self-reversed profile. With nLTE radiative models of H, C, Si, and Fe, these properties set the penetration depth of flare heating to 100 ± 100 km (i.e., photospheric layers). Estimates of the non-magnetic energy flux are at least a factor of two less than the sunquake energy flux. Milne-Eddington inversions of the Si I line show that the local magnetic energy changes are also too small to drive the acoustic pulse. Our work raises several questions. Have we missed the signature of downward energy propagation? Is it intermittent in time and/or non-local? Does the 1-2 s photospheric radiative damping time discount compressive modes?.

  12. HerMES: LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES INDIVIDUALLY DETECTED AT 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 2.0 IN GOODS-N WITH HERSCHEL/SPIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgarella, D.; Heinis, S.; Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Ilbert, O.; Magdis, G.; Hwang, H. S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Brisbin, D.; Chanial, P.; Clements, D. L.; Franceschini, A.; Marchetti, L.; Glenn, J.; Gonzalez Solares, E. A. E-mail: sebastien.heinis@oamp.fr

    2011-06-10

    As part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey we have investigated the rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) properties of a sample of more than 4800 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North field. Most LBGs are not detected individually, but we do detect a sub-sample of 12 objects at 0.7 < z < 1.6 and one object at z = 2.0. The ones detected by Herschel SPIRE have redder observed NUV - U and U - R colors than the others, while the undetected ones have colors consistent with average LBGs at z > 2.5. The UV-to-FIR spectral energy distributions of the objects detected in the rest-frame FIR are investigated using the code CIGALE to estimate physical parameters. We find that LBGs detected by SPIRE are high-mass, luminous infrared galaxies. It appears that LBGs are located in a triangle-shaped region in the A{sub FUV} versus log L{sub FUV} = 0 diagram limited by A{sub FUV} = 0 at the bottom and by a diagonal following the temporal evolution of the most massive galaxies from the bottom right to the top left of the diagram. This upper envelop can be used as upper limits for the UV dust attenuation as a function of L{sub FUV}. The limits of this region are well explained using a closed-box model, where the chemical evolution of galaxies produces metals, which in turn lead to higher dust attenuation when the galaxies age.

  13. STRONG C{sup +} EMISSION IN GALAXIES AT z? 1-2: EVIDENCE FOR COLD FLOW ACCRETION POWERED STAR FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisbin, Drew; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen; Spoon, Henrik; Stacey, Gordon J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Verma, Aprajita

    2015-01-20

    We have recently detected the [C II] 157.7 ?m line in eight star-forming galaxies at redshifts 1 to 2 using the redshift (z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS). Our sample targets star formation dominant sources detected in PAH emission. This represents a significant addition to [C II] observations during the epoch of peak star formation. We have augmented this survey with observations of the [O I] 63 ?m line and far infrared photometry from the PACS and SPIRE Herschel instruments as well as Spitzer IRS spectra from the literature showing PAH features. Our sources exhibit above average gas heating efficiency, many with both [O I]/FIR and [C II]/FIR of ?1% or more. The relatively strong [C II] emission is consistent with our sources being dominated by star formation powered photo-dissociation regions, extending to kiloparsec scales. We suggest that the star formation mode in these systems follows a Schmidt-Kennicutt law similar to local systems, but at a much higher rate due to molecular gas surface densities 10-100times that of local star-forming systems. The source of the high molecular gas surface densities may be the infall of neutral gas from the cosmic web. In addition to the high [C II]/FIR values, we also find high [C II]/PAH ratios and, in at least one source, a cool dust temperature. This source, SWIRE 4-5, bears a resemblance in these diagnostics to shocked regions of Stephan's Quintet, suggesting that another mode of [C II] excitation in addition to normal photoelectric heating may be contributing to the observed [C II] line.

  14. Laminated root rot in western North America. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thies, W.G.; Sturrock, R.N.

    1995-04-01

    Laminated root rot, caused by Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gib., is a serious root disease affecting Douglas-fir and other commercially important species of conifers in northwestern North America. This report gives an overview of the disease as it occurs in the Pacific Northwest in Canada and the United States. Information on recognizing crown symptoms and signs of the disease is presented. The disease cycle of laminated root rot, from initiation to intensification and distribution within infected stands, is described. Finally, disease management strategies during stand development and at stand regeneration are discussed. Features on mechanical approaches also are included. The report is intended as a general reference for a wide audience.

  15. Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0287) (11/28/06)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    811 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 228 / Tuesday, November 28, 2006 / Notices Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877-8339. [FR Doc. E6-20124 Filed 11-27-06; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Amended Record of Decision: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Amended Record of Decision. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its Record of Decision (ROD) published

  16. Architecture and technology of 500 Msample/s feedback systems for control of coupled-bunch instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teytelman, Dmitry

    2000-03-30

    Feedback control of coupled-bunch instabilities presents many challenges. Control bandwidths up to 250 MHz are required to damp all of the unstable coupled-bunch modes in recent accelerators. A digital parallel-processing array with 80 DSPs has been developed to control longitudinal instabilities in PEP-II/ALS/DA NE machines. Here the authors present a description of the architecture as well as the technologies used to implement 500 Msample/s real-time control system with 2,000 FIR filtering channels. Algorithms for feedback control, data acquisition, and analysis are described and measurements from ALS are presented.

  17. J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .Jq. 3 8.5 J Hr. Mark Finkelstein . . State Street Associates L.P. II Ithaca, New York 14GSO Dear Fir. Flnkelstein: .' This Is a followup letter to your telephone discussion on September 30, 1994, with Dr. Y. Alexander Yilliams of my staff. As you discussed, the Department of Energy (DOE) Is tmplementfng a radiological survey,program to determine the radiological conditions at.sites that were formerly used by DOE predecessor agencies. One such slte is the former Ithaca Gun Company facility in

  18. Is the Use of a Surrogate Urethra an Option in Prostate High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Josef Kaelkner, Karl Mikael; Berg, Lars; Levitt, Seymour; Holmberg, Carina; Nilsson, Sten; Lundell, Marie

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and the dosimetric consequences of substituting a surrogate urethra assumed to be at the geometric center of the prostate, in place of the true urethra when using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred prostate cancer patients treated with HDR brachytherapy constituted the study group. A pre-plan was made with the urethra visualized. The true urethra was defined, and a surrogate urethra was placed at the geometric center of the prostate. The distance between the two urethras was measured. The deviation was evaluated at the base, middle, and apex. To evaluate the dosimetric consequences for the true urethra when using a surrogate urethra, two different dose plans were made: one based on the true urethra and one based on the surrogate urethra. The dose-volume histograms for the true urethra were analyzed. Results: The deviation between the true urethra and the surrogate urethra was greatest at the base of the prostate. A statistically significant difference was seen between the dosimetric parameters for the true and the surrogate urethra when the dose plan was made using the surrogate urethra. In this situation the dose to the true urethra was increased above our defined maximum tolerance limit. Conclusions: When using dose plans made according to a surrogate urethra the dose to the true urethra might be too high to be acceptable. If the true urethra is not visualized, severe damage could easily develop in a significant number of patients.

  19. COLA. III. RADIO DETECTION OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN COMPACT MODERATE LUMINOSITY INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, R.; Conway, J. E.; Aalto, S.; Appleton, P. N.; Norris, R. P.; Pihlstroem, Y. M.; Kewley, L. J.

    2010-09-01

    We present results from 4.8 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) and global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations of the northern half of the moderate FIR luminosity (median L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11.01} L{sub sun}) COLA sample of star-forming galaxies. VLBI sources are detected in a high fraction (20/90) of the galaxies observed. The radio luminosities of these cores ({approx}10{sup 21} W Hz{sup -1}) are too large to be explained by radio supernovae or supernova remnants and we argue that they are instead powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These sub-parsec scale radio cores are preferentially detected toward galaxies whose VLA maps show bright 100-500 parsec scale nuclear radio components. Since these latter structures tightly follow the FIR to radio-continuum correlation for star formation, we conclude that the AGN-powered VLBI sources are associated with compact nuclear starburst environments. The implications for possible starburst-AGN connections are discussed. The detected VLBI sources have a relatively narrow range of radio luminosity consistent with models in which intense compact Eddington-limited starbursts regulate the gas supply onto a central supermassive black hole. The high incidence of AGN radio cores in compact starbursts suggests little or no delay between the starburst phase and the onset of AGN activity.

  20. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gasmore » chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  1. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  2. Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Inez

    2014-07-28

    In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

  3. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model for Skagit River Estuary for Estuarine Restoration Feasibility Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Liu, Hedong; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2006-08-03

    The Skagit River is the largest river in the Puget Sound estuarine system. It discharges about 39% of total sediment and more than 20% of freshwater into Puget Sound. The Skagit River delta provides rich estuarine and freshwater habitats for salmon and many other wildlife species. Over the past 150 years, economic development in the Skagit River delta has resulted in significant losses of wildlife habitat, particularly due to construction of dikes. Diked portion of the delta is known as Fir Island where irrigation practices for agriculture land over the last century has resulted in land subsidence. This has also caused reduced efficiency of drainage network and impeded fish passages through the area. In this study, a three-dimensional tidal circulation model was developed for the Skagit River delta to assist estuarine restoration in the Fir Island area. The hydrodynamic model used in the study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM). The hydrodynamic model was calibrated using field data collected from the study area specifically for the model development. Wetting and drying processes in the estuarine delta are simulated in the hydrodynamic model. The calibrated model was applied to simulate different restoration alternatives and provide guidance for estuarine restoration and management. Specifically, the model was used to help select and design configurations that would improve the supply of sediment and freshwater to the mudflats and tidal marsh areas outside of diked regions and then improve the estuarine habitats for salmon migration.

  4. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  5. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Dennis K.; Vocaturo, Michael; Guttadora, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  6. Development of a polysilicon process based on chemical vapor deposition of dichlorosilane in an advanced Siemen's reactor. Final report, October 11, 1982-May 21, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, J.R.; Arvidson, A.N.; Sawyer, D.H.; Muller, D.M.

    1983-07-14

    Dichlorosilane (DCS) was used as the feedstock for an advanced decomposition reactor for silicon production. The advanced reactor had a cool bell jar wall temperature, 300/sup 0/C, when compared to Siemen's reactors previously used for DCS decomposition by Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation. Previous reactors had bell jar wall temperatures of approximately 750/sup 0/C. The cooler wall temperature allows higher DCS flow rates and concentrations. A silicon deposition rate of 2.28 gm/hr-cm was achieved with power consumption of 59 kWh/kg. Interpretation of data suggests that a 2.8 gm/hr-cm deposition rate is possible. The 2.8 gm/hr-cm deposition rate surpasses the goal of 2.0 gm/hr-cm. Power consumption and conversion should approach the program goals of 60 kWh/kg and 40%. Screening of lower cost materials of construction was done as a separate program segment. Stainless Steel (304 and 316), Hastalloy B, Monel 400 and 1010-1020 Carbon Steel were placed individually in an experimental scale reactor. Silicon was deposited from trichlorosilane feedstock. The resultant silicon was analyzed for electrically active and metallic impurities as well as carbon. No material contributed significant amounts of electrically active or metallic impurities, but all contributed carbon. Single crystal growth could not be maintained in most zone refining evaluations. No material need be excluded from consideration for use in construction of decomposition reactor components for production of photovoltaic grade silicon; however, further evaluation and the use of the low carbon alloys is considered essential.

  7. BPA-2011-01579-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address * Currently Proposed Utility ECA Implementation Budget for the fiscal year 2012-2013 rate period I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and...

  8. Commercial Buildings Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Integration Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL 2 Strategic Fit within ...

  9. CBI Technology Impact Framework

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CBI Technology Impact Framework 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, ...

  10. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Increasing the Value...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The agenda and workshop presentations are below. Agenda An Example Commercial True Microgrid: Santa Rita Jail DC - The Power to Change the World: From Data Centers to Whole...

  11. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to ...

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Tuesday, September 10 2013 Next Time Items All day All times ICCE 2013: International Conference & Exhibition on Clean Energy 9...

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, August 10 2013 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, December 31 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, April 28 2014 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

  2. 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to...

  3. QER Public Meeting in Cheyenne, WY: Infrastructure Siting | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Policy Advisor Central Flyway, Audubon Rockies - Statement (222.76 KB) Michael Olsen, Senior Director, Statoil North America - Statement (52.82 KB) Tad True, Vice ...

  4. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Managing O & M Costs Rue Phillips, CEOCofounder True South Renewables Inc. Pioneers in PV Operations and Maintenance protocols, procedures Maintaining and operating...

  5. Slide14 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Most automatic translations are limited to translating from a single language into another single language. WorldWideScience.org partnering with Microsoft Translator enables true ...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measure the evolution of Newton's constant, Gsub eff, that appears in Modified Gravity theories, without assuming General Relativity to be true. The novelty of these...

  7. Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy potential. Further investigation by drilling is necessary to determine the true nature of the waters at depth. Authors Laura Garchar and Greg Arehart Published GRC, 2008 DOI...

  8. Microsoft Word - JanuaryNews2015.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    only interested in learning more about the true story of Los Alamos' Manhattan Project history, but also about all of the scientific breakthroughs that are happening at the...

  9. New Technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fabricated to fit various turnstile models. Chemical Agent DetectorInterrogator This gun-like tool is an example of innovative technology - a true breakthrough for law...

  10. EIA-812, Monthly Product Pipeline Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... reporting company. Enter the Doing Business As "DBA" name if appropriate. Enter ... error greater than 5 percent of the true value is discovered by a respondent or if ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... We focus on the three methods most adept at constraining w, namely, ... integral overmore the true function. Adopting a similar approach, we calculate the corresponding ...

  12. Symmetry Breaking of H2 Dissociation by a Single Photon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    six-fold rotational symmetry, abound but are only approximately true because the objects of our macroscopic world are highly complex. Once we reduce their size and...

  13. Stationary bubbles and their tunneling channels toward trivial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We investigate the dynamics and tunneling channels of true vacuum bubbles for various tensions. In particular, in line with the idea of superposition of geometries, we build a ...

  14. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benjamin Peterson Mortenson C onstruction Rue Phillips True S outh R enewables Richard Pizzella Hartford Steam Boiler Larry Pratt CFV S olar T est L aboratory Angelo Purpura ...

  15. Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important science and engineering applications. In this paper we describe a new high performance conjugate...

  16. MiniBooNE Charged Current Charged Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    includes the experimentally reconstructed nucleon scattering energy spectrum, the migration matrices from reconstructed to true energy (for the bound nucleons in carbon, free...

  17. ESnet, Coalition Partners Announce Global Breakthrough for Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Software-Defined Networking Proving true SDN principles and deployment at Internet-scale, ONOS-based peering router and Vandervecken SDN controller stack successfully...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of current and recent weather for use by ship's crew or scientists during operations. True and Apparent Winds were displayed. Update rate was once per minute. Other Contacts...

  19. Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such measurements (from hours to several minutes), while maintaining at least reasonable accuracy (agreement with true ratios +- 3% or better) and precision (1% RSD or better),...

  20. RAZAR Adaptive Zoom Rifle Scope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagwell, Brett; Baker, Mike; Heinsohn, John; Squire, Michael

    2014-10-22

    RAZAR adaptive zoom is a revolutionary method whereby true optical zoom is accomplished by cooperatively varying the focal lengths of multiple active optical elements in the system.

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... mathematical treatment of the true model calibration problem in whichmore both the computed data and experimental data have error bars. This year, we examined methods to ...

  2. Department

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    persons who manage the system, or those persons directly responsible for gathering the informa tion, the information submitted is, to the best of our knowledge and belief, true,...

  3. Agenda, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7077797,"lon":-97.4317035,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Norwell, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1617681,"lon":-70.7939307,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Danville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.96342,"lon":-76.6127329,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  6. Colmar, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2673286,"lon":-75.2535079,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Geneva, Switzerland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.2038099,"lon":6.1399589,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  8. Lake County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4897279,"lon":-87.3016132,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Ohio County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1111311,"lon":-80.610489,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  10. Duncanville, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.6518004,"lon":-96.9083366,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Cedar City, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6774769,"lon":-113.0618931,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  12. Loyola, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3513302,"lon":-122.100518,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Monroe County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1851445,"lon":-86.4996546,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. West Union, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7945166,"lon":-83.5451934,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2072286,"lon":-92.0213883,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Cass County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8199089,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Cherokee County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1134803,"lon":-84.059029,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  18. Homestead, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4059025,"lon":-79.9119948,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Buena Vista, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7110387,"lon":-119.7937851,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  20. Webster County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.5707456,"lon":-89.2847251,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Wabash County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.4226484,"lon":-87.8156715,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Mitchell County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.443669,"lon":-98.2212979,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  3. Columbus, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2014404,"lon":-85.9213796,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Sunnyvale, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7965165,"lon":-96.5608242,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Greene County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.5013936,"lon":-77.6994197,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Sidney, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1427623,"lon":-102.9779785,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  7. Sunol-Midtown, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3247466,"lon":-121.9081972,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  8. Abbottstown, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8864869,"lon":-76.9847013,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Monroe County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.2742526,"lon":-90.1869644,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. El Mirage, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6130942,"lon":-112.3246042,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  11. Glenn Heights, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5487479,"lon":-96.8566667,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. Martinsville, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4278253,"lon":-86.4283279,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Cass County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8755529,"lon":-96.1526985,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Springfield, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.5092118,"lon":-86.8849984,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Spring, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.0799405,"lon":-95.4171601,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Cass County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9398601,"lon":-90.2620042,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Jessup, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1492746,"lon":-76.7752493,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Madison County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8237518,"lon":-82.6915429,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Calhoun County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1733216,"lon":-90.658333,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  20. Aurora, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3175549,"lon":-81.3453858,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Osseo, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.1194091,"lon":-93.4024532,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Kailua, Hawaii: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.4022222,"lon":-157.7394444,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  3. Erie, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1292241,"lon":-80.085059,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  4. Rochester Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6583661,"lon":-83.1499322,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Wilson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5808413,"lon":-95.8142885,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Abbott, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.8848809,"lon":-97.0733361,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Accomack County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7063323,"lon":-75.8069082,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Jefferson County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3871722,"lon":-80.7657804,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Carroll County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0385843,"lon":-89.9626799,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Buchtel, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4620147,"lon":-82.1818141,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. West Homestead, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3939581,"lon":-79.9119946,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. Lake County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5964304,"lon":-91.4964639,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Androscoggin County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1912416,"lon":-70.1707037,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2098407,"lon":-87.5691735,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Scott County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6834072,"lon":-93.5407909,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Madison County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.436934,"lon":-78.2476146,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  17. Annapolis, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9784453,"lon":-76.4921829,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Franklin, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1823171,"lon":-83.3815429,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Weston, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3490017,"lon":-96.6694368,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Wayne County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1598501,"lon":-82.4752757,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Lake County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0839644,"lon":-122.8084496,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. Vicksburg, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3526456,"lon":-90.877882,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  3. Richmond Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Adams Center, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Sanders County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Carlisle, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Ogle County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9969811,"lon":-89.3226954,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Loretto, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Afton, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7249282,"lon":-110.9318687,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  10. Lancaster, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5920798,"lon":-96.7561082,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Elko, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8324211,"lon":-115.7631232,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  12. Georgetown, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.376834,"lon":-79.2944964,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  13. Hutchins, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.6492999,"lon":-96.7130521,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Washington County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8413319,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  15. Neenah, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1858193,"lon":-88.462609,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  16. Greene County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3311215,"lon":-93.5003454,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Monroe County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5508815,"lon":-92.0665197,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Calhoun County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3475302,"lon":-85.1894045,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Webberville, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6669787,"lon":-84.1741305,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Morgan County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3661344,"lon":-92.8577105,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Sausalito, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8590937,"lon":-122.4852507,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. Alum Rock, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.366111,"lon":-121.826111,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  3. Absecon, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4284503,"lon":-74.4957076,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Knox County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8776411,"lon":-90.2244662,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Washington, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2991837,"lon":-91.6929449,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Grand Prairie, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7459645,"lon":-96.9977846,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Abercrombie, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.4477384,"lon":-96.7303557,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Iowa County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9416737,"lon":-90.0746767,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. San Martin, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.0849464,"lon":-121.6102216,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  10. East Foothills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3810508,"lon":-121.8174533,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  11. Gifford, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.6753089,"lon":-80.4092181,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. East Cleveland, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5331066,"lon":-81.5790137,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Rosslyn Farms, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4256246,"lon":-80.0939445,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Boyne City, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.2166751,"lon":-85.0139419,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Benton County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.644786,"lon":-87.3413599,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  16. Madison, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2472924,"lon":-79.6772645,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Wyandotte County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0986811,"lon":-94.7691586,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Marathon County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.850452,"lon":-89.8505012,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  19. Palmdale, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5794343,"lon":-118.1164613,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  20. Taylor County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.2455088,"lon":-99.8124935,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Morgan County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7341219,"lon":-90.2244662,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Calhoun County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.857973,"lon":-81.1196075,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  3. Delaware County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.4263135,"lon":-94.8105955,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Lowell, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9336426,"lon":-85.3419609,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Knox County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6712397,"lon":-97.87216,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  6. Ellis County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.2920072,"lon":-99.8124935,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Gilroy, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.0057816,"lon":-121.5682751,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  8. Maumee, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5628294,"lon":-83.6538244,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Delaware County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2583533,"lon":-85.3962769,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.472467,"lon":-76.129966,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  11. Northampton County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.226762,"lon":-75.9927652,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  12. Adairsville, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3687021,"lon":-84.9341093,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. DeSoto, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5898577,"lon":-96.8569451,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Ellis County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8683549,"lon":-99.2785583,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. South Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.588958,"lon":-80.0386522,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  16. Adair, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5005428,"lon":-94.6435862,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Knox County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6665815,"lon":-87.4207518,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Fairfield, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0134066,"lon":-80.0711661,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Fruitdale, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3117785,"lon":-121.9373561,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  20. Quincy, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2528772,"lon":-71.0022705,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. South Yarmouth, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6667779,"lon":-70.1847413,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Monte Sereno, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.236333,"lon":-121.992458,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  3. Williamsport, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2883704,"lon":-87.2938999,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Greene County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.1347943,"lon":-82.820974,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  5. Cedar Hill, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5884689,"lon":-96.9561152,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Wilmer, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5890243,"lon":-96.6852724,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Ovilla, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5265264,"lon":-96.8863898,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.7056206,"lon":-80.0364297,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Linn County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8556605,"lon":-93.1779659,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Gooding County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9180557,"lon":-114.7494346,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  11. Laurens County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.433014,"lon":-82.9931607,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  12. Miami County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.770099,"lon":-86.0529604,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  13. Perrysburg, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.556996,"lon":-83.627157,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  14. Youngtown, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.5939281,"lon":-112.3029362,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  15. Corcoran, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0952417,"lon":-93.5474577,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Chester, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7842667,"lon":-74.6968284,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Martin County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8733053,"lon":-77.1485163,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Terramuggus, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6350991,"lon":-72.4703638,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Bend, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.0581728,"lon":-121.3153096,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  20. Seven Trees, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.2860536,"lon":-121.8385638,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  1. Lexington Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.164668,"lon":-121.9730139,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Wyoming County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6339466,"lon":-81.5596427,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. Ingham County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6468943,"lon":-84.3542049,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Linn County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0659844,"lon":-91.6760691,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Fulton, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8467082,"lon":-91.9479586,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Columbia, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9176632,"lon":-76.2521521,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Humphreys County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0245773,"lon":-87.7369607,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Alakanuk, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":62.6888889,"lon":-164.6152778,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  9. Acequia, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6679642,"lon":-113.5969537,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  10. Agar, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.8383153,"lon":-100.0745668,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  11. Boyette, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.8383805,"lon":-82.2909146,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. Lake County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.981532,"lon":-81.2518833,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  13. Gibson County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9969735,"lon":-88.864698,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  14. Muskegon, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2341813,"lon":-86.2483921,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Washington County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3001466,"lon":-90.9438468,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Rowlett, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.9029017,"lon":-96.56388,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  17. Cohocton, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5022907,"lon":-77.5072102,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Adrian, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2747775,"lon":-102.6652114,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  19. Los Altos, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3852183,"lon":-122.1141298,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  20. Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Software Sectors Buildings washarvested true Package Relationships Relationship Dataset License CC0 1.0 Open Data Author Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)...

  1. Management Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - June 7 - 9, 2016 SAND2016-5553 PE International Collaboration: SKB EBS Task Force - ... - TRUE-1, predictive modeling Task 5 - Integration of hydrogeology and hydrochemistry Task ...

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    True-up Projections Current Rate Schedules New Rate Schedules were effective October ... Final action by FERC is pending. 2 Current Rate Schedules Rate schedules include ...

  3. Search for: shape memory* | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... cannot accurately represent true data patterns, in particular, for complex real world ... The new Householder reconstruction algorithm allows us to design more efficient parallel ...

  4. High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Commercial ...

  5. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, David

    2006-12-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), together with Hamworthy Peabody Combustion Incorporated (formerly Peabody Engineering Corporation), the University of Utah, and Far West Electrochemical have developed and demonstrated an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas and coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The combustion system is a simple, low-cost, energy-efficient burner that can reduce NOx by more than 75%. The U.S. steel industry needs to address NOx control at its steelmaking facilities. A significant part of NOx emissions comes from gas-fired boilers. In steel plants, byproduct gases – blast furnace gas (BFG) and coke-oven gas (COG) – are widely used together with natural gas to fire furnaces and boilers. In steel plants, natural gas can be fired together with BFG and COG, but, typically, the addition of natural gas raises NOx emissions, which can already be high because of residual fuel-bound nitrogen in COG. The Project Team has applied its expertise in low-NOx burners to lower NOx levels for these applications by combining advanced burner geometry and combustion staging with control strategies tailored to mixtures of natural gas and byproduct fuel gases. These methods reduce all varieties of NOx – thermal NOx produced by high flame temperatures, prompt NOx produced by complex chain reactions involving radical hydrocarbon species and NOx from fuel-bound nitrogen compounds such as ammonia found in COG. The Project Team has expanded GTI’s highly successful low-NOx forced internal recirculation (FIR) burner, previously developed for natural gas-fired boilers, into facilities that utilize BFG and COG. For natural gas firing, these burners have been shown to reduce NOx emissions from typical uncontrolled levels of 80-100 vppm to single-digit levels (9 vppm). This is done without the energy efficiency penalties incurred by alternative NOx control methods, such as external flue gas recirculation (FGR), water injection, and selective non

  6. Temperature dependent Raman scattering and far-infrared reflectance spectra of MgO modified Pb{sub 0.99}(Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} ceramics: A composition effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Z. H.; Chang, P.; Hu, Z. G. Chu, J. H.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, G. S.; Dong, X. L.

    2014-09-07

    Lattice dynamics and phase transition of MgO modified Pb{sub 0.99}(Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} (PZTN-x wt. % MgO, x?=?0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5) ceramics have been investigated by far-infrared (FIR) reflectance in the temperature range of 5.5300?K and Raman spectra between 77 and 300?K, respectively. With the aid of above complementary methods, the structure of all ceramics was defined as low-temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral phase [F{sub R(LT)}] at room temperature. The FIR dielectric functions were extracted from the multi-Lorentz oscillator dispersion model. The lowest frequency phonon mode, which is related to Pb-BO{sub 3} (B?=?Zr, Ti, Nb) vibration, mainly dominates the FIR dielectric response. With increasing MgO composition, the dielectric constants ?(0) at room temperature are estimated to 85.4, 73.4, 73.9, and 41.9, respectively. The decreasing trend can be due to the doubly ionized oxygen vacancies induced by Mg substitution for B-site. The order-disorder phase transition located around 120?K can be clearly clarified from temperature evolution of phonon frequency, damping, and intensity. It decreases slightly with increasing MgO composition, which influence the distortion due to the broken correlation chains and local permanent dipoles creation. Moreover, the transformation from antiferroelectric orthorhombic A{sub O} to [ F{sub R(LT)} ] phase has been observed around 250?K, which is associated with the antiferroelectric displacement of Pb atoms along ? 110 ? and coupled rotations of the corner-connected oxygen octahedral. Furthermore, the transition from [ F{sub R(LT)} ] to [ F{sub R(HT)} ] (high-temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral phase) was identified around 290?K for MgO-doped PZTN ceramics. It arises from the shift of cation (Pb and Zr/Ti/Nb/Mg ions) along the ? 111 ? direction and the transition temperature slightly decreases compared to the pure ceramic.

  7. Strong far-infrared cooling lines, peculiar CO kinematics, and possible star-formation suppression in Hickson compact group 57

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.; Ogle, P. M.; Rich, J. A.; Xu, C. K.; Lisenfeld, U.; Bitsakis, T.; Guillard, P.; Charmandaris, V.; Cluver, M.; Jarrett, T.; Dopita, M. A.; Kewley, L. J.; Freeland, E.; Rasmussen, J.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.

    2014-11-10

    We present [C II] and [O I] observations from Herschel and CO(1-0) maps from the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA) of the Hickson compact group HCG 57, focusing on the galaxies HCG 57a and HCG 57d. HCG 57a has been previously shown to contain enhanced quantities of warm molecular hydrogen consistent with shock or turbulent heating. Our observations show that HCG 57d has strong [C II] emission compared to L {sub FIR} and weak CO(1-0), while in HCG 57a, both the [C II] and CO(1-0) are strong. HCG 57a lies at the upper end of the normal distribution of the [C II]/CO and [C II]/FIR ratios, and its far-infrared (FIR) cooling supports a low-density, warm, diffuse gas that falls close to the boundary of acceptable models of a photon-dominated region. However, the power radiated in the [C II] and warm H{sub 2} emissions have similar magnitudes, as seen in other shock-dominated systems and predicted by recent models. We suggest that shock heating of the [C II] is a viable alternative to photoelectric heating in violently disturbed, diffuse gas. The existence of shocks is also consistent with the peculiar CO kinematics in the galaxy, indicating that highly noncircular motions are present. These kinematically disturbed CO regions also show evidence of suppressed star formation, falling a factor of 10-30 below normal galaxies on the Kennicutt-Schmidt relation. We suggest that the peculiar properties of both galaxies are consistent with a highly dissipative, off-center collisional encounter between HCG 57d and 57a, creating ring-like morphologies in both systems. Highly dissipative gas-on-gas collisions may be more common in dense groups because of the likelihood of repeated multiple encounters. The possibility of shock-induced star-formation suppression may explain why a subset of these HCG galaxies has been found previously to fall in the mid-infrared green valley.

  8. A Study of NO{sub x} Reduction by Fuel Injection Recirculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feese, J.J.; Turns, S.R.

    1996-08-01

    Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments in natural-gas fired boilers have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub X}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. The objective of the present investigation is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub X} reduction observed between FIR and FGR by studying laminar diffusion flames. The purpose of studying laminar flames is to isolate chemical effects from the effects of turbulent mixing and heat transfer, which are inherent in practical boilers. Numerical simulations of H{sub 2}-air and CH{sub 4}-air counterflow diffusion flames using full kinetics were performed and NO{sub X} emission indices calculated for various conditions. Studies were conducted in which a N{sub 2} diluent was added either on the fuel- or air-side of the flame for conditions of either fixed initial velocities or fixed fuel mass flux. Results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in diluent effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side verses air-side dilution. Simulations in which flow velocities were fixed as diluent was added either to the air or fuel stream showed lower NO{sub X} emissions for air-side dilution; however, if instead, fuel mass fluxes were fixed as diluent was added, which results in an increase in the velocity of the streams, fuel-side dilution was more effective. These results were independent of whether H{sub 2} or Ch

  9. Search for [C II] emission in z = 6.5-11 star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzlez-Lpez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Riechers, Dominik A. E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the search for the [C II] emission line in three z > 6.5 Ly? emitters (LAEs) and one J-dropout galaxy using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We observed three bright z ? 6.5-7 LAEs discovered in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the multiple imaged lensed z ? 11 galaxy candidate found behind the galaxy cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015. For the LAEs IOK-1 (z = 6.965), SDF J132415.7+273058 (z = 6.541), and SDF J132408.3+271543 (z = 6.554) we find upper limits for the [C II] line luminosity of <2.05, <4.52, and <10.56 10{sup 8} L {sub ?}, respectively. We find upper limits to the far-IR (FIR) luminosity of the galaxies using a spectral energy distribution template of the local galaxy NGC 6946 and taking into account the effects of the cosmic microwave background on the millimeter observations. For IOK-1, SDF J132415.7+273058, and SDF J132408.3+271543 we find upper limits for the FIR luminosity of <2.33, 3.79, and 7.72 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}, respectively. For the lensed galaxy MACS0647-JD, one of the highest-redshift galaxy candidates to date with z{sub ph}=10.7{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.6}, we put an upper limit in the [C II] emission of <1.36 10{sup 8} (?/15){sup 1} L {sub ?} and an upper limit in the FIR luminosity of <6.1 10{sup 10} (?/15){sup 1} L {sub ?} (where ? is the magnification factor). We explore the different conditions relevant for the search for [C II] emission in high-redshift galaxies as well as the difficulties for future observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT).

  10. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W.; Zevenbergen, Gary A.

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  11. imageApps Package v 4.8

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-11

    The imageApps package provides a number of image processing modules that are compatible with the Umbra/Camera package. Each module works with an connector and generally generates an output image. Modules include the following: imageBlobber: Rapid image segmentation into color blob regions. imageSegmenter: Another image segmentation module. imageAverage: A simple FIR image filter. imageMovingAverage: A simple IIR image filter. imageColorGrid: Used for tracking calibration color blobs. imageCrop: Simple cropping function. imageDifference: Used for detecting motion inmore » image objects. imageSnake: Incorporates the (patent pending) polygon snake algorithm developed under the LDRD. camcal: A calibration module for performing visual targeting (originally developed under Automated Visual Direction LDRD)« less

  12. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  13. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  14. Triple effect absorption chiller utilizing two refrigeration circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, R.C.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes a heat absorption method for an absorption chiller. It comprises: providing a firs absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range, providing a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range; heat exchanging refrigerant and absorber solution; thermal communication with an external heat load. This patent describes a heat absorption apparatus for use as an absorption chiller. It includes: a first absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range; a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range which has a lower maximum temperature relative to the first temperature range; the first circuit having generator means, condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operatively connected together; the second circuit having generator means condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operative connected together; and the first circuit condenser means and the first circuit absorber means being in heat exchange communication with the second circuit generator means.

  15. Instrumentation in astronomy VII; Proceedings of the SPIE Meeting, Vol. 1235, Pts. 1 2, Tucson, AZ, Feb. 13-17, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The topics discussed include IR detectors and instrumentation, detectors, other instrumentation, optical instrumentation, and space instrumentation. Papers are presented on the IR spectrometer/imager for the ESO VLT, the fiber-coupled high-resolution IR array spectrometer for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, the Balloon-Borne Infrared Telescope for FIR spectroscopy, and a simple transputer-based CCD camera controller. Attention is given to CCD guidance system for William Herschel Telescope, the New Technology Telescope control/acquisition system as a prototype for the VLT, a control system for spincasting 8-m borosilicate honeycomb mirrors, echelle spectrographs for 8-m class telescopes, and fiber spectroscopy at Palomar Observatory. Other papers are on the Kitt Peak National Observatory fiber actuator device, a two-star photoelectric photometer, an ultrahigh-resolution XUV spectroheliograph, an optical monitor for X-ray satellites, and large-format electrographic and array detectors for a space Schmidt imaging telescope.

  16. INEEL BNCT Research Program Annual Report, CY-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2001-03-01

    This report is a summary of the activities conducted in conjunction with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 2000. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, neutron source design and demonstration, and support the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National BNCT Program goals are the goals of this Program. Contributions from the individual contributors about their projects are included, specifically described are the following, chemistry: analysis of biological samples and an infrared blood-boron analyzer, and physics: progress in the patient treatment planning software, measurement of neutron spectra for the Argentina RA-6 reactor, and recalculation of the Finnish research reactor FiR 1 neutron spectra, BNCT accelerator technology, and modification to the research reactor at Washington State University for an epithermal-neutron beam.

  17. Caltech Campus Map and Directory 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O I INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O LIG O LIG O S AN PAS QUAL S T. HOLLIS TON AVE . HILL AVE . C ALIFOR NIA B LVD. DE L MAR B LVD. WILS ON AVE . C ATALINA AVE . S AN PAS QUAL S T. C HE S TE R AVE . MIC HIG AN AVE . A R D E N R D . S AN PAS QUAL S HOLLIS TON AVE . S S C a m p u s D i r e c to r y M a p A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 MOOR E AVE R Y FINANC IAL PAS ADE NA FIR E S TATION # 34 IMS S B E C KMAN AUD B AXTE R KE C K S E R VIC E S WATSON C E S H R STEELE LAB

  18. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Tajima receives DOe early career awarD 2 NeuTrON reflec- TOmeTry prOviDes firsT sub-NaNOmeTer visualizaTiON Of live cell aDhesiON 3 creaTiNg a high- efficieNcy cOmpacT iON acceleraTOr, aN alTerNaTive TO larger, mOre cOsTly sTruc- Tures 4 heaDs up! LANSCE beam reliability achieves "world class" ranking AOT has issued

  19. OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Rykala, Adam; Isaak, Kate; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Bradford, Charles M.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, Asantha; Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter; Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub

  20. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  1. Femtosecond Electron and Photon Pulses Facility in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimjaem, S.; Thongbai, C.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, N.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M. W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.

    2007-01-19

    Femtosecond electron and photon pulses facility has been established as SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF). Femtosecond electron bunches can be generated from a system consisting of an RF gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet as an magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. Femtosecond electron pulses can be used directly or used as a source to produce equally short electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses via certain kind of radiation production processes. At SURIYA project, we are interested especially in production of radiation in Far-infrared (FIR) regime. At these wavelengths, the radiation from femtosecond electron pulses is emitted coherently resulting in high intensity radiation. Overview of the facility, the generation of femtosecond electron bunches, the theoretical background of coherent transition radiation and the recent experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  2. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  3. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  4. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  5. RESOLVING THE RADIO SOURCE BACKGROUND: DEEPER UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONFUSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I.; Miller, N.; Perley, R. A.; Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J. V.

    2012-10-10

    We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam area at 3 GHz with 8'' FWHM resolution and 1.0 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise near the pointing center. The P(D) distribution from the central 10 arcmin of this confusion-limited image constrains the count of discrete sources in the 1 < S({mu}Jy) < 10 range. At this level, the brightness-weighted differential count S {sup 2} n(S) is converging rapidly, as predicted by evolutionary models in which the faintest radio sources are star-forming galaxies; and Almost-Equal-To 96% of the background originating in galaxies has been resolved into discrete sources. About 63% of the radio background is produced by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the remaining 37% comes from star-forming galaxies that obey the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation and account for most of the FIR background at {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 160 {mu}m. Our new data confirm that radio sources powered by AGNs and star formation evolve at about the same rate, a result consistent with AGN feedback and the rough correlation of black hole and stellar masses. The confusion at centimeter wavelengths is low enough that neither the planned Square Kilometre Array nor its pathfinder ASKAP EMU survey should be confusion limited, and the ultimate source detection limit imposed by 'natural' confusion is {<=}0.01 {mu}Jy at {nu} = 1.4 GHz. If discrete sources dominate the bright extragalactic background reported by ARCADE 2 at 3.3 GHz, they cannot be located in or near galaxies and most are {<=}0.03 {mu}Jy at 1.4 GHz.

  6. Smith-Purcell free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, K.J.; Walsh, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The term Smith-Purcell free electron laser can be employed generally to describe any coherent radiation source in which a diffraction grating is used to couple an electron beam with the electromagnetic field. To date, most practical developments of this concept have focused on devices which operate in the millimeter spectral regime. In this paper construction of a Smith-Purcell free-electron laser operating in the far-infrared (FIR) region using a novel resonator cavity design and the electron beam from a low energy (0.5-5 MeV) radio-frequency accelerator will be discussed. A tunable source in this region would have many applications and since the beam energy is low, the small size and low overall cost of such a device would make it a laboratory instrument. Current projects which are progressing towards developing a FIR source are the programs at Stanford and CREOL. Both of these projects are using permanent magnet undulators to couple the electron beam with the electromagnetic field. An alternative approach is to use an electron beam passing over a diffraction grating as the radiating mechanism. This phenomenon is known as Smith-Purcell radiation and was first demonstrated for incoherent emission at visible wavelengths. The addition of feedback enhances the stimulated component of the emission which leads to the growth of coherence. Recent calculations for spontaneous emission have shown that the wiggler parameter and the grating efficiency are analogous. This result has important implications for the development of a Smith-Purcell FEL because a grating based free-electron laser would offer a greater range of tunability at a lower cost than its wiggler based counterpart.

  7. Y-12 and the National Park Service study, part

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beta 3 Calutrons and Building 9731, the Graphite Reactor, K-25 and the city's historic Jackson Square) seemed to cause them to realize, maybe for the first time, the true...

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home National Program Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Location does not have significant natural shading (e.g., trees, tall buildings on the south-facing roof). d. Home as designed has adequate free roof area within +- 45 of true ...

  9. DOE Publishes Technical Brief Clarifying Misconceptions about Safety of LED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The spectral emission of LEDs is a frequent subject of concern, so to set the record straight, the U.S. Department of Energy has published a technical brief entitled True Colors: LEDs and the...

  10. High Performance Builder Spotlight: G.W. Robinson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    G.W. Robinson of Gainesville, Florida, worked with Building America partners Florida Solar Energy Center and Florida HERO to achieve a true net zero energy home in 2010.

  11. PBL FY 2002 Second Quarter Review Forecast of Generation Accumulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slice true-ups, and actual expense levels. Any variation of these can change the net revenue situation. FY 2002 Forecasted Second Quarter Results 170 (418) FY 2002 Unaudited...

  12. OpenCL_hands_on_intro_sc14_final_no_zoo_slides.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    code cl::Program program(context, KernelSource, true); Example: vector addition * The "hello world" program of data parallel programming is a program to add two vectors Ci ...

  13. Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... the grid to minimize the number of customers affected by an outage. ... we are able to 'true-up' the power flow model," Swenson says. Accurate data allows PPL to more fully use its ...

  14. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, August 17 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  15. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, May 2 2013 Next Time Items All day 11:00 Transportation Energy Futures Study: The Key Results and Conclusions...

  16. Calendar | OpenEI Community

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, August 29 2013 Next Time Items All day All times Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...

  17. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Friday, August 16 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  18. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, July 28 2014 Next Time Items All day 09:00 Solar Federal Roadmapping Meeting 28 Jul 2014 - 09:00 - 16:00 Syndicate...

  19. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, August 15 2013 Next Time Items All day 13:00 DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013 -...

  20. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Tuesday, September 3 2013 Next Time Items All day All times Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...

  1. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, August 31 2013 Next Time Items All day All times Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...

  2. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Sunday, August 18 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  3. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Wednesday, August 7 2013 Next Time Items All day All times WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT 6 Aug 2013 -...

  4. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Tuesday, July 29 2014 Next Time Items All day 09:00 Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations 29...

  5. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, August 19 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  6. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, May 4 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

  7. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Friday, August 9 2013 Next Time Items All day All times WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT 6 Aug 2013 -...

  8. Fuel Economy Fact and Fiction | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    than ever, there's a lot of information-true and false-floating around about fuel economy. ... Just the facts... The best device for improving your fuel economy is a tire gauge. There ...

  9. Y-12, submarines, work for others and AVLIS ? Reader response...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gained from people who actually did the work are extremely valuable in capturing the true history of the times. She lived through the events and has a great recall of the people...

  10. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a newer technique called infrared scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) and an older tried-and-true technique called Fourier transform infrared...

  11. Energy blogs | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy blogs Home > Community Filter Search Author Enter a comma separated list of user names. Tags My groups True False Apply Kmorales City of McPherson, Kansas, Board of...

  12. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    still remain true, even if at first glance it appears that high prices are having no impact. Undoubtedly, recent changes in gasoline markets, such as the rapid phase-out of...

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    likes to say, today's Web is like the Model T Ford -- revolutionary but ready for vast improvement. This is especially true when it comes to making the Web work for science and ...

  14. OSTIblog Articles in the x-portal Topic | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    likes to say, today's Web is like the Model T Ford -- revolutionary but ready for vast improvement. This is especially true when it comes to making the Web work for science and ...

  15. Benefits of Demand Response in Electricity Markets and Recommendations for Achieving Them. A report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1252 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (February 2006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Most electricity customers see electricity rates that are based on average electricity costs and bear little relation to the true production costs of electricity as they vary over time. Demand...

  16. August 2012 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    was the path of the light circuit as depicted on the site map. The locate did give a true signal of depth and variance of an underground utility. When the excavation, which was...

  17. A brief overview of some historical details of the city of Oak...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than has been credited thus far. It is true, however, that Tennessee Governor Prentice Cooper was NOT consulted and did not know of the decision to locate the Manhattan Project's...

  18. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 SECTION L ATTACHMENT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION L ATTACHMENT H LETTER OF COMMITMENT I, INSERT NAME, hereby certify that the resume submitted with this letter is true and correct. I agree to accept the position of ...

  19. Hardness as a Function of Composition for N-Type Last Thermoelectric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of H for a true quaternary system. Possible implications of hardness change on fabrication and in-service reliability are also discussed. URL: Link to article - ScienceDirect...

  20. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Calls on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... GCEA knows that homeowners want the option to have a third party perform the audit, whether that is GCEA or a true third party auditor. In GCEA's process, when a homeowner decides ...

  1. Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Unfortunately, there are no true crystal balls - the models are only as good as the data ... A 2003 OMB circular acknowledged the growing role of simulation-based analysis and ...

  2. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, April 30 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada...

  3. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 22 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 22 23 24 25 26 27 28...

  4. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 15 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 15 16 17 18 19 20 21...

  5. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, April 27 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada...

  6. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 29 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 29 30 1 2 3 4 5...

  7. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, May 2 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada...

  8. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 1 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  9. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of May 4 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 4 5 6 7 8 9 10...

  10. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of April 27 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 27 28 29 30 1 2 3...

  11. Fermilab Today | Result of the Week Archive | 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 December 18, 2003 DZero Examines True Nature of New Particle December 11, 2003 Search for Leptoquarks with the CDF Detector December 4, 2003 Search for Leptoquarks with the DZero...

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Establishing the True Nature of Cloud Overlap with ARM Data Di Girolamo, L.(a), Astin, I.(b), and McFarquhar, G.M.(a), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (a), University of...

  13. Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the true flux of hydrothermal gases may affect the results of geochemical modeling of gas dispersion in the near-surface environment.3 References 1.0 1.1 Measuring...

  14. Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... characteristics of the large school bus data set are presented in Figures 2 through 4. Understanding true vehicle usage is critical not only in design, but also in deployment. ...

  15. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Many people think of space as a silent, empty void and the sun as a distant source of light and heat. Not true. The sun and the Earth are connected in complex, intimate and ...

  16. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of August 12 2013 Next Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday All day 12 13...

  17. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 23 2014 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 23 24 25 26 27 28...

  18. Microsoft Word - Kimelman_manuscript_revised.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... true-positive predictive rate of about 80%, i.e., 80% of ... or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency ... of both "death proteins" and "survival proteins". ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    aims to develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning ... 1) A true-3D hydro-thermal fracturing computer code that is particularly suited to EGS, ...

  20. Microsoft Word - SCV13 0001_Response.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Verification for FY 2013 Slice True-Up Adjustment Charge comment SCV13 0001 - HunterSnohomish PUD Please find below Snohomish PUD's comments regarding potential items for...

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the...

  2. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaging surveys in this decade's hot competition to uncover the true nature of the dark side of our Universe. Read more Tip of the Week: Safety Summer dangers at the...

  3. MHK Projects/Makai Ocean Energy Research Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Details Makai Ocean Engineering has designed, owns, and operates a closed-cycle OTEC system in Kailua-Kona Hawaii. True deep cold seawater is drawn from a depth of about...

  4. PV-MOD_PVPMC_Workshop_2014_Attendees_Website.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... C onstruction Rue Phillips True S outh R enewables Richard Pizzella Hartford Steam Boiler Andrew Ponec Dragonfly S ystems Larry Pratt CFV S olar T est L aboratory Heather ...

  5. Recycled Natural Gas Pipes Shore Up Green Building - News Feature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    true and tested like "off the shelf" steel is standard practice in building construction. ... The steel natural gas pipe used in the RSF was purchased from a company that specializes ...

  6. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Privacy Act Requests |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    penalty in the Privacy Act for requesting or obtaining access to records under false pretenses, and 2) include a declaration that your statement is true and correct under penalty ...

  7. Methods for consistent forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2006-11-21

    This invention teaches further method improvements to forewarn of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves conversion of time-serial data into equiprobable symbols. A second improvement is a method to maximize the channel-consistent total-true rate of forewarning from a plurality of data channels over multiple data sets from the same patient or process. This total-true rate requires resolution of the forewarning indications into true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. A third improvement is the use of various objective functions, as derived from the phase-space dissimilarity measures, to give the best forewarning indication. A fourth improvement uses various search strategies over the phase-space analysis parameters to maximize said objective functions. A fifth improvement shows the usefulness of the method for various biomedical and machine applications.

  8. Summer in the Arctic | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Did you know that one of the best places to study global warming is actually in one of the coldest climates on the planet? It's true Climate change and a warming world have far ...

  9. Widget:FlashDetect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FlashDetect Jump to: navigation, search This widget sets the wgFlashEnabled javascript variable as true and adds the class "flash" to the body tag if Flash is detected using...

  10. Haiti: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lack of investment in the energy infrastructure, caused in part by the fact that prices are artificially held below the true cost of production and delivery. Power supply is...

  11. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Quadrant Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Quadrant moved ducts and high efficiency furnace inside conditioned space on nearly all 300 customizable house plans. The builder uses dry, true factory-assembled walls, extensive air sealing, and just in time delivery for pre-sold homes.

  12. The two-way relationship between ionospheric outflow and the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dynamics. However, because the ring current deposits energy into the ionosphere, the inverse may also be true: the ring current can play a critical role in the dynamics of ...

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Differences in Cloud Characteristics at Barrow and Atqasuk at the NSAAAO CART Doran, ... operation of a true "inland" site at the NSAAAO, is that the ECMWF model predicted more ...

  14. SF 424

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEBT? g. TOTAL . 00 Yes If "Yes" attach an explanation. No 18. TO THE BEST OF MY KNOWLEDGE AND BELIEF, ALL DATA IN THIS APPLICATIONPREAPPLICATION ARE TRUE AND CORRECT....

  15. Isotope and Temperature Effects in Liquid Water Probed by Soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This is probably true, but not on an atomic scale Surprisingly, our microscopic knowledge ... How can we find out? In recent years, soft x-ray spectroscopy has emerged as a new tool to ...

  16. Microsoft Word - knuteson-ro.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The number of AERI observations used in the monthly statistics is shown in Figure 4 as a ... The opposite is true for the monthly statistics of the 10 m observed brightness ...

  17. ARM - Sea Level and Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This is particularly true if severe storms such as hurricanes and typhoons become more frequent. Statistics on Sea Level Rise According to many studies, the global mean sea level ...

  18. Barr Engineering Statement of Methodology Rosemount Wind Turbine Simulations by Truescape Visual Reality, DOE/EA-1791 (May 2010)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Barr Engineering, Minneapolis engaged Truescape in May 2010 to: 1) Provide a series of TrueViewTM2 “human field of view” survey controlled photo simulations from pre-determined viewpoint locations...

  19. Eastern Pine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eastern Pine 1 EASTERN PINE 1 Ryerson University by True North Design Eastern Pine 2 Mark ... Eastern Pine 18 ROOF PLAN Eastern Pine 19 NORTH + SOUTH ELEVATION Eastern Pine 20 EXTERIOR ...

  20. Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation J.-F. Louis Atmospheric and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The main purpose of the ARM program is to provide the necessary data to develop, test and ... This is certainly true of radiosonde data, which sample extremely small volumes, both in ...