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Sample records for true fir hemlock

  1. HEMLOCK

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-25

    HEMLOCK (Heterogeneous Ensemble Machine Learning Open Classification Kit) is a software tool for constructing, evaluating, and applying heterogeneous ensemble data models for use in solving supervised machine learning problems. Specifically, the main class of problems targeted by HEMLOCK is the problem of multiple-class classification (also called labeling or categorization) of data with continuous or discrete features. HEMLOCK consists of various data readers, machine learning algorithms, model combination and comparison routines, evaluation methods for model performancemore » testing, and interfaces to external, state-of-the-art machine learning software libraries.« less

  2. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  3. TrueWind Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TrueWind Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: TrueWind Solutions Place: Albany, NY Website: www.awstruepower.com References: TrueWind Solutions1 Information About...

  4. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-11-10

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  5. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  6. Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel Researchers Borrow From Fir Tree to Create Biodiesel December 12, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Rajit Sapar analyzes samples at the Joint BioEnergy Institute's lab. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Rajit Sapar analyzes samples at the Joint BioEnergy Institute's lab. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Communications Specialist (detailee) One of the best

  7. True: Order (2015-CE-42049) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    True: Order (2015-CE-42049) True: Order (2015-CE-42049) February 4, 2016 DOE ordered True Manufacturing Co., Inc., to pay a $36,400 civil penalty after finding True had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 182 units of True commercial refrigerator basic models TCGG-72 and GCGG-72-S, which did not meet the application energy conservation standard. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and True. Federal law subjects manufacturers and

  8. Microsoft Word - Tad True QER Testimony (2).docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tad True Vice President, Belle Fourche & Bridger Pipelines Casper, WY before the U.S. Department of Energy Quadrennial Energy Review Hearing in Permitting and Siting, Cheyenne, WY August 21, 2014 Good morning, my name is Tad True and I am the Vice President of Belle Fourche and Bridger Pipeline. I appreciate the opportunity to testify today. As background, our pipelines are part of a collection of family owned companies that we refer to as the True Companies. My grandfather, H.A.

  9. Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules Integrated Microinverters for Enabling True ACPV Modules solarbridge logo2.jpg This project, led by SolarBridge Technologies, is developing an innovative alternating-current photovoltaic (ACPV) module that consists of an integrated "Universal PV-Dock" and a high-reliability, low-cost, high-efficiency microinverter to substantially reduce balance of system (BOS) costs in residential and commercial PV systems. In 2011,

  10. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A BestPractices Steam Technical Brief How To Calculate The True Cost of Steam U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable Industrial Technologies Program Boosting the productivity and competitiveness of U.S. industry through improvements in energy and environmental performance How To Calculate The True Cost of Steam Knowing the correct cost of steam is important for many reasons, and

  11. TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer TruePeak Process Laser Analyzer In-Situ Sensors Provide Real-Time Measurements Enabling Better Control and Process Optimization Current chemical process controls use few in-situ sensors, relying instead on analytic techniques that require sample conditioning and transport, and significant turnaround time. With few exceptions, these techniques lack speed of measurement, accuracy of measurement, sensitivity of measurement, and economical measurement. In-situ sensors

  12. Crayola's True Color Shines Through: Green | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Crayola's True Color Shines Through: Green Crayola's True Color Shines Through: Green August 13, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis The Crayola solar farm became fully operational this week. Ten children from around the country, known as the "Crayola Green Team," helped dedicate the newest addition to the Easton, Pa.-plant. Photos courtesy of Crayola. | Photo Courtesy of Crayola The Crayola solar farm became fully operational this week. Ten children from around the country, known as the

  13. MODELING THE ANOMALY OF SURFACE NUMBER DENSITIES OF GALAXIES ON THE GALACTIC EXTINCTION MAP DUE TO THEIR FIR EMISSION CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Kayo, Issha; Nishimichi, Takahiro

    2015-02-01

    The most widely used Galactic extinction map is constructed assuming that the observed far-infrared (FIR) fluxes come entirely from Galactic dust. According to the earlier suggestion by Yahata et al., we consider how FIR emission of galaxies affects the SFD map. We first compute the surface number density of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies as a function of the r-band extinction, A {sub r,} {sub SFD}. We confirm that the surface densities of those galaxies positively correlate with A {sub r,} {sub SFD} for A {sub r,} {sub SFD} < 0.1, as first discovered by Yahata et al. for SDSS DR4 galaxies. Next we construct an analytical model to compute the surface density of galaxies, taking into account the contamination of their FIR emission. We adopt a log-normal probability distribution for the ratio of 100 ?m and r-band luminosities of each galaxy, y ? (?L){sub 100} {sub ?m}/(?L) {sub r}. Then we search for the mean and rms values of y that fit the observed anomaly, using the analytical model. The required values to reproduce the anomaly are roughly consistent with those measured from the stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies. Due to the limitation of our statistical modeling, we are not yet able to remove the FIR contamination of galaxies from the extinction map. Nevertheless, the agreement with the model prediction suggests that the FIR emission of galaxies is mainly responsible for the observed anomaly. Whereas the corresponding systematic error in the Galactic extinction map is 0.1-1mmag, it is directly correlated with galaxy clustering and thus needs to be carefully examined in precision cosmology.

  14. Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho: Succession and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R.; Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-04-01

    The report describes a taxonomic system for classifying plant succession in the Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho. A total of 10 potential tree layer types, 35 shrub types, and 45 herb layer types are categorized. Diagonostic keys based on indicator species assist field identification of the types. Discussion of management implications includes pocket gopher populations, success of planted and natural tree seedlings, big-game and livestock forage preferences, and responses of major shrub and herb layer species to disturbances.

  15. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  16. How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam This brief details how to calculate the true cost of steam, which is important for monitoring and managing energy use in a plant, evaluating proposed design changes to the generation or distribution infrastructure and the process itself, and for continuing to identify competitive advantages through steam system and plant efficiency improvements. PDF icon How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam (September 2003) More

  17. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radars. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased array radars. An ultra-compact optical true time delay device is demonstrated that can support 112 antenna elements with better than six bits of delay in a volume 16-inch x 5-inch x 4-inch including the box and electronics. Free-space beams circulate in a White cell,

  18. Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide Extensive calculations revealed that the calcium-iridium-oxygen compound CaIrO3 is a Slater-type insulator, putting to rest the debate of...

  19. Steam Technical Brief: How to Calculate the True Cost of Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This BestPractice Steam Technical Brief helps you calculate the true cost of steam. Knowing the correct cost is important for many reasons and all of them have to do with improving the company's bottom line.

  20. True Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    DOE Solid-State Lighting Program technology fact sheet on LEDs and the relationship between CCT, CRI, optical safety, material degradation, and photobiological stimulation

  1. Commissioning of the Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator: A multi-institutional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Bellon, M.; Wen, N.; Zhao, B.; Chetty, I. J.; Foster, R.; Speiser, M.; Solberg, T.; Altunbas, C.; Westerly, D.; Miften, M.; Altman, M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Latest generation linear accelerators (linacs), i.e., TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and its stereotactic counterpart, TrueBeam STx, have several unique features, including high-dose-rate flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon modes, reengineered electron modes with new scattering foil geometries, updated imaging hardware/software, and a novel control system. An evaluation of five TrueBeam linacs at three different institutions has been performed and this work reports on the commissioning experience. Methods: Acceptance and commissioning data were analyzed for five TrueBeam linacs equipped with 120 leaf (5 mm width) MLCs at three different institutions. Dosimetric data and mechanical parameters were compared. These included measurements of photon beam profiles (6X, 6XFFF, 10X, 10XFFF, 15X), photon and electron percent depth dose (PDD) curves (6, 9, 12 MeV), relative photon output factors (Scp), electron cone factors, mechanical isocenter accuracy, MLC transmission, and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG). End-to-end testing and IMRT commissioning were also conducted. Results: Gantry/collimator isocentricity measurements were similar (0.27-0.28 mm), with overall couch/gantry/collimator values of 0.46-0.68 mm across the three institutions. Dosimetric data showed good agreement between machines. The average MLC DLGs for 6, 10, and 15 MV photons were 1.33 {+-} 0.23, 1.57 {+-} 0.24, and 1.61 {+-} 0.26 mm, respectively. 6XFFF and 10XFFF modes had average DLGs of 1.16 {+-} 0.22 and 1.44 {+-} 0.30 mm, respectively. MLC transmission showed minimal variation across the three institutions, with the standard deviation <0.2% for all linacs. Photon and electron PDDs were comparable for all energies. 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beam quality, %dd(10){sub x} varied less than 0.3% for all linacs. Output factors (Scp) and electron cone factors agreed within 0.27%, on average; largest variations were observed for small field sizes (1.2% coefficient of variation, 10 MV, 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 cm{sup 2}) and small cone sizes (<1% coefficient of variation, 6 Multiplication-Sign 6 cm{sup 2} cone), respectively. Conclusions: Overall, excellent agreement was observed in TrueBeam commissioning data. This set of multi-institutional data can provide comparison data to others embarking on TrueBeam commissioning, ultimately improving the safety and quality of beam commissioning.

  2. Description of true and delayed ternary nuclear fission accompanied by the emission of various third particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@vsu.ru; Kadmensky, S. S.; Lyubashevsky, D. E. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15

    The mechanisms and the features of the main types of nuclear ternary fission (that is, true ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted before the rupture of the fissioning nucleus into fragments, and delayed ternary fission, in which a third particle is emitted from fission fragments going apart) are investigated within quantum-mechanical fission theory. The features of T-odd asymmetry in true ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are investigated for the cases where alpha particles, prescission neutrons, and photons appear as third particles emitted by fissioning nuclei, the Coriolis interaction of the spin of the polarized fissioning nucleus with the spin of the third particle and the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances excited in the fissioning nucleus in the case of projectile-neutron capture being taken into account. For the cases where third particles emitted by fission fragments are evaporated neutrons or photons, T-odd asymmetries in delayed ternary nuclear fission induced by cold polarized neutrons are analyzed with allowance for the mechanism of pumping of large fission-fragment spins oriented orthogonally to the fragment-emission direction and with allowance for the interference between the fission amplitudes for neutron resonances.

  3. SU-E-T-585: Commissioning of Electron Monte Carlo in Eclipse Treatment Planning System for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X; Lasio, G; Zhou, J; Lin, M; Yi, B; Guerrero, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission electron Monte Carlo (eMC) algorithm in Eclipse Treatment Planning System (TPS) for TrueBeam Linacs, including the evaluation of dose calculation accuracy for small fields and oblique beams and comparison with the existing eMC model for Clinacs. Methods: Electron beam percent-depth-dose (PDDs) and profiles with and without applicators, as well as output factors, were measured from two Varian TrueBeam machines. Measured data were compared against the Varian TrueBeam Representative Beam Data (VTBRBD). The selected data set was transferred into Eclipse for beam configuration. Dose calculation accuracy from eMC was evaluated for open fields, small cut-out fields, and oblique beams at different incident angles. The TrueBeam data was compared to the existing Clinac data and eMC model to evaluate the differences among Linac types. Results: Our measured data indicated that electron beam PDDs from our TrueBeam machines are well matched to those from our Varian Clinac machines, but in-air profiles, cone factors and open-filed output factors are significantly different. The data from our two TrueBeam machines were well represented by the VTBRBD. Variations of TrueBeam PDDs and profiles were within the 2% /2mm criteria for all energies, and the output factors for fields with and without applicators all agree within 2%. Obliquity factor for two clinically relevant applicator sizes (1010 and 1515 cm{sup 2}) and three oblique angles (15, 30, and 45 degree) were measured for nominal R100, R90, and R80 of each electron beam energy. Comparisons of calculations using eMC of obliquity factors and cut-out factors versus measurements will be presented. Conclusion: eMC algorithm in Eclipse TPS can be configured using the VTBRBD. Significant differences between TrueBeam and Clinacs were found in in-air profiles and open field output factors. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated for a wide range of cut-out factors and oblique incidence.

  4. Stand-Level Gas-Exchange Responses to Seasonal Drought in Very Young Versus Old Douglas-fir Forests of the Pacific Northwest, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Bible, K; Falk, M; Paw U, K T

    2009-02-23

    This study examines how stand age affects ecosystem mass and energy exchange response to seasonal drought in three adjacent Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) forests. The sites include two early seral stands (ES) (0-15 years old) and an old-growth (OG) ({approx} 450-500) forest in the Wind River Experiment Forest, Washington, USA. We use eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (F{sub NEE}), latent energy ({lambda}E) and sensible heat (H) to derive evapotranspiration rate (E{sub T}), bowen ratio ({beta}), water use efficiency (WUE), canopy conductance (G{sub c}), the Priestley-Taylor coefficient ({alpha}) and a canopy decoupling factor ({Omega}). The canopy and bulk parameters are examined to see how ecophysiological responses to water stress, including changes in available soil water ({theta}{sub r}) and vapor pressure deficit ({delta}e) differ among the two forest successional-stages. Despite very different rainfall patterns in 2006 and 2007, we observed distinct successional-stage relationships between E{sub T}, {alpha}, and G{sub c} to {delta}e and {theta}{sub r} during both years. The largest stand differences were (1) higher morning G{sub c} (> 10 mm s{sup -1}) at the OG forest coinciding with higher CO{sub 2} uptake (F{sub NEE} = -9 to -6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) but a strong negative response in G{sub c} to moderate {delta}e later in the day and a subsequent reduction in E{sub T}, and (2) higher E{sub T} at the ES stands because midday canopy conductance did not decrease until very low water availability levels (<30%) were reached at the end of the summer. Our results suggest that early seral stands are more likely than mature forests to experience declines in production if the summer drought becomes longer or intensifies because water conserving ecophysiological responses were only observed at the very end of the seasonal drought period in the youngest stands.

  5. Reveal the True Biology: Exploiting Single-Molecule Real-Time DNA Sequencing for Improved Microbial Assembly and Methylome Analysis ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Turner, Steve [Pacific Biosciences

    2013-03-22

    Steve Turner's talk "Reveal the True Biology" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  6. P-odd, P-even, and T-odd asymmetries in true quaternary fission of nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    The coefficients of P-odd, P-even, and T -odd asymmetries for a third and a fourth prescission particle emitted in the true quaternary fission of nuclei that was induced by polarized cold neutrons were studied on the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory. By using non-evaporation (nonadiabatic) mechanisms of light-particle emission, these coefficients were compared with the analogous coefficients for prescission third particles emitted in the ternary fission of nuclei.

  7. Probabilities for the emission of light particles and their energy and angular distributions for true quaternary nuclear fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S. G., E-mail: kadmensky@phys.vsu.ru; Titova, L. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)] [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15

    On the basis of quantum-mechanical fission theory, the features of true quaternary nuclear fission are studied by treating this fission process as a sequence of three processes following one another in the course of time. The first two processes are the escape of the first and then the second of the two light particles emitted from the neck of a fissioning nucleus because of a nonadiabatic character of the collective deformation motion of this nucleus. Finally, the third process is the separation of the fissioning nucleus into two rather heavy fission fragments. The differences that arise in the emission probabilities and in the angular and energy distributions upon going over from the first emitted to the second emitted prescission third and fourth particles are analyzed by invoking experimental data on the spontaneous and thermalneutron-induced fission of nuclei, and it is shown that these differences are caused by the changes both in the geometric configuration of the fissioning nucleus and in the shell structure of its neck after the first prescission particle is emitted from it.

  8. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic Scintillation and Other Stereotactic Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pino, R; Therriault-Proulx, F; Wang, X; Yang, J; Beddar, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To perform dose profile and output factor (OF) measurements with the Exradin W1 plastic scintillation detector (PSD) for small fields made by the high-definition multi-leaf collimator (MLC) on the TrueBeam STx system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new small volume near-water equivalent and energy independent PSD manufactured by Standard Imaging, Inc. All measurements were performed in an IBA Blue Phantom water tank. Square MLC-shaped fields with sides ranging from 0.5 cm to 2 cm and jawshaped fields with sides ranging from 1 cm to 40 cm were measured using an SAD setup at 10 cm depth. Dose profile and percent depth dose (PDD) measurements were also taken under the same conditions for MLC fields 0.5×0.5 and 1×1 cm2 in size with jaws at 2×2cm2. The CC01 and W1 were vertically mounted. Results: OFs measured with the W1 for jaw only square fields were consistent with the ones measured with a Farmers PTW TN33013 ion chamber (1.8% maximum deviation). OF and penumbra measurement results are presented below. PDDs measured for all detectors are within 1.5% for the 0.5×0.5 cm2 and within 1% for the 1×1 cm2 MLC fields.Output factors:MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 0.555 0.541 0.5851.0cm 0.716 0.702 0.7331.5cm 0.779 0.761 0.7772.0cm 0.804 0.785 0.796Penumbras (mm):MLC size W1 CC01 EDGE0.5cm 2.7 2.9 2.51.0cm 3.0 3.4 2. Conclusion: OFs measured for small MLC fields were consistent with the ones measured with the other stereotactic detectors. Measured penumbras are consistent with detector size. The Exradin W1 PSD is an excellent choice for characterizing MLC-shaped small beam dosimetry used for stereotactic radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIH/NCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: “Water-Equivalent Plastic Scintillation Detectors for Small Field Radiotherapy”.

  9. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux-gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C.

    2014-05-13

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes and variances above, within and beneath a tall closed Douglas-Fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime subcanopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at time scales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime subcanopy heat flux cospectra. The daytime momentum flux cospectra inside the canopy and in the subcanopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of a mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of themore »momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the subcanopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed mean wind speed profile. In the canopy at night at the smallest resolved scales, we find relatively large momentum fluxes (compared to at larger scales), and increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing time scale, consistent with very small eddies likely generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum but not heat. We find unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the canopy. The flux-gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the subcanopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately; however, single source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the subcanopy and above-canopy layers. Modeled sensible heat fluxes above dark warm closed canopies are likely underestimated using typical values of the Stanton number.« less

  10. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  11. Observations of the scale-dependent turbulence and evaluation of the flux–gradient relationship for sensible heat for a closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak wind conditions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vickers, D.; Thomas, C. K.

    2014-09-16

    Observations of the scale-dependent turbulent fluxes, variances, and the bulk transfer parameterization for sensible heat above, within, and beneath a tall closed Douglas-fir canopy in very weak winds are examined. The daytime sub-canopy vertical velocity spectra exhibit a double-peak structure with peaks at timescales of 0.8 s and 51.2 s. A double-peak structure is also observed in the daytime sub-canopy heat flux co-spectra. The daytime momentum flux co-spectra in the upper bole space and in the sub-canopy are characterized by a relatively large cross-wind component, likely due to the extremely light and variable winds, such that the definition of amore »mean wind direction, and subsequent partitioning of the momentum flux into along- and cross-wind components, has little physical meaning. Positive values of both momentum flux components in the sub-canopy contribute to upward transfer of momentum, consistent with the observed sub-canopy secondary wind speed maximum. For the smallest resolved scales in the canopy at nighttime, we find increasing vertical velocity variance with decreasing timescale, consistent with very small eddies possibly generated by wake shedding from the canopy elements that transport momentum, but not heat. Unusually large values of the velocity aspect ratio within the canopy were observed, consistent with enhanced suppression of the horizontal wind components compared to the vertical by the very dense canopy. The flux–gradient approach for sensible heat flux is found to be valid for the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers when considered separately in spite of the very small fluxes on the order of a few W m−2 in the sub-canopy. However, single-source approaches that ignore the canopy fail because they make the heat flux appear to be counter-gradient when in fact it is aligned with the local temperature gradient in both the sub-canopy and above-canopy layers. While sub-canopy Stanton numbers agreed well with values typically reported in the literature, our estimates for the above-canopy Stanton number were much larger, which likely leads to underestimated modeled sensible heat fluxes above dark warm closed canopies.« less

  12. Method and apparatus for identifying conductive objects by monitoring the true resistive component of impedance change in a coil system caused by the object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, William D.; Capots, Larry H.; George, James P.; Janik, Richard

    1981-01-01

    The type of conductor, its property, and if a metal, its type and cross-sectional area can be obtained from measurements made at different frequencies for the amount of unbalance created in a previously balanced stable coil detection system. The true resistive component is accurately measured and thus reflects only the voltage loss attributable to eddy currents caused by introduction of the test sample to the coil system. This voltage divided by corresponding applied frequency gives a curve which peaks at a frequency dependent upon type of conductor. For a metal this peak frequency is proportional to the samples resistivity divided by its cross-sectional area.

  13. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J.; Ceci, S.; Svarc, A.

    2011-09-15

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  14. SU-E-T-128: Dosimetric Evaluation of MLC Modeling in Pinnacle V9.2 for Varian TrueBeam STx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otageri, P; Grant, E; Maricle, S; Mathews, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of MLC modeling after commissioning the Varian TrueBeam LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2. Methods: Stepand-shoot IMRT QAs were investigated when we observed our measured absolute dose results using ion chamber (Capintec PR-05P) were uncharacteristically low; about 45% compared to doses calculated by Pinnacle{sup 3} (Phillips, Madison, WI). This problem was predominant for large and highly modulated head and neck (HN) treatments. Intuitively we knew this had to be related to shortcomings in the MLC modeling in Pinnacle. Using film QA we were able to iteratively adjust the MLC parameters. We confirmed results by re-testing five failed IMRT QA patients; and ion chamber measurements were verified in Quasar anthropomorphic phantom. Results: After commissioning the LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2, the MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X were 2.0%, 1.7% and 2.0%, respectively, and additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies was 0.5%. These parameters were obtained from profiles scanned with an Edge detector (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) during machine commissioning. A Verification testing with radiographic EDR2 film (Kodak, Rochester, NY) measurement was performed by creating a closed MLC leaf pattern and analyzing using RIT software (RIT, Colorado Springs, CO). This reduced MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X to 0.7%, 0.9% and 0.9%, respectively; while increasing additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies to 1.0%. Conclusion: Radiographic film measurements were used to correct MLC transmission values for step and shoot IMRT fields used in Pinnacle version 9.2. After adjusting the MLC parameters to correlate with the film QA, there was still very good agreement between the Pinnacle model and commissioning data. Using the same QA methodology, we were also able to improve the beam models for the Varian C-series linacs, Novalis-Tx, and TrueBeam M-120 linacs.

  15. SU-E-T-71: Commissioning and Acceptance Testing of a Commercial Monte Carlo Electron Dose Calculation Model (eMC) for TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheu, R; Tseng, T; Powers, A; Lo, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide commissioning and acceptance test data of the Varian Eclipse electron Monte Carlo model (eMC v.11) for TrueBeam linac. We also investigated the uncertainties in beam model parameters and dose calculation results for different geometric configurations. Methods: For beam commissioning, PTW CC13 thimble chamber and IBA Blue Phantom2 were used to collect PDD and dose profiles in air. Cone factors were measured with a parallel plate chamber (PTW N23342) in solid water. GafChromic EBT3 films were used for dose calculation verifications to compare with parallel plate chamber results in the following test geometries: oblique incident, extended distance, small cutouts, elongated cutouts, irregular surface, and heterogeneous layers. Results: Four electron energies (6e, 9e, 12e, and 15e) and five cones (66, 1010, 1515, 2020, and 2525) with standard cutouts were calculated for different grid sizes (1, 1.5,2, and 2.5 mm) and compared with chamber measurements. The results showed calculations performed with a coarse grid size underestimated the absolute dose. The underestimation decreased as energy increased. For 6e, the underestimation (max 3.3 %) was greater than the statistical uncertainty level (3%) and was systematically observed for all cone sizes. By using a 1mm grid size, all the calculation results agreed with measurements within 5% for all test configurations. The calculations took 21s and 46s for 6e and 15e (2.5mm grid size) respectively distributed on 4 calculation servants. Conclusion: In general, commissioning the eMC dose calculation model on TrueBeam is straightforward and thedose calculation is in good agreement with measurements for all test cases. Monte Carlo dose calculation provides more accurate results which improves treatment planning quality. However, the normal acceptable grid size (2.5mm) would cause systematic underestimation in absolute dose calculation for lower energies, such as 6e. Users need to be cautious in this situation.

  16. A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    2013-05-31

    This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

  17. True Color Tube Borescope Inspection System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-08-07

    The overall purpose of TCTBIS is to determine the quality of the inside surface of a tube. This is done by acquiring multiple images along the inside of a tube and converting these images into one unwrapped image of the inside of a tube. This resultant image is the same as if you had slit a tube length-wise, flattened it out, and then taken a picture of it. What is unique about this system ismore » that the picture is acquired in a non-destructive manner. TCTBIS also analyzes the unwrapped images for oxidation, foreign particles, and surface imperfections, scratches.« less

  18. True Electric LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56298 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  19. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Varian EDGE machine is a new stereotactic platform, combining Calypso and VisionRT localization systems with a stereotactic linac. The system includes TrueBeam DeveloperMode, making possible the use of XML-scripting for automation of linac-related tasks. This study details the use of DeveloperMode to automate commissioning tasks for Varian EDGE, thereby improving efficiency and measurement consistency. Methods: XML-scripting was used for various commissioning tasks,including couch model verification,beam-scanning,and isocenter verification. For couch measurements, point measurements were acquired for several field sizes (22,44,1010cm{sup 2}) at 42 gantry angles for two couch-models. Measurements were acquired with variations in couch position(rails in/out,couch shifted in each of motion axes) compared to treatment planning system(TPS)-calculated values,which were logged automatically through advanced planning interface(API) scripting functionality. For beam scanning, XML-scripts were used to create custom MLC-apertures. For isocenter verification, XML-scripts were used to automate various Winston-Lutz-type tests. Results: For couch measurements, the time required for each set of angles was approximately 9 minutes. Without scripting, each set required approximately 12 minutes. Automated measurements required only one physicist, while manual measurements required at least two physicists to handle linac positions/beams and data recording. MLC apertures were generated outside of the TPS,and with the .xml file format, double-checking without use of TPS/operator console was possible. Similar time efficiency gains were found for isocenter verification measurements Conclusion: The use of XML scripting in TrueBeam DeveloperMode allows for efficient and accurate data acquisition during commissioning. The efficiency improvement is most pronounced for iterative measurements, exemplified by the time savings for couch modeling measurements(approximately 10 hours). The scripting also allowed for creation of the files in advance without requiring access to TPS. The API scripting functionality enabled efficient creation/mining of TPS data. Finally, automation reduces the potential for human error in entering linac values at the machine console,and the script provides a log of measurements acquired for each session. This research was supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.

  20. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  1. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  2. Hydro Power to Make the American Dream Come True

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  3. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was Shirley Oden Cox, retiree from Y-12. Shirley came to Oak Ridge when her dad, William Lewis (Bill) Oden, moved his wife and two children to here in September, 1944 to take a...

  4. Geological and Geothermal Investigation of the Lower Wind River Valley, Southwestern Washington Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berri, Dulcy A.; Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    The Wind River Valley, on the west slope of the Cascade Range, is a northwest-trending drainage that joins the Columbia River near Carson, Washington. The region has been heavily dissected by fluvial and glacial erosion. Ridges have sharp crests and deep subsidiary valleys typical of a mature topography, with a total relief of as much as 900 m. The region is vegetated by fir and hemlock, as well as dense, brushy ground-cover and undergrowth. The lower 8 km of the valley is privately owned and moderately populated. The upper reaches lies within the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and include several campgrounds and day parks, the Carson National Fish Hatchery, and the Wind River Ranger Station and Wind River Nursery of the US Forest Service. Logging activity is light due to the rugged terrain, and consequently, most valley slopes are not accessible by vehicle. The realization that a potential for significant geothermal resources exists in the Wind River area was brought about by earlier exploration activities. Geologic mapping and interpretation was needed to facilitate further exploration of the resource by providing a knowledge of possible geologic controls on the geothermal system. This report presents the detailed geology of the lower Wind River valley with emphasis on those factors that bear significantly on development of a geothermal resource.

  5. Ultra-compact optical true time delay device for wideband phased...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The input is a fiber-and-microlens array, whose output spots are re-imaged multiple times ... The fiber-to-detector insertion loss is 7.82 dB for the shortest delay path. Authors: ...

  6. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    system and to compare them to values measured with an IBA CC01 ionization chamber and a Sun Nuclear Edge detector diode for 6 MV photon beams. Methods: The Exradin W1 is a new...

  7. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Wells

    2008-11-30

    PolyFuel has developed state-of-the-art portable fuel cell technology for the portable computing market. A novel approach to passive water recycling within the MEA has led to significant system simplification and size reduction. Miniature stack technology with very high area utilization and minimalist seals has been developed. A highly integrated balance of plant with very low parasitic losses has been constructed around the new stack design. Demonstration prototype systems integrated with laptop computers have been shown in recent months to leading OEM computer manufacturers. PolyFuel intends to provide this technology to its customers as a reference design as a means of accelerating the commercialization of portable fuel cell technology. The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

  8. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution 2X | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  9. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Velocity Planar Measurement (Current), 3D Velocity Volumetric Measurement (Current), Density (Ice), Direction (Ice), Speed (Ice), Thickness (Ice), Pressure (Tidal), Sea Surface...

  10. TRUE COLORS: LEDS AND THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CCT, CRI, OPTICAL SAFETY, MATERIAL DEGRADATION, AND PHOTOBIOLOGICAL STIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2014-08-30

    This document analyzes the optical, material, and photobiological hazards of LED light sources compared to conventional light sources. It documents that LEDs generally produce the same amount of blue light, which is the primary contributor to the risks, as other sources at the same CCT. Duv may have some effect on the amount of blue light, but CRI does not.

  11. SU-E-T-423: TrueBeam Small Field Dosimetry Using Commercial Plastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    radiosurgery and body radiation therapy. Sam Beddar would like to disclose a NIHNCI SBIR Phase II grant (2R44CA153824-02A1) with Standard Imaging, Title: "Water-Equivalent Plastic...

  12. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution GS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GS < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  13. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution AV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AV < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  14. Y-12 uranium storage facility?a dream come true,? part 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part 2 Last week we introduced Shirley Cox and began a two-part series on her career at Y-12 leading up to the recommendation that the Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Slice True-Up 101 pptx.pptx [Read-Only...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ted Barham, Janice Johnson and many others Content Organized and Presented by Craig Larson Slice History A Review of Subscription and RD(Regional Dialogue) Slice distinctions...

  16. Carbon Molecular Sieve Membrane as a True One Box Unit for Large Scale Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Liu

    2012-05-01

    IGCC coal-fired power plants show promise for environmentally-benign power generation. In these plants coal is gasified to syngas then processed in a water gas-shift (WGS) reactor to maximize the hydrogen/CO{sub 2} content. The gas stream can then be separated into a hydrogen rich stream for power generation and/or further purified for sale as a chemical and a CO{sub 2} rich stream for the purpose of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Today, the separation is accomplished using conventional absorption/desorption processes with post CO{sub 2} compression. However, significant process complexity and energy penalties accrue with this approach, accounting for ~20% of the capital cost and ~27% parasitic energy consumption. Ideally, a ??one-box? process is preferred in which the syngas is fed directly to the WGS reactor without gas pre-treatment, converting the CO to hydrogen in the presence of H{sub 2}S and other impurities and delivering a clean hydrogen product for power generation or other uses. The development of such a process is the primary goal of this project. Our proposed "one-box" process includes a catalytic membrane reactor (MR) that makes use of a hydrogen-selective, carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membrane, and a sulfur-tolerant Co/Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The membrane reactor??s behavior has been investigated with a bench top unit for different experimental conditions and compared with the modeling results. The model is used to further investigate the design features of the proposed process. CO conversion >99% and hydrogen recovery >90% are feasible under the operating pressures available from IGCC. More importantly, the CMS membrane has demonstrated excellent selectivity for hydrogen over H{sub 2}S (>100), and shown no flux loss in the presence of a synthetic "tar"-like material, i.e., naphthalene. In summary, the proposed "one-box" process has been successfully demonstrated with the bench-top reactor. In parallel we have successfully designed and fabricated a full-scale CMS membrane and module for the proposed application. This full-scale membrane element is a 3" diameter with 30"L, composed of ~85 single CMS membrane tubes. The membrane tubes and bundles have demonstrated satisfactory thermal, hydrothermal, thermal cycling and chemical stabilities under an environment simulating the temperature, pressure and contaminant levels encountered in our proposed process. More importantly, the membrane module packed with the CMS bundle was tested for over 30 pressure cycles between ambient pressure and >300 -600 psi at 200 to 300°C without mechanical degradation. Finally, internal baffles have been designed and installed to improve flow distribution within the module, which delivered ?90% separation efficiency in comparison with the efficiency achieved with single membrane tubes. In summary, the full-scale CMS membrane element and module have been successfully developed and tested satisfactorily for our proposed one-box application; a test quantity of elements/modules have been fabricated for field testing. Multiple field tests have been performed under this project at National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The separation efficiency and performance stability of our full-scale membrane elements have been verified in testing conducted for times ranging from 100 to >250 hours of continuous exposure to coal/biomass gasifier off-gas for hydrogen enrichment with no gas pre-treatment for contaminants removal. In particular, "tar-like" contaminants were effectively rejected by the membrane with no evidence of fouling. In addition, testing was conducted using a hybrid membrane system, i.e., the CMS membrane in conjunction with the palladium membrane, to demonstrate that 99+% H{sub 2} purity and a high degree of CO{sub 2} capture could be achieved. In summary, the stability and performance of the full-scale hydrogen selective CMS membrane/module has been verified in multiple field tests in the presence of coal/biomass gasifier off-gas under this project. A promi

  17. U-028: Microsoft Windows win32k.sys TrueType Font Parsing Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in Microsoft Windows, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

  18. Root Diseases and Exotic Ecosystems: Implications for Long-Term Site Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otrosina, W. J.; Garbelotto, M.

    1997-09-01

    Management activities and various land uses have taken place recently that have dramatically altered edaphic and environmental conditions under which forest tree species and ecosystems have evolved. Sequoia giganteum stands, fire suppression in this fire dependent ecosystem has resulted in increased mortality due to Heterobasidion annosum. On hypothesis is that fire suppression results in increased encroachment of true firs, easily infected by S-group Heterobasidion annosum, thereby transferring the disease via root contacts with S. giganteum. Existence of a hybrid with S and P ISG's of H. annosum may be evidence for anthropogenic influences on evolutionary pathways in this pathogen.

  19. Strangeness suppression of qq creation observed in exclusive reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mestayer, M. D.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Aghasyan, M.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Fassi, L. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Raue, B. A.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Saini, M. S.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Simonyan, A.; Sokhan, D.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vernarsky, B.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-10-10

    In this study, we measured the ratios of electroproduction cross sections from a proton target for three exclusive meson-baryon final states: ?K+, p?0, and n?+, with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. Using a simple model of quark hadronization, we extract qq creation probabilities for the first time in exclusive two-body production, in which only a single qq pair is created. We observe a sizable suppression of strange quark-antiquark pairs compared to nonstrange pairs, similar to that seen in high-energy production.

  20. Could what that ESCO sales rep said really be true? Savings realization rates in ESPC versus bid-to-spec projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Philip; Earni, Shankar; Williams, Charles

    2014-08-11

    Claims that savings realization is greater in energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) are rampant at least among energy service company representatives and other ESPC cheerleaders. But hard supporting evidence for these claims has been virtually non-existent. The Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program uses its Compliance Tracking System (CTS) database to document the performance of federal buildings and projects towards meeting various federal energy-saving goals. This paper focuses on preliminary analysis from CTS to understand and compare the performance of federal ESPCs with projects that have been implemented with more conventional government appropriations funding. The authors have found preliminary evidence using CTS that shows markedly higher savings realization rates among ESPC projects than appropriations-funded ones. There are numerous caveats to the data comparison that clamor for further study, but the difference is still intriguing. If borne out, this finding will provide concrete support to the idea that ESPCs guarantees and measurement and verification, long touted by energy service companies (ESCOs) as offering savings assurance, may truly yield substantial benefits. If ESPCs actually do perform better (i.e., have higher realization rates and savings persistence) than conventional bid-to-spec projects, the perceived premium for conducting them may look like a very good deal after all.

  1. Property:UtilityLocation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Agway Energy Services, LLC + true + Aiken Electric Coop Inc + true + Aitkin Public Utilities Comm + true + Ajo Improvement Co + true + (previous 25) (next 25)...

  2. Property:EIA/861/NercMro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + true + Brainerd Public Utilities + true + Brodhead Water & Lighting Comm + true + Brown County Rural Elec Assn + true + Burke-Divide Electric Coop Inc + true + Butler County...

  3. Property:EIA/861/IsoNy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc. + true + M Major Energy Electric Services + true + N NOCO Electric + true + NRG Power Marketing LLC + true + National Grid Generation, LLC + true + (previous 25) (next...

  4. Moving Industry Forward: Finding the Environmental Opportunity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sorption patterns on Douglas fir biochar. Johnson recently tested a mine spoil laden soil collected from a superfund mining site in Colorado at the ALS and found certain...

  5. Comprehensive amplitude analysis of γγπ+π-,π0π0 and K¯K below 1.5 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Ling-Yun; Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-08-15

    In this paper we perform an amplitude analysis of essentially all published pion and kaon pair production data from two photon collisions below 1.5 GeV. This includes all the high statistics results from Belle, as well as older data from Mark II at SLAC, CELLO at DESY, Crystal Ball at SLAC. The purpose of this analysis is to provide as close to a model-independent determination of the γγ to meson pair amplitudes as possible. Having data with limited angular coverage, typically |cosθ| < 0.6-0.8, and no polarization information for reactions in which spin is an essential complication, the determination of the underlying amplitudes might appear an intractable problem. However, imposing the basic constraints required by analyticity, unitarity, and crossing-symmetry makes up for the experimentally missing information. Above 1.5 GeV multi-meson production channels become important and we have too little information to resolve the amplitudes. Nevertheless, below 1.5 GeV the two photon production of hadron pairs serves as a paradigm for the application of S-matrix techniques. Final state interactions among the meson pairs is critical to this analysis. To fix these, we include the latest ππ → ππ, K⁻K scattering amplitudes given by dispersive analyses, supplemented in the K⁻K threshold region by the recent precision Dalitz plot analysis from BaBar. With these hadronic amplitudes built into unitarity, we can constrain the overall description of γγ → ππ and K⁻K datasets, both integrated and differential cross-sections, including the high statistics charged and neutral pion data from Belle. A region of solutions is found for the γγ → ππ partial waves with both isospin 0 and 2. Since this analysis invokes coupled hadronic channels, even the relatively poor integrated cross-section data on γγ → K⁻K narrows the patch of solutions to essentially a single form. For this we present the complete partial wave amplitudes, show how well they fit all the available data, and give the two photon couplings of scalar and tensor resonances that appear.

  6. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He?3(e?,e'd) Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J. P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deltuva, A.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golak, J.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; Kievsky, A.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H. -J.; Luo, W.; Marcucci, L. E.; Markowitz, P.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J.R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sauer, P. U.; Sawatzky, B.; Schiavilla, R.; Schoenrock, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Skibinski, R.; St John, J.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Viviani, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Witala, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the most sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.

  7. True atomic-scale imaging of a spinel Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}(111) surface in aqueous solution by frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitta, Mitsunori, E-mail: m-kitta@aist.go.jp; Kohyama, Masanori [Research Institute for Ubiquitous Energy Devices, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Spinel-type lithium titanium oxide (LTO; Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}) is a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Revealing the atomic-scale surface structure of LTO in liquid is highly necessary to investigate its surface properties in practical environments. Here, we reveal an atomic-scale image of the LTO(111) surface in LiCl aqueous solution using frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy. Atomically flat terraces and single steps having heights of multiples of 0.5?nm were observed in the aqueous solution. Hexagonal bright spots separated by 0.6?nm were also observed on the flat terrace part, corresponding to the atomistic contrast observed in the ultrahigh vacuum condition, which suggests that the basic atomic structure of the LTO(111) surface is retained without dramatic reconstruction even in the aqueous solution.

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  15. Structural Health Monitoring Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... be cause due to transients within the signal that are often caused by damage in machinery. ... 2.40 filtershm.m File Reference Feature Extraction: Filters signals with FIR filter. ...

  16. Using RSI format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Poloidal magnetic field is determined by measuring the Faraday rotation of the FIR laser beam ... Absolute calibration of the polarimeter system is achieved by use of a rotating quartz ...

  17. ELECTRON DENSITY FLUCTUATIONS AND FLUCTUATION-INDUCED TRANSPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... - The FIR signal beam profile out of the waveguide, incident on the meshes above the vacuum vessel. The 120 cm focal length lens provides the tightest beam waist of about 2.4 cm. ...

  18. Study of e+e-?pp?0 in the vicinity of the ?(3770)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. ?N.; Ai, X.? C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. ?J.; An, F. ?F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. ?Z.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Ban, Y.; Bennett, J.? V.; Bertani, M.; Bian, J.? M.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Braun, S.; Briere, R.? A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G.? F.; Cetin, S.? A.; Chang, J.? F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H.? S.; Chen, J.? C.; Chen, M.? L.; Chen, S.? J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.? R.; Chen, Y.? B.; Cheng, H.? P.; Chu, X.? K.; Chu, Y.? P.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H.? L.; Dai, J.? P.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z.? Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; Ding, W.? M.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L.? Y.; Dong, M. ?Y.; Du, S.? X.; Fan, J.? Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. ?S.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feng, C. ?Q.; Fu, C. ?D.; Fuks, O.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Geng, C.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W.? X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. ?H.; Gu, Y.? T.; Guan, Y.? H.; Guo, A.? Q.; Guo, L.? B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.? P.; Han, Y.? L.; Harris, F.? A.; He, K.? L.; He, M.; He, Z.? Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y.? K.; Hou, Z.? L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H.? M.; Hu, J. ?F.; Hu, T.; Huang, G.? M.; Huang, G. ?S.; Huang, H.? P.; Huang, J.? S.; Huang, L.; Huang, X. ?T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, C. ?S.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q.? P.; Ji, X. ?B.; Ji, X.? L.; Jiang, L. ?L.; Jiang, L.? W.; Jiang, X.? S.; Jiao, J.? B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D.? P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. ?L.; Kang, X.? S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kloss, B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Khn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J.? S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Leyhe, M.; Li, C.? H.; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D.; Li, D.? M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H.? B.; Li, J.? C.; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, Lei; Li, P. ?R.; Li, Q.? J.; Li, T.; Li, W.? D.; Li, W.? G.; Li, X.? L.; Li, X.? N.; Li, X.? Q.; Li, Z.? B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y.? F.; Liang, Y.? T.; Lin, D.? X.; Liu, B.? J.; Liu, C. ?L.; Liu, C.? X.; Liu, F.? H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. ?B.; Liu, H.? H.; Liu, H.? M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.? P.; Liu, K.; Liu, K.? Y.; Liu, P.? L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S.? B.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.? B.; Liu, Z.? A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X.? C.; Lu, G.? R.; Lu, H.? J.; Lu, H.? L.; Lu, J.? G.; Lu, X.? R.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y.? P.; Luo, C.? L.; Luo, M.? X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X.? L.; Lv, M.; Ma, F.? C.; Ma, H. ?L.; Ma, Q.? M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. ?Y.; Maas, F. ?E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q.? A.; Mao, Y.? J.; Mao, Z.? P.; Messchendorp, J.? G.; Min, J.; Min, T.? J.; Mitchell, R.? E.; Mo, X.? H.; Mo, Y.? J.; Moeini, H.; Morales Morales, C.; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N.? Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nikolaev, I. ?B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, X.? Y.; Olsen, S.? L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H.? P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J.? L.; Ping, R.? G.; Poling, R.; Q., N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C.? F.; Qin, L.? Q.; Qin, X.? S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. ?H.; Qiu, J. ?F.; Rashid, K.? H.; Redmer, C.? F.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X.? D.; Sarantsev, A.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C.? P.; Shen, X.? Y.; Sheng, H.? Y.; Shepherd, M.? R.; Song, W.? M.; Song, X. ?Y.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G.? X.; Sun, J. ?F.; Sun, S.? S.; Sun, Y.? J.; Sun, Y. ?Z.; Sun, Z. ?J.; Sun, Z.? T.; Tang, C.? J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E.? H.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G.? S.; Wang, B.; Wang, D.; Wang, D.? Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L.? L.; Wang, L. ?S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.? L.; Wang, Q.? J.; Wang, S.? G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X.? F.; Wang, Y.? D.; Wang, Y.? F.; Wang, Y.? Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. ?G.; Wang, Z.? H.; Wang, Z.? Y.; Wei, D.? H.; Wei, J.? B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. ?P.; Werner, M.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L.? H.; Wu, N.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L.? G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z.? J.; Xie, Y.? G.; Xiu, Q.? L.; Xu, G.? F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. ?J.; Xu, Q.? N.; Xu, X.? P.; Xue, Z.; Yan, L.; Yan, W.? B.; Yan, W.? C.; Yan, Y.? H.; Yang, H.? X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.? X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M.? H.; Yu, B. ?X.; Yu, C. ?X.; Yu, H.? W.; Yu, J.? S.; Yu, S.? P.; Yuan, C. ?Z.; Yuan, W.? L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. ?A.; Zallo, A.; Zang, S.? L.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. ?X.; Zhang, B.? Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. ?B.; Zhang, C.? C.; Zhang, D.? H.; Zhang, H.? H.; Zhang, H.? Y.; Zhang, J.? J.; Zhang, J.? Q.; Zhang, J.? W.; Zhang, J.? Y.; Zhang, J. ?Z.; Zhang, S.? H.; Zhang, X. ?J.; Zhang, X.? Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.? H.; Zhang, Z.? H.; Zhang, Z.? P.; Zhang, Z.? Y.; Zhao, G.

    2014-08-22

    The process e+e-?pp?0 has been studied by analyzing data collected at ?s=3.773 GeV, at s?=3.650 GeV, and during a ?(3770) line shape scan with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider. The Born cross section of pp?0 in the vicinity of the ?(3770) is measured, and the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 is extracted considering interference between resonant and continuum production amplitudes. Two solutions with the same probability and a significance of 1.5? are found. The solutions for the Born cross section of ?(3770)?pp?0 are 33.81.82.1 pb and 0.06+0.10-0.04+0.01-0.01 pb (<0.22 pb at a 90% confidence level). Using the estimated cross section and a constant decay amplitude approximation, the cross section ?(pp??(3770)?0) is calculated for the kinematic situation of the planned PANDA experiment. The maximum cross section corresponding to the two solutions is expected to be less than 0.79 nb at 90% confidence level and 12210 nb at a center-of-mass energy of 5.26 GeV.

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  1. Highly tunable quantum Hall far-infrared photodetector by use of GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As-graphene composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei City 25137, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    We have developed a highly tunable, narrow band far-infrared (FIR) photodetector which utilizes the characteristic merits of graphene and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As heterostructure in the Quantum Hall states (QHS). The heterostructure surface is covered with chemical vapor-deposited graphene, which functions as a transparent top-gate to vary the electron density of the 2DEG. FIR response observed in the vicinity of integer QH regime can be effectively tuned in a wide range of 27102?cm{sup ?1} with a bias voltage less than ?1?V. In addition, we have found that the presence of graphene can genuinely modulate the photoresponse. Our results demonstrate a promising direction for realizing a tunable long-wavelength FIR detector using QHS in GaAs 2DEG/ graphene composite material.

  2. Optical layout and mechanical structure of polarimeter-interferometer system for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Z. Y.; Liu, H. Q. Jie, Y. X.; Wang, Z. X.; Shen, J. S.; An, Z. H.; Yang, Y.; Zeng, L.; Wei, X. C.; Li, G. S.; Zhu, X.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Lan, T.

    2014-11-15

    A Far-InfaRed (FIR) three-wave POlarimeter-INTerferometer (POINT) system for measurement current density profile and electron density profile is under development for the EAST tokamak. The FIR beams are transmitted from the laser room to the optical tower adjacent to EAST via ?20 m overmoded dielectric waveguide and then divided into 5 horizontal chords. The optical arrangement was designed using ZEMAX, which provides information on the beam spot size and energy distribution throughout the optical system. ZEMAX calculations used to optimize the optical layout design are combined with the mechanical design from CATIA, providing a 3D visualization of the entire POINT system.

  3. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  4. Observation of a new charged charmoniumlike state inB0?J/?K-?+decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chilikin, K.; Mizuk, R.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D.?M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A.?M.; Bansal, V.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T.?E.; ?ervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B.?G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J.?E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y.?M.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X.?H.; Hou, W.-S.; Huschle, M.; Hyun, H.?J.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Joo, K.?K.; Julius, T.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D.?Y.; Kim, H.?J.; Kim, J.?H.; Kim, M.?J.; Kim, Y.?J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B.?R.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J.?S.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mohanty, G.?B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N.?K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S.?L.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C.?W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T.?K.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L.?E.; Ribel, E.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C.?P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Thorne, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wagner, M.?N.; Wang, C.?H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X.?L.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K.?M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z.?P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-12-16

    We present the results of an amplitude analysis of B0?J/?K-?+ decays. A new charged charmoniumlike state Zc(4200)+ decaying to J/??+ is observed with a significance of 6.2?. The mass and width of the Zc(4200)+ are 4196+31-29+17-13 MeV/c2 and 370+70-70+70-132 MeV, respectively; the preferred assignment of the quantum numbers is JP=1+. In addition, we find evidence for Zc(4430)+?J/??+. The analysis is based on a 711 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the asymmetric-energy e+e- collider KEKB.

  5. Coupled ππ, KK¯ scattering in P-wave and the ρ resonance from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, David J.; Briceño, Raúl A.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we determine elastic and coupled-channel amplitudes for isospin-1 meson-meson scattering in $P$-wave, by calculating correlation functions using lattice QCD with light quark masses such that $m_\\pi = 236$ MeV in a cubic volume of $\\sim (4 \\,\\mathrm{fm})^3$. Variational analyses of large matrices of correlation functions computed using operator constructions resembling $\\pi\\pi$, $K\\overline{K}$ and $q\\bar{q}$, in several moving frames and several lattice irreducible representations, leads to discrete energy spectra from which scattering amplitudes are extracted. In the elastic $\\pi\\pi$ scattering region we obtain a detailed energy-dependence for the phase-shift, corresponding to a $\\rho$ resonance, and we extend the analysis into the coupled-channel $K\\overline{K}$ region for the first time, finding a small coupling between the channels.

  6. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle inpp?Z/?*?e+e-Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. ?V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. ?F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. ?B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B.? C.?K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. ?E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. ?J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. ?F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. ?D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Faur, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. ?H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. ?A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. ?D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. ?P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. ?D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. ?N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. ?A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W. ?M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. ?K.?A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. ?L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. ?G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. ?K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. ?M.; Popov, A.? V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P.? N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M.? P.; Santos, A. ?S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. ?D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. ?A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G.? R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D.? A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V.? V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W.? M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E.? W.; Vasilyev, I.? A.; Verkheev, A. ?Y.; Vertogradov, L. ?S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle sin2??eff which determines the relative strength of weak and electromagnetic interactions, in pp?Z/?*?e+e- events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of sin2??eff=0.231470.00047 is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  7. October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002 - September 2002 (CRAC 2 period) October 2001 - March 2002 (CRAC 1 period) Final LB CRAC True-Ups for FY 2006 True-Up for CRAC 9 Period: June 14, 2006 Workshop True-Up for...

  8. Star formation relations and CO spectral line energy distributions across the J-ladder and redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greve, T. R.; Leonidaki, I.; Xilouris, E. M.; Wei, A.; Henkel, C.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Van der Werf, P.; Meijerink, R.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Daz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; Gonzlez-Alfonso, E.; Harris, A.; Naylor, D. A.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present FIR [50-300 ?m]CO luminosity relations (i.e., log L{sub FIR}=?log L{sub CO}{sup ?}+?) for the full CO rotational ladder from J = 1-0 up to J = 13-12 for a sample of 62 local (z ? 0.1) (Ultra) Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs; L {sub IR[8-1000} {sub ?m]} > 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}) using data from Herschel SPIRE-FTS and ground-based telescopes. We extend our sample to high redshifts (z > 1) by including 35 submillimeter selected dusty star forming galaxies from the literature with robust CO observations, and sufficiently well-sampled FIR/submillimeter spectral energy distributions (SEDs), so that accurate FIR luminosities can be determined. The addition of luminous starbursts at high redshifts enlarge the range of the FIRCO luminosity relations toward the high-IR-luminosity end, while also significantly increasing the small amount of mid-J/high-J CO line data (J = 5-4 and higher) that was available prior to Herschel. This new data set (both in terms of IR luminosity and J-ladder) reveals linear FIRCO luminosity relations (i.e., ? ? 1) for J = 1-0 up to J = 5-4, with a nearly constant normalization (? ? 2). In the simplest physical scenario, this is expected from the (also) linear FIR(molecular line) relations recently found for the dense gas tracer lines (HCN and CS), as long as the dense gas mass fraction does not vary strongly within our (merger/starburst)-dominated sample. However, from J = 6-5 and up to the J = 13-12 transition, we find an increasingly sublinear slope and higher normalization constant with increasing J. We argue that these are caused by a warm (?100 K) and dense (>10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}) gas component whose thermal state is unlikely to be maintained by star-formation-powered far-UV radiation fields (and thus is no longer directly tied to the star formation rate). We suggest that mechanical heating (e.g., supernova-driven turbulence and shocks), and not cosmic rays, is the more likely source of energy for this component. The global CO spectral line energy distributions, which remain highly excited from J = 6-5 up to J = 13-12, are found to be a generic feature of the (U)LIRGs in our sample, and further support the presence of this gas component.

  9. HerMES: Spectral energy distributions of submillimeter galaxies at z > 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.-S.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Clements, D. L.; Dai, Y.; Fazio, G. G.; Bock, J. J.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A. J.; Wang, L.; Page, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Riechers, D.; Roseboom, I.; and others

    2014-03-20

    We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z > 4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at ?{sub rest} < 3.5 ?m, a hot dust component peaking at ?{sub rest} ? 5 ?m, and cold dust component which becomes significant for ?{sub rest} > 50 ?m. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350 ?m. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40-80 K, and their L {sub FIR} ? 10{sup 13} L {sub ?} qualifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around (q) = 2.2 indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24 ?m detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5 ?m luminosity of Log{sub 10}(L {sub 4.5}/L {sub ?}) = 11 ? 11.5. Their L {sub 4.5}/L {sub FIR} ratios are very similar to those of starburst-dominated SMGs at z ? 2. The L {sub CO} L {sub FIR} relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at z ? 2. We conclude that SMGs at z > 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR but otherwise very similar to those at z ? 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.

  10. Detection of long-term trends in carbon accumulation by forests in Northeastern U. S. and determination of causal factors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. William Munger; Steven C. Wofsy; David R. Foster

    2012-01-31

    The overall project goal was to quantify the trends and variability for Net ecosystem exchange of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and energy by northeastern forests, with particular attention to the role of succession, differences in species composition, legacies of past land use, and disturbances. Measurements included flux measurements and observations of biomass accumulation using ecosystem modeling as a framework for data interpretation. Continuation of the long-term record at the Environmental Measurement Site (EMS) Tower was a priority. The final quality-assured CO{sub 2}-flux data now extend through 2010. Data through 2011 are collected but not yet finalized. Biomass observations on the plot array centered on the tower are extended to 2011. Two additional towers in a hemlock stand (HEM) and a younger deciduous stand (LPH) complement the EMS tower by focusing on stands with different species composition or age distribution and disturbance history, but comparable climate and soil type. Over the period since 1993 the forest has added 24.4 Mg-C ha{sup -1} in the living trees. Annual net carbon uptake had been increasing from about 2 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} in the early 1990s to nearly 6 Mg-C ha{sup -1}y{sup -1} by 2008, but declined in 2009-2010. We attribute the increasing carbon uptake to a combination of warmer temperatures, increased photosynthetic efficiency, and increased influence by subcanopy hemlocks that are active in the early spring and late autumn when temperatures are above freezing but the deciduous canopy is bare. Not all of the increased carbon accumulation was found in woody biomass. Results from a study using data to optimize parameters in an ecosystem process model indicate that significant changes in model parameters for photosynthetic capacity and shifts in allocation to slow cycling soil organic matter are necessary for the model to match the observed trends. The emerging working hypothesis is that the pattern of increasing carbon uptake over the early 2000's represents a transient pulse that will eventually end as decomposition of the accumulated carbon catches up.

  11. Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POORE, ROBERT Z.

    1999-08-01

    The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

  12. Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 12.06.11 Sweet Smell of Renewable Fuel Office of Science researchers borrowed from a fir tree to create a fuel that could leave

  13. Observations of summer roosting and foraging behavior of a hoary bat (Lasiurus cinereus) in southern New Hampshire.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veillieux, J. P.; Moosman, P. R.; Reynolds, D. S.; LaGory, K. E.; Walston, L. J.; Environmental Science Division; Franklin Pierce Univ.; Fitchburg State Coll.; St. Paul's School

    2009-01-01

    Few data are available that describe the roosting and foraging ecology of the Hoary Bat (Lasiurus cinereus), and no such data are available for the northeastern United States. We captured a juvenile Hoary Bat in south-central New Hampshire during July of 2007 and monitored its roosting behavior for ten days and its foraging behavior for one night. The bat roosted with two other bats, which we presumed were its mother and sibling. These bats roosted exclusively in Tsuga canadensis (Eastern Hemlock Tree) and tended to roost near tree tops in the forest canopy. The radiotagged bat used at least six roost trees and changed roost location eight times during the ten-day observation period. Although roost-tree fidelity was low, all roost trees were located within a maximum circular area of 0.5 ha. The bat foraged over an estimated 156-ha area of mostly forest habitat (68%), with additional open habitats (15%) and wetlands (17%). These data are the first observations of roosting and foraging behaviors by the Hoary Bat in the northeastern region of its geographic range.

  14. A far-infrared spectroscopic survey of intermediate redshift (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdis, Georgios E.; Rigopoulou, D.; Hopwood, R.; Clements, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Farrah, D.; Pearson, C.; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Griffin, M. J.; Oliver, S.; Perez Fournon, I.; Riechers, D.; Swinyard, B. M.; Thatte, N.; Scott, D.; Valtchanov, I.; Vaccari, M.

    2014-11-20

    We present Herschel far-IR photometry and spectroscopy as well as ground-based CO observations of an intermediate redshift (0.21 ? z ? 0.88) sample of Herschel-selected (ultra)-luminous infrared galaxies (L {sub IR} > 10{sup 11.5} L {sub ?}). With these measurements, we trace the dust continuum, far-IR atomic line emission, in particular [C II] 157.7 ?m, as well as the molecular gas of z ? 0.3 luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) and perform a detailed investigation of the interstellar medium of the population. We find that the majority of Herschel-selected intermediate redshift (U)LIRGs have L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios that are a factor of about 10 higher than that of local ULIRGs and comparable to that of local normal and high-z star-forming galaxies. Using our sample to bridge local and high-z [C II] observations, we find that the majority of galaxies at all redshifts and all luminosities follow an L {sub C} {sub II}L {sub FIR} relation with a slope of unity, from which local ULIRGs and high- z active-galactic-nucleus-dominated sources are clear outliers. We also confirm that the strong anti-correlation between the L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratio and the far-IR color L {sub 60}/L {sub 100} observed in the local universe holds over a broad range of redshifts and luminosities, in the sense that warmer sources exhibit lower L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} at any epoch. Intermediate redshift ULIRGs are also characterized by large molecular gas reservoirs and by lower star formation efficiencies compared to that of local ULIRGs. The high L {sub C} {sub II}/L {sub FIR} ratios, the moderate star formation efficiencies (L {sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ?} or L {sub IR}/M{sub H{sub 2}}), and the relatively low dust temperatures of our sample (which are also common characteristics of high-z star-forming galaxies with ULIRG-like luminosities) indicate that the evolution of the physical properties of (U)LIRGs between the present day and z > 1 is already significant by z ? 0.3.

  15. Aurora Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  16. Cove Fort Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  17. Thermo Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  18. Ulupalakua Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  19. Kelsey South Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  20. Criterion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  1. Tuscarora I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  2. Pilot Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  3. Gerlach Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  4. Silver Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  5. Hot Pot Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  6. Airforce Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  7. Pumpernickel Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  8. Linden Ranch | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  9. Dynapower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  10. Whirlwind Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  11. Drum Mountain Geothermal Project (2) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  12. DeArmand Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  13. High Valley Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  14. Mahogany Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  15. Newberry I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  16. Orita I Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  17. GV1 Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  18. Akutan Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  19. Olene Gap Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  20. Lovelock Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  1. Alum Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  2. Truckee Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  3. Trail Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":,"gkml":,"fusiontables":,"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers...

  4. HerMES: LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES INDIVIDUALLY DETECTED AT 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 2.0 IN GOODS-N WITH HERSCHEL/SPIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgarella, D.; Heinis, S.; Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Ilbert, O.; Magdis, G.; Hwang, H. S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Brisbin, D.; Chanial, P.; Clements, D. L.; Franceschini, A.; Marchetti, L.; Glenn, J.; Gonzalez Solares, E. A. E-mail: sebastien.heinis@oamp.fr

    2011-06-10

    As part of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey we have investigated the rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) properties of a sample of more than 4800 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North field. Most LBGs are not detected individually, but we do detect a sub-sample of 12 objects at 0.7 < z < 1.6 and one object at z = 2.0. The ones detected by Herschel SPIRE have redder observed NUV - U and U - R colors than the others, while the undetected ones have colors consistent with average LBGs at z > 2.5. The UV-to-FIR spectral energy distributions of the objects detected in the rest-frame FIR are investigated using the code CIGALE to estimate physical parameters. We find that LBGs detected by SPIRE are high-mass, luminous infrared galaxies. It appears that LBGs are located in a triangle-shaped region in the A{sub FUV} versus log L{sub FUV} = 0 diagram limited by A{sub FUV} = 0 at the bottom and by a diagonal following the temporal evolution of the most massive galaxies from the bottom right to the top left of the diagram. This upper envelop can be used as upper limits for the UV dust attenuation as a function of L{sub FUV}. The limits of this region are well explained using a closed-box model, where the chemical evolution of galaxies produces metals, which in turn lead to higher dust attenuation when the galaxies age.

  5. THE PHYSICS OF THE FAR-INFRARED-RADIO CORRELATION. I. CALORIMETRY, CONSPIRACY, AND IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacki, Brian C.; Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot

    2010-07-01

    The far-infrared (FIR) and radio luminosities of star-forming galaxies are linearly correlated over a very wide range in star formation rate, from normal spirals like the Milky Way to the most intense starbursts. Using one-zone models of cosmic ray (CR) injection, cooling, and escape in star-forming galaxies, we attempt to reproduce the observed FIR-radio correlation (FRC) over its entire span. The normalization and linearity of the FRC, together with constraints on the CR population in the Milky Way, have strong implications for the CR and magnetic energy densities in star-forming galaxies. We show that for consistency with the FRC, {approx}2% of the kinetic energy from supernova explosions must go into high-energy primary CR electrons and that {approx}10%-20% must go into high-energy primary CR protons. Secondary electrons and positrons are likely comparable to or dominate primary electrons in dense starburst galaxies. We discuss the implications of our models for the magnetic field strengths of starbursts, the detectability of starbursts by Fermi, and CR feedback. Overall, our models indicate that both CR protons and electrons escape from low surface density galaxies, but lose most of their energy before escaping dense starbursts. The FRC is caused by a combination of the efficient cooling of CR electrons (calorimetry) in starbursts and a conspiracy of several factors. For lower surface density galaxies, the decreasing radio emission caused by CR escape is balanced by the decreasing FIR emission caused by the low effective UV dust opacity. In starbursts, bremsstrahlung, ionization, and inverse Compton cooling decrease the radio emission, but they are countered by secondary electrons/positrons and the dependence of synchrotron frequency on energy, both of which increase the radio emission. Our conclusions hold for a broad range of variations in our fiducial model, such as those including winds, different magnetic field strengths, and different diffusive escape times.

  6. STRONG C{sup +} EMISSION IN GALAXIES AT z? 1-2: EVIDENCE FOR COLD FLOW ACCRETION POWERED STAR FORMATION IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisbin, Drew; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Nikola, Thomas; Parshley, Stephen; Spoon, Henrik; Stacey, Gordon J.; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Verma, Aprajita

    2015-01-20

    We have recently detected the [C II] 157.7 ?m line in eight star-forming galaxies at redshifts 1 to 2 using the redshift (z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS). Our sample targets star formation dominant sources detected in PAH emission. This represents a significant addition to [C II] observations during the epoch of peak star formation. We have augmented this survey with observations of the [O I] 63 ?m line and far infrared photometry from the PACS and SPIRE Herschel instruments as well as Spitzer IRS spectra from the literature showing PAH features. Our sources exhibit above average gas heating efficiency, many with both [O I]/FIR and [C II]/FIR of ?1% or more. The relatively strong [C II] emission is consistent with our sources being dominated by star formation powered photo-dissociation regions, extending to kiloparsec scales. We suggest that the star formation mode in these systems follows a Schmidt-Kennicutt law similar to local systems, but at a much higher rate due to molecular gas surface densities 10-100times that of local star-forming systems. The source of the high molecular gas surface densities may be the infall of neutral gas from the cosmic web. In addition to the high [C II]/FIR values, we also find high [C II]/PAH ratios and, in at least one source, a cool dust temperature. This source, SWIRE 4-5, bears a resemblance in these diagnostics to shocked regions of Stephan's Quintet, suggesting that another mode of [C II] excitation in addition to normal photoelectric heating may be contributing to the observed [C II] line.

  7. Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and Notice of Proposed Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement for the Mesaba Energy Project Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Demonstration Plant Northern Minnesota Iron Range

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    207 Federal Register / Vol. 70, No. 192 / Wednesday, October 5, 2005 / Notices Relay Service (FIRS) at 1-800-877- 8339. [FR Doc. 05-19963 Filed 10-4-05; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Notice of Public Hearing AGENCY: National Assessment Governing Board; Education SUMMARY: The National Assessment Governing Board is announcing a public hearing on October 25, 2005 to obtain comment on the draft 2009 Science Framework for the National Assessment of Educational Progress

  8. Record of Decision; Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    89 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 70 / Wednesday, April 12, 1995 / Notices who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal Information Relay Service (FIRS) at 1- 800-877-8339 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m., Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Program Authority: 20 U.S.C. 7705. Dated: April 5, 1995. Thomas W. Payzant, Assistant Secretary for Elementary and Secondary Education. [FR Doc. 95-8927 Filed 4-11-95; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-M Advisory Council on Education

  9. Laminated root rot in western North America. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thies, W.G.; Sturrock, R.N.

    1995-04-01

    Laminated root rot, caused by Phellinus weirii (Murr.) Gib., is a serious root disease affecting Douglas-fir and other commercially important species of conifers in northwestern North America. This report gives an overview of the disease as it occurs in the Pacific Northwest in Canada and the United States. Information on recognizing crown symptoms and signs of the disease is presented. The disease cycle of laminated root rot, from initiation to intensification and distribution within infected stands, is described. Finally, disease management strategies during stand development and at stand regeneration are discussed. Features on mechanical approaches also are included. The report is intended as a general reference for a wide audience.

  10. United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    73258 18.89, /J" c. j _- /;I_ EFG (07.90) United States Government Department of Energy I memorandum W Y fir ,"1 ti2,ej ? r-l DATE: CE' .' 2 :12; REPLY TO AlTN OF: EM-421 (W. A. W illiams, 903-8149) b/fad; 0' \/A a5 SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utilized Sites ReGbbial Action Program TO: The F ile I have reviewed the attached site summar recommendations for the following sites: ies and elimination '4B : M itts & Merrel Co., Saginaw, M ichigan North Carolina

  11. J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .Jq. 3 8.5 J Hr. Mark Finkelstein . . State Street Associates L.P. II Ithaca, New York 14GSO Dear Fir. Flnkelstein: .' This Is a followup letter to your telephone discussion on September 30, 1994, with Dr. Y. Alexander Yilliams of my staff. As you discussed, the Department of Energy (DOE) Is tmplementfng a radiological survey,program to determine the radiological conditions at.sites that were formerly used by DOE predecessor agencies. One such slte is the former Ithaca Gun Company facility in

  12. Editedby]ody H.

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    / ,.. Editedby]ody H. h"eiken, INC Division Prepared byElaine Roybal, NC-7 I An Affi"rrnative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer Thisrepot, w prepuredasanaccountof u.vrksponsored by an agencyof the UnitedStniesGovernment.Neitherthe UnitedStatesGavcrrrment noranyagency thsreof, norany of their~pioy~, makes any warranty,expressor implied,or assumesany legal fiobdityor responsibility fir theaccuracy, completerrsss, or use)idrress of any information, apparatus,product,or prwss disclosed.or

  13. Is the Use of a Surrogate Urethra an Option in Prostate High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Josef Kaelkner, Karl Mikael; Berg, Lars; Levitt, Seymour; Holmberg, Carina; Nilsson, Sten; Lundell, Marie

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy and the dosimetric consequences of substituting a surrogate urethra assumed to be at the geometric center of the prostate, in place of the true urethra when using high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred prostate cancer patients treated with HDR brachytherapy constituted the study group. A pre-plan was made with the urethra visualized. The true urethra was defined, and a surrogate urethra was placed at the geometric center of the prostate. The distance between the two urethras was measured. The deviation was evaluated at the base, middle, and apex. To evaluate the dosimetric consequences for the true urethra when using a surrogate urethra, two different dose plans were made: one based on the true urethra and one based on the surrogate urethra. The dose-volume histograms for the true urethra were analyzed. Results: The deviation between the true urethra and the surrogate urethra was greatest at the base of the prostate. A statistically significant difference was seen between the dosimetric parameters for the true and the surrogate urethra when the dose plan was made using the surrogate urethra. In this situation the dose to the true urethra was increased above our defined maximum tolerance limit. Conclusions: When using dose plans made according to a surrogate urethra the dose to the true urethra might be too high to be acceptable. If the true urethra is not visualized, severe damage could easily develop in a significant number of patients.

  14. Impacts of simulated herbivory on volatile organic compound emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2015-01-28

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gasmore » chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC–MS–FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  15. Impacts of simulated herbivory on VOC emission profiles from coniferous plants

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Faiola, C. L.; Jobson, B. T.; VanReken, T. M.

    2014-09-18

    The largest global source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere is from biogenic emissions. Plant stressors associated with a changing environment can alter both the quantity and composition of the compounds that are emitted. This study investigated the effects of one global change stressor, increased herbivory, on plant emissions from five different coniferous species: bristlecone pine (Pinus aristata), blue spruce (Picea pungens), western redcedar (Thuja plicata), grand fir (Abies grandis), and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsugas menziesii). Herbivory was simulated in the laboratory via exogenous application of methyl jasmonate, an herbivory proxy. Gas-phase species were measured continuously with a gas chromatographmore » coupled to a mass spectrometer and flame ionization detector (GC-MS-FID). Stress responses varied between the different plant types and even between experiments using the same set of saplings. The compounds most frequently impacted by the stress treatment were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 1,8-cineol, beta-myrcene, terpinolene, limonene, and the cymene isomers. Individual compounds within a single experiment often exhibited a different response to the treatment from one another.« less

  16. Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, Inez

    2014-07-28

    In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

  17. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, D.K.; Vocaturo, M.; Guttadora, L.J.

    1991-07-23

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH[sub 3]OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth. 10 figures.

  18. Laser for high frequency modulated interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansfield, Dennis K. (E. Windsor, NJ); Vocaturo, Michael (Columbus, NJ); Guttadora, Lawrence J. (Iselin, NJ)

    1991-01-01

    A Stark-tuned laser operating in the 119 micron line of CH.sub.3 OH has an output power of several tens of milliwatts at 30 Watts of pump power while exhibiting a doublet splitting of about ten MHz with the application of a Stark field on the order of 500 volts/cm. This output power allows for use of the laser in a multi-channel interferometer, while its high operating frequency permits the interferometer to measure rapid electron density changes in a pellet injected or otherwise fueled plasma such as encountered in magnetic fusion devices. The laser includes a long far-infrared (FIR) pyrex resonator tube disposed within a cylindrical water jacket and incorporating charged electrodes for applying the Stark field to a gas confined therein. With the electrodes located within the resonator tube, the resonator tube walls are cooled by a flowing coolant without electrical breakdown in the coolant liquid during application of the Stark field. Wall cooling allows for substantially increased FIR output powers. Provision is made for introducing a buffer gas into the resonator tube for increasing laser output power and its operating bandwidth.

  19. 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to...

  20. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Managing O & M Costs Rue Phillips, CEOCofounder True South Renewables Inc. Pioneers in PV Operations and Maintenance protocols, procedures Maintaining and operating...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measure the evolution of Newton's constant, Gsub eff, that appears in Modified Gravity theories, without assuming General Relativity to be true. The novelty of these...

  2. Workforce Pipeline | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Daily Herald True Romance: From walking opposite paths to following the same route Dallas Morning News Workforce Pipeline Argonne seeks to attract, hire and retain a diverse ...

  3. ESnet, Coalition Partners Announce Global Breakthrough for Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Software-Defined Networking Proving true SDN principles and deployment at Internet-scale, ONOS-based peering router and Vandervecken SDN controller stack successfully...

  4. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    submitted is, to the best of our knowledge and belief, true, accurate, and complete. We are aware that there are significant penalties for submitting false information,...

  5. Commercial Buildings Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Integration Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL 2 Strategic Fit within ...

  6. Symmetry Breaking of H2 Dissociation by a Single Photon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    six-fold rotational symmetry, abound but are only approximately true because the objects of our macroscopic world are highly complex. Once we reduce their size and...

  7. New Technologies | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fabricated to fit various turnstile models. Chemical Agent DetectorInterrogator This gun-like tool is an example of innovative technology - a true breakthrough for law...

  8. Colonial Pipeline Company Timothy C. Felt

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    United States - a 370 million dollar pipeline that would deliver gasoline and other ... Those words remain true to this day - infrastructure projects that are designed to serve ...

  9. Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Software Sectors Buildings washarvested true Package Relationships Relationship Dataset License CC0 1.0 Open Data Author Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)...

  10. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    especially true in the central United States where they occur most frequently. As Earth's climate changes, researchers question the degree to which severe thunderstorms and...

  11. Secure Wireless Tritium Air Monitoring Cart Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Pre-amplifier - Floating with respect to ground - True differential input - Eliminates ground loops - Excellent AC common mode rejection * Impedance matched for up to 200ft RG58...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Fabrication of smooth thin films of topological insulators with true insulating bulk are extremely important for utilizing their novel properties in quantum and spintronic devices. ...

  13. Origin And Characterization Of Geothermal Waters At Desert Queen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy potential. Further investigation by drilling is necessary to determine the true nature of the waters at depth. Authors Laura Garchar and Greg Arehart Published GRC, 2008 DOI...

  14. Slide14 | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Most automatic translations are limited to translating from a single language into another single language. WorldWideScience.org partnering with Microsoft Translator enables true ...

  15. NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Increasing the Value...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The agenda and workshop presentations are below. Agenda An Example Commercial True Microgrid: Santa Rita Jail DC - The Power to Change the World: From Data Centers to Whole...

  16. BPA-2011-01579-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address * Currently Proposed Utility ECA Implementation Budget for the fiscal year 2012-2013 rate period I declare under penalty of perjury that the foregoing is true and...

  17. Memorandum of American High-Performance Buildings Coalition DOE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    organizations committed to promoting performance-based energy efficiency and sustainable building standards developed through true, consensus-bases processes, and the U.S. ...

  18. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drive air currents around the globe. This is especially true for the area known as the "Tropical Warm Pool" in the western Pacific Ocean and eastern Indian Ocean. ...

  19. Monitoring Trace Radionuclides by ICP Mass Spectrometry with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    such measurements (from hours to several minutes), while maintaining at least reasonable accuracy (agreement with true ratios +- 3% or better) and precision (1% RSD or better),...

  20. Diversity & Inclusion: Outreach & Education Diversity | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bringing Students To STEM With My Brother's Keeper Breaking Energy Oswego teen scientist wins medal creating next-generation biofuel Daily Herald True Romance: From walking ...

  1. ALSNews Vol. 314

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    chemical, and material sciences. Kung praised the new User Support Building (USB) as "a success in project management: heartening, early, and under budget. A true...

  2. Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important science and engineering applications. In this paper we describe a new high performance conjugate...

  3. MiniBooNE Charged Current Charged Pion Cross Section Data Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    includes the experimentally reconstructed nucleon scattering energy spectrum, the migration matrices from reconstructed to true energy (for the bound nucleons in carbon, free...

  4. ARM - Field Campaign - Marine ARM GPCI Investigations of Clouds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of current and recent weather for use by ship's crew or scientists during operations. True and Apparent Winds were displayed. Update rate was once per minute. Other Contacts...

  5. Agenda, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7077797,"lon":-97.4317035,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Norwell, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1617681,"lon":-70.7939307,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Danville, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.96342,"lon":-76.6127329,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  8. Colmar, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2673286,"lon":-75.2535079,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Geneva, Switzerland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.2038099,"lon":6.1399589,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  10. Lake County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4897279,"lon":-87.3016132,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Ohio County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1111311,"lon":-80.610489,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  12. Duncanville, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.6518004,"lon":-96.9083366,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Cedar City, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6774769,"lon":-113.0618931,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  14. Loyola, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3513302,"lon":-122.100518,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Monroe County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1851445,"lon":-86.4996546,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. West Union, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7945166,"lon":-83.5451934,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2072286,"lon":-92.0213883,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Cass County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8199089,"lon":-86.3376761,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Cherokee County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1134803,"lon":-84.059029,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  20. Homestead, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4059025,"lon":-79.9119948,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Buena Vista, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7110387,"lon":-119.7937851,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. Webster County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.5707456,"lon":-89.2847251,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. Wabash County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.4226484,"lon":-87.8156715,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Mitchell County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.443669,"lon":-98.2212979,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  5. Columbus, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2014404,"lon":-85.9213796,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Sunnyvale, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7965165,"lon":-96.5608242,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Greene County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.5013936,"lon":-77.6994197,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Sidney, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.1427623,"lon":-102.9779785,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  9. Sunol-Midtown, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3247466,"lon":-121.9081972,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  10. Abbottstown, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8864869,"lon":-76.9847013,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Monroe County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.2742526,"lon":-90.1869644,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. El Mirage, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.6130942,"lon":-112.3246042,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  13. Glenn Heights, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5487479,"lon":-96.8566667,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Martinsville, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4278253,"lon":-86.4283279,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Cass County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8755529,"lon":-96.1526985,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Springfield, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.5092118,"lon":-86.8849984,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Spring, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.0799405,"lon":-95.4171601,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Cass County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9398601,"lon":-90.2620042,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Jessup, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1492746,"lon":-76.7752493,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Madison County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8237518,"lon":-82.6915429,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Calhoun County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1733216,"lon":-90.658333,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  2. Aurora, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3175549,"lon":-81.3453858,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. Osseo, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.1194091,"lon":-93.4024532,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Kailua, Hawaii: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.4022222,"lon":-157.7394444,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  5. Erie, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1292241,"lon":-80.085059,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  6. Rochester Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6583661,"lon":-83.1499322,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Wilson County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5808413,"lon":-95.8142885,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Abbott, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.8848809,"lon":-97.0733361,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Accomack County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7063323,"lon":-75.8069082,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Jefferson County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3871722,"lon":-80.7657804,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Carroll County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0385843,"lon":-89.9626799,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. Buchtel, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4620147,"lon":-82.1818141,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. West Homestead, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3939581,"lon":-79.9119946,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Lake County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5964304,"lon":-91.4964639,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Androscoggin County, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1912416,"lon":-70.1707037,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Tuscaloosa, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.2098407,"lon":-87.5691735,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Scott County, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.6834072,"lon":-93.5407909,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Madison County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.436934,"lon":-78.2476146,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  19. Annapolis, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9784453,"lon":-76.4921829,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Franklin, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1823171,"lon":-83.3815429,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Weston, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3490017,"lon":-96.6694368,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Wayne County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1598501,"lon":-82.4752757,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. Lake County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0839644,"lon":-122.8084496,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  4. Vicksburg, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3526456,"lon":-90.877882,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  5. Richmond Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5528288,"lon":-81.5101208,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Adams Center, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8600635,"lon":-76.0054785,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Sanders County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.6109463,"lon":-115.1316944,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  8. Carlisle, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2014771,"lon":-77.1888704,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Ogle County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9969811,"lon":-89.3226954,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Loretto, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0546855,"lon":-93.6355165,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Afton, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7249282,"lon":-110.9318687,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  12. Lancaster, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5920798,"lon":-96.7561082,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  13. Elko, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8324211,"lon":-115.7631232,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  14. Georgetown, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.376834,"lon":-79.2944964,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  15. Hutchins, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.6492999,"lon":-96.7130521,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Washington County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8413319,"lon":-97.179026,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  17. Neenah, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.1858193,"lon":-88.462609,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  18. Greene County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3311215,"lon":-93.5003454,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Monroe County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5508815,"lon":-92.0665197,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Calhoun County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3475302,"lon":-85.1894045,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Webberville, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6669787,"lon":-84.1741305,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  2. Morgan County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.3661344,"lon":-92.8577105,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. Sausalito, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8590937,"lon":-122.4852507,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  4. Alum Rock, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.366111,"lon":-121.826111,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  5. Absecon, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4284503,"lon":-74.4957076,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Knox County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8776411,"lon":-90.2244662,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Washington, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2991837,"lon":-91.6929449,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Grand Prairie, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7459645,"lon":-96.9977846,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Abercrombie, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.4477384,"lon":-96.7303557,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Iowa County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9416737,"lon":-90.0746767,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. San Martin, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.0849464,"lon":-121.6102216,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  12. East Foothills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3810508,"lon":-121.8174533,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  13. Gifford, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.6753089,"lon":-80.4092181,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. East Cleveland, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5331066,"lon":-81.5790137,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. Rosslyn Farms, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4256246,"lon":-80.0939445,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Boyne City, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.2166751,"lon":-85.0139419,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Benton County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.644786,"lon":-87.3413599,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  18. Madison, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2472924,"lon":-79.6772645,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Wyandotte County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0986811,"lon":-94.7691586,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Marathon County, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.850452,"lon":-89.8505012,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  1. Palmdale, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.5794343,"lon":-118.1164613,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. Taylor County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.2455088,"lon":-99.8124935,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. Morgan County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7341219,"lon":-90.2244662,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Calhoun County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.857973,"lon":-81.1196075,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  5. Delaware County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.4263135,"lon":-94.8105955,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Lowell, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9336426,"lon":-85.3419609,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Knox County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6712397,"lon":-97.87216,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  8. Ellis County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.2920072,"lon":-99.8124935,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Gilroy, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.0057816,"lon":-121.5682751,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  10. Maumee, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5628294,"lon":-83.6538244,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Delaware County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2583533,"lon":-85.3962769,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.472467,"lon":-76.129966,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  13. Northampton County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.226762,"lon":-75.9927652,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  14. Adairsville, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3687021,"lon":-84.9341093,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  15. DeSoto, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5898577,"lon":-96.8569451,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  16. Ellis County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8683549,"lon":-99.2785583,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. South Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.588958,"lon":-80.0386522,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  18. Adair, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5005428,"lon":-94.6435862,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Knox County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6665815,"lon":-87.4207518,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Fairfield, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0134066,"lon":-80.0711661,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Fruitdale, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3117785,"lon":-121.9373561,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. Quincy, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2528772,"lon":-71.0022705,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  3. South Yarmouth, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6667779,"lon":-70.1847413,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Monte Sereno, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.236333,"lon":-121.992458,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  5. Williamsport, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2883704,"lon":-87.2938999,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Greene County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.1347943,"lon":-82.820974,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  7. Cedar Hill, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5884689,"lon":-96.9561152,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Wilmer, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5890243,"lon":-96.6852724,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Ovilla, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.5265264,"lon":-96.8863898,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Palm Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.7056206,"lon":-80.0364297,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  11. Linn County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8556605,"lon":-93.1779659,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  12. Gooding County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.9180557,"lon":-114.7494346,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  13. Laurens County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.433014,"lon":-82.9931607,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  14. Miami County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.770099,"lon":-86.0529604,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  15. Perrysburg, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.556996,"lon":-83.627157,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  16. Youngtown, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.5939281,"lon":-112.3029362,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  17. Corcoran, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0952417,"lon":-93.5474577,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Chester, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7842667,"lon":-74.6968284,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  19. Martin County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8733053,"lon":-77.1485163,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Terramuggus, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6350991,"lon":-72.4703638,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  1. Bend, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.0581728,"lon":-121.3153096,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. Seven Trees, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.2860536,"lon":-121.8385638,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  3. Lexington Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.164668,"lon":-121.9730139,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  4. Wyoming County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6339466,"lon":-81.5596427,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  5. Ingham County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6468943,"lon":-84.3542049,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  6. Linn County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0659844,"lon":-91.6760691,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  7. Fulton, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8467082,"lon":-91.9479586,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  8. Columbia, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9176632,"lon":-76.2521521,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  9. Humphreys County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0245773,"lon":-87.7369607,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  10. Alakanuk, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":62.6888889,"lon":-164.6152778,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  11. Acequia, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6679642,"lon":-113.5969537,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  12. Agar, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.8383153,"lon":-100.0745668,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  13. Boyette, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.8383805,"lon":-82.2909146,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  14. Lake County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.981532,"lon":-81.2518833,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  15. Gibson County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.9969735,"lon":-88.864698,"alt":0,"address":"","ic...

  16. Muskegon, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2341813,"lon":-86.2483921,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  17. Washington County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3001466,"lon":-90.9438468,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  18. Rowlett, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.9029017,"lon":-96.56388,"alt":0,"address":"","ico...

  19. Cohocton, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5022907,"lon":-77.5072102,"alt":0,"address":"","i...

  20. Adrian, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.2747775,"lon":-102.6652114,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  1. Los Altos, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lse,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":,"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.3852183,"lon":-122.1141298,"alt":0,"address":"","...

  2. DOE Funds Advanced Magnet Lab and NREL to Develop Next-Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AML's design does not require a gearbox, which may lead to improved reliability and reduced maintenance costs. While this may also be true for contemporary, gearbox-free ...

  3. New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AML's design does not require a gearbox, which may lead to improved reliability and reduced maintenance costs. Although this may also be true for contemporary, gearbox-free ...

  4. ON THE LACK OF TIME DILATION SIGNATURES IN GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We show that the measured durations and associated Esub iso estimates for GRBs detected near the instrument's detection threshold should be considered lower limits to the true ...

  5. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, March 31 2014 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Friday, August 1 2014 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Wednesday, October 1 2014 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Tuesday, September 10 2013 Next Time Items All day All times ICCE 2013: International Conference & Exhibition on Clean Energy 9...

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    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, August 10 2013 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, April 7 2014 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

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    groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, April 28 2014 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

  15. Microsoft Word - JanuaryNews2015.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    only interested in learning more about the true story of Los Alamos' Manhattan Project history, but also about all of the scientific breakthroughs that are happening at the...

  16. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Debug IDs set to "True" ... 51 8 NOMENCLATURE AC alternating current BOM Bill of Materials CSI Customer Support Information DC direct current GMT...

  17. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  18. Search for [C II] emission in z = 6.5-11 star-forming galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzlez-Lpez, Jorge; Infante, Leopoldo; Riechers, Dominik A. E-mail: linfante@astro.puc.cl; and others

    2014-04-01

    We present the search for the [C II] emission line in three z > 6.5 Ly? emitters (LAEs) and one J-dropout galaxy using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. We observed three bright z ? 6.5-7 LAEs discovered in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF) and the multiple imaged lensed z ? 11 galaxy candidate found behind the galaxy cluster MACSJ0647.7+7015. For the LAEs IOK-1 (z = 6.965), SDF J132415.7+273058 (z = 6.541), and SDF J132408.3+271543 (z = 6.554) we find upper limits for the [C II] line luminosity of <2.05, <4.52, and <10.56 10{sup 8} L {sub ?}, respectively. We find upper limits to the far-IR (FIR) luminosity of the galaxies using a spectral energy distribution template of the local galaxy NGC 6946 and taking into account the effects of the cosmic microwave background on the millimeter observations. For IOK-1, SDF J132415.7+273058, and SDF J132408.3+271543 we find upper limits for the FIR luminosity of <2.33, 3.79, and 7.72 10{sup 11} L {sub ?}, respectively. For the lensed galaxy MACS0647-JD, one of the highest-redshift galaxy candidates to date with z{sub ph}=10.7{sub ?0.4}{sup +0.6}, we put an upper limit in the [C II] emission of <1.36 10{sup 8} (?/15){sup 1} L {sub ?} and an upper limit in the FIR luminosity of <6.1 10{sup 10} (?/15){sup 1} L {sub ?} (where ? is the magnification factor). We explore the different conditions relevant for the search for [C II] emission in high-redshift galaxies as well as the difficulties for future observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the Cerro Chajnantor Atacama Telescope (CCAT).

  19. Temperature dependent Raman scattering and far-infrared reflectance spectra of MgO modified Pb{sub 0.99}(Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} ceramics: A composition effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Z. H.; Chang, P.; Hu, Z. G. Chu, J. H.; Wang, J. X.; Wang, G. S.; Dong, X. L.

    2014-09-07

    Lattice dynamics and phase transition of MgO modified Pb{sub 0.99}(Zr{sub 0.95}Ti{sub 0.05}){sub 0.98}Nb{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} (PZTN-x wt. % MgO, x?=?0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5) ceramics have been investigated by far-infrared (FIR) reflectance in the temperature range of 5.5300?K and Raman spectra between 77 and 300?K, respectively. With the aid of above complementary methods, the structure of all ceramics was defined as low-temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral phase [F{sub R(LT)}] at room temperature. The FIR dielectric functions were extracted from the multi-Lorentz oscillator dispersion model. The lowest frequency phonon mode, which is related to Pb-BO{sub 3} (B?=?Zr, Ti, Nb) vibration, mainly dominates the FIR dielectric response. With increasing MgO composition, the dielectric constants ?(0) at room temperature are estimated to 85.4, 73.4, 73.9, and 41.9, respectively. The decreasing trend can be due to the doubly ionized oxygen vacancies induced by Mg substitution for B-site. The order-disorder phase transition located around 120?K can be clearly clarified from temperature evolution of phonon frequency, damping, and intensity. It decreases slightly with increasing MgO composition, which influence the distortion due to the broken correlation chains and local permanent dipoles creation. Moreover, the transformation from antiferroelectric orthorhombic A{sub O} to [ F{sub R(LT)} ] phase has been observed around 250?K, which is associated with the antiferroelectric displacement of Pb atoms along ? 110 ? and coupled rotations of the corner-connected oxygen octahedral. Furthermore, the transition from [ F{sub R(LT)} ] to [ F{sub R(HT)} ] (high-temperature ferroelectric rhombohedral phase) was identified around 290?K for MgO-doped PZTN ceramics. It arises from the shift of cation (Pb and Zr/Ti/Nb/Mg ions) along the ? 111 ? direction and the transition temperature slightly decreases compared to the pure ceramic.

  20. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  1. Femtosecond Electron and Photon Pulses Facility in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimjaem, S.; Thongbai, C.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, N.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M. W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.

    2007-01-19

    Femtosecond electron and photon pulses facility has been established as SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF). Femtosecond electron bunches can be generated from a system consisting of an RF gun with a thermionic cathode, an alpha magnet as an magnetic bunch compressor, and a linear accelerator as a post acceleration section. Femtosecond electron pulses can be used directly or used as a source to produce equally short electromagnetic (EM) radiation pulses via certain kind of radiation production processes. At SURIYA project, we are interested especially in production of radiation in Far-infrared (FIR) regime. At these wavelengths, the radiation from femtosecond electron pulses is emitted coherently resulting in high intensity radiation. Overview of the facility, the generation of femtosecond electron bunches, the theoretical background of coherent transition radiation and the recent experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  2. OBSERVATIONS OF Arp 220 USING HERSCHEL-SPIRE: AN UNPRECEDENTED VIEW OF THE MOLECULAR GAS IN AN EXTREME STAR FORMATION ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangwala, Naseem; Maloney, Philip R.; Glenn, Jason; Kamenetzky, Julia; Wilson, Christine D.; Mentuch, Erin; Schirm, Maximilien R. P.; Rykala, Adam; Isaak, Kate; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Boselli, Alessandro; Bradford, Charles M.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, Asantha; Fulton, Trevor; Imhof, Peter; Madden, Suzanne C.; Sauvage, Marc; and others

    2011-12-10

    We present Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver Fourier Transform Spectrometer (Herschel SPIRE-FTS) observations of Arp 220, a nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy. The FTS provides continuous spectral coverage from 190 to 670 {mu}m, a wavelength region that is either very difficult to observe or completely inaccessible from the ground. The spectrum provides a good measurement of the continuum and detection of several molecular and atomic species. We detect luminous CO (J = 4-3 to 13-12) and water rotational transitions with comparable total luminosity {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} L{sub Sun }; very high-J transitions of HCN (J = 12-11 to 17-16) in absorption; strong absorption features of rare species such as OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and HF; and atomic lines of [C I] and [N II]. The modeling of the continuum shows that the dust is warm, with T = 66 K, and has an unusually large optical depth, with {tau}{sub dust} {approx} 5 at 100 {mu}m. The total far-infrared luminosity of Arp 220 is L{sub FIR} {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun }. Non-LTE modeling of the extinction corrected CO rotational transitions shows that the spectral line energy distribution of CO is fit well by two temperature components: cold molecular gas at T {approx} 50 K and warm molecular gas at T {approx} 1350{sup +280}{sub -100} K (the inferred temperatures are much lower if CO line fluxes are not corrected for dust extinction). These two components are not in pressure equilibrium. The mass of the warm gas is 10% of the cold gas, but it dominates the CO luminosity. The ratio of total CO luminosity to the total FIR luminosity is L{sub CO}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -4} (the most luminous lines, such as J = 6-5, have L{sub CO,J=6-5}/L{sub FIR} {approx} 10{sup -5}). The temperature of the warm gas is in excellent agreement with the observations of H{sub 2} rotational lines. At 1350 K, H{sub 2} dominates the cooling ({approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }) in the interstellar medium compared to CO ({approx}0.4 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }). We have ruled out photodissociation regions, X-ray-dominated regions, and cosmic rays as likely sources of excitation of this warm molecular gas, and found that only a non-ionizing source can heat this gas; the mechanical energy from supernovae and stellar winds is able to satisfy the large energy budget of {approx}20 L{sub Sun} M{sup -1}{sub Sun }. Analysis of the very high-J lines of HCN strongly indicates that they are solely populated by infrared pumping of photons at 14 {mu}m. This mechanism requires an intense radiation field with T > 350 K. We detect a massive molecular outflow in Arp 220 from the analysis of strong P Cygni line profiles observed in OH{sup +}, H{sub 2}O{sup +}, and H{sub 2}O. The outflow has a mass {approx}> 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun} and is bound to the nuclei with velocity {approx}< 250 km s{sup -1}. The large column densities observed for these molecular ions strongly favor the existence of an X-ray luminous AGN (10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in Arp 220.

  3. INEEL BNCT Research Program Annual Report, CY-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2001-03-01

    This report is a summary of the activities conducted in conjunction with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 2000. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, neutron source design and demonstration, and support the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National BNCT Program goals are the goals of this Program. Contributions from the individual contributors about their projects are included, specifically described are the following, chemistry: analysis of biological samples and an infrared blood-boron analyzer, and physics: progress in the patient treatment planning software, measurement of neutron spectra for the Argentina RA-6 reactor, and recalculation of the Finnish research reactor FiR 1 neutron spectra, BNCT accelerator technology, and modification to the research reactor at Washington State University for an epithermal-neutron beam.

  4. imageApps Package v 4.8

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-12-11

    The imageApps package provides a number of image processing modules that are compatible with the Umbra/Camera package. Each module works with an connector and generally generates an output image. Modules include the following: imageBlobber: Rapid image segmentation into color blob regions. imageSegmenter: Another image segmentation module. imageAverage: A simple FIR image filter. imageMovingAverage: A simple IIR image filter. imageColorGrid: Used for tracking calibration color blobs. imageCrop: Simple cropping function. imageDifference: Used for detecting motion inmore » image objects. imageSnake: Incorporates the (patent pending) polygon snake algorithm developed under the LDRD. camcal: A calibration module for performing visual targeting (originally developed under Automated Visual Direction LDRD)« less

  5. Caltech Campus Map and Directory 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O I INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O LIG O LIG O S AN PAS QUAL S T. HOLLIS TON AVE . HILL AVE . C ALIFOR NIA B LVD. DE L MAR B LVD. WILS ON AVE . C ATALINA AVE . S AN PAS QUAL S T. C HE S TE R AVE . MIC HIG AN AVE . A R D E N R D . S AN PAS QUAL S HOLLIS TON AVE . S S C a m p u s D i r e c to r y M a p A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 MOOR E AVE R Y FINANC IAL PAS ADE NA FIR E S TATION # 34 IMS S B E C KMAN AUD B AXTE R KE C K S E R VIC E S WATSON C E S H R STEELE LAB

  6. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  7. LIQUID PROPANE GAS (LPG) STORAGE AREA BOILING LIQUID EXPANDING VAPOR EXPLOSION (BLEVE) ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACE, M.E.

    2004-01-13

    The PHA and the FHAs for the SWOC MDSA (HNF-14741) identified multiple accident scenarios in which vehicles powered by flammable gases (e.g., propane), or combustible or flammable liquids (e.g., gasoline, LPG) are involved in accidents that result in an unconfined vapor cloud explosion (UVCE) or in a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion (BLEVE), respectively. These accident scenarios are binned in the Bridge document as FIR-9 scenarios. They are postulated to occur in any of the MDSA facilities. The LPG storage area will be in the southeast corner of CWC that is relatively remote from store distaged MAR. The location is approximately 30 feet south of MO-289 and 250 feet east of 2401-W by CWC Gate 10 in a large staging area for unused pallets and equipment.

  8. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory * Est. 1943 The Pulse-Newsletter of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center and Accelerator Operations and Technology Division I N S I D E 2 Tajima receives DOe early career awarD 2 NeuTrON reflec- TOmeTry prOviDes firsT sub-NaNOmeTer visualizaTiON Of live cell aDhesiON 3 creaTiNg a high- efficieNcy cOmpacT iON acceleraTOr, aN alTerNaTive TO larger, mOre cOsTly sTruc- Tures 4 heaDs up! LANSCE beam reliability achieves "world class" ranking AOT has issued

  9. Triple effect absorption chiller utilizing two refrigeration circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVault, R.C.

    1988-03-22

    This patent describes a heat absorption method for an absorption chiller. It comprises: providing a firs absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range, providing a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range; heat exchanging refrigerant and absorber solution; thermal communication with an external heat load. This patent describes a heat absorption apparatus for use as an absorption chiller. It includes: a first absorption system circuit for operation within a first temperature range; a second absorption system circuit for operation within a second temperature range which has a lower maximum temperature relative to the first temperature range; the first circuit having generator means, condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operatively connected together; the second circuit having generator means condenser means, evaporator means, and absorber means operative connected together; and the first circuit condenser means and the first circuit absorber means being in heat exchange communication with the second circuit generator means.

  10. V, Ii. Pat-SC&~, Ciructor, Elvision of Techdcal Jkitiseru

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    V, Ii. Pat-SC&~, Ciructor, Elvision of Techdcal Jkitiseru I?. J. !%.Ltl2, Jr., chief, 5isC81bleDU3 Cperstions jw;ta, Prodcc' s.on Giviaion S-A-fiCi : PC: 3JS:?dl please '& advised that zrrangezkenta ?a-Je hem mde M.ti All.e~~ny ~~IWZI ta roll a% *Qdr %tcrylLct, 3. Y. plant on tkx3 firsC, xeclr4z.i of ZY&I m .nLh, %I=& shro*sgh June 1352, and -nil& !Sethlehe:a Stotl to roll at +,hai.r T~ckaxinna, 3. Y. plan% on the second n;ze:tznd of tk23 -IFx-xlth. 3: aould suaost, hcesvcr,

  11. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , . d Sepmber 20, 1976 . e E. K. Limp, Chfdf, Process Facilities Safety liranch, ~%&iCj kP3RT uF FlhimiiS : &TECH SPECSALlY S-EL Cuwr)wTIa:i On huyusf 19, 1976, Fred F, Ha_ytaod, DRdL, and I visttdd be A?j-TzcILi - planf in ' dardrvlltit, ;ic# YorX, to i3ake a orelir;linary assczimx~f of tile radIo?ocjical status of facilities ut47fzad durfnb3 lW-51 for X': contract mrk f WI 1 vi n.; urd a. GcLwter, Ham r4tina+r, ;iismssicms warz &id ' cliL1 :Ir. tionalj fir. Ted Ckx, mo Has fmf 1

  12. StPln-5;.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3, z biuatL66ed Ywmb Dr, wipe *1&w af um the kbnd teobnalog ai llww lmmb unmr 8laterws. ,'T$$s tbkirablsr: fir, v'bw of' tb 3'm-t that ma II;FO &mn~ a&d Feraarohba cl& mlxub ri lsamv l&&hmdale 2n th@ n th#atar. ' ( \ and lsaw~*~falrPbttifusuaxrlPacrbare af vfdJ2wa gm&3le l&m 8tnaCfwtrcl~ ww% fss%ewf, Thww tat0 * $h&ylit3*Jey* oh6 QXPdtm of thclk qt&M%htta~* 'a6 ~lldl a* 'the ~~~~~~1~~* odblte %a T#twllua uk&bll) 8wcI 2s ami m. The [Al&J& z*wgll

  13. RESOLVING THE RADIO SOURCE BACKGROUND: DEEPER UNDERSTANDING THROUGH CONFUSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condon, J. J.; Cotton, W. D.; Fomalont, E. B.; Kellermann, K. I.; Miller, N.; Perley, R. A.; Scott, D.; Vernstrom, T.; Wall, J. V.

    2012-10-10

    We used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to image one primary beam area at 3 GHz with 8'' FWHM resolution and 1.0 {mu}Jy beam{sup -1} rms noise near the pointing center. The P(D) distribution from the central 10 arcmin of this confusion-limited image constrains the count of discrete sources in the 1 < S({mu}Jy) < 10 range. At this level, the brightness-weighted differential count S {sup 2} n(S) is converging rapidly, as predicted by evolutionary models in which the faintest radio sources are star-forming galaxies; and Almost-Equal-To 96% of the background originating in galaxies has been resolved into discrete sources. About 63% of the radio background is produced by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the remaining 37% comes from star-forming galaxies that obey the far-infrared (FIR)/radio correlation and account for most of the FIR background at {lambda} Almost-Equal-To 160 {mu}m. Our new data confirm that radio sources powered by AGNs and star formation evolve at about the same rate, a result consistent with AGN feedback and the rough correlation of black hole and stellar masses. The confusion at centimeter wavelengths is low enough that neither the planned Square Kilometre Array nor its pathfinder ASKAP EMU survey should be confusion limited, and the ultimate source detection limit imposed by 'natural' confusion is {<=}0.01 {mu}Jy at {nu} = 1.4 GHz. If discrete sources dominate the bright extragalactic background reported by ARCADE 2 at 3.3 GHz, they cannot be located in or near galaxies and most are {<=}0.03 {mu}Jy at 1.4 GHz.

  14. What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    that you have included in your complaint are true and correct to the best of your knowledge and belief; and An affirmation, as described in Sec. 708.13 of this subpart, that...

  15. MHK Projects/Makai Ocean Energy Research Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Details Makai Ocean Engineering has designed, owns, and operates a closed-cycle OTEC system in Kailua-Kona Hawaii. True deep cold seawater is drawn from a depth of about...

  16. DOE Reaches Settlements with Three Commercial Refrigeration Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    paid a civil penalty of 1,600 after manufacturing and distributing 8 units of commercial refrigerator-freezer model RFS-1D-S1-EW-PT-HD. True agreed to a 36,400 civil penalty ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Major technical products from the proposal include: 1) A true-3D hydro-thermal ... with our program manager, the research of this grant was refocused to study the ...

  18. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Quadrant Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Quadrant moved ducts and high efficiency furnace inside conditioned space on nearly all 300 customizable house plans. The builder uses dry, true factory-assembled walls, extensive air sealing, and just in time delivery for pre-sold homes.

  19. Microsoft Word - SCV13 0001_Response.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost Verification for FY 2013 Slice True-Up Adjustment Charge comment SCV13 0001 - HunterSnohomish PUD Please find below Snohomish PUD's comments regarding potential items for...

  20. DOE Publishes Technical Brief Clarifying Misconceptions about Safety of LED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The spectral emission of LEDs is a frequent subject of concern, so to set the record straight, the U.S. Department of Energy has published a technical brief entitled True Colors: LEDs and the...

  1. Y-12, submarines, work for others and AVLIS ? Reader response...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gained from people who actually did the work are extremely valuable in capturing the true history of the times. She lived through the events and has a great recall of the people...

  2. Energy blogs | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy blogs Home > Community Filter Search Author Enter a comma separated list of user names. Tags My groups True False Apply Kmorales City of McPherson, Kansas, Board of...

  3. Energy Secretary Bodman Kicks Off "Energizing America for Energy Security" Tour with Visit to Habitat for Humanity "Net-Zero Energy Home"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WHEAT RIDGE, COLORADO - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today kicked off the "Energizing America for Energy Security" Tour with a visit to Habitat for Humanity's first "true net-zero energy...

  4. DOE Releases New Report on Benefits of Recovery Act for Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Solazyme Inc., a San Francisco-based company, is a true start-up success story. Founded in 2003 by a scientist and entrepreneur that were among the first people to focus on algae ...

  5. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 SECTION L ATTACHMENT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION L ATTACHMENT H LETTER OF COMMITMENT I, INSERT NAME, hereby certify that the resume submitted with this letter is true and correct. I agree to accept the position of ...

  6. Widget:FlashDetect | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FlashDetect Jump to: navigation, search This widget sets the wgFlashEnabled javascript variable as true and adds the class "flash" to the body tag if Flash is detected using...

  7. ARM - Education Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the null hypothesis and the alternate hypothesis should be mutually exclusive. In other words, if one is true, then the other one should be false. The null hypothesis is the one...

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Establishing the True Nature of Cloud Overlap with ARM Data Di Girolamo, L.(a), Astin, I.(b), and McFarquhar, G.M.(a), University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (a), University of...

  9. Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the true flux of hydrothermal gases may affect the results of geochemical modeling of gas dispersion in the near-surface environment.3 References 1.0 1.1 Measuring...

  10. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, April 30 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada...

  11. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 22 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 22 23 24 25 26 27 28...

  12. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 15 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 15 16 17 18 19 20 21...

  13. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, April 27 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada...

  14. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 29 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 29 30 1 2 3 4 5...

  15. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, May 2 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada...

  16. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 1 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  17. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of May 4 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 4 5 6 7 8 9 10...

  18. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of April 27 2015 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 27 28 29 30 1 2 3...

  19. August 2012 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    was the path of the light circuit as depicted on the site map. The locate did give a true signal of depth and variance of an underground utility. When the excavation, which was...

  20. PROMPT X-RAY AND OPTICAL EXCESS EMISSION DUE TO HADRONIC CASCADES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    keV that exceed simple extrapolations of the low-energy power-law portion of the Band spectral model. This is also true for the prompt optical emission observed in several bursts. ...

  1. OpenCL_hands_on_intro_sc14_final_no_zoo_slides.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    code cl::Program program(context, KernelSource, true); Example: vector addition * The "hello world" program of data parallel programming is a program to add two vectors Ci ...

  2. PySKI: THE PYTHON SPARSE KERNEL INTERFACE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    code cl::Program program(context, KernelSource, true); Example: vector addition * The "hello world" program of data parallel programming is a program to add two vectors Ci ...

  3. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (IR s-SNOM) and an older tried-and-true technique called Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). A melding of these two tools, combined with the intense infrared...

  4. High Performance Builder Spotlight: G.W. Robinson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-01

    G.W. Robinson of Gainesville, Florida, worked with Building America partners Florida Solar Energy Center and Florida HERO to achieve a true net zero energy home in 2010.

  5. GE MEMS for LTE Advanced Mobile Devices | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEMS Switch Technology Demonstrates Performance Which Could Meet Demands for Next-Generation "True 4G" Mobile Devices Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on...

  6. Fermilab Today

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    imaging surveys in this decade's hot competition to uncover the true nature of the dark side of our Universe. Read more Tip of the Week: Safety Summer dangers at the...

  7. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    rigs doing true workovers (where tubing is pulled from the well), or doing rod string and pump repair operations, and that are, on average, crewed and working every day of the...

  8. Barr Engineering Statement of Methodology Rosemount Wind Turbine Simulations by Truescape Visual Reality, DOE/EA-1791 (May 2010)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Barr Engineering, Minneapolis engaged Truescape in May 2010 to: 1) Provide a series of TrueViewTM2 “human field of view” survey controlled photo simulations from pre-determined viewpoint locations...

  9. PBL FY 2002 Second Quarter Review Forecast of Generation Accumulated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slice true-ups, and actual expense levels. Any variation of these can change the net revenue situation. FY 2002 Forecasted Second Quarter Results 170 (418) FY 2002 Unaudited...

  10. Methods for consistent forewarning of critical events across multiple data channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hively, Lee M.

    2006-11-21

    This invention teaches further method improvements to forewarn of critical events via phase-space dissimilarity analysis of data from biomedical equipment, mechanical devices, and other physical processes. One improvement involves conversion of time-serial data into equiprobable symbols. A second improvement is a method to maximize the channel-consistent total-true rate of forewarning from a plurality of data channels over multiple data sets from the same patient or process. This total-true rate requires resolution of the forewarning indications into true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. A third improvement is the use of various objective functions, as derived from the phase-space dissimilarity measures, to give the best forewarning indication. A fourth improvement uses various search strategies over the phase-space analysis parameters to maximize said objective functions. A fifth improvement shows the usefulness of the method for various biomedical and machine applications.

  11. Haiti: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lack of investment in the energy infrastructure, caused in part by the fact that prices are artificially held below the true cost of production and delivery. Power supply is...

  12. High throughput lessons from the LHC experience.Johnston.TNC2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This is true for the two largest experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN - ATLAS and CMS - and for the climate science community. In the near future, experiments ...

  13. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a true Carolina bay. Historically, Steel Creek Bay was selected for aquatic ecology research because it is bay-like in hydrology and function and it represented a...

  14. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of August 12 2013 Next Time Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday All day 12 13...

  15. OpenCL_hands_on_intro_sc14_final_no_zoo_slides.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KernelSource, true); Example: vector addition * The "hello world" program of data parallel programming is a program to add two vectors Ci Ai + Bi for i0 to N-1 * For...

  16. Y-12 and the National Park Service study, part

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beta 3 Calutrons and Building 9731, the Graphite Reactor, K-25 and the city's historic Jackson Square) seemed to cause them to realize, maybe for the first time, the true...

  17. New ALS Technique Gives Nanoscale Views of Complex Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a newer technique called infrared scattering-scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM) and an older tried-and-true technique called Fourier transform infrared...

  18. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    still remain true, even if at first glance it appears that high prices are having no impact. Undoubtedly, recent changes in gasoline markets, such as the rapid phase-out of...

  19. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, August 17 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  20. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, May 2 2013 Next Time Items All day 11:00 Transportation Energy Futures Study: The Key Results and Conclusions...

  1. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, August 29 2013 Next Time Items All day All times Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...

  2. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Friday, August 16 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  3. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, July 28 2014 Next Time Items All day 09:00 Solar Federal Roadmapping Meeting 28 Jul 2014 - 09:00 - 16:00 Syndicate...

  4. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Thursday, August 15 2013 Next Time Items All day 13:00 DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013 -...

  5. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Tuesday, September 3 2013 Next Time Items All day All times Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...

  6. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Saturday, August 31 2013 Next Time Items All day All times Portland General Electic RFP--deadline for intent to bid September...

  7. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Sunday, August 18 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  8. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Wednesday, August 7 2013 Next Time Items All day All times WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT 6 Aug 2013 -...

  9. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Tuesday, July 29 2014 Next Time Items All day 09:00 Regulatory Roadmap Workshop for Federal Bulk Transmission Regulations 29...

  10. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, August 19 2013 Next Time Items All day All times DLA Energy RFP - Deadline: August 19, 2013 - 12:00pm EST 15 Aug 2013...

  11. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Monday, May 4 2015 Next Items Syndicate content Create content Recently added events Mar 24 2015 Nevada Solar...

  12. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Friday, August 9 2013 Next Time Items All day All times WAPA REC RFP - Deadline: August 9, 2013 - 4:30 p.m. PT 6 Aug 2013 -...

  13. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    names. Tags My groups True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev Week of June 23 2014 Next Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 23 24 25 26 27 28...

  14. CMI in the News | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the News Geochemical Society: Alexandra Navrotsky named 2016 V.M. Goldschmidt medalist Phys.org: How true is conventional wisdom about price volatility of tech metals? U.S. Government Accountability Office: Rare Earth Materials: Developing a Comprehensive Approach Could Help DOD Better Manage National Security Risks in the Supply Chain The Ames Laboratory: How true is conventional wisdom about price volatility of tech metals? U.S. Senate Energy & Natural Resources Committee: Hearing to

  15. PNNL Stress/Strain Correlation for Zircaloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geelhood, Kenneth J.; Beyer, Carl E.; Luscher, Walter G.

    2008-07-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked with incorporating cladding mechanical property data into the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) fuel codes, FRAPCON-31 and FRAPTRAN2, by the NRC Office of Nuclear Reactor Research. The objective of that task was to create a mechanical model that can calculate true stress, true strain, and the possible failure of the fuel rod cladding based on uniaxial test data.

  16. LIDAR Wind Speed Measurement Analysis and Feed-Forward Blade Pitch Control for Load Mitigation in Wind Turbines: January 2010--January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunne, F.; Simley, E.; Pao, L.Y.

    2011-10-01

    This report examines the accuracy of measurements that rely on Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to wind turbine feed-forward control systems and discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feed-forward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. The first half of this report examines the accuracy of different measurement scenarios that rely on coherent continuous-wave or pulsed Doppler LIDAR systems to determine their applicability to feed-forward control. In particular, the impacts of measurement range and angular offset from the wind direction are studied for various wind conditions. A realistic case involving a scanning LIDAR unit mounted in the spinner of a wind turbine is studied in depth with emphasis on choices for scan radius and preview distance. The effects of turbulence parameters on measurement accuracy are studied as well. Continuous-wave and pulsed LIDAR models based on typical commercially available units were used in the studies present in this report. The second half of this report discusses feed-forward control system designs that use preview wind measurements. Combined feedback/feed-forward blade pitch control is compared to industry standard feedback control when simulated in realistic turbulent above-rated winds. The feed-forward controllers are designed to reduce fatigue loads, increasing turbine lifetime and therefore reducing the cost of energy. Three feed-forward designs are studied: non-causal series expansion, Preview Control, and optimized FIR filter. The input to the feed-forward controller is a measurement of incoming wind speeds that could be provided by LIDAR. Non-causal series expansion and Preview Control methods reduce blade root loads but increase tower bending in simulation results. The optimized FIR filter reduces loads overall, keeps pitch rates low, and maintains rotor speed regulation and power capture, while using imperfect wind measurements provided by the spinning continuous-wave LIDAR model.

  17. On the future of BNL user facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi, I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to portray the emerging technology of high-power high-brightness electron beams. This new technology will impact several fields of science and it is essential that BNL stay abreast of the development. BNL has a relative advantage and vital interest in pursuing this technology that will impact its two major facilities, the NSLS and RHIC. We have a sensible development path towards this critical future technology, in which BNL will gradually acquire a strong basis of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) technology while executing useful projects. The technology of high-power AND high-brightness (HPHB) electron beams is based of the convergence of two extant, but relatively recent technologies: Photoinjectors and superconducting energy-recovering linacs. The HPHB technology presents special opportunities for the development of future BNL user facilities for High-Energy and Nuclear Science (HE-NP) and Basic Energy Science (BES). In HE-NP this technology makes it possible to build high-energy electron cooling for RHIC in the short range and a unique linac-based electron-ion collider (eRHIC). In BES, we can build short pulse, coherent FIR sources and high flux femtosecond hard x-ray sources based on Compton scattering in the short range and, in the longer range, femtosecond, ultra-high brightness synchrotron light sources and, ultimately, an X-ray Free-Electron Laser (FEL).

  18. Compact, Low-power and Precision Timing Photodetector Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varner, Gary S.; Ruckman, Larry L.; Schwiening, Jochen; Vavra, Jaroslav; /SLAC

    2011-06-14

    Photodetector readout for next generation high event rate particle identification and single-photon detection requires a digitizer capable of integrated recording of dense arrays of sensor elements with high analog bandwidth (precision timing) and large record depth, in a cost-effective, compact and low-power way. Simply stated, one cannot do better than having a high-fidelity 'oscilloscope on a chip' for every sensor channel. A firs version of the Buffered Large Analog Bandwidth (BLAB1) ASIC has been designed based upon the lessons learned from the development of the Large Analog Bandwidth Recorder and Digitizer with Ordered Readout (LABRADOR) ASIC. While this LABRADOR ASIC has been very successful and forms the readout basis of a generation of new, large-scale radio neutrino detectors, its limited sampling depth is a major drawback. To address this shortcoming, a prototype intended for photodetector readout has been designed and fabricated with 64k deep sampling at multi-GSa/s operation. An evaluation system has been constructed for instrumentation of Time-Of-Propagation (TOP) and focusing DIRC prototypes and test results will be reported.

  19. Direct detector for terahertz radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM); Shaner, Eric A. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA)

    2008-09-02

    A direct detector for terahertz radiation comprises a grating-gated field-effect transistor with one or more quantum wells that provide a two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region. The grating gate can be a split-grating gate having at least one finger that can be individually biased. Biasing an individual finger of the split-grating gate to near pinch-off greatly increases the detector's resonant response magnitude over prior QW FET detectors while maintaining frequency selectivity. The split-grating-gated QW FET shows a tunable resonant plasmon response to FIR radiation that makes possible an electrically sweepable spectrometer-on-a-chip with no moving mechanical optical parts. Further, the narrow spectral response and signal-to-noise are adequate for use of the split-grating-gated QW FET in a passive, multispectral terahertz imaging system. The detector can be operated in a photoconductive or a photovoltaic mode. Other embodiments include uniform front and back gates to independently vary the carrier densities in the channel region, a thinned substrate to increase bolometric responsivity, and a resistive shunt to connect the fingers of the grating gate in parallel and provide a uniform gate-channel voltage along the length of the channel to increase the responsivity and improve the spectral resolution.

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF NOVEL LOW-NOx BURNERS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cygan, David

    2006-12-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI), together with Hamworthy Peabody Combustion Incorporated (formerly Peabody Engineering Corporation), the University of Utah, and Far West Electrochemical have developed and demonstrated an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas and coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The combustion system is a simple, low-cost, energy-efficient burner that can reduce NOx by more than 75%. The U.S. steel industry needs to address NOx control at its steelmaking facilities. A significant part of NOx emissions comes from gas-fired boilers. In steel plants, byproduct gases blast furnace gas (BFG) and coke-oven gas (COG) are widely used together with natural gas to fire furnaces and boilers. In steel plants, natural gas can be fired together with BFG and COG, but, typically, the addition of natural gas raises NOx emissions, which can already be high because of residual fuel-bound nitrogen in COG. The Project Team has applied its expertise in low-NOx burners to lower NOx levels for these applications by combining advanced burner geometry and combustion staging with control strategies tailored to mixtures of natural gas and byproduct fuel gases. These methods reduce all varieties of NOx thermal NOx produced by high flame temperatures, prompt NOx produced by complex chain reactions involving radical hydrocarbon species and NOx from fuel-bound nitrogen compounds such as ammonia found in COG. The Project Team has expanded GTIs highly successful low-NOx forced internal recirculation (FIR) burner, previously developed for natural gas-fired boilers, into facilities that utilize BFG and COG. For natural gas firing, these burners have been shown to reduce NOx emissions from typical uncontrolled levels of 80-100 vppm to single-digit levels (9 vppm). This is done without the energy efficiency penalties incurred by alternative NOx control methods, such as external flue gas recirculation (FGR), water injection, and selective non-catalytic reduction. The FIR burner was previously demonstrated on firetube and watertube boilers, and these units are still operating at several industrial and commercial boiler sites in sizes ranging from 2.5 to 60 million Btu/h. This report covers the development of an innovative combustion system suitable for natural gas or coke-oven gas firing within the steel industry. The prototype FIR burner was evaluated on a 20 million Btu/h watertube boiler. Acceptable burner performance was obtained when firing natural gas and simulated coke-oven gas doped with ammonia. The laboratory data reveals a direct relationship between NOx formation and the ammonia concentration in the fuel. In addition, NOx formation increases as the primary stoichiometric ratio (PSR) increases. Representative ammonia concentrations, as documented in the steel industry, ranged from 200 to 500 vppm. When the laboratory burner/boiler was operated with 500 vppm ammonia in the fuel, NOx emissions ranged from 50 to 75 vppm. This, conservatively, is 75% less than state-of-the-art burner performance. When the burner is operated with 200 vppm ammonia in the fuel, the corresponding NOx emissions would range from 30 to 45 vppm, 84% less than present burner technology. During field evaluation on a 174 million Btu/h industrial prototype burner both natural gas and actual COG from on-site generation were tested. Despite the elevated hydrogen cyanide and ammonia content in the COG throughout the test program, the FIR burner showed an improvement over baseline emissions. At full load; 167 million Btu/h, NOx emissions were relatively low at 169 vppm. This represents a 30% reduction compared to baseline emissions not accounting for the higher hydrogen cyanide content in the COG. CO emissions remained below 20 vppm and were stable across the firing range. This represents a 68% reduction compared to baseline CO emissions. When firing natural gas, emissions were stable as firing rate increased over the range. At low fire; 45 million Btu/h, NOx emissions where 33 vppm and increased at full load; 144 million Btu

  1. Scaling to Nanotechnology Limits with the PIMS Computer Architecture and a new Scaling Rule.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debenedictis, Erik

    2015-02-01

    We describe a new approach to computing that moves towards the limits of nanotechnology using a newly formulated sc aling rule. This is in contrast to the current computer industry scali ng away from von Neumann's original computer at the rate of Moore's Law. We extend Moore's Law to 3D, which l eads generally to architectures that integrate logic and memory. To keep pow er dissipation cons tant through a 2D surface of the 3D structure requires using adiabatic principles. We call our newly proposed architecture Processor In Memory and Storage (PIMS). We propose a new computational model that integrates processing and memory into "tiles" that comprise logic, memory/storage, and communications functions. Since the programming model will be relatively stable as a system scales, programs repr esented by tiles could be executed in a PIMS system built with today's technology or could become the "schematic diagram" for implementation in an ultimate 3D nanotechnology of the future. We build a systems software approach that offers advantages over and above the technological and arch itectural advantages. Firs t, the algorithms may be more efficient in the conventional sens e of having fewer steps. Second, the algorithms may run with higher power efficiency per operation by being a better match for the adiabatic scaling ru le. The performance analysis based on demonstrated ideas in physical science suggests 80,000 x improvement in cost per operation for the (arguably) gene ral purpose function of emulating neurons in Deep Learning.

  2. Dual nozzle single pump fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, C.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes an improvement in a fuel injection system in a stratified charge hybrid internal combustion engine including a main combustion chamber, a precombustion chamber connected with the main chamber, fuel injectors in the main combustion chamber and precombustion chamber which open at higher and lower pressure levels respectively to sequentially inject fuel into the prechamber and the main chamber, timed spark ignition means in the prechamber for ignition of the fuel-air mixture therein, and an engine driven and timed fuel injection pump having a variable output capacity that varies with power level position, the injection pump is supplied by a low pressure charging pump. The improvement comprises: a shuttle valve including a bore therein; a shuttle spool means positioned within the bore defining a prechamber supply chamber on one side thereof and a spool activation chamber on the opposite side thereof the spool means having a first and second position; biasing means urging the spool towards it first position with the spool actuation chamber at its minimum volume; first conduit means connecting charging pressure to the prechamber supply camber in the first position oil the spool means; second conduit means connecting the injection pump to spool actuation chamber; third conduit means connecting the spool actuating chamber with the main injector; forth conduit means connecting the prechamber supply chamber with the prechamber injector; the initial charge from the injection pump actuates the spool means from its fir to its second position.

  3. It's No Secret: Fifty-eight Years of National Security Programs at BNL (463rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indusi, Joseph

    2010-11-17

    Prepare for a true tale of suspense and international intrigue. A tale that began in 1952, continued through the Cold War, and is not yet complete today. A tale of unexpected allies. Hear the true tale of one Laboratory’s efforts to keep nuclear materials out of the hands of evildoers. Freidlander. Higinbotham. Dodson. Kouts. And many more! See some of BNL’s all-star cast in the defining roles that shaped their careers as they worked toward keeping the nation and the world safe from the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

  4. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Length of Particle Accelerators I have six questions. 1. How long is a particle accelerator? 2. Is it true that there are weapons 40 times stronger than the fatman and little boy atomic bombs used in World War II? 3. What does E=mc2 mean? 4. Does electricity in general move at the speed of light? How was fusion discovered? 5. Is it true that the sun is a ball of hydrogen that is in a fusion chain reaction? 6. How can you become a scientific worker at Fermilab? Dear Mr. Bond, I am glad you are

  5. Important communication talk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fermilab P. Oddone Tevatron Symposium June 11, 2012 It is the best of times! 2 "The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science" The sense mystery has never been greater! The sense of mystery.... Why are we not a soup of red photons? How do elementary particles get their mass? Do all forces unify? The sense of mystery.... 4 M ν What is dark matter? See-saw Why are neutrinos so light?

  6. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Artistic Homes, Albuquerque, NM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Artistic Homes of Albuquerque was the first production home builder in the United States to offer a true net-zero upgrade option on all of its homes. According to co-owner Tom Wade, in 2010, 45% of the homes Artistic sold were built to near or at true zero net energy (with HERS scores of under 5). Artistic's standard home averaged a low HERS score of 51. "Zero energy was not much harder than what we were already doing. When we sat down with our subs and told them our goals, they got excited

  7. Biomedical nuclear and X-ray imager using high-energy grazing incidence mirrors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Craig, William W.; Hasegawa, Bruce; Pivovaroff, Michael J.

    2005-09-27

    Imaging of radiation sources located in a subject is explored for medical applications. The approach involves using grazing-incidence optics to form images of the location of radiopharmaceuticals administered to a subject. The optics are "true focusing" optics, meaning that they project a real and inverted image of the radiation source onto a detector possessing spatial and energy resolution.

  8. Survey Administration Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-02-12

    This software allows a student/user at some point during the flow of content on a web page to input comments and rate the content with things such as: 1) True false 2) Text Comments 3) Ratings 1-5 4) etc. This information is stored anonymously in the database and can be retrieved and reported on.

  9. The Origins of Mass

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-08-07

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  10. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine E-mail: rua@cbpf.br

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  11. The Origins of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-07-30

    The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

  12. Applying vitrification to meet customers` values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, B. [Scientific Ecology Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Cost-effective waste management solutions that maximize customer value require a thorough and flexible evaluation and integration of approaches, technology applications, and disposal options. This is particulary true in the application of vitrification to low-level radioactive and mixed waste stabilization. Case-specific evaluations are the required to determine the highest value, most cost-effective approaches.

  13. Flowing effects in gas lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhi, G.

    1984-05-01

    Currently accepted theory states that saturation intensity and gain (or optical power density) increase without limit with the increase of the flow speed. These conclusions are not true. It is shown instead that they tend to be limiting values with the increase of flow speed. The variations of the parameters mentioned above with flow speed are presented.

  14. AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ____________________________________________ AFFIDAVIT FOR SURVIVING RELATIVE STATE_________________ ] ] SS: _________________________ COUNTY OF____________] That I, _________________________________ , am the *_____________________ of ____________________________________ who is deceased and make the attached request pursuant to 10 C.F.R., Section 1008. That the information contained on the attached request is true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief, and I am signing this

  15. Application of coherent 10 micron imaging lidar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, M.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Richards, R.K.; Bennett, C.A.

    1997-04-01

    With the continuing progress in mid-IR array detector technology and high bandwidth fan-outs, i.f. electronics, high speed digitizers, and processing capability, true coherent imaging lidar is becoming a reality. In this paper experimental results are described using a 10 micron coherent imaging lidar.

  16. San Juan Fracture Characterization Project: Status and current results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majer, E.L.; Daley, T.M.; Myer, L.R.; Nihei, K.; Queen, J.; Sinton, J.; Murphy, J.; Fortuna, M.; Lynn, H.B.; Imhoff, M.A.; Wilson, R.

    2001-02-26

    The overall objectives of this report are to extend current state-of-the-art 3-D imaging to extract the optimal information for fracture quantification and to develop next generation capability in fracture imaging for true 3-D imaging of the static and dynamic fracture properties.

  17. High Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Technology (HIT) Catalyst Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL Commercial Buildings Integration Building Technologies Office 2 How can we catalyze the adoption of high impact commercial building technologies? Occupants Financial Institutions Government Utilities Scientists Manufacturers Dealers Suppliers Owners Stakeholder Engagement & Partnerships Managers Designers Engineers 3 Building

  18. When it comes to demand response, is FERC its own worst enemy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin F.; Wolak, Frank A.

    2009-10-15

    There is a significant risk of creating conditions that will crowd out true price response by focusing too much on demand response programs with unverifiable baselines and reliability-based rather than price-based mechanisms for obtaining consumption reductions. (author)

  19. ISO and US Standards for Thermal Cutting and Joint Preparation (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautz, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hochanadel, P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-02

    The summary of this presentation is: (1) There is a lot of shared space between AWS and ISO documents; (2) Several areas use the same specifications and standards, especially true in process materials; and (3) Equipment is one area with very little overlap.

  20. Garvey.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E 0 c alculated w ith r ealis2c N N a nd N NN i nterac2ons H: True H amiltonian w ith s ame i nterac2ons a s a bove R T, L (|q|,): Standard r esponse f unc2ons f rom e...

  1. Understanding the Impact of Higher Corn Prices on Consumer Food Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2007-04-18

    In an effort to assess the true effects of higher corn prices, the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) commissioned an analysis on the impact of increased corn prices on retail food prices. This paper summarizes key results of the study and offers additional analysis based on information from a variety of other sources.

  2. When I was a coal miner: a pastor's memoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan L. Martineau

    2005-07-01

    This is a true story about a young man from Michigan who became the pastor of a small church in Coalwood, West Virginia. In order to support his family, he worked underground in a deep coal mine. This book tells the story of life in a coal-mining community and presents an insider's view of a coal mine.

  3. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Affordable High Performance in Production Homes: Artistic Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Artistic Homes, a successful New Mexico production builder, who went from code-minimum to under HERS 50 standard on every home, with optional PV upgrades to HERS 35 or true net zero on every home plan offered.

  4. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Develop a true 3D hydro-thermal fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation. Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator.

  5. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev 2014 Next January M T W T F S S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 February M T W...

  6. Calendar | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    True False Apply Year Month Week Day Prev 2016 Next January M T W T F S S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 February M T W...

  7. Working with Us | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Us Working with Us True to its mission, the office serves to actively facilitate relationships between the Department and Members of Congress, Governors, State/local officials and their staffs, tribal governments, public interest groups representing consumers/citizens organizations, business/industries, civic groups, educational organizations and institutions, and all other energy-oriented stakeholder organizations. Congressional Affairs Congressional Testimony Congressional Resources

  8. INVESTIGATING THE RELIABILITY OF CORONAL EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION DIAGNOSTICS USING THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Org. A021S, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-10

    Determining the temperature distribution of coronal plasmas can provide stringent constraints on coronal heating. Current observations with the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (EIS) on board Hinode and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide diagnostics of the emission measure distribution (EMD) of the coronal plasma. Here we test the reliability of temperature diagnostics using three-dimensional radiative MHD simulations. We produce synthetic observables from the models and apply the Monte Carlo Markov chain EMD diagnostic. By comparing the derived EMDs with the 'true' distributions from the model, we assess the limitations of the diagnostics as a function of the plasma parameters and the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We find that EMDs derived from EIS synthetic data reproduce some general characteristics of the true distributions, but usually show differences from the true EMDs that are much larger than the estimated uncertainties suggest, especially when structures with significantly different density overlap along the line of sight. When using AIA synthetic data the derived EMDs reproduce the true EMDs much less accurately, especially for broad EMDs. The differences between the two instruments are due to the: (1) smaller number of constraints provided by AIA data and (2) broad temperature response function of the AIA channels which provide looser constraints to the temperature distribution. Our results suggest that EMDs derived from current observatories may often show significant discrepancies from the true EMDs, rendering their interpretation fraught with uncertainty. These inherent limitations to the method should be carefully considered when using these distributions to constrain coronal heating.

  9. Parametric Grid Information in the DOE Knowledge Base: Data Preparation, Storage, and Access

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HIPP,JAMES R.; MOORE,SUSAN G.; MYERS,STEPHEN C.; SCHULTZ,CRAIG A.; SHEPHERD,ELLEN; YOUNG,CHRISTOPHER J.

    1999-10-01

    The parametric grid capability of the Knowledge Base provides an efficient, robust way to store and access interpolatable information which is needed to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. To meet both the accuracy and performance requirements of operational monitoring systems, we use a new approach which combines the error estimation of kriging with the speed and robustness of Natural Neighbor Interpolation (NNI). The method involves three basic steps: data preparation (DP), data storage (DS), and data access (DA). The goal of data preparation is to process a set of raw data points to produce a sufficient basis for accurate NNI of value and error estimates in the Data Access step. This basis includes a set of nodes and their connectedness, collectively known as a tessellation, and the corresponding values and errors that map to each node, which we call surfaces. In many cases, the raw data point distribution is not sufficiently dense to guarantee accurate error estimates from the NNI, so the original data set must be densified using a newly developed interpolation technique known as Modified Bayesian Kriging. Once appropriate kriging parameters have been determined by variogram analysis, the optimum basis for NNI is determined in a process they call mesh refinement, which involves iterative kriging, new node insertion, and Delauny triangle smoothing. The process terminates when an NNI basis has been calculated which will fir the kriged values within a specified tolerance. In the data storage step, the tessellations and surfaces are stored in the Knowledge Base, currently in a binary flatfile format but perhaps in the future in a spatially-indexed database. Finally, in the data access step, a client application makes a request for an interpolated value, which triggers a data fetch from the Knowledge Base through the libKBI interface, a walking triangle search for the containing triangle, and finally the NNI interpolation.

  10. The flash pyrolysis and methanolysis of biomass (wood) for production of ethylene, benzene and methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1990-02-01

    The process chemistry of the flash pyrolysis of biomass (wood) with the reactive gases, H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} and with the non-reactive gases He and N{sub 2} is being determined in a 1 in. downflow tubular reactor at pressures from 20 to 1000 psi and temperatures from 600 to 1000{degrees}C. With hydrogen, flash hydropyrolysis leads to high yields of methane and CO which can be used for SNG and methanol fuel production. With methane, flash methanolysis leads to high yields of ethylene, benzene and CO which can be used for the production of valuable chemical feedstocks and methanol transportation fuel. At reactor conditions of 50 psi and 1000{degrees}C and approximately 1 sec residence time, the yields based on pine wood carbon conversion are up to 25% for ethylene, 25% for benzene, and 45% for CO, indicating that over 90% of the carbon in pine is converted to valuable products. Pine wood produces higher yields of hydrocarbon products than Douglas fir wood; the yield of ethylene is 2.3 times higher with methane than with helium or nitrogen, and for pine, the ratio is 7.5 times higher. The mechanism appears to be a free radical reaction between CH{sub 4} and the pyrolyzed wood. There appears to be no net production or consumption of methane. A preliminary process design and analysis indicates a potentially economical competitive system for the production of ethylene, benzene and methanol based on the methanolysis of wood. 10 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Exploratory Technology Research Program for electrochemical energy storage: Annual report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, K. [ed.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Propulsion Systems provides support for an Electrochemical Energy Storage Program, that includes research and development (R&D) on advanced rechargeable batteries and fuel cells. A major goal of this program is to develop electrochemical power sources suitable for application in electric vehicles (EVs). The program centers on advanced systems that offer the potential for high performance and low life-cycle costs, both of which are necessary to permit significant penetration into commercial markets. The DOE Electrochemical Energy Storage Program is divided into two projects: the Electric Vehicle Advanced Battery Systems (EVABS) Development Program and the Exploratory Technology Research (ETR) Program. The EVABS Program management responsibility has been assigned to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is responsible for management of the ETR Program. The EVABS and ETR Programs include an integrated matrix of R&D efforts designed to advance progress on selected candidate electrochemical systems. The United States Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), a tripartite undertaking between DOE, the U.S. automobile manufacturers and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), was formed in 1991 to accelerate the development of advanced batteries for consumer EVs. The role of the FIR Program is to perform supporting research on the advanced battery systems under development by the USABC and EVABS Program, and to evaluate new systems with potentially superior performance, durability and/or cost characteristics. The specific goal of the ETR Program is to identify the most promising electrochemical technologies and transfer them to the USABC, the battery industry and/or the EVABS Program for further development and scale-up. This report summarizes the research, financial and management activities relevant to the ETR Program in CY 1993.

  12. HERSCHEL FINDS EVIDENCE FOR STELLAR WIND PARTICLES IN A PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE: IS THIS WHAT HAPPENED TO THE YOUNG SUN?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceccarelli, C.; Lpez-Sepulcre, A.; Dominik, C.; Kama, M.; Padovani, M.; Caux, E.; Caselli, P.

    2014-07-20

    There is evidence that the young Sun emitted a high flux of energetic (?10MeV) particles. The collisions of these particles with the material at the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk induced spallation reactions that formed short-lived radionuclei, like {sup 10}Be, whose trace is now visible in some meteorites. However, it is poorly known exactly when this happened, and whether and how it affected the solar system. Here, we present indirect evidence for an ejection of energetic particles in the young protostar, OMC-2 FIR 4, similar to that experienced by the young solar system. In this case, the energetic particles collide with the material in the protostellar envelope, enhancing the abundance of two molecular ions, HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, whose presence is detected via Herschel observations. The flux of energetic particles at a distance of 1AU from the emitting source, estimated from the measured abundance ratio of HCO{sup +} and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, can easily account for the irradiation required by meteoritic observations. These new observations demonstrate that the ejection of ?10MeV particles is a phenomenon occurring very early in the life of a protostar, before the disappearance of the envelope from which the future star accretes. The whole envelope is affected by the event, which sets constraints on the magnetic field geometry in the source and opens up the possibility that the spallation reactions are not limited to the inner edge of the Protosolar Nebula disk.

  13. Comparison of Laboratory and Field Methods for Determining the Quasi-Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, Boris

    1997-08-01

    Laboratory and field ponded infiltration tests in quasi-saturated soils (containing entrapped air) exhibit the same three-stage temporal variability for the flow rate and hydraulic conductivity. However, the values for the hydraulic conductivity may differ by as much as two orders of magnitude due to differences in the geometry and physics of flow when different laboratory and field methods are applied. The purpose of this paper is to investigate this variability using a comparison of results of ponded infiltration tests conducted under laboratory conditions using confined cores, with results of field tests conducted using partially isolated cores and double-ring infiltrometers. Under laboratory conditions in confined cores, during the firs stage, the water flux decreases over time because entrapped air plugs the largest pores in the soils; during the second stage, the quasi-saturated hydraulic conductivity increases by one to two orders of magnitude, essentially reaching the saturated hydraulic conductivity, when entrapped air is discharged from the soils; during the third stage, the hydraulic conductivity decreases to minimum values due to sealing of the soil surface and the effect of biofilms sealing the pores within the wetted zone. Under field conditions, the second stage is only partially developed, and when the surface sealing process begins, the hydraulic pressure drops below the air entry value, thereby causing atmospheric air to enter the soils. As a result, the soils become unsaturated with a low hydraulic conductivity, and the infiltration rate consequently decreases. Contrary to the laboratory experiments in confined cores, the saturated hydraulic conductivity cannot be reached under field conditions. In computations of infiltration one has to take into account the variations in the quasi-saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivities, moisture and entrapped air content, and the hydraulic gradient in the quasi-saturated or unsaturated soils.

  14. THE KILOPARSEC-SCALE STAR FORMATION LAW AT REDSHIFT 4: WIDESPREAD, HIGHLY EFFICIENT STAR FORMATION IN THE DUST-OBSCURED STARBURST GALAXY GN20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, J. A.; Riechers, D.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Carilli, C. L.; Daddi, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution observations of the 880?m (rest-frame FIR) continuum emission in the z=4.05 submillimeter galaxy GN20 from the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI). These data resolve the obscured star formation (SF) in this unlensed galaxy on scales of 0.''3נ0.''2 (?2.1נ1.3kpc). The observations reveal a bright (16 1mJy) dusty starburst centered on the cold molecular gas reservoir and showing a bar-like extension along the major axis. The striking anti-correlation with the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 imaging suggests that the copious dust surrounding the starburst heavily obscures the rest-frame UV/optical emission. A comparison with 1.2mm PdBI continuum data reveals no evidence for variations in the dust properties across the source within the uncertainties, consistent with extended SF, and the peak star formation rate surface density (119 8 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1}kpc{sup 2}) implies that the SF in GN20 remains sub-Eddington on scales down to 3kpc{sup 2}. We find that the SF efficiency (SFE) is highest in the central regions of GN20, leading to a resolved SF law with a power-law slope of ?{sub SFR}??{sub H{sub 2}{sup 2.11.0}}, and that GN20 lies above the sequence of normal star-forming disks, implying that the dispersion in the SF law is not due solely to morphology or choice of conversion factor. These data extend previous evidence for a fixed SFE per free-fall time to include the star-forming medium on ?kiloparsec scales in a galaxy 12Gyr ago.

  15. SHOCK-ENHANCED C{sup +} EMISSION AND THE DETECTION OF H{sub 2}O FROM THE STEPHAN'S QUINTET GROUP-WIDE SHOCK USING HERSCHEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, P. N.; Lord, S.; Lu, N.; Guillard, P.; Boulanger, F.; Pineau des Forts, G.; Cluver, M. E.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Ogle, P.; Falgarone, E.; Duc, P.-A.; Gallagher, S.; Gao, Y.; Jarrett, T.; Lisenfeld, U.; Peterson, B. W.; Struck, C.; Sturm, E.; Tuffs, R.; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present the first Herschel spectroscopic detections of the [O I] 63 ?m and [C II] 158 ?m fine-structure transitions, and a single para-H{sub 2}O line from the 35 15 kpc{sup 2} shocked intergalactic filament in Stephan's Quintet. The filament is believed to have been formed when a high-speed intruder to the group collided with a clumpy intergroup gas. Observations with the PACS spectrometer provide evidence for broad (>1000 km s{sup 1}) luminous [C II] line profiles, as well as fainter [O I] 63 ?m emission. SPIRE FTS observations reveal water emission from the p-H{sub 2}O (1{sub 11}-0{sub 00}) transition at several positions in the filament, but no other molecular lines. The H{sub 2}O line is narrow and may be associated with denser intermediate-velocity gas experiencing the strongest shock-heating. The [C II]/PAH{sub tot} and [C II]/FIR ratios are too large to be explained by normal photo-electric heating in photodissociation regions. H II region excitation or X-ray/cosmic-ray heating can also be ruled out. The observations lead to the conclusion that a large fraction the molecular gas is diffuse and warm. We propose that the [C II], [O I], and warm H{sub 2} line emission is powered by a turbulent cascade in which kinetic energy from the galaxy collision with the intergalactic medium is dissipated to small scales and low velocities, via shocks and turbulent eddies. Low-velocity magnetic shocks can help explain both the [C II]/[O I] ratio, and the relatively high [C II]/H{sub 2} ratios observed. The discovery that [C II] emission can be enhanced, in large-scale turbulent regions in collisional environments, has implications for the interpretation of [C II] emission in high-z galaxies.

  16. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  17. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992-January 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.

    1998-12-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on December 27, 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa, on January 31, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section A10 included pressure, temperature, and salinity [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-1 1 , CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and underway pCO{sub 2}. The TCO{sub 2} was measured by using two Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzers (SOMMAs) for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples that were coupled to a coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for TALK were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-}2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by infrared photometry with a precision of {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. The work aboard the R/V Meteor was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CHOO016, and the Bundesministerium fir Forschung und Technologies through grants 03F0545A and MPG 099/1.

  18. SU-E-QI-03: Compartment Modeling of Dynamic Brain PET - The Effect of Scatter and Random Corrections On Parameter Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Häggström, I; Karlsson, M; Larsson, A; Schmidtlein, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of corrections for random and scattered coincidences on kinetic parameters in brain tumors, by using ten Monte Carlo (MC) simulated dynamic FLT-PET brain scans. Methods: The GATE MC software was used to simulate ten repetitions of a 1 hour dynamic FLT-PET scan of a voxelized head phantom. The phantom comprised six normal head tissues, plus inserted regions for blood and tumor tissue. Different time-activity-curves (TACs) for all eight tissue types were used in the simulation and were generated in Matlab using a 2-tissue model with preset parameter values (K1,k2,k3,k4,Va,Ki). The PET data was reconstructed into 28 frames by both ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) and 3D filtered back-projection (3DFBP). Five image sets were reconstructed, all with normalization and different additional corrections C (A=attenuation, R=random, S=scatter): Trues (AC), trues+randoms (ARC), trues+scatters (ASC), total counts (ARSC) and total counts (AC). Corrections for randoms and scatters were based on real random and scatter sinograms that were back-projected, blurred and then forward projected and scaled to match the real counts. Weighted non-linearleast- squares fitting of TACs from the blood and tumor regions was used to obtain parameter estimates. Results: The bias was not significantly different for trues (AC), trues+randoms (ARC), trues+scatters (ASC) and total counts (ARSC) for either 3DFBP or OSEM (p<0.05). Total counts with only AC stood out however, with an up to 160% larger bias. In general, there was no difference in bias found between 3DFBP and OSEM, except in parameter Va and Ki. Conclusion: According to our results, the methodology of correcting the PET data for randoms and scatters performed well for the dynamic images where frames have much lower counts compared to static images. Generally, no bias was introduced by the corrections and their importance was emphasized since omitting them increased bias extensively.

  19. First test of high frequency Gravity Waves from inflation using Advanced LIGO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Alejandro; Freese, Katherine E-mail: ktfreese@umich.edu

    2015-01-01

    Inflation models ending in a first order phase transition produce gravitational waves (GW) via bubble collisions of the true vacuum phase. We demonstrate that these bubble collisions can leave an observable signature in Advanced LIGO, an upcoming ground-based GW experiment. These GW are dependent on two parameters of the inflationary model: ? represents the energy difference between the false vacuum and the true vacuum of the inflaton potential, and ? measures how fast the phase transition ends (?? the number of e-folds during the actual phase transition). Advanced LIGO will be able to test the validity of single-phase transition models within the parameter space 10{sup 7}GeV?

  20. COMPARISON OF SHEAR STRENGTH OF CERAMIC JOINTS DETERMINED BY VARIOUS TEST METHODS WITH SMALL SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Yutai; Kiggans Jr, James O; Khalifa, Hesham; Back, Christina A.; Hinoki, Tatsuya; Ferraris, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Four different shear test methods i.e. doubled notched shear test, asymmetrical four point bend test, Iosipescu test, and torsion test, were investigated for their ability to evaluate one standard SiC to SiC ceramic brittle joint while using small size specimens. Double notched shear test showed higher stress concentration at the notch base and a lower nominal shear strength. Both asymmetrical four point bend test and Iosipescu test utilized epoxy jointed metal extensors, which failed during test and caused misalignment and tensile type of failure. Torsion test can deliver true shear loading. However, base material failure was observed for the torsion joint samples in this study. None of the tests can successfully induce true shear failure of the joint because the joint is stronger and tougher than the SiC substrate. Torsion test appears to be promising because of the pure shear loading, less stress concentration, and easy alignment.

  1. The fixed hypernode method for the solution of the many body Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederiva, F; Kalos, M H; Reboredo, F; Bressanini, D; Guclu, D; Colletti, L; Umrigar, C J

    2006-01-24

    We propose a new scheme for an approximate solution of the Schroedinger equation for a many-body interacting system, based on the use of pairs of walkers. Trial wavefunctions for these pairs are combinations of standard symmetric and antisymmetric wavefunctions. The method consists in applying a fixed-node restriction in the enlarged space, and computing the energy of the antisymmetric state from the knowledge of the exact ground state energy for the symmetric state. We made two conjectures: first, that this fixed-hypernode energy is an upper bound to the true fermion energy; second that this bound would necessarily be lower than the usual fixed-node energy using the same antisymmetric trial function. The first conjecture is true, and is proved in this paper. The second is not, and numerical and analytical counterexamples are given. The question of whether the fixed-hypernode energy can be better than the usual bound remains open.

  2. Method and apparatus for correcting eddy current signal voltage for temperature effects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kustra, Thomas A. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Caffarel, Alfred J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring physical characteristics of an electrically conductive material by the use of eddy-current techniques and compensating measurement errors caused by changes in temperature includes a switching arrangement connected between primary and reference coils of an eddy-current probe which allows the probe to be selectively connected between an eddy current output oscilloscope and a digital ohm-meter for measuring the resistances of the primary and reference coils substantially at the time of eddy current measurement. In this way, changes in resistance due to temperature effects can be completely taken into account in determining the true error in the eddy current measurement. The true error can consequently be converted into an equivalent eddy current measurement correction.

  3. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  4. TTW 3-27-08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27, 2008 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 03-26-08) 6,544 Shipments received since opening 54,140 Cubic meters of waste disposed 99,539 Containers disposed in the underground ... WIPP enjoys the support of surrounding communities, is an international benchmark for radioactive waste management and is a true success story for the Department of Energy. You are proving that permanent deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste can be safely and efficiently achieved. Keep up that outstanding performance, and

  5. Obstacle to populating the string theory landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Larfors, Magdalena

    2008-12-15

    We construct domain walls and instantons in a class of models with coupled scalar fields, determining, in agreement with previous studies, that many such solutions contain naked timelike singularities. Vacuum bubble solutions of this type do not contain a region of true vacuum, obstructing the ability of eternal inflation to populate other vacua. We determine a criterion that potentials must satisfy to avoid the existence of such singularities and show that many domain wall solutions in type IIB string theory are singular.

  6. QER- Comment of Kate Darling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The town of Plainfield does not need to accomodate the addition of a proposed natural gas pipeline that will do damage to personal property and wetlands. We are meeting our own energy needs without relying on increased production and distribution of fossil fuels. This is especially true when we will not have access to the fuel that is endangering our environment and way of life and will even be required to pay for it with an increased tarrif on our electric bills.

  7. CONP-9010321-1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or. ^ CONP-9010321-1 DE91 008316 TIME, DYNAMICS AND CHAOS*) Integrating Poincare's "Non-lntegrable Systems" Ilya Prigogine , '> , * , > Time has always haunted man. Time is indeed our fundamental existential dimension. It has fascinated philosophers as well as scientists. It has often been stated that science has solved the problem of time. Is this really true? Indeed, a very fundamental property of r \ ^ the basic equations of physics, be it classical physics or quantum 3 ^

  8. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis 1998 Annual Report Grand Challenge Projects biocatalysis.gif A model of the Michaelis complex for the TEM-1/penicillin system from molecular dynamics simulations. Investigators: P. A. Bash, Northwestern University Medical School and M. Karplus, Harvard University Research Objectives A guiding principle of molecular biology is that the structure of a biomolecule defines its function. This principle is especially true in the case

  9. Auditors Name

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Template Revised: 6/12/2014 Template Reviewed: 6/12/2014 Auditor Contract Audit Department Sandia Corporation, which operates Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 1461 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1461 Date Dear Auditor: This letter concerns your audit of billed costs or charges for the following Sandia Corporation which operates Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) contracts: (list contracts here) We make the following representations, which are true to the best of our knowledge and

  10. PPPL and Princeton scientists developing a novel system for verifying

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear warheads | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab and Princeton scientists developing a novel system for verifying nuclear warheads By John Greenwald April 25, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Scientists at Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are developing a unique process to verify that nuclear weapons to be dismantled or removed from deployment contain true warheads. The system could confirm this

  11. Alternating Current Photovoltaic Building Block - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Alternating Current Photovoltaic Building Block Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (891 KB) Technology Marketing Summary This technology provides a fully integrated and self-containing alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) Building Block device and method that allows photovoltaic applications to become true plug-and-play devices. The

  12. Correlations estimate volume distilled using gravity, boiling point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, A.; Consuelo Perez de Alba, M. del; Manriquez, L.; Guardia Mendoz, P. de la

    1995-10-23

    Mathematical nd graphic correlations have been developed for estimating cumulative volume distilled as a function of crude API gravity and true boiling point (TBP). The correlations can be used for crudes with gravities of 21--34{degree} API and boiling points of 150--540 C. In distillation predictions for several mexican and Iraqi crude oils, the correlations have exhibited accuracy comparable to that of laboratory measurements. The paper discusses the need for such a correlation and the testing of the correlation.

  13. 2004 TEPP Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 TEPP Annual Report 2004 TEPP Annual Report During FY 2004, the Office of Environmental Management completed over 23,000 shipments of radioactive material and waste. In recent years, the transport of all types of hazardous materials has received increased publicity. This is particularly true for radioactive material. As a high visibility shipper of radioactive material, the DOE and its transportation activities have come under intense scrutiny from Congress, states, tribes, local governments,

  14. Highlights Archive | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Archive Highlights Archive Keeping Light in Tune Modeling Magnetism in Rare-Earth Intermetallic Materials Changing Surface Shapes with Temperature Revealing the True Nature of a Metal Oxide Weight Loss Regime for Massive Low Temperature Electrons Can't We All Just Get Along? Elusive Oxygen Isotope Captured with Groundbreaking Sensitivity Perpendicular Magnetism Unparalleled Find in Single Crystal Hard or Soft Shell? It's Not Just a Taco Question The Dark Side of the Carbon Nanotube

  15. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    INTERNATIONAL NATURAL GAS PRICING - A CHALLENGE TO ECONOMIC MODELING A Presentation to the Energy Information Administration Washington August 23, 2012 JAMES T. JENSEN Phone (781) 894 2362 Jensen Associates Fax (781) 894 9130 49 Crescent Street; Weston, MA 02493 U.S.A. E Mail JAI-Energy@Comcast.Net Website JAI-Energy.com THE ECONOMIC MODELING OF NORTH AMERICAN NATURAL GAS BENEFITS FROM A LIBERALIZED MARKET IN WHICH GAS PRICES ARE SET BY MARKET COMPETITION Unfortuately, That is Not True of

  16. Parsons Salt Water Processing Facility Construction Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Parsons Corporation Salt Waste Processing Facility Construction Project Report from the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review February 5-14, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health and Safety Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance Washington, DC 20585 Parsons Corporation SWPF Construction Project DOE-VPP Onsite Review February 2013 Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes that true excellence can be

  17. Elongational rheology and cohesive fracture of photo-oxidated LDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roln-Garrido, Vctor H. Wagner, Manfred H.

    2014-01-15

    It was found recently that low-density polyethylene (LDPE) samples with different degrees of photo-oxidation represent an interesting system to study the transition from ductile to cohesive fracture and the aspects of the cohesive rupture in elongational flow. Sheets of LDPE were subjected to photo-oxidation in the presence of air using a xenon lamp to irradiate the samples for times between 1 day and 6 weeks. Characterisation methods included Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, solvent extraction method, and rheology in shear and uniaxial extensional flows. Linear viscoelasticity was increasingly affected by increasing photo-oxidation due to crosslinking of LDPE, as corroborated by the carbonyl index, acid and aldehydes groups, and gel fraction. The molecular stress function model was used to quantify the experimental data, and the nonlinear model parameter ? was found to be correlated with the gel content. The uniaxial data showed that the transition from ductile to cohesive fracture was shifted to lower elongational rates, the higher the gel content was. From 2 weeks photo-oxidation onwards, cohesive rupture occurred at every strain rate investigated. The true strain and true stress at cohesive fracture as well as the energy density applied to the sample up to fracture were analyzed. At low gel content, rupture was mainly determined by the melt fraction while at high gel content, rupture occurred predominantly in the gel structure. The strain at break was found to be independent of strain rate, contrary to the stress at break and the energy density. Thus, the true strain and not the stress at break or the energy density was found to be the relevant physical quantity to describe cohesive fracture behavior of photo-oxidated LDPE. The equilibrium modulus of the gel structures was correlated with the true strain at rupture. The stiffer the gel structure, the lower was the deformation tolerated before the sample breaks.

  18. Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Toward a new metric for ranking high performance computing systems. The High Performance Linpack (HPL), or Top 500, benchmark [1] is the most widely recognized and discussed metric for ranking high performance computing systems. However, HPL is increasingly unreliable as a true measure of system performance for a growing collection of important

  19. Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Color dispersion and Milky-Way-like reddening among type Ia supernovae Past analyses of Type Ia supernovae have identified an irreducible scatter of 5%-10% in distance, widely attributed to an intrinsic dispersion in luminosity. Another equally valid source of this scatter is intrinsic dispersion in color. Misidentification of the true source

  20. Duality and conformal structure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Duality and conformal structure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Duality and conformal structure In four dimensions, two metrics that are conformally related define the same Hodge dual operator on the space of two-forms. The converse, namely, that two metrics that have the same Hodge dual are conformally related, is established. This is true for metrics of arbitrary (nondegenerate) signature. For Euclidean signature a stronger result, namely, that the conformal class of the metric is