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Sample records for tropical rain forest

  1. Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbauer, S. F.

    2004-01-16

    The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

  2. 8, 42214266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4221 #12;ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

  3. 7, 69036958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 6903­6958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions The Tropical Forest and fire emissions experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT, USA Received: 4 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2007

  4. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, Kolby; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J.; Martin, Scot T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  5. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under...

  6. Effects of selective logging on tropical forest tree growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J.water content cannot explain the increases in diameter observed before the onset of rains.

  7. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    W. M. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:Physics The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  8. Characterization of Throughfall Heterogeneity in a Tropical Pre-Montane Could Forest in Costa Rica 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Amelie Cecile

    2013-09-26

    of this study, rain gauge networks were deployed in a 2.2-hectare watershed within a tropical pre-montane transitional cloud forest in Costa Rica. Throughfall data were collected daily for a total of 39 events from 28 June–17 July 2012 and 12 June–16 July 2013...

  9. Analysis of TRMM Precipitation Radar Algorithms and Rain over the Tropics and Southeast Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funk, Aaron

    2013-12-10

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) 2A23 algorithm classifies rain echo as stratiform or convective while the 2A25 algorithm corrects vertical profiles of radar reflectivity for attenuation ...

  10. Forests, Water and People in the Humid Tropics, ed. M. Bonell and L.A. Bruijnzeel. Published by Cambridge University Press. UNESCO 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    Forests, Water and People in the Humid Tropics, ed. M. Bonell and L.A. Bruijnzeel. Published Minimising the hydrological impact of forest harvesting in Malaysia's rain forests to the use of tracked vehicles ('skidders') and haulage lorries, such extraction is slow and costly

  11. Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Seasonal controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest Lucy R. Hutyra,1 controls on the exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J. Geophys. Res., 112, G03008 response to climate and weather. This study presents 4 years of eddy covariance data for CO2 and water

  12. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soilof Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Journals Tropicalof Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

  13. Chapter Number1 Biomass Prediction in Tropical Forests:2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chapter Number1 Biomass Prediction in Tropical Forests:2 The Canopy Grain Approach3 Christophe France9 1. Introduction10 The challenging task of biomass prediction in dense and heterogeneous tropical different forest structures may indeed present similar above ground biomass (AGB) values.13 This is probably

  14. Rain Forest Islands in the Chilean Semiarid Region: Fog-dependency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rain Forest Islands in the Chilean Semiarid Region: Fog-dependency, Ecosystem Persistence and Tree that these forests persist as a result of fog-water inputs. If so, then because fog-water deposition is spatially by the direction of fog input should determine forest structure and tree regeneration patterns. To investigate

  15. Lacunarity as a texture measure for a tropical forest landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Haiping; Krummel, J.

    1996-01-01

    Fragmentation and loss of tropical forest cover alters terrestrial plant and animal population dynamics, reduces biodiversity and carbon storage capacity, and, as a global phenomenon could affect regional and global climate patterns. Lacunarity as a texture measure can offer a simple solution to characterize the texture of tropical forest landscape and determine spatial patterns associated with ecological processes. Lacunarity quantifies the deviation from translational invariance by describing the distribution of gaps within a binary image at multiple scales. As lacunarity increases, the spatial arrangement of tropical forest gaps will also increase. In this study, we used the Spatial Modeler in Imagine as a graphic programming tool to calculate lacunarity indices for a tropical forest landscape in Southern Mexico and Northern Guatemala. Lacunarity indices were derived from classified Landsat MSS images acquired in 1974 and 1984. Random-generated binary images were also used to derive lacunarity indices and compared with the lacunarity of forest patterns derived from the classified MSS images. Tropical forest area declined about 17%, with most of the forest areas converted into pasture/grassland for grazing. During this period, lacunarity increased about 25%. Results of this study suggest that tropical forest fragmentation could be quantified with lacunarity measures. The study also demonstrated that the Spatial Modeler can be useful as a programming tool to quantify spatial patterns of tropical forest landscape by using remotely sensed data.

  16. Can extractive reserves save the rain forest: A ecological and socioeconomic comparison of non-timber forest product extraction systems in Peten, Guatemala, and West Kalimantan, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salafsky, N.; Dugelby, B.L.; Terborgh, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    Extractive reserves in tropical rain forests, in which only non-timber products are harvested, have been heralded by some conservationists as a means of maintaining biodiversity while providing income for local people. The study of extraction systems in Peten, Guatemala, and in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, leads to a more tempered conclusion, for while the Peten program was quite successful, the Kalimantan program was not. The study finds the success of an extractive reserve to be contingent on: (1) ecological conditions, and (2) socioeconomic and political factors. Although the study focuses on market-oriented extractive reserves, many of the issues discussed apply as well to other land uses such as the collection of non-timber forest products for household consumption or small-scale timber extraction.

  17. Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    their representation in Earth system models. Tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle

  18. Increasing carbon storage in intact African tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide1,2 . The role of tropical forests is critical dioxide concentrations, may be the cause of the increase in carbon stocks13 , as some theory14 and models2 with estimates of fossil fuel emissions, ocean carbon fluxes and carbon released from land-use change, indicate

  19. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  20. Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy dynamics and modeled evapotranspiration from a wet tropical forest in Costa Rica H). #12;1. Introduction The energy balance of tropical forests is complex due to feedback mechanisms among.W. Loeschera, *, H.L. Gholza,b , J.M. Jacobsc , S.F. Oberbauerd,e a School of Forest Resources and Conservation

  1. Tropical Forest Trust | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation,PowerNetworksEnergia LtdaTropical

  2. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soilunseen majority: soil microbes as drivers of plant diversitya challenge for soil microbes and biofuels engineers alike.

  3. Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andexample, the energy stored in tropical forest biomass variedforest (JRU) and that illustrates the control that available energy

  4. Management of Philippine tropical forests: Implications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The first part of the paper presents the massive changes in tropical land management in the Philippines as a result of a {open_quotes}paradigm shift{close_quotes} in forestry. The second part of the paper analyzes the impacts of the above management strategies on global warming, in general, preserved forests are neither sinks not sources of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Reforestation activities are primarily net sinks of carbon specially the use of fast growing reforestation species. Estimates are given for the carbon-sequestering ability of some commonly used species. The last part of the paper policy recommendations and possible courses of action by the government to maximize the role of forest lands in the mitigation of global warming. Private sector initiatives are also explored.

  5. Estimation of tropical forest structural characteristics using large-footprint lidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weishampel, John F.

    Estimation of tropical forest structural characteristics using large-footprint lidar Jason B in identifying the amount of carbon in terrestrial vegetation pools and is central to global carbon cycle studies. Although current remote sensing techniques recover such tropical forest structure poorly, new large-footprint

  6. U.S Markets for Certified and Non-Certified Hardwood Tropical Forest Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the fact that tropical forests have a longer growing period, hence encouraging the paper industry to use tropical hardwood pulp for paper production (U.S. and International Institutions 1983). In 2000, the United Agricultural Center Baton Rouge, Louisiana Louisiana Forest Products Development Center Working Paper #76

  7. Leaf traits and foliar CO2 exchange in a Peruvian tropical montane cloud forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Weg, Marjan

    2011-06-28

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) are one of the most fascinating, but least understood ecosystems in the world, and the interest in the carbon (C) cycle of TMCFs with regard to carbon sequestration and storage ...

  8. Airborne LiDAR Detects Selectively Logged Tropical Forest Even in an Advanced Stage of Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, Rafi; Lindsell, Jeremy A.; Laurin, Gaia Vaglio; Valentini, Riccardo; Coomes, David A.

    2015-01-01

    logged tropical forests: the attained and the attainable. Conserv. Lett. 2012, 5, 296–303. 10. Silver, W. L.; Ostertag, R.; Lugo, a. E. The Potential for Carbon Sequestration Through Reforestation of Abandoned Tropical Agricultural and Pasture Lands... be of high conservation value [2,7–9] and act as globally-important carbon sinks [9–12]. However, there is much uncertainty regarding the changing extent of regenerating forests, their rate and stage of recovery, and the influence of recovery on further...

  9. Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes A M A N D metabolism, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide as a by-product. Little is known of how autotrophic respiration components vary across environmental gradients, particularly in tropical ecosystems. Here, we

  10. Vegetation History And Logging Disturbance: Effects On Rain Forest In The Lope Reserve, Gabon (With Special Emphasis On Elephants and Apes) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lee JT

    An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central Gabon, between January 1989 to July 1991. Vegetation in Lope ...

  11. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  12. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; et al

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within themore »51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63« less

  13. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  14. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, RD; Bruno, RD; da Rocha, HR; de Freitas, HC; Goulden, ML; Miller, SD

    2006-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andsurface energy exchange in the Amazonian terra firme forestvapour, energy, and CO 2 exchange. The rates of whole-forest

  15. Root morphology and anchorage of six native tree species from a tropical montane forest and an elfin forest in Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    in tropical forests in Ecuador. Increasing altitude was accompanied by higher wind speeds and more shallow anchorage in soils with low bulk density and in environments with high wind speeds. Abbreviations: AR m. At 3000 m, 48% of the trees were inclined, lying or even partly uprooted. At this altitude, all

  16. Nitrogen deposition in tropical forests from savanna and deforestation fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Van Der Werf, GR; Morton, DC; Mu, M; Kasibhatla, PS

    2010-01-01

    15, Atkinson R (2000) Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx.tropics – impact on atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemicalimpact of fires on atmospheric chemistry. N r can be emitted

  17. Nutrient dynamics and nitrogen trace gas flux during ecosystem development in montane rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.H.; Vitousek, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Patterns of nitrogen trace gas emissions, soil nitrogen flux, and nutrient availability were evaluated at five sites that form a chronosequence in Hawaiian montane rain forest. The estimated age of basaltic parent material from which soils developed at the Kilauea site was 200 yr, 6000 yr at the Puu Makaala site, 185000 yr at the Kohala site, 1.65 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Molokai site, and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Kauai site. Peak net N mineralization and nitrification values were found in soils from the 185000-yr-old Kohala site. Nitrogen content of foliage and leaf litter was highest in the intermediate age sites (Puu Makaala and Kohala) and N and P retranslocation was lowest at the Puu Makaala site. Soil cores fertilized with nitrogen had significantly higher rates of root ingrowth than control cores at the two youngest sites (200 and 6000 yr old) but not in older sites (185000 and 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old sites) and total fine root growth into control cores was greatest at the Kohala site. The highest N{sub 2}O emissions were found at the 185000-yr-old Kohala site, while the highest combined flux of N{sub 2}O + NO was observed at the 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old Kauai site. While overall N{sub 2}O emission rates were correlated with rates of N transformations, soil water content appeared to influence the magnitude of emissions of N{sub 2}O and the ratios of emissions of NO vs. N{sub 2}O. N{sub 2}O emissions occurred when water-filled pore space (WFPS) values were >40%, with highest emissions in at least two sites observed at WFPS values of 75%. Among sites, high N{sub 2}O emissions were associated with high soil N transformation rates. Large NO fluxes were observed only at the Kauai site when WFPS values were <60%. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Tropical dry-forest mammals of Palo Verde: Ecology and conservation in a changing landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoner, Kathryn E.; Timm, Robert M.

    2004-02-01

    More than 114 species of mammals originally were present in Costa Rica’s tropical dry forest, and perhaps 110 species are still found there today. Bats are the most diverse group, with more than 66 species, followed by 11 species of rodents, 7 species of marsupials, 6 species in the weasel family, 5 species of cats, 3 species in the raccoon family, 3 species of primates, 3 species of artiodactyls, 2 species of canids, 2 species of xenarthrans (edentates), 1 rabbit, and 1 tapir. Costa Rica has no endemic dry forest mammals. The species that have been extirpated from this region were either highly prized game species that have been eliminated by overhunting (white-lipped peccaries) or were specialists that either feed on specific foods or have very specific habitat requirements that have been eliminated by habitat destruction. In Costa Rica 10 of the 13 mammal species recognized as endangered and 7 of the 14 found in reduced populations are found within tropical dry forest habitat. Mammals that inhabit tropical dry forest areas must be capable of dealing with high temperatures, low precipitation in the dry season, and large fluctuations in the availability of food resources during the year. Most mammals of the dry forest can be characterized as resident generalists that shift their diets in order to utilize seasonally available food resources; as resident specialists that forage on insects, seeds, or fruit and nectar; or as migrants that occupy dry forests only seasonally and move to other habitats during periods of low food availability in their foraging area in search of food sources in other areas. Bats, some of which serve as pollinators and seed dispersers, are important components of the dry forest fauna. Some species of bats change habitats within the dry forest or migrate into and out of the dry forest seasonally. Hunting has been, and continues to be, an important threat to most large mammals in dry forest habitats. As early as 1880, large numbers of deer skins were exported from Costa Rica to Europe, the majority of which came from Guanacaste. Illegal poaching is still a serious problem in the protected areas of Guanacaste. Throughout Mesoamerica, deforestation to create pastures and, in recent years, for crop cultivation has negatively affected many populations of tropical dry forest mammals. Approximately 50% of the 250,000 ha area in the lower Tempisque Basin had been deforested by 1956 and by 1970 most of the dry forest had been converted into pastureland. The spread of introduced African grasses and seasonal fires have continued to eliminate mature dry forest in northern Costa Rica in the last decades. Contamination by pesticides from agricultural fields has become a serious threat to the mammalian fauna in the region. The use of cattle as a management tool also threatens the mammalian fauna in tropical dry forest due to their affect on the natural vegetation. Cattle were reintroduced into Parque Nacional Palo Verde in the 1980s in an attempt to control the rapidly expanding cattails in the marsh, which were eliminating habitat for aquatic birds. However, cattle have been ineffective at controlling cattails, and overgrazing of tree seedlings has hindered regeneration of the forest because cattle graze selectively on seedlings of native species. The mammals of the tropical dry forest are among the most poorly known of any of the bioclimatic life zones. Conservation measures for this endangered fauna should include expanded research, training and educational programs for park personnel, economic alternatives, and sustainable development. In addition, efforts should be made for the creation of additional protected areas with buffer zones and for the development of natural regeneration programs.... contaminación por pesticidas en los campos agrícolas se ha convertido en una seria amenaza para los mamíferos de la región. El uso de ganado como herramienta de manejo también es una amenaza para la fauna de mamíferos en el bosque tropical seco debido a su...

  19. The relationship between wood density and mortality in a global tropical forest data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Nathan

    The relationship between wood density and mortality in a global tropical forest data set Nathan J-offs, long-term ecological research, phylogenetic independent contrasts, trait conservatism. Summary · Wood in mortality rates with wood density, drawing on data for 765 500 trees from 1639 species at 10 sites located

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Soil aggregates in a tropical deciduous forest: effects on C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forney, Larry J.

    within soil micro- and macro-aggregates in a tropical deciduous forest in Me´xico. We measured, for three nutrients dynamics. Keywords Macro-aggregates Á Micro-aggregates Á Mexico Á Soil bacteria Á t, Instituto de Ecologi´a, Universidad Nacional Auto´noma de Me´xico, Me´xico, D.F., Me´xico L. J. Forney

  1. Predicting species diversity in tropical forests Joshua B. Plotkina,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    of Malaysia, Kepong, Malaysia 52109; kSarawak Forestry Department, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia SW 93750; and l to the size of the area raised to some exponent. The exponent often turns out to be roughly 1 4. This power, individually identified trees from five tropical forests on three continents. Although the power law

  2. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest Rakan A. Zahawi a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Erle C.

    Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery Rakan A. Zahawi a from lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are a cost-effective substitute for tradi- tional field Rica. Ecosynth methods combine aerial images from consumer-grade digital cameras with com- puter vision

  3. Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    Intervention Analysis of Hurricane Effects on Snail Abundance in a Tropical Forest Using Long disturbances, such as hurricanes, have profound effects on pop- ulations, either directly by causing mortality of resources. In the last 20 years, two major disturbances, Hurricane Hugo in 1989 and Hurricane Georges

  4. Possible linkages between Saharan dust and tropical cyclone rain band invigoration in the eastern Atlantic during NAMMA-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    for tropical cyclogenesis, it also provides an infusion of cloud condensation and ice nuclei which can

  5. Integrating soil macroinvertebrate diversity, litter decomposition and secondary succession in a tropical montane cloud forest in Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negrete-Yankelevich, Simoneta

    This research considers human impacts on three components of biodiversity (composition, spatial structure and function). Given the relict character and unusual biogeochemical balance of tropical montane cloud forests in ...

  6. Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Porto Velho, RO 78900-000, Brazil. P. Artaxo, L. S. Borma,tropical forest to savanna in Brazil Humberto R. da Rocha, 1RIMA Editora, Sa˜o Carlos, Brazil. Oliveira, R. , et al. (

  7. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  8. Radon fluxes in tropical forest ecosystems of Brazilian Amazonia: night-time CO2 net ecosystem exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Radon fluxes in tropical forest ecosystems of Brazilian Amazonia: night-time CO2 net ecosystem exchange derived from radon and eddy covariance methods C H R I S T O P H E R S . M A R T E N S *, T H O M 97119.900, Brazil Abstract Radon-222 (Rn-222) is used as a transport tracer of forest canopy

  9. CO2 balance of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests derived from a global database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luyssaert, S. [University of Antwerp; Inglima, I. [Second University of Naples; Jung, M. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; Piao, S. [LSCE, Orme des Merisiers; Schulze, E.-D. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Wingate, L. [University of Edinburgh; Matteucci, G. [CNR-ISAFOM; Aubinet, M. [Faculte Universitaire des Sciences Agronomiques de Gembloux; Beer, C. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Bernhofer, C. [Technische Universitat Dresden; Black, K. G. [University College, Dublin; Bonal, D. [INRA Kourou - UMR EcoFog; Chambers, J. [Tulane University; Ciais, P. [LSCE, Orme des Merisiers; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Delucia, Evan H. [University of Illinois; Dolman, A. J. [Universitate Amsterdam; Don, A. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Gielen, B. [University of Antwerp; Grace, John [University of Edinburgh; Granier, A. [INRA EEF; Grelle, A. [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Griffis, T. [University of Minnesota; Grunwald, T. [Technische Universitat Dresden; Guidolotti, G. [University of Tuscia; Hanson, P. J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Harding, R. [Center of Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Kolari, P. [University of Helsinki; Kruijt, B. [Alterra; Kutsch, W. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Lagergren, F. [Lund University, Sweden; Laurila, T. [Finnish Meteorological institute; Law, B. [Oregon State University; Le Maire, G. [LSCE, Orme des Merisiers; Lindroth, A. [Lund University, Sweden; Magnani, F. [Universita di Bologna; Marek, M. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic; Mateus, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Portugal; Migliavacca, M. [Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca; Mission, L. [University of California, Berkeley; Montagnani, L. [Bolzano, Agency for the Environment; Moncrief, J. [University of Edinburgh; Moors, E. [Alterra; Munger, J. W. [University of Oxford; Nikinmaa, E. [University of Helsinki; Loustau, D. [INRA EPHYSE; Pita, G. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Portugal; Rebmann, C. [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Richardson, A. D. [University of New Hampshire; Roupsard, O. [CIRAD; Saigusa, N. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan; Sanz, M. J. [CEAM, Valencia, Spain; Seufert, G. [Joint Research Centre, Italy; Sorensen, L. [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Tang, J. [University of Minnesota; Valentini, R. [University of Tuscia; Vesala, T. [University of Helsinki; Janssens, I. A. [University of Antwerp

    2007-01-01

    Forests sequester large amounts of atmospheric carbon. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the fate of this carbon over both short and long timescales. Relevant data to address these uncertainties have been and are being collected at many sites around the world, but synthesis of these data is still sparse. To facilitate synthesis activities, we have assembled a comprehensive global database for forest ecosystems, which includes carbon budget variables (fluxes and stocks), ecosystem traits (e.g. leaf area index, age) as well as ancillary site information such as management regime, climate and soil characteristics. This can be used to: quantify global, regional to biome-specific carbon-budgets, to re-examine established relationships, test emerging hypotheses about ecosystem functioning (e.g. a constant NEP to GPP), and provide benchmarks for model evaluations. Our synthesis highlighted that globally, gross primary production of forests benefited from higher temperatures and precipitation whereas net primary production saturated beyond a threshold of 1500 mm precipitation or a mean annual temperature of 10 C. The global pattern in NEP was found insensitive to climate and appears to be mainly determined by non-climatic conditions such as successional stage, management, site history and site disturbance. At the biome level, only the carbon fluxes in temperate humid evergreen and temperate humid deciduous forests were sufficiently robust. All other biomes still need further study to reduce uncertainties in their carbon balance. Carbon budgets of boreal semi-arid and tropical semi-arid forests would benefit most from additional data inputs. Closing the CO2-balances of specific biomes required the introduction of closure terms. These closure terms were substantial for all biomes and suggested that to better close carbon balances, more data are needed especially on respiratory processes, advection and on non-CO2 carbon fluxes.

  10. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  11. R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Stefan

    R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests Geertje for carbon storage and sequestration. Lianas reduce tree growth, survival, and leaf productivity; however liana carbon stocks are unlikely to compensate for liana-induced losses in net carbon sequestration

  12. Land use, food production, and the future of tropical forest species in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phalan, Benjamin Timothy

    2010-07-06

    in low-yielding farming systems, but there was considerable turnover between these systems and forests, with widespread generalists replacing narrowly endemic forest-dependent species. Species most dependent on forest as a natural habitat, those...

  13. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  14. The role of gap phase processes in the biomass dynamics of tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    Department, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900, Thailand 4 Forest Environment Division, Forest Research Institute Colorado Island (BCI), Panama; Pasoh and Lambir, Malaysia; and Huai Kha Khaeng (HKK), Thailand). We show in incoming solar radiation, in

  15. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-03-05

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3?, and POx (representing the sum of PO43?, HPO42?, and H2PO4?)) and five potential competitors (plantmore »roots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive) followed this order: (1) for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2) for NO3?, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3) for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among different nutrient consumers. Although we used as many observations as we could obtain, more nutrient addition experiments in tropical systems would greatly benefit model testing and calibration. In summary, the N-COM model provides an ecologically consistent representation of nutrient competition appropriate for land BGC models integrated in Earth System Models.« less

  16. Using climate policies and carbon markets to save tropical forests : the case of Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpels, Marisa (Marisa Carina)

    2008-01-01

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s, advocates for forest conservation thought that climate change could provide a lever to motivate developing countries to reduce deforestation. Fifteen years after the first climate change ...

  17. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com The carbon balance of tropical forest regions, 19902005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    the biosphere to the atmosphere, through the combustion and decomposition of vegetation biomass. The exact of knowledge of the carbon balance of the tropical bio- sphere, looking at both CO2 emissions from land use, principally because they contain the more substantial biomass carbon stocks, but also because so few data

  18. ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL FACTORS AFFECTING ILLEGAL LOGGING OF TROPICAL FOREST OF BERAU, EAST KALIMANTAN, INDONESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , INDONESIA USING REMOTE SENSING AND GIS Anita Zaitunah Yousif Ali Hussin Ali Sharifi Department of Natural pollution and storms. The annual deforestation rate in Indonesia was 1.8 million ha between 1985 and 1997 of forests and cutting in unauthorised areas. In Indonesia, there is a smuggling of illegal logs

  19. Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Phenological Patterns and Reproductive Success of the Tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quesada Avendaño, Mauricio

    ´abitat con base en la densidad y las condiciones ambientales: (1) h´abitat perturbado (cuatro poblaciones de poblaciones de plantas. En un estudio de 4 a~nos, determinamos los efectos de la fragmentaci´on de bosques y;1112 Forest Fragmentation and Reproductive Success Herrer´ias-Diego et al. poblaciones en dos condiciones de h

  20. Age of riverine carbon suggests rapid export of terrestrial primary production in tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    exchange of carbon and water in an Amazonian rain forest, J.rains. The lack of variability in ? 14 C VP values between the rising water

  1. Abstract--Certified timber product is a market-linked tool to address the need for sustainable forest management and support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification schemes (PEFC). Malaysia has the world's largest area of certified tropical forest

  2. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andon tropical forest carbon, water, and energy exchange. Twothe role of forest in the water and energy cycles and

  3. Modest carbon price could save Borneo forests: study Reuters, 4 June 2009 -Tropical forests in Borneo under threat of conversion to palm oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Borneo under threat of conversion to palm oil plantations could be more profitable left standing threat of being converted to oil palm plantations. "They are not meant to be clearing forest for palm oil development. It's pretty clear that forests are being felled for oil palm," said Venter, a conservation

  4. Control of Dry Season Evapotranspiration over the Amazonian Forest as Inferred from Observations at a Southern Amazon Forest Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juárez, RIN; Hodnett, MG; Fu, R; Goulden, ML; von Randow, C

    2007-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andEnergy and water dynam- ics of a central Amazonian rain forest.

  5. Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Ian P

    2012-01-01

    This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

  6. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-04-29

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore »large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (66 ± 2%) was rapid (11 to 26 years; mean and SE: 18 ± 3 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial–millennial turnover was typically much less abundant (34 ± 3%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral-associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were statistically similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–25% of annual litter production. Observed trends in mineral-associated ?14C over time could not be fit using the single-pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and ?14C as compared with a more realistic two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils documented here are supported by findings from paired 14C studies in other types of ecosystems, and suggest that most mineral-associated C cycles relatively rapidly (decadal scales) across ecosystems that span a broad range of state factors.« less

  7. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-01-16

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore »large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (74 ± 4%) was rapid (9 to 29 years, mean and SE 20 ± 2 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial – millennial turnover was much less abundant (26%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–30% of annual litterfall production (estimated by doubling aboveground litterfall). Observed trends in mineral-associated ?14C over time could not be fit using the single pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and ?14C as compared with a more realistic constrained two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils implied by our data suggest that other studies using single-pool ?14C models of mineral-associated C dynamics, unconstrained by multiple time points, may have systematically underestimated C turnover.« less

  8. Contact information Director of Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , systematics, plant ecology, paleoecology, tropical rain forest ecology and ecosystem dynamics. Studying

  9. Acid rain - A further look at the evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenstein, A.W.

    1986-03-01

    There is widespread belief that acid rain is damaging lakes and forests in eastern North America, and that the threat of further damage is severe enough to warrant prompt remedial action. The cause of acid rain, hence ecological damage, is popularly held to be the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) created by the combustion of fossil fuels. This popular belief rests on a narrow selection of data, and is not substantiated by the broader body of knowledge which is available. Nevertheless, numerous bills have been introduced in Congress proposing large reductions in SO/sub 2/ emissions. For example, the first bill introduced in 1985 was S.52, ''The Acid Rain Control Act of 1985.'' It calls for reducing SO/sub 2/ emissions by 10 million tons annually. While the language of S.52 and similar bills is not specific on causes and effects of acid rain, the testimony before Congressional committees made it clear that the concerns focus on the actual or potential acidification of lakes and soils by acid rain, and actual or potential impacts of acid rain on fish, other aquatic life, trees, crops, and human health. This article assesses the merits of these contentions about acid rain by examining technical evidence that relates SO/sub 2/ emissions to the acidity of rain to actual or potential environmental impacts.

  10. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  11. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  12. Edge effects in a forest mosaic: implications for oak regeneration in the Highlands of Chiapas, Mexico. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    López-Barrera, Fabiola

    Forest edges created by scattered-patch clear-cutting have become a common landscape feature in tropical montane forests, including pine-oak and evergreen cloud forests. Forest-edge-pasture gradients were characterised ...

  13. On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part I: Satellite Observations and Rain Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Haiyan

    and freshwater flooding is the number one cause of death from hurricanes in the United States (Elsberry 2002 1998­2000, Lonfat et al. (2004) showed that the maximum azimuthally averaged rainfall rate is about 12. of rain (24 h) 1 ] and Tropical Storm Allison (2001, $6 billion in damages, 27 deaths, 35­40 in. of rain

  14. West Texas Rain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Commission, Culberson County Underground Water District and county officials to install a 2,500-gallon rainwater harvesting tank at the Culberson County Courthouse. West Texas Rain Rainwater harvesting demonstration sites save water and money (Above... Left) One of the three rainwater harvesting demonstrations is located at the Culberson County Courthouse in Van Horn. This 2,500-gallon tank has been installed to catch and store the rainwater. (Above Right) Landscape irrigation using the harvested...

  15. Virtual Field Trip: Temperate Rain Forest Knysna Forest Biome near

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Disturbance #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs Severity: high Size: large Frequency: 50-90 yrs Severity: low Size: small Fire in the PNW Natural Disturbance #12;Vegetation Succession #12;Species

  16. Heat and moisture transfer through building envelope components subjected to outdoor weather conditions including rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayamaha, S.E.G. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Singapore experiences a warm and humid climate with abundant rainfall during the entire year. Such conditions are typical of tropical climates where many of today`s metropolitan cities are situated. Rain has been found to affect the thermal performance of building components in two ways, namely, by cooling the surface during rain and thereafter by drying of the absorbed moisture after rain. However, existing software used for predicting the thermal performance of building components do not consider such effects and are therefore inadequate for accurate estimation of the thermal performance of building components in tropical climates. To overcome these limitations, this study was carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and moisture flow through porous building materials exposed to outdoor conditions such as solar radiation and rain.

  17. Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    A. : The Tropical Forest and Fire Emis- sions Experiment:W. M. : The Trop- ical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  18. Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: The Event Ecology of Migration and Forest Conversion in the Sierra de Lacandn National Park, Guatemala1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    1 Proximate and Underlying Causes of Tropical Deforestation: The Event Ecology of Migration-farm") resource use, while population researchers have largely ignored rural-to-rural migration. The way in which in another place has been inadequately explored. This paper investigates the primary proximate and underlying

  19. Controlling acid rain : policy issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01

    The policy and regulatory ramifications of U.S. acid rain control programs are examined; particularly, the alternative of a receptor-oriented strategy as constrasted to emission-oriented proposals (e.g., the Mitchell bill) ...

  20. Optical Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996TechnologiesDistribution, and FilmRain Gauge and

  1. Reducing uncertainty in predictions of the response of Amazonian forests to climate change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rowland, Lucy Miranda

    2013-07-01

    Amazonia contains the largest expanse of tropical forest in the world and is globally significant as a store of carbon, a regulator of climate and an area of high species diversity. The ability of the Amazonian forests ...

  2. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  3. Rain, Rain, Don't Go Away Taking a 360-Degree View of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Rain, Rain, Don't Go Away Taking a 360-Degree View of Water The Science of Photography National Flood Studies Field Campaign ­ 6 Taking a 360-Degree View of Water ­ 8 From GLOBE Star Student to GLOBE

  4. Virtual Field Trip: Temperate Rain Forest Douglas Fir and Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Disturbance Cascade Creek fire on the southwest flank of Mount Adams. Sept 2012 #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs Severity: high Size: large Frequency: 50-90 yrs Severity: low Size: small Fire in the PNW Natural Disturbance #12;Vegetation Succession #12;Species and Trophic relationships Pacific Giant

  5. The Effect of Rain on ERS Scatterometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    measurements in rainy conditions [1] [2]. In a raining area, rain striking the water surface creates splashThe Effect of Rain on ERS Scatterometer Measurements Congling Nie and David G. Long Department evidence of rain surface per- turbation in recent studies of surface radar backscatter, the rain effects

  6. Can N 2 O stable isotopes and isotopomers be useful tools to characterize sources and microbial pathways of N 2 O production and consumption in tropical soils?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    from tropical forest soils, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 14,2 O source partitioning in soils: recent progress, remaininga temperate grassland soil after fertiliser application,

  7. Tropical Forest Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergyTrail

  8. The Nitrogen Paradox in Tropical Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , by an abundance of N-fixing plants, and by sustained export of bioavailable N at the ecosystem scale. However and biogeochemical cycles through their vast exchanges of energy, water, carbon, and nutrients with the global, recycle, and export (via leaching and denitrification) very large quantities of N (e.g., Davidson et al

  9. Long range transport of acid rain precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, James A.

    1983-01-01

    A model of the long range transport of primary and secondary pollutants derived by Fay and Rosenzweig (1) is applied to the problem of the transport of acid rain precursors. The model describes the long term average (annual ...

  10. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Brazil | Amazon | land use | micrometeorology D eforestation in the tropics affects the land–atmosphere ex- change of trace gases and energyand energy (W·m ?2 ) ?uxes, calculated as (? = logged ? unlogged), in Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil.

  11. World Bank to raise $250M for avoided deforestation in tropics World Bank to raise $250M for avoided deforestation in tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Street Journal. The $250 million fund will reward Indonesia, Brazil, Congo and other tropical forest argue that the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation (RED) initiative, launched in 2005 by the United their forests to offset greenhouse gas emissionsm. Meanwhile, last month Brazil -- which has the world's largest

  12. Auritella foveata, a new species of Inocybaceae (Agaricales) from tropical India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matheny, P. Brandon

    Auritella foveata, a new species of Inocybaceae (Agaricales) from tropical India P. Brandon Matheny & Matheny is described as new from mixed evergreen forests in tropical India. The species is distinctive due, systematics. Introduction India is exceedingly rich in fungal diversity (Manoharachary et al. 2005). Indeed

  13. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  14. Extreme flood sensitivity to snow and forest harvest, western Cascades, Oregon, United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Extreme flood sensitivity to snow and forest harvest, western Cascades, Oregon, United States J. A; published 3 December 2010. [1] We examined the effects of snow, event size, basin size, and forest harvest delivered 75% more water to soils than rain events. Peak discharges of >10 year rainonsnow events were

  15. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and ?, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  16. Why we started a Volunteer Rain Gauge Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    in their backyards #12;4-inch diameter High capacity rain gauges Aluminum foil-wrapped Styrofoam hail pads Snow

  17. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  18. Sediment detachment by rain power Emmanuel J. Gabet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabet, Emmanuel "Manny"

    , washload, kinematic wave Citation: Gabet, E. J., and T. Dunne, Sediment detachment by rain power, Water, detaching soil particles and displacing water. We use the term, rain power, to describe the rate at whichSediment detachment by rain power Emmanuel J. Gabet Department of Geological Sciences, University

  19. Berry Brook Watershed 2011 Rain Barrel Sale for Dover Residents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Allowing rain water to soak into the soil decreases stormwater runoff and helps recharge your groundwaterBerry Brook Watershed 2011 Rain Barrel Sale for Dover Residents Order Online: www Road Dover, NH 03824 Final day to ORDER: Orders must reach SkyJuice by June 18 Pick up your Rain Barrel

  20. An empirical approach to retrieving monthly evapotranspiration over Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negron Juarez, RI; Goulden, ML; Myneni, RB; Fu, R; Bernardes, S; Gao, H

    2008-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andEnergy and water dynamics of a central Amazonian rain forest.energy exchange of a pasture and a mature transitional tropical forest

  1. Heavy rains hamper Louisiana gas line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, C.

    1983-06-01

    Despite heavy rains and flooding a 36-mile gas pipeline loop for Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. was completed from north of Starks (at the end of Transco's south Louisiana lateral) to the Lake Charles area. Somastic-coated, 42-in. grade X-60 pipe comprises 90% of the route. The contract included multiple 30-42 in. fabrications, installation of six 42-in. gate valves, and expansion of the Gillis compressor station.

  2. Climate drying and associated forest decline in the lowlands of northern Guatemala during the late Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate drying and associated forest decline in the lowlands of northern Guatemala during the late 2008 Keywords: Guatemala Holocene Lake sediments Environmental changes Tropical palaeoclimate of northern Guatemala. The question remains as to whether this vegetation change was driven exclusively

  3. Climate and the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Presenter: Rick Lumpkin AOML Program Review 4-6 March 2014 What drives Tropical Atlantic climate changes and what are their impacts? #12;AOML Program Review2 Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Why this matters to NOAA and to society: Climate variability in the Tropical Atlantic

  4. Forest sector: A world bank policy paper. Sector forestal: Documento de politica del banco mundial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Forests are the most extensive terrestrial ecosystem, and nearly 500 million people depend on forests for their livelihood. Since the World Bank issued its forestry sector policy paper in 1978, there has been growing concern about the accelerated rate of destruction of the remaining primary forests in various parts of the world. The policy paper identifies two key challenges: to slow the alarmingly rapid rates of deforestation, especially (although not exclusively) in the tropical moist forests, and to ensure adequate planting of new trees to meet the rapidly growing demand for fuelwood in developing countries. The Bank intends to move vigorously to promote the conservation of natural forests and the sustainable development of managed forestry resources.

  5. Rain Machine (Solar Still) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE98Rain Machine (Solar

  6. Jack Rains | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItemPolarTool andJack Rains

  7. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  8. GARDENSA RAIN GARDEN MANUAL FOR SOUTH CAROLINA As development increases, so

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    #12;Rain gardens should be located in an area to which rain water typically flows. If a depression a storm will produce more than 1 inch of rain in 24 hours, excess water should be able to leave the rain an overflow so that excess water from larger storms can be diverted out of the rain garden. To prevent

  9. Soil Taxonomy and Land Evaluationfor Forest Establishment1 HaruyoshiIkawa2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Taxonomy and Land Evaluationfor Forest Establishment1 HaruyoshiIkawa2 Abstract: Soil Taxonomy, the United States system of soil classification, can be used for land evaluation for selected purposes. One use is forest establish- ment in the tropics, andthe soil family category is especially

  10. Capture and Characterization of Wind-Driven Rain during Tropical Cyclones and Supercell Thunderstorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disdrometers measure the induced voltage from the displacement of an aluminum covered styrofoam sensor

  11. Sulfur controls edge closer in acid-rain debate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-10-04

    The role of airborne sulfur emissions from midwestern and southern coal-fired power plants in exacerbating the acid rain problem is discussed. This problem is discussed from the standpoint of legislation, compliance costs, scrubber performance and cost, and chemistry of acid rains.

  12. Simultaneous Wind and Rain Retrieval for ERS Scatterometer Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Simultaneous Wind and Rain Retrieval for ERS Scatterometer Measurements Congling Nie and David G on the ESCAT wind-only retrieval has been evaluated. For high incidence angle measurements, the additional scattering of rain causes estimated wind speeds to appear higher than expected. It is also noted

  13. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 18I1976 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................ 6 Water Inputs .........................................6 Precipitation Measurement

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Karl Kong, Pei Wen Lei, Yabo Li, Rain Yuan Rain Tian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that are currently used to collect food scraps at UBC are cleaned at the Composting Facility located at the south, Yabo Li, Rain Yuan Rain Tian AN INVETIGATION INTO ORGANIC WASTE BIN LINERS APSC 262 April 10, 2014 1036 Technology and Society Instructor Name: Paul Winkelman AN INVETIGATION INTO ORGANIC WASTE BIN LINERS

  15. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  16. Acid rain in China. Rapid industrialization has put citizens and ecosystems at risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorjoern Larssen; Espen Lydersen; Dagang Tang [and others] [Norwegian Institute for Water Research and University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2006-01-15

    Acid rain emerged as an important environmental problem in China in the late 1970s. Many years of record economic growth have been accompanied by increased energy demand, greater coal combustion, and larger emissions of pollutants. As a result of significant emissions and subsequent deposition of sulfur, widespread acid rain is observed in southern and southwestern China. In fact, the deposition of sulfur is in some places higher than what was reported from the 'black triangle' in central Europe in the early 1980s. In addition, nitrogen is emitted from agriculture, power production, and a rapidly increasing number of cars. As a result, considerable deposition of pollutants occurs in forested areas previously thought to be pristine. Little is known about the effects of acid deposition on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in China. This article presents the current situation and what to expect in the future, largely on the basis of results from a five-year Chinese-Norwegian cooperative project. In the years ahead, new environmental challenges must be expected if proper countermeasures are not put into place. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (?) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a ? of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing ? to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  18. TROPICAL FORESTRY Spring 2014 / Tuesdays Periods 4-5 (10:40-12:35); Wednesdays Period 4 (10:40-11:30)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    product extract and services, and the sustainability and tradeoffs in production. We cover current formal-timber forest product extraction, and payment for environmental services. The class will focus on ecological and non-timber production from natural and planted forests in the tropics 2. Gain understanding

  19. Presentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the production chain MalaysiaResearch and development in energy alternative from biomass through briquetting and forest industries GhanaDevelopment of energy alternatives for the efficient utilization of woodPresentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme

  20. Fog and Soil Weathering as Sources of Nutrients in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    265 Fog and Soil Weathering as Sources of Nutrients in a California Redwood Forest Holly A. Ewing,1. Firestone,4 and Vanessa K.S. Boukili5 Abstract Fog water deposition is thought to influence the ecological from fog and rain, as well as the fate of these inputs, within a Sonoma County, California, coast

  1. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  2. Geography 102, Spring 2007 Tropical Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office: Bunche Hall 1176 Phone: 206-4590/825-1071, email:raphael@geog.ucla.edu Office Hours: M/W 10:30p the development of Tropical Cli- mates - the laws that govern the movement of air; solar radiation in the Tropics in the Tropics - the Hadley Cells, the Trade Winds, the InterTropical Convergence Zone, the Tropical ocean

  3. Review: Forest Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helman, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Review: Forest Economics By Daowei Zhang and Peter H. PearsePearse, Peter H. Forest Economics. Vancouver, BC: UBC Press,Zhang and Pearse's Forest Economics presents a clear and

  4. Reynolda Campus Wake Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    Reynolda Campus Wake Forest University Wake Forest University Reynolda Campus Office of Research than NIH and NSF, such as the Departments of Commerce, Energy, Homeland Security, and State

  5. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  6. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  7. Ecology 2003 91, 240252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    Journal of Ecology 2003 91, 240­252 © 2003 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Center for Tropical Forest Science, Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute-words: above-ground biomass change, carbon cycle, dry living above-ground bio- mass, tropical rain forest

  8. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, RD; Bruno, RD; da Rocha, HR; de Freitas, HC; Goulden, ML; Miller, SD

    2006-01-01

    Congresso Brasileiro de Meteorologia: S˜ao Paulo, 298–302.Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (2 ° 28 0 S, 54 ° 57 0

  9. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahawi, RA; Dandois, JP; Holl, KD; Nadwodny, D; Reid, JL; Ellis, EC

    2015-01-01

    multirotor hexacopter’ UAV using R.A. Zahawi et al. /and Ellis, 2013). The UAV was equipped with a lithium-unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are a cost-effective

  10. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahawi, RA; Dandois, JP; Holl, KD; Nadwodny, D; Reid, JL; Ellis, EC

    2015-01-01

    Schiffman, R. , 2014. Drones ?ying high as new tool for ?eldS.A. , 2012. Dawn of drone ecology: low-cost autonomousCanopy structure Costa Rica Drone Ecosynth Hexacopter LiDAR

  11. Tropical Forest Fragments Enhance Pollinator Activity in Nearby Coffee Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    y 2002 observ´e la actividad de abejas y la tasa de deposici´on de polen en flores de caf´e a lo´on de polen fueron significativamente mayores en sitios a menos de 100 m de fragmentos de bosque que en

  12. Averting biodiversity collapse in tropical forest protected areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurence, William F.

    2012-08-01

    Thonburi, Bangkok 10150, Thailand. 22Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, Scotland EH3 5LR, UK. 23Tshuapa-Lomami-Lualaba Project, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo. 24Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA. 25National Museum of Natural...

  13. Nocturnal cold air drainage and pooling in a tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulden, M. L.; Miller, S. D.; da Rocha, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    that the degree of thermal stratification, and possibly thethat the degree of thermal stratification, and possibly the

  14. Are tropical forests near a high temperature threshold?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christopher E.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    evaporative demand and Vapor Pressure Deficit (VPD) andslope of the saturation vapor pressure deficit curve (Pa Ka change in vapor pressure deficit or relative humidity

  15. Nitrogen deposition in tropical forests from savanna and deforestation fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Van Der Werf, GR; Morton, DC; Mu, M; Kasibhatla, PS

    2010-01-01

    Burrows JP (2009) Regional NOx emission inversion through aglobal soil-biogenic nox emissions. Journal of Geophysical

  16. Nocturnal cold air drainage and pooling in a tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulden, M. L.; Miller, S. D.; da Rocha, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddyof terrestrial carbon sequestration [Tans et al. , 1990].

  17. Using lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropical forest recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahawi, RA; Dandois, JP; Holl, KD; Nadwodny, D; Reid, JL; Ellis, EC

    2015-01-01

    Lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles will revolutionizelightweight unmanned aerial vehicles to monitor tropicalfrom lightweight unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) are a cost-

  18. Nitrogen deposition in tropical forests from savanna and deforestation fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Van Der Werf, GR; Morton, DC; Mu, M; Kasibhatla, PS

    2010-01-01

    but before the Industrial Revolution) and another cover- inget al. , 2006). Before the Industrial Revolution, humans had

  19. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYorkColoradoBelcher Homes Jump to:OASBellJump

  20. Heavy pollution suppresses light rain in China: observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai R.; Bennartz, Ralph; Chen, Deliang; Wang, Weiguo

    2009-08-15

    Long-term observational data reveal that both the frequency and amount of light rain have decreased in eastern China (EC) for 1956-2005 with high spatial coherency. This is different from the trend of total rainfall observed in EC, which decreases in northern EC and increases in southern EC. To examine the cause of the light rain trends, we analyzed the long-term variability of atmospheric water vapor and its correlation with light rain events. Results show very weak relationships between large-scale moisture transport and light rain in EC. This suggests that light rain trend in EC is not driven by large-scale circulation changes. Because of human activities, pollutant emission has increased dramatically in China for the last few decades, leading to significant reductions in visibility between 1960 and 2000. Cloud-resolving model simulations show that aerosols corresponding to heavily polluted conditions can significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and reduce droplet sizes compared to pristine conditions. This can lead to a significant decline in raindrop concentration and delay raindrop formation because smaller cloud droplets are less efficient in the collision and coalescence processes. Together with weaker convection, the precipitation frequency and amount are significantly reduced in the polluted case. Satellite data also reveal higher CDNC and smaller droplet size over polluted land in EC relative to pristine regions, which is consistent with the model results. This evidence suggests that the significantly increased aerosol particles produced by air pollution are at least partly responsible for the decreased light rain events observed in China over the past fifty years.

  1. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests' carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980's in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country's total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  2. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 4: Mexico: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Cerutti, O.M.; Ordonez, M.J.; Minjarez, R.D. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico) Centro de Ecologia

    1992-08-01

    Estimates of carbon emissions from deforestation in Mexico are derived for the year 1985 and for two contrasting scenarios in 2025. Carbon emissions are calculated through an in-depth review of the existing information on forest cover deforestation mtes and area affected by forest fires as well as on forests` carbon-related biological characteristics. The analysis covers both tropical -- evergreen and deciduous -- and temperate -- coniferous and broadleaf -- closed forests. Emissions from the forest sector are also compared to those from energy and industry. Different policy options for promoting the sustainable management of forest resources in the country are discussed. The analysis indicates that approximately 804,000 hectares per year of closed forests suffered from major perturbations in the mid 1980`s in Mexico, leading to an annual deforestation mte of 668,000 hectares. Seventy five percent of total deforestation is concentrated in tropical forests. The resulting annual carbon balance is estimated in 53.4 million tons per year, and the net committed emissions in 45.5 million tons or 41% and 38%, respectively, of the country`s total for 1985--87. The annual carbon balance from the forest sector in 2025 is expected to decline to 16.5 million tons in the low emissions scenario and to 22.9 million tons in the high emissions scenario. Because of the large uncertainties in some of the primary sources of information, the stated figures should be taken as preliminary estimates.

  3. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia, Canada. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I thank Lula E. Greene, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experi ment

  4. ENJOYING THE RAIN FOREST Nowhere in the world will your eyes observe a greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will see today are the same as those that dazzled the first Spanish explorers more than 500 years ago. You

  5. Impacts of experimentally imposed drought on leaf respiration and morphology in an Amazon rain forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    . C Araga~o1 , Yadvinder Malhi1 , Antonio L. Da Costa5 , Alan P. Braga5 , Paulo L. Gonc¸alves5 , Joao De Athaydes5 , Mauricio Da Costa5 , Samuel S. Almeida6 , Catherine Campbell7 , Vaughan Hurry7

  6. Temporal and Spatial Diversity and Distribution of Arboreal Carabidae (Coleoptera) in a Western Amazonian Rain Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at http://www.jstor.org/page/info the discovery and use of these resources. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support NationalMuseumof NaturalHistory,SmithsonianInstitution,Washington,D.C.20560, U.S.A. and Jon D. Witman

  7. Atmospheric deposition of ^Be by rain events, in central Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Atmospheric deposition of ^Be by rain events, in central Argentina Juri Ayub, J. , Di Gregorio, B Aplicada San Luis. UniversidadNacional de San Luis - CONICET. Ejercito de los Andes 950. Argentina. 2 Buenos Aires, Argentina 3. Escuela de Cienciay Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de San Martin. Martin de

  8. The Acid Rain Program: What it Means to Mountain Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    ://www.epa.gov/airtrends/aqtrends.html #12;5 Title IV - Acid Rain Program · Power Sector Cap & Emission Trading Program for SO2 · 8) & Emission Trading ­ Title V ­ Permits ­ Title VI ­ Stratospheric Ozone 1http) · Environmental Monitoring #12;6 Recent Programs · NOx Budget Trading Program (NBP) 2000 · Ozone season NOx Cap

  9. Water and Energy Savings, and Carbon Emission Reductions From Rain Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Water and Energy Savings, and Carbon Emission Reductions From Rain Water Harvesting, Combined Heat Infrastructure Ecology Decentralized Water Resource Development: Low Impact Development (LID) Decentralized Energy Production: Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Policies for Adoption of Rain Water Harvesting

  10. The Role of Wave Energy Accumulation in Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Tropical North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    The Role of Wave Energy Accumulation in Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Tropical North Atlantic "wave energy"). Relative vorticity increases locally leading to an increase in the likelihood scales of interaction. The importance of wave energy accumulation for tropical cyclogenesis

  11. Tropical bases by regular projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hept, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    We consider the tropical variety $\\mathcal{T}(I)$ of a prime ideal $I$ generated by the polynomials $f_1, ..., f_r$ and revisit the regular projection technique introduced by Bieri and Groves from a computational point of view. In particular, we show that $I$ has a short tropical basis of cardinality at most $r + \\codim I + 1$ at the price of increased degrees, and we provide a computational description of these bases.

  12. Observations of Precipitation Size and Fall Speed Characteristics within Coexisting Rain and Wet Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuter, Sandra

    Snow SANDRA E. YUTER Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State are compared among samples obtained in mixed precipitation (rain and wet snow) and rain in the Oregon Cascade Mountains and in dry snow in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Coexisting rain and snow particles

  13. Photometric Model of a Rain Drop Kshitiz Garg and Shree K. Nayar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayar, Shree K.

    conditions such as haze and fog, rain drops are large and visible to the naked eye. Each drop refracts and photometric models show that each rain drop behaves like a wide-angle lens that redirects light from a large of rain is highly complex. Unlike the particles that cause other weather conditions such as haze and fog

  14. Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Aerosol control on depth of warm rain in convective clouds Mahen Konwar,1 R. S. Maheskumar,1 J. R effective radius (re) increased with distance above cloud base (D). Warm rain became detectable, i.e., rain water content >0.01 g/Kg, at the tops of growing convective clouds when re exceeded 12 mm. The re

  15. Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect Haipeng Guo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    is low, and the maximum water-level rise is less than the maximum air pressure induced by rain and the water table depth. Citation: Guo, H., J. J. Jiao, and E. P. Weeks (2008), Rain-induced subsurface] Water table fluctuation may induce subsurface airflow [Jiao and Li, 2004] and airflow caused by rain

  16. RAIN AND WIND ESTIMATION FROM SEAWINDS IN HURRICANES AT ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    RAIN AND WIND ESTIMATION FROM SEAWINDS IN HURRICANES AT ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION Brent A. Williams method for estimating wind and rain in hurricanes from SeaWinds at ultra-high resolution is developed. We use a hurricane model to generate prior distributions for the wind speed, wind di- rection, and rain

  17. An iterative process for international negociations on acid rain in Northern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toint, Philippe

    An iterative process for international negociations on acid rain in Northern Europe using a general 138.48.4.14) #12; An iterative process for international negotiations on acid rain in Northern Europe transboundary pollution problem related to acid rain in Northern Europe. This simulation shows the need

  18. Protecting climate with forests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Changing feedbacks in the climate–biosphere system Front.313–32 Bonan G B 2008 Forests and climate change: forcings,feedbacks, and the climate benefits of forests Science

  19. MECS 2006- Forest Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  20. A General Systems Theory for Rain Formation in Warm Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-15

    A cumulus cloud model which can explain the observed characteristics of warm rain formation in monsoon clouds is presented. The model is based on classical statistical physical concepts and satisfies the principle of maximum entropy production. Atmospheric flows exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations that are ubiquitous to all dynamical systems in nature, such as physical, chemical, social, etc and are characterized by inverse power law form for power (eddy energy) spectrum signifying long-range space-time correlations. A general systems theory model for atmospheric flows developed by the author is based on the concept that the large eddy energy is the integrated mean of enclosed turbulent (small scale) eddies. This model gives scale-free universal governing equations for cloud growth processes. The model predicted cloud parameters are in agreement with reported observations, in particular, the cloud dropsize distribution. Rain formation can occur in warm clouds within 30minutes lifetime under favourable conditions of moisture supply in the environment.

  1. Cometary panspermia explains the red rain of Kerala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey Louis; A. Santhosh Kumar

    2003-10-05

    Red coloured rain occurred in many places of Kerala in India during July to September 2001 due to the mixing of huge quantity of microscopic red cells in the rainwater. Considering its correlation with a meteor airbust event, this phenomenon raised an extraordinary question whether the cells are extraterrestrial. Here we show how the observed features of the red rain phenomenon can be explained by considering the fragmentation and atmospheric disintegration of a fragile cometary body that presumably contains a dense collection of red cells. Slow settling of cells in the stratosphere explains the continuation of the phenomenon for two months. The red cells under study appear to be the resting spores of an extremophilic microorganism. Possible presence of these cells in the interstellar clouds is speculated from its similarity in UV absorption with the 217.5 nm UV extinction feature of interstellar clouds.

  2. Global Forests Syllabus -1 GLOBAL FORESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    , and conservation. Another explores ongoing strategies that seek to sustain forests through markets and other (environmental, socioeconomic and political) under which forest products are harvested and transformed. A variety stakeholders & power Reading comments 18 Changing scenarios Reading comments 20 Costs, benefits

  3. 1984 issues: gas decontrol, energy tax, acid rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, M.

    1983-12-01

    Energy analysts predict that Congress will propose a limited natural gas deregulation bill, an energy tax to offset budget deficits, and acid rain legislation that will focus on scrubber requirements for boilers. Politics will play an important role in whether legislation materializes since Democrats generally favor federal conservation programs and Republicans want to speed up deregulation. The November election will indicate which direction Congress will lean. (DCK)

  4. Rains County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy Marketing Corp Jump to: navigation,Rainier,Rains

  5. Forest Resources and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the forest resource. Our aim is that British forests ­ from their creation to maturity and regeneration and harvesting, and the physical properties of stands, trees and timber. Scope of our work Our research focuses expertise in forecasting forest growth is now applied to carbon assessment and management. We also work

  6. Forest Research Coporate Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Coporate Plan 2006­2009 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Corporate Plan 2006­2009 1Corporate Plan 2006­2009 #12;Chief Executive Professor Jim Lynch Forest Research Alice Holt Lodge Farnham Surrey GU10 4LH Tel: 01420 22255 E-mail: research

  7. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2000-2001 An agency of the Forestry Commission #12-SMITH Chief Research Officer Forest Research Members DR A.R. GRIFFIN Renewable Resources Division Shell Research Organisation Spring 2001 Advisory Committee on Forest Research Chief Executive Chief Research

  8. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  9. Prince George Forest Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxson, Darwyn

    Prince George Forest Region Forest Resources & Practices Team May 1999 Note #PG-20 · ExtensionAssociate,UniversityofNorthern BritishColumbia 2 MSc, RPBio, Silvifauna Research, Prince George, BC 3 PhD, R.M. Sagar and Associates, Prince George, BC #12;Ministry of Forests, 5th Floor, 1011 - 4th Avenue, Prince George, BC V2L 3H9

  10. LETTER The incidence and implications of clouds for cloud forest plant water relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Greg

    functioning by 1) altering leaf energy balance and suppressing plant transpiration, 2) adding water into leaves. Clouds alter microclimate by changing energy balance and thus reducing vapour pressure deficit.4% of the world's tropical forest area (Scatena et al. 2010). Unfortunately, TMCF is extremely vulnerable

  11. Estimating tropical cyclone precipitation risk in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    This paper uses a new rainfall algorithm to simulate the long-term tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology in Texas based on synthetic tropical cyclones generated from National Center for Atmospheric Research/National ...

  12. Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: Observing, Understanding Observing System for Climate #12;Performance 4 Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: A coordinated multi-national effort to develop and sustain moored buoy observing systems for climate research

  13. The Dynamics and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason A.

    2010-01-15

    Through methodology unique for tropical cyclones in peer-reviewed literature, this study explores how the dynamics of moist convection affects the predictability of tropical cyclogenesis. Mesoscale models are used to perform ...

  14. The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason Allen

    2005-02-17

    This thesis contains an observational analysis of the genesis of Tropical Storm Allison (2001). Using a paradigm of tropical cyclone formation as the superposition of potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, the importance of different scales of PV...

  15. A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

  16. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water sources derived from small (rain events, A. ordosia took advantage of deeper soil waterSummer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse

  17. Geography 102, Spring 2006 Tropical Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hours: Tu/Th 9:30p.m-10:30p.m., and by appointment Office: Bunche Hall 1176 Phone: 206 that underly the development of Tropical Cli- mates - the laws that govern the movement of air; solar radiation Circulation in the Tropics - the Hadley Cells, the Trade Winds, the InterTropical Convergence Zone

  18. Geography 102, Spring 2008 Tropical Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall 1176 Phone: 206-4590/825-1071, email:raphael@geog.ucla.edu Office Hours: M/W 10:00a.m-11:00a Cli- mates - the laws that govern the movement of air; solar radiation in the Tropics; temperature - the Hadley Cells, the Trade Winds, the InterTropical Convergence Zone, the Tropical ocean circulation

  19. Light rain events change over North America, Europe and Asia for 1973-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2010-10-28

    Long-term daily precipitation data from NCDC are used to investigate the changes of light rain events from 1973-2009 over North America, Europe and Asia. Results reveal that the trend of light rain events presents a remarkably diverse feature in different regions, while an overall decrease trend can be found over the continents in northern hemisphere. In North America, most of stations show a decrease trend for light rain on the annual basis but a decrease trend can also be found for moderate and heavy rain. The opposite trends are observed over the stations in Europe and the trend of light rain is not significant when averaged for all the stations. In Asia, especially East Asia, the light rain days show an overwhelming decrease trend with high spatial coherency. Meanwhile the moderate and heavy rain events (> 10 mm/day) have increased, suggesting a remarkable shift of precipitation from light to heavy rain in East Asia. While both the warming at a global scale and increased atmospheric aerosols due to air pollution at a regional scale (e.g. East Asia) may have affected the light rain changes, it remains a challenging task to quantitatively detect and separate the cause of light rain changes in different regions. ?

  20. Changes in Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) retrievals due to the orbit boost estimated from rain gauge data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMoss, Jeremy

    2009-06-02

    to 403 km in August 2001. The change in orbit altitude produced small changes in a wide range of observing parameters, including field-of-view size and viewing angles. Due to natural climatic variability, it is not possible to evaluate possible changes...

  1. Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow Your PowerWeatherize »Rain or Shine:

  2. Automated Rain Sampler for Real time pH and Conductivity Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weerasinghe, R; Jayananda, M K; Sonnadara, D U J

    2015-01-01

    To monitor the acidity of rain water in real time, a rain water sampling system was developed. The rain sampler detects the initial rain after a dry spell and collects a water sample. Before performing the measurements, the pH probe is calibrated using a standard buffer solution whereas the conductivity probe is calibrated using deionized water. After calibrating the probes the pH and the conductivity of the collected rain water sample are measured using the pH and the conductivity probe. Weather parameters such as air temperature, humidity and pressure are also recorded simultaneously. The pH and conductivity measurement data including weather parameters are transmitted to central station using a GSM modem for further analysis. The collected rain water sample is preserved at the remote monitoring station for post chemical analysis. A programmable logic controller controls the entire process.

  3. Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance April 2014 Forest Products Trade between China. Whiletheglobaleconomicdownturnaffectedconsumptioninmanycountries,China'stradewithAfricaremained mostly unaffected. In particular, commodities, such as oil and gas

  4. With Chest Waders, Hip Boots, Or Rain Gear R. O. Parker Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in addition to the boots and rain gear (fig. 1). FEET FIRST When you fall feet first into the water, airWith Chest Waders, Hip Boots, Or Rain Gear R. O. Parker Jr. Neither chest wade rs, hip boots, nor rain ge a r will cause you to drown if you don't panic . Wade rs, the m ost dreaded of the thre e, can

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855_Raines Draft Rev 4

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management Update Project Management Update Bob Raines Director, Project Management Systems and Assessments * Everybody's Favorite Subject Cost Estimating * Cost Estimating * EVMS...

  6. Journal of Tropical Ecology (2006) 22:431440. Copyright 2006 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0266467406003221 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    2006-01-01

    Williams-Linera2 and Jos´e Mar´ia Rey Benayas Departamento de Ecolog´ia Funcional, Instituto de Ecolog (anemochorous) and Myrsine coriacea (endozoochorous) did not differ in their rate of colonization between an important role as a source of propagules for the colonization of aban- doned fields. In tropical forests

  7. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appeals Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses...

  8. Acid rain control strategists overlook dust removal benefits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    Various strategies for controlling acid rain by reducing SO{sub 2} from existing utilities have failed to take into account the incidental particulate removal abilities of SO{sub 2} scrubbers. This has resulted in over-estimating the costs of acid rain control by 25% or more. This oversight has also caused utilities to invest in preliminary engineering of precipitator upgrades which will never have to be made if scrubbers are installed. While it seems inexplicable that a factor of this importance could have been overlooked by the industry, it is because of the unique situation in old U.S. utility power plants. These plants have relatively inefficient particulate control equipment which is not subject to new source performance standards. New power plants incorporate highly efficient particulate control devices so the ability of the downstream scrubbers to remove dust is irrelevant. The very small amount of particulate entering the scrubber from a highly efficient precipitator could be offset by escaping sulfate particles from a poorly operated scrubber. So an informal guideline was established to indicate that the scrubber had no overall effect on particulate emissions. The industry has generalized upon this guideline when, in fact, it only applies to new plants. The McIlvaine Company in its FGD Knowledge Network has thoroughly documented evidence that SO{sub 2} scrubbers will remove as much as 95% of the particulate being emitted from the relatively low efficiency precipitators operating on the nations existing coal-fired power plants.

  9. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16 Forest in Rural Studies 17 International

  10. Department of Forest Resource Management Annual Report 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensing 13 Forest Inventory and Empirical Ecosystem Modeling 14 Forest Planning 15 Forest Techology 16

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 45, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 621 A C-Band Wind/Rain Backscatter Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    signature is altered by rain. Rain striking the water creates splash products including rings, stalksIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 45, NO. 3, MARCH 2007 621 A C-Band Wind/Rain--With the confirmed evidence of rain surface pertur- bation in recent studies, the rain effects on C

  12. The tropical double description method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allamigeon, Xavier; Goubault, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We develop a tropical analogue of the classical double description method allowing one to compute an internal representation (in terms of vertices) of a polyhedron defined externally (by inequalities). The heart of the tropical algorithm is a characterization of the extreme points of a polyhedron in terms of a system of constraints which define it. We show that checking the extremality of a point reduces to checking whether there is only one minimal strongly connected component in an hypergraph. The latter problem can be solved in almost linear time, which allows us to eliminate quickly redundant generators. We report extensive tests (including benchmarks from an application to static analysis) showing that the method outperforms experimentally the previous ones by orders of magnitude. The present tools also lead to worst case bounds which improve the ones provided by previous methods.

  13. Forest Research Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2005­2006 The research agency of the Forestry Commission #12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts I 2005­2006 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor to be printed 24 July 2006 HC 1407 The research agency of the Forestry Commission Edinburgh: The Stationery

  14. CERTIFIED FOREST PRODUCTS MARKETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    industry sectors with PEFC C-o-C certification June 2003 Construction 1% Pulp & paper 4% Wood manufacturing% Sawnwood 13% Panels 9% RW & primary 5% Windows & doors 5% Pulp & paper 5% DIY products 6% Trade & retailers 5% Other primary forest industries 6% Sawmilling 39% Timber trade 43% #12;Forest industry sectors

  15. Water Resources Forests & Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Resources Forests & Water More than half of the nation's freshwater supply originates on forestland. Healthy and sustainable forests can help ensure a continuous supply of clean and abundant water. Not only does forestland provide the cleanest water of any land use, it also helps absorb rainfall

  16. Forest Estate Modelling (Part 2) Forest Research Institute, Rotorua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    adequate models of growth and yield, and data on costs and prices, it is not too difficult to find "optiForest Estate Modelling (Part 2) O. Garcia Forest Research Institute, Rotorua The Problem Given after centuries of continued forest management, exist in Europe. Some countries still base their forest

  17. Lodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Very large patches of even-aged forests varying in composition from Fire Regimes in Lodgepole Pine Forests The historic fire regime is dominated by severe, stand-replacing fires. These fires occur at longLodgepole Pine Forest Ecology A foundation for future forest management Claudia Regan ­ Regional

  18. FOREST CERTIFICATION:FOREST CERTIFICATION: BIOLOGICAL BENEFITS ORBIOLOGICAL BENEFITS OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Stewardship Council (FSC) ­ 257 million acres Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC

  19. On the infiltration of rain water through the soil with runo# of the excess water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasano, Antonio

    On the infiltration of rain water through the soil with runo# of the excess water Iacopo Borsi '' Viale Morgagni 67/A, 50134 Firenze, Italy Abstract This paper deals with the modelling of the rain water infiltration through the soil above the aquifer in case of runo# of the excess water. The main feature

  20. Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets David Jon by raindrop impacts. We use high-speed imaging of drop impacts on dry sand to describe the drop (2007), Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets, J

  1. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Water Management through Rain Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (4m x 5m) and can hold vast amounts of water at any given time. The bowl shaped rain garden must is an important parameter since the soil used effects the water absorption ability of the rain garden. The optimalUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Water Management through

  2. The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12­14 mm

  3. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  4. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of forest stands is valuable for studies of the physical environment. Energy balance research centers on howPACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station FOREST SERVICE U.S. DEPARTMENT in relation to climatic and stand variables USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 71 /1971 #12;CONTENTS

  5. The Health of Colorado's Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Health of Colorado's Forests 2009 Report Special Issue: Threats to Colorado's Current and Future Forest Resources #12;Acknowledgements William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International), is the primary author of the 2009 Report on the Health of Colorado's Forests. Thanks to the following Colorado

  6. Howland Forest David Hollinger, USDA Forest Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · An old-growth forest is a unique ecological endpoint · Long-term record of carbon is on factors that regulate long term carbon storage · Infrastructure · Topography experiment (21 ha) Canopy application, 18 kg N ha-1 y-1 (NH4NO3) C Sequestration Assessed in 3 Ways: · Eddy

  7. The land-atmosphere water flux in the tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andfrom a Douglas fir forest using the energy balance approach.measurements of energy partition for Amazonian forest. Quar-

  8. Forest sector: A World Bank policy paper. Secteur forestier: document de politique generale de la banque mondiale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Forests are the most extensive terrestrial ecosystem, and nearly 500 million people depend on forests for their livelihood. Since the World Bank issued its forestry sector policy paper in 1978, there has been growing concern about the accelerated rate of destruction of the remaining primary forests in various parts of the world. The policy paper identifies two key challenges: to slow the alarmingly rapid rates of deforestation, especially (although not exclusively) in the tropical moist forests, and to ensure adequate planting of new trees to meet the rapidly growing demand for fuelwood in developing countries. The Bank intends to move vigorously to promote the conservation of natural forests and the sustainable development of managed forestry resources.

  9. Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified grassland ecosystem in northwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Summer rain pulse size and rainwater uptake by three dominant desert plants in a desertified composition, Rain pulse size, Summer precipitation Abstract To examine the different effects of rain pulse with different pulse sizes based on the changes in the hydrogen isotope ratios (dD) of their stem water 7 days

  10. Computational Statistics Canonical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Hongshik

    : First Author: Yu-Chuan Chen First Author Secondary Information: Order of Authors: Yu-Chuan Chen Hyejung;Computational Statistics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor) Canonical Forest Yu-Chuan Chen

  11. Selecting a Consulting Forester 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19

    Landowners often need professional help after a weather-related disaster has damaged timber stands. A consulting forester can help a landowner develop management strategies that fit the landowner's objectives. This publication includes a checklist...

  12. Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    Forest Fires: Answers to 12 Common Questions 1. Is wildfire bad for forests? No. Some forests need burning on the forest floor 2. What are the types of forest fires? Broadly there are two types: low

  13. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    deposition collectors measure rain water as well as some drymore vertically deposited rain water during the winter thanTable 2). Likewise, bulk rain water NO - –N concentrations

  14. Suppression of rice methane emission by sulfate deposition in simulated acid rain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauci, Vincent

    limitation had been lifted by the simulated acid rain S deposition. Citation: Gauci, V., N. B. Dise, G process and so the duration of paddy inundation and the employment of mid-season field drainage both

  15. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Elizabeth M.

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

  16. Environmental Externalities in Electric Power Markets: Acid Rain, Urban Ozone, and Climate Change

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the emissions resulting from the generation of electricity by utilities and their role in contributing to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and climate change.

  17. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings : evidence from the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Elizabeth M.

    1998-01-01

    The U.S. Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate ...

  18. ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade: Scenarios and challenges:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European Conference ­ 4 ­ 5 May 2010 ­Phnom Penh 2 Long Ratanakoma (Cambodia) - Climate change, forest conversion

  19. Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Phenomena Exhibited by Forest Fires J. S. BARROWS U. S. Forest Service ABSTRACT Forest fire phenomena of forest fires is related to the International Symposium topic of Fire Models. Analysis of the behavior of large-scale forest fires and smaller scale experimental fires in forest fuels permits critical

  20. Integrated Title V/acid rain permits: Transitioning through initial permit issuance and reopenings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomfield, C. [Environmental Protection Agency, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Titles IV and V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Act or CAA) created two new stationary source permitting programs, one specific to acid rain (Title IV), and a second for operating permits in general (Title V). The Phase 2 portion of the acid rain program was designed to be implemented through the Title V operating permit program, thereby subjecting all Phase 2 acid rain sources to the requirements of Title V. Permits issued pursuant to Phase 2 of the acid rain program will be viewed as a self-contained portion of the Title V operating permit and will be governed by regulations promulgated under both Title IV and Title V. The requirements imposed by Title IV may not always be consistent with the broader operating permit program requirements of Title V, and when inconsistency occurs, the acid rain requirements will take precedence. This nonalignment will perhaps be most apparent during two stages of initial permitting: (1) the transition period following Title V program approval when permit application, issuance, and effective dates differ between the two programs, and (2) at the point when acid rain permits must be reopened to incorporate Phase 2 NO{sub x} requirements. This paper explores strategies for streamlining implementation of the two programs with particular focus on these two coordination issues.

  1. Morphology of rain water channelization in systematically varied model sandy soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; C. M. Cejas; R. Barrois; R. Dreyfus; D. J. Durian

    2014-03-13

    We visualize the formation of fingered flow in dry model sandy soils under different raining conditions using a quasi-2d experimental set-up, and systematically determine the impact of soil grain diameter and surface wetting property on water channelization phenomenon. The model sandy soils we use are random closely-packed glass beads with varied diameters and surface treatments. For hydrophilic sandy soils, our experiments show that rain water infiltrates into a shallow top layer of soil and creates a horizontal water wetting front that grows downward homogeneously until instabilities occur to form fingered flows. For hydrophobic sandy soils, in contrast, we observe that rain water ponds on the top of soil surface until the hydraulic pressure is strong enough to overcome the capillary repellency of soil and create narrow water channels that penetrate the soil packing. Varying the raindrop impinging speed has little influence on water channel formation. However, varying the rain rate causes significant changes in water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. At a fixed raining condition, we combine the effects of grain diameter and surface hydrophobicity into a single parameter and determine its influence on water infiltration depth, water channel width, and water channel separation. We also demonstrate the efficiency of several soil water improvement methods that relate to rain water channelization phenomenon, including pre-wetting sandy soils at different level before rainfall, modifying soil surface flatness, and applying superabsorbent hydrogel particles as soil modifiers.

  2. Forest Research Wildfires in Wales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,000 recorded grassfires and nearly 550 forest fires in South Wales; this equates to eight times more per unit

  3. Forest fires: from economic assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    1 Forest fires: from economic assessment to governance Laura Secco, Davide Pettenella and Mauro context) Contribute of ongoing research (A model to quantify forest fires costs) Proposal for future research (An ACF approach to stakeholders analysis) Final remarks Background Background - 1 Forest fires

  4. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  5. Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    Forest Biomass and Lignocellulosic Materials Forest-derived biopolymers lignin and cellulose of sustainable products such as nanocellulose and biocomposites from forest biomass; biorefining to develop high

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  7. developing and forests: finding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ://www.ncreif.org/indices/timberland.phtml. T he chief attribute of the forestry asset class is its superior historical risk- return pro le producing growing sites and lower establishment and labour costs than the temperate forests of mature products make Africa an attractive forestry option. Typical emerging market risks as well as environmental

  8. FOREST CERTIFICATION January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the unintended consequence of government regulation in the global marketplace has been to shift the supply agendas of industrial associations, environmental organizations, government agencies, and forest landowner, certification has become a focal point for the wide range of social, cultural, environmental and economic

  9. Forest Service Research Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management problems, such as Planning-Programing-Budgeting, will require automated procedures to col- lect in terms of products and services and alter- native methods of producing them . The out- puts from PPBS- semble forest data up to an economic limit of about 50,000 lines of map data at an average cost of 0

  10. Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breger, Dwayne; Rizzo, Rob

    2011-09-20

    In the state’s Electricity Restructuring Act of 1998, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts recognized the opportunity and strategic benefits to diversifying its electric generation capacity with renewable energy. Through this legislation, the Commonwealth established one of the nation’s first Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard (RPS) programs, mandating the increasing use of renewable resources in its energy mix. Bioenergy, meeting low emissions and advanced technology standards, was recognized as an eligible renewable energy technology. Stimulated by the state’s RPS program, several project development groups have been looking seriously at building large woody biomass generation units in western Massachusetts to utilize the woody biomass resource. As a direct result of this development, numerous stakeholders have raised concerns and have prompted the state to take a leadership position in pursuing a science based analysis of biomass impacts on forest and carbon emissions, and proceed through a rulemaking process to establish prudent policy to support biomass development which can contribute to the state’s carbon reduction commitments and maintain safeguards for forest sustainability. The Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative (SFBI) was funded by the Department of Energy and started by the Department of Energy Resources before these contentious biomass issues were fully raised in the state, and continued throughout the substantive periods of this policy development. Thereby, while SFBI maintained its focus on the initially proposed Scope of Work, some aspects of this scope were expanded or realigned to meet the needs for groundbreaking research and policy development being advanced by DOER. SFBI provided DOER and the Commonwealth with a foundation of state specific information on biomass technology and the biomass industry and markets, the most comprehensive biomass fuel supply assessment for the region, the economic development impact associated with biomass usage, an understanding of forest management trends including harvesting and fuel processing methods, and the carbon profile of utilizing forest based woody biomass for the emerging biomass markets. Each of the tasks and subtasks have provided an increased level of understanding to support new directives, policies and adaptation of existing regulations within Massachusetts. The project has provided the essential information to allow state policymakers and regulators to address emerging markets, while ensuring forest sustainability and understanding the complex science on CO2 accounting and impacts as a result of biomass harvesting for power generation. The public at large and electricity ratepayers in Massachusetts will all benefit from the information garnered through this project. This is a result of the state’s interest to provide financial incentives to only biomass projects that demonstrate an acceptable carbon profile, an efficient use of the constrained supply of fuel, and the harvest of biomass to ensure forest sustainability. The goals of the Massachusetts Sustainable Forest Bioenergy Initiative as proposed in 2006 were identified as: increase the diversity of the Massachusetts energy mix through biomass; promote economic development in the rural economy through forest industry job creation; help fulfill the state’s energy and climate commitments under the Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard and Climate Protection Plan; assist the development of a biomass fuel supply infrastructure to support energy project demands; provide education and outreach to the public on the benefits and impacts of bioenergy; improve the theory and practice of sustainable forestry in the Commonwealth. Completed project activities summarized below will demonstrate the effectiveness of the project in meeting the above goals. In addition, as discussed above, Massachusetts DOER needed to make some modifications to its work plan and objectives during the term of this project due to changing public policy demands brought forth in the course of the public discours

  11. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature 'McIntosh', 'Empire', and 'Golden Delicious' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and in 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and pH 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at ph 2.5 in 'Empire'. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in 'McIntosh'. The incidence of russetting on 'Golden Delicious' fruits was ameliorated by the presence of rain-exclusion chambers but was not affected by acid rain. With season-long sprays at pH 2.75, there was a slight delay in maturity and lower weight of 'McIntosh' apples. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  12. Vol. 54, No. 4APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Apr. 1988, p. 979-983 0099-2240/88/040979-05$02.00/0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    from Pristine Tropical Waters MADELINE BERMUDEZ AND TERRY C. HAZENt* Microbial Ecology Laboratory pristine sites in a tropical rain forest. These sites included nonpolluted rivers and water from bromeliads identified as Escherichia coli. Their DNA was isolated and purified, and the base composition (G+C content

  13. Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategy Forests for People Access, recreation & tourism on the national forest estate #12;#12;Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate | 3 Forests for People Access, recreation and tourism on the national forest estate Setting the scene Everyone has a right of responsible access

  14. By Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -intensity lightning fires kept tree density down and the forests were very well adapted to fire because of the healthyBy Sandy Benson Forest Fuels Management Specialist, Nebraska Forest Service Thinning is an excellent management tool for forest landowners to use to improve forest health and productivity

  15. Are Forest Fires Predictable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-23

    Dynamic mean field theory is applied to the problem of forest fires. The starting point is the Monte Carlo simulation in a lattice of million cells. The statistics of the clusters is obtained by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm. We get the map $p_n\\to p_{n+1}$, where $p_n$ is the probability of finding a tree in a cell, and $n$ is the discrete time. We demonstrate that the time evolution of $p$ is chaotic. The arguments are provided by the calculation of the bifurcation diagram and the Lyapunov exponent. The bifurcation diagram reveals several windows of stability, including periodic orbits of length three, five and seven. For smaller lattices, the results of the iteration are in qualitative agreement with the statistics of the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000.

  16. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  17. Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Fire Effects on Forest Soil: Cave Gulch Fire, Helena National Forest #12;ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ecosystems. Historically, ponderosa pine (Pinus contorta) forest systems have had low intensity fires every forests. Once forest managers began suppressing forest fires, vegetation and debris accumulated

  18. USING NEXRAD AND RAIN GAUGE PRECIPITATION DATA FOR HYDROLOGIC CALIBRATION OF SWAT IN A NORTHEASTERN WATERSHED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, Aisha M.; Sadeghi, Ali M.; Zhang, Xuesong; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Shirmohammadi, Adel

    2010-05-10

    The value of watershed?scale, hydrologic and water quality models to ecosystem management is increasingly evident as more programs adopt these tools to evaluate the effectiveness of different management scenarios and their impact on the environment. Quality of precipitation data is critical for appropriate application of watershed models. In small watersheds, where no dense rain gauge network is available, modelers are faced with a dilemma to choose between different data sets. In this study, we used the German Branch (GB) watershed (~50 km2), which is included in the USDA Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP), to examine the implications of using surface rain gauge and next?generation radar (NEXRAD) precipitation data sets on the performance of the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The GB watershed is located in the Coastal Plain of Maryland on the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay. Stream flow estimation results using surface rain gauge data seem to indicate the importance of using rain gauges within the same direction as the storm pattern with respect to the watershed. In the absence of a spatially representative network of rain gauges within the watershed, NEXRAD data produced good estimates of stream flow at the outlet of the watershed. Three NEXRAD datasets, including (1)*non?corrected (NC), (2) bias?corrected (BC), and (3) inverse distance weighted (IDW) corrected NEXRAD data, were produced. Nash?Sutcliffe efficiency coefficients for daily stream flow simulation using these three NEXRAD data ranged from 0.46 to 0.58 during calibration and from 0.68 to 0.76 during validation. Overall, correcting NEXRAD with rain gauge data is promising to produce better hydrologic modeling results. Given the multiple precipitation datasets and corresponding simulations, we explored the combination of the multiple simulations using Bayesian model averaging.

  19. Tropical cyclone preparedness and response : opportunities for operations research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Maurice D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores how operations research methods can be applied in the emergency response community by looking at two recent tropical storm disasters; tropical cyclone Yemyin in Pakistan, June 2007 and super typhoon ...

  20. Diurnal analysis of intensity trends in Atlantic tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowch, Roman S

    2013-01-01

    I postulate that a diurnal cycle may exist in observational variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) intensity. Prior studies document a significant diurnal signal in moist convection across tropical regions. Since ...

  1. Channel planform dynamics of an alluvial tropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Aldo

    2005-08-29

    apparently plays a relatively minor role as a formative event in shaping the overall humid tropical landscape. A third objective was to develop an empirical model for predicting bend migration rates in humid tropical rivers, resulting in empirical...

  2. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States DONGMIN LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States DONGMIN LEE GESTAR, University The authors examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology precipitation dataset used is the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation

  3. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  4. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  5. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P.O. BOX 245, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA 94701 USDA FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH PAPER PSW- 76 /1971 #12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vegetation Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2--Key to Vegetation Types

  6. Radiative forcing of natural forest disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalcar- bon and energy cycling in the boreal forests, includingand Forest Meteorology, Liu HP, Randerson JT (2008) Interannual variability of surface energy

  7. Health Consequences of Forest Fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; McKee, Douglas; Thomas, Duncan

    2004-01-01

    to Lung Health of Haze From Forest Fires: The SingaporeJim, C.Y. 1999. “The Forest Fires in Indonesia 1997-1998:A Study of the 1997 Forest Fires in South East Asia Using

  8. Using neutrons to fight forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egbert, Hal; Walker, Ronald; Flocchini, R.

    2006-01-01

    USING NEUTRONS TO FIGHT FOREST FIRES Hal Egbert, Ronaldretardant to the scene of forest fires. One system that goesretardant to the scene of forest fires. MAFFS is the acronym

  9. Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Building wildfire resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission: Edinburgh #12;© Crown resilience into forest management planning Forestry Commission Practice Guide Forestry Commission, Edinburgh

  10. Future Forests Program Plan 2013 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Future Forests Program Plan 2013 ­ 2016 (November 2012) #12;2 Summary Mission and vision The mission of Future Forests is to provide management of forests in a future characterized by change. Our vision

  11. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  12. A Current Overview of Forest Products Certification Shadia Duery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Forest Certification (PEFC), the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), the Sustainable Forestry Initiative

  13. Climate Science in the Tropics: Waves, Vortices, Boualem Khouider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stechmann, Samuel N.

    Climate Science in the Tropics: Waves, Vortices, and PDEs Boualem Khouider1 , Andrew J Majda2 and climate on the entire globe, yet contemporary operational computer models are often deficient.10 Keywords: Climate science, Tropical meteorology, waves, vortices, convection, PDEs, MJO, GCMs, tropical

  14. Tropical cyclone energy dispersion under vertical shears Xuyang Ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Tropical cyclone energy dispersion under vertical shears Xuyang Ge,1 Tim Li,1,2 and Xiaqiong Zhou1] Tropical cyclone Rossby wave energy dispersion under easterly and westerly vertical shears is investigated, and X. Zhou (2007), Tropical cyclone energy dispersion under vertical shears, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L

  15. LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    THESIS LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by GABRIELA MORA ROJAS Department LEVEL JETS IN THE TROP- ICAL AMERICAS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS The climatologies of five tropical low level jets are studied through

  16. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Hurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known as a tropical cyclone. #12;Hurricanes in Florida · 1851-2004 Florida's Hurricane Total: 110 Southwest Florida

  17. Hurricane Isaac, August 28, 2012/NOAA Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Isaac, August 28, 2012/NOAA Tropical Cyclones A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT, 6 of which became hurricanes East Pacific Ocean: 15 tropical storms, 8 of which became hurricanes Central Pacific Ocean: 4 tropical storms, 2 of which became hurricanes Over a typical 2-year period, the U

  18. November2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade #12;#12;Timber Trade Flows and Actors in MyanmarNovember2013Forest Trends Report Series Forest Trade and Finance Timber Trade Flows and Actors The Political Economy of Myanmar's Timber Trade Kevin Woods November 2013 #12;Acknowledgments The author, Kevin

  19. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ... Bronze Age...

  20. Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xuening

    2013-01-01

    Los Angeles Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests Aof the Thesis Internet Usage Mining Using Random Forests bydata emerges, data mining is finally in the spotlight. This

  1. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmánek, Marcel; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Tanzania Species Family Alien plant invasions in savannasLo pez-Olmedo et al. 2007). Alien plant invasions in Africanspecies of naturalised alien plants for tropical savannas in

  2. Network Coded Information Raining over High-Speed Rail through IEEE 802.16j

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valaee, Shahrokh

    Network Coded Information Raining over High-Speed Rail through IEEE 802.16j Christopher Sue, Sameh propose a two-hop wireless network architecture for high-speed rail employing 802.16j. Due to its backward in high-speed rail communications and better exploit relay diversity. We refer to our proposed scheme

  3. Formation and evolution of coronal rain observed by SDO/AIA on February 22, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vashalomidze, Z; Zaqarashvili, T V; Oliver, R; Shergelashvili, B; Ramishvili, G; Poedts, S; De Causmaecker, P

    2015-01-01

    The formation and dynamics of coronal rain are currently not fully understood. Coronal rain is the fall of cool and dense blobs formed by thermal instability in the solar corona towards the solar surface with acceleration smaller than gravitational free fall. We aim to study the observational evidence of the formation of coronal rain and to trace the detailed dynamics of individual blobs. We used time series of the 171 \\AA\\, and 304 \\AA\\, spectral lines obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) above active region AR 11420 on February 22, 2012. Observations show that a coronal loop disappeared in the 171 \\AA\\ channel and appeared in the 304 \\AA\\ line$\\text{}\\text{}$ more than one hour later, which indicates a rapid cooling of the coronal loop from 1 MK to 0.05 MK. An energy estimation shows that the radiation is higher than the heat input, which indicates so-called catastrophic cooling. The cooling was accompanied by the formation of coronal rain in the fo...

  4. Midweek increase in U.S. summer rain and storm heights suggests air pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Midweek increase in U.S. summer rain and storm heights suggests air pollution invigorates air pollution suppresses cloud-drop coalescence and early rainout during the growth of thunderstorms explained by the difference in composition of aerosol pollution at that time. This ``weekend effect'' may

  5. WeatherJuly2015,Vol.70,No.7 Is there a Rhythm Of The Rain?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    accessed through channels such as artists' websites and YouTube (our choice of data- base is discussed198198 Weather­July2015,Vol.70,No.7 Is there a Rhythm Of The Rain? An analysis of weather have ana- lysed how our environment has influenced music: Wagner (1972) looked at weather in classical

  6. Adaptive FIR Filtering of Range Sidelobes for Air and Spaceborne Rain Mapping Stephen P. Lohmeier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Adaptive FIR Filtering of Range Sidelobes for Air and Spaceborne Rain Mapping Stephen P. Lohmeier and Telecommunications Center Abstract ­ This paper describes an adaptive finite-impulse response (FIR) filteringB [1] sidelobe levels. Although others have used wavelets to achieve suppression [2]. To measure light

  7. A phase screen model for simulating numerically the propagation of a laser beam in rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukin, I P; Rychkov, D S; Falits, A V [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Lai, Kin S; Liu, Min R [DSO National Laboratories 20 (Singapore)

    2009-09-30

    The method based on the generalisation of the phase screen method for a continuous random medium is proposed for simulating numerically the propagation of laser radiation in a turbulent atmosphere with precipitation. In the phase screen model for a discrete component of a heterogeneous 'air-rain droplet' medium, the amplitude screen describing the scattering of an optical field by discrete particles of the medium is replaced by an equivalent phase screen with a spectrum of the correlation function of the effective dielectric constant fluctuations that is similar to the spectrum of a discrete scattering component - water droplets in air. The 'turbulent' phase screen is constructed on the basis of the Kolmogorov model, while the 'rain' screen model utiises the exponential distribution of the number of rain drops with respect to their radii as a function of the rain intensity. Theresults of the numerical simulation are compared with the known theoretical estimates for a large-scale discrete scattering medium. (propagation of laser radiation in matter)

  8. Crowdsourcing, Climate Change and Student Science: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    it one of the most innovative citizen science programs in the nation. Students of all ages at over 100Crowdsourcing, Climate Change and Student Science: The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow: Dr. Nolan Doesken Address: Department of Atmospheric Science 1371 Campus Delivery Colorado State

  9. RADARSAT SCANSAR WIND RETRIEVAL AND RAIN EFFECTS ON SCANSAR MEASUREMENTS UNDER HURRICANE CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    RADARSAT SCANSAR WIND RETRIEVAL AND RAIN EFFECTS ON SCANSAR MEASUREMENTS UNDER HURRICANE CONDITIONS CB, Provo, Utah 84602 ABSTRACT RADARSAT-1 ScanSAR SWA images of Hurricane Katrina are used-band polarization ratio models have been proposed, none have been well verified in hurricane conditions. Although C

  10. HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT U.S.A * selnimri@mail.ucf.edu 2 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA 3 Space model has been developed to support the analysis and design of the new airborne Hurricane Imaging

  11. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  12. Chapter 4587 TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN WIND SHEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, David S.

    , it is shown that small values of wind shear in the range of 1.25 to 5 ms -1 are the most favorable, and very and middle troposphere, and a relatively small value of vertical wind shear, which is the change with heightChapter 4587 TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN WIND SHEAR: CLIMATOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS AND PHYSICAL

  13. Humboldt National Forest East Mormon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    Humboldt National Forest Humboldt National Forest Millers Delamar Valley Dry Lake Dry Lake Valley Boundary Existing Designated Corridor (See Note 2) (As of 6/5/2009) Solar Energy Study Area (As of 6 14 16 Kilometers Carson City Ely Nevada Las Vegas Solar Energy Study Areas in Nevada Map Prepared

  14. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    . Phillips and Thomas J. Corcoran Optimal Control of Raw Timber Production Processes .................................................................................................. 60 Malcolm Kirby Forest Management Planning for Timber Production: A Sequential Approach.S.DEPARTMEN'I' OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 32 OPERATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLANNING METHODS: proceedings

  15. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wider range of suppliers. As working circles beyond the size of a single National Forest have recently. Alternatives for expansion of working circles must be assessed in light of present Forest Service timber management policy and the impacts of timber supply. These alternates include (a) combination of National

  16. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range Experiment Station Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion leachate can reduce surface erosion. Res. Note PSW-342, 4 p., illus. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Exp from north- western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay frac- tions. As a result, the soil

  17. Atmospheric deposition of {sup 7}Be by rain events, incentral Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayub, J. Juri; Velasco, H.; Rizzotto, M. [Grupo de Estudios Ambientales. Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis. Universidad National de San Luis--CONICET. Ejercito de los Andes 950. Argentina (Argentina); Di Gregorio, D. E.; Huck, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Comision National de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Universidad National de San Martin. Martin de Irigoyen 3100, 1650 San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina. (Argentina)

    2008-08-07

    Beryllium-7 is a natural radionuclide that enters into the ecosystems through wet and dry depositions and has numerous environmental applications in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Atmospheric wet deposition of {sup 7}Be was measured in central Argentina. Rain traps were installed (1 m above ground) and individual rain events have been collected. Rain samples were filtered and analyzed by gamma spectrometry. The gamma counting was undertaken using a 40%-efficient p-type coaxial intrinsic high-purity natural germanium crystal built by Princeton Gamma-Tech. The cryostat was made from electroformed high-purity copper using ultralow-background technology. The detector was surrounded by 50 cm of lead bricks to provide shielding against radioactive background. The detector gamma efficiency was determined using a water solution with known amounts of chemical compounds containing long-lived naturally occurring radioisotopes, {sup 176}Lu, {sup 138}La and {sup 40}K. Due to the geometry of the sample and its position close to the detector, the efficiency points from the {sup 176}Lu decay, had to be corrected for summing effects. The measured samples were 400 ml in size and were counted curing one day. The {sup 7}Be detection limit for the present measurements was as low as 0.2 Bq l{sup -1}. Thirty two rain events were sampled and analyzed (November 2006-May 2007). The measured values show that the events corresponding to low rainfall (<20 mm) are characterized by significantly higher activity concentrations (Bq l{sup -1}). The activity concentration of each individual event varied from 0.8 to 3.5 Bq l{sup -1}, while precipitations varied between 4 and 70 mm. The integrated activity by event of {sup 7}Be was fitted with a model that takes into account the precipitation amount and the elapsed time between two rain events. The integrated activities calculated with this model show a good agreement with experimental values.

  18. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 25, NO. 3, PAGES 577-579, MARCH 1989 Comment on "Are Rain Rate Processes Self-Similar?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 25, NO. 3, PAGES 577-579, MARCH 1989 Comment on "Are Rain Rate the properties of the rain field with those of its fluctu- ations in such a way that neither of their theorems are rele- vant to the problem of stochasticself-similar rain modeling. We would thereforelike to take

  19. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    justice to renewable energy and land use. We have teams of experts in the areas of forest sciencesForest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management

  20. This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Framework Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating Energy, Products, and Land's Note M.T. Goergen Jr. SAF TASK FORCE REPORT Managing Forests because Carbon Matters: Integrating EnergyThis Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows Climate­Forest Interactions Biomass Use and Feedstock

  1. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication Volume 6 2003 Number 3 Issue Summary Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the rural community perspective of managing the forest Land, Chadwick D. Oliver Series Editor Mary L. Tyrrell Rural Communities and Forests A summary

  2. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 2 of 31 2011 Great Plains Forest Fire Compact AOP Table of Contents I. Intentionally Left Blank 28 K. Public Law 110-79 29 #12;Great Plains Interstate Forest Fire Compact Page 3 of 31

  3. Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeton, William S.

    1 Vermont's Changing Forests Key Findings on the Health of Forested Ecosystems from the Vermont Members Anne Archie, USDA Forest Service Douglas Lantagne, University of Vermont Ed O'Leary, Vermont, USDA Farm Service Agency Charles Scott, USDA Forest Service Steven Sinclair, Vermont Agency of Natural

  4. Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

    2005-08-02

    A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

  5. Validation and analysis of microwave-derived rainfall over the tropics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleishauer, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed single channel microwave rain rate retrieval algorithm exists to measure global precipitation over the data-sparse tropical oceans. The objective of this study is to retrieve and validate rainfall using this algorithm, followed by an analysis of the derived rainfall fields. Retrieval consists of applying the algorithm technique to the extraction of four years worth of achieved data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) instrument flown aboard the NIMBUS 5 satellite. The Pacific Atoll Raingage Data Set is chosen as a ground truth measure to validate the ESMR-Derived rainfall data against, comparing slope, intercept and correlation between 5 deg x 5 deg area average. Despite limitations imposed by the comparison of point measurements to area-averaged rainfall, results show a 0.80 correlation. Monthly and quarterly climatological mean rainfall estimates are produced, with a consequent analysis of prominent signals, especially in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the Indian monsoon. Latent heat flux is computed, using the ESMR-derived rainfall, and plotted to show qualitatively where seasonal latent thermodynamic energy sources and sinks exist in the atmosphere. A comparison of the summer and winter quarterly composites of the above products with previously compiled climatologies and Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) showed only minor discrepancies in location and intensity, which are discussed in some detail.

  6. Basic Installation Guidelines & Instructions for your SkyJuice Rain Barrel 1. Your rain barrel must be placed on a surface that is flat and level. Use a spade to flatten the area for placement of the barrel.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the barrel by the spigot. To maintain the tight connection, open the barrel and tighten the nut on the inside of dish soap to the rain barrel to stop the mosquitoes from laying eggs in the water. Dish soap

  7. Managing watershed services of tropical forests and plantations: can meta-analyses help?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is also relevant to reservoirs for drinking water or hydroelectricity production (Guo et al., 2000). Over

  8. Soybean production and conversion of tropical forest in the Brazilian Amazon: The case of Vilhena, Rondônia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, J. Christopher; Koeppe, Matthew; Coles, Benjamin; Price, Kevin P.

    2005-08-01

    :WorldSupplyandDistribution.CounselorandAttache´ Reports. Foreign Agricultural Service, Cotton, Oilseeds, Tobacco and Seeds Division. 5. EMBRAPA 2002. Sistemas de Produc¸ a˜ o 1: Tecnologias de Produc¸ a˜ o de Soja—Regia˜ o Central do Brasil. (Production Systems 1: Technologies of Soybean Production... Recursos Naturais. 20. (Survey of Natural Resources). Rio de Janeiro: Ministe´ rio das Minas e Energia. (In Portuguese). 16. RADAMBRASIL 1978. Levantamento de Recursos Naturais. 19. (Survey of Natural Resources). Rio de Janeiro: Ministe´ rio das Minas e...

  9. Water relations of evergreen and drought-deciduous trees along a seasonally dry tropical forest chronosequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasselquist, Niles J.; Allen, Michael F.; Santiago, Louis S.

    2010-01-01

    in the freezer until water extraction for stable isotopein the freezer until water extraction for stable isotopeand after thorough water extraction (100°C, 3 h). d 18 O

  10. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    PLoS ONE: Characterization of Trapped Lignin-DegradingAccess For Readers Hubs Characterization of Trapped Lignin-11:36:02 AM] PLoS ONE: Characterization of Trapped Lignin-

  11. ORNL part of new project to study how tropical forests worldwide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    better than ten kilometers. This is the resolution that next-generation Earth system models will achieve during the project's lifetime. The team will take advantage of...

  12. Nutrient enrichment increased species richness of leaf litter fungal assemblages in a tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    functioning, but the determinates of their diversity and functional interactions are not well known) food webs (Kaspari et al. 2008). While litter decomposition is mediated by both biotic and abiotic

  13. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    Center for Applied Biogeosciences, University of Tulsa,Tulsa OK 74104; Department of Environmental Science, PolicyBio-Sep® (University of Tulsa) beads to create the lignin-

  14. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    Related Articles on the Web University of Tulsa,Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States of America, 6 Department ofBio-Sep® (University of Tulsa) beads to create the lignin-

  15. An Overview of World Tropical Hardwood Resources, Forest Products Trade and Environmental Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Comoros, Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea

  16. Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweizer, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    AND ENVIRONMENTAL GOVERNANCE IN THE PANAMA CANAL WATERSHED Daniella M. Schweizer ABSTRACT Increased global

  17. Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweizer, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    politics and economics as the core of environmental issues (environmental degradation, with the role that politics and economics play on those issues.

  18. Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    : carbon isotopes, elevation, Hawai'i, imaging spectroscopy, land-use change, pastures, remote sensing be addressed, future changes in ecosystem dynamics and atmospheric carbon dioxide cannot be easily predictedEffects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry

  19. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    D. W. T. : Emissions from smoldering combustion of biomassemissions of oxygenated organic species from biomass combustion,

  20. Carbon stocks in coffee agroforests and mixed dry tropical forests in the western highlands of Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    of Guatemala Mikaela Schmitt-Harsh · Tom P. Evans · Edwin Castellanos · J. C. Randolph Received: 4 January 2012- ducted in 2007 and 2010 in the Lake Atitla´n region of Guatemala, this research examines the carbon pools Estudios Ambientales y de Biodiversidad, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala, 18 Avenida 11-95 Zona 15

  1. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Morton, DC

    2015-01-01

    19), 7888–7892. CHEN ET AL. HURRICANES AND AMAZON FIRES AREand G. C. Hurtt (2007), Hurricane Katrina’s carbon footprintThe 2013 Atlantic basin hurricane season: Blip or ?ip? ,

  2. Water relations of evergreen and drought-deciduous trees along a seasonally dry tropical forest chronosequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasselquist, Niles J.; Allen, Michael F.; Santiago, Louis S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined the water status of six can- opyECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Water relations of evergreen andseasonal variation in soil water availability. Furthermore,

  3. Plant-Water Relations in Seasonally Dry Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Gregory Rubin

    2012-01-01

    treatment. Figure 3. Leaf water potential measured over timeecosystems, including soil water use generally between 20 cmboth deep roots and deep water use by plants have also been

  4. CO2 balance of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests derived from a global database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    derived from a global database S . L U Y S S A E R T * w ,of construct- ing a database of monthly climate observationsregional ecosystem modeling: database of model drivers and

  5. Biogenic volatile organic compound emissions from a lowland tropical wet forest in Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geron, C; Guenther, A; Greenberg, J; Loescher, HW; Clark, D; Baker, B

    2002-01-01

    Geophysical Research 103 (D1), Kuck, L.R. , Smith Jr. , T. ,basin (Grace et al. , 1995; Kuck et al. , 2000) but is ca. a

  6. CO2 balance of boreal, temperate, and tropical forests derived from a global database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    2486.2007.01439.x CO 2 balance of boreal, temperate, andR T et al. Fig. 10 Observed CO 2 balance for boreal biomes.These CO 2 balances were not closed and therefore the

  7. Measuring the Effect of Selective Logging on Tropical Forest-Atmosphere Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulden, Michael L.

    and low impact extraction methods 1. Conventional Selective Logging: ·Large percent of canopy/soil can takes advantage of newly available PAR. · Reduced Impact Logging and/or Light Harvest resulted in little disturbance. · These are dry season data - chambers indicate decomposition is water limited. POSSIBLE

  8. Succession and management of tropical dry forests in the Americas: Review and new perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quesada Avendaño, Mauricio

    Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA g Departamento de Bota^nica, IB ­ UNESP and Behavior, and Soil, Water and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA 1. Introduction

  9. Community Interactions In Tropical Forest Restoration And Environmental Governance In The Panama Canal Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweizer, Daniella

    2012-01-01

    2008. Plan de desarrollo sostenible y gestion integrada deWatershed (Plan de Desarrollo Sostenible y Gestion Integrada

  10. Fine root dynamics along an elevational gradient in tropical Amazonian and Andean forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    synchronised to seasonality of solar radiation. Finally, we provide the first insights into root growth-level productivity is limited. To date, studies from only three elevational transects have provided data on fine root

  11. Interannual Variation of the Surface Temperature of Tropical Forests from Satellite Observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Huilin; Zhang, Shuai; Fu, Rong; Li, Wenhong; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    and afternoon observations from passive microwave remote sensing facilitate the investigation of the interannual changes of LST anomalies on a diurnal basis. As a result of the variability of cloud cover and the corresponding reduction of solar radiation...

  12. Plant and microbial controls on nitrogen retention and loss in a Humid Tropical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, P.

    2009-01-01

    of total dissolved N in leachate (Cabrera and Beare 1993)bulk soil, gas and leachate (n = 10 per plot). Mineral Nbiomass, bulk soil, gas and leachate. We used experimental

  13. Plant-Water Relations in Seasonally Dry Tropical Montane Cloud Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Gregory Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Isotope Analyzer (Los Gatos Research, California, USA).Identifier V1.0 (Los Gatos Research) using the factory

  14. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    degradation of the lignin substrate analog L-dihydrophenylalanine (L-DOPA) with 0.3% hydrogen peroxide for peroxidase, and without for phenol

  15. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeAngelis, Kristen

    2012-01-01

    degradation of the lignin substrate analog L-dihydrophenylalanine (L-DOPA) with 0.3% hydrogen peroxide for peroxidase, and without for phenol

  16. Satellite-based modeling of gross primary production in a seasonally moist tropical evergreen forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA c Centro de Energia Nuclear

  17. Influence of soil texture on carbon dynamics and storage potential in tropical forest soils of Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01

    Isoto´pica, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA),Isoto´pica, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (at the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA),

  18. Isotopic variability of N 2 O emissions from tropical forest soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, T.; Trumbore, S. E; Tyler, S. C; Davidson, E. A; Keller, M.; de Camargo, P. B

    2000-01-01

    de Camargo, Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, AvlSN relative to 4Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura,

  19. Diel patterns of soil respiration in a tropical forest after Hurricane Wilma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas, Rodrigo; Allen, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    and A. E. Lugo (1992), Hurricane Hugo - Damage to a Tropicaldecomposition following hurricane litter inputs in severalforest to 10 years of hurricanes and droughts, Ecol.

  20. Coronal rain in magnetic arcades: Rebound shocks, Limit cycles, and Shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, X; Keppens, R; Van Doorsselaere, T

    2015-01-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer ($>6$ hour) timespan. We quantify how in-situ forming blob-like condensations grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona-transition-region like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy and temperature while blobs descend, impact and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a resu...

  1. Carbon calculator tracks the climate benefits of managed private forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, William C; Sharma, Benktesh D

    2015-01-01

    to fossil fuel Regenerated forest energy used in the LoggingManaging forests because carbon matters: Integrating energy,Energy from post-consumer residues relevant private forest

  2. A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A History of Forest Certification Priyan Perera1 Richard P. Vlosky2 Louisiana Forest Products reviews the history of forest certification, development of different certification schemes

  3. How resilient are southwestern ponderosa pine forests after crown fires?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, M; Mast, J N

    2005-01-01

    of an intense prescribed forest fire: Is it ecologicalspecies to fires in Pinus ponderosa forests in northernIn Fire Effects in Southwestern Forests: Proceedings of the

  4. infrastructure Report by Forest Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................ 10 Sustainable urban drainageBenefits of green infrastructure Report by Forest Research Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Promoting sustainable greenspace #12;Defra research contract number WC0807 October2010 Promoting sustainable

  5. Pacific Southwest Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, economic costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES costs, fire economics, suppression costs, Fire Economics Evaluation System (FEES) Current cost estimates planning and economics research unit, with headquarters at the Forest Fire Laboratory, Riverside, Calif. He

  6. Forest and Range Experiment Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I Polar Till Define-i Our Seasons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sun-Eanh Energy Relations Earth-Sun Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I The Sun Affects Our Forests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Energy Balance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Local Energy Relations

  7. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  8. PACIFIC SOUTHWEST Forest and Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Solar Radiation.211:614 Retrieval Terms: insolation; reproduction; snow management; environ mental planning. Solar radiation environmental factor. Incident solar radia tion creates a secondary form of radiation which af fects the forest

  9. Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

  10. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature McIntosh, Empire, and Golden Delicious apple trees (Malus domestica) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at pH 2.5 in Empire. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in McIntosh. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  11. The red rain phenomenon of Kerala and its possible extraterrestrial origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey Louis; A. Santhosh Kumar

    2006-01-02

    A red rain phenomenon occurred in Kerala, India starting from 25th July 2001, in which the rainwater appeared coloured in various localized places that are spread over a few hundred kilometers in Kerala. Maximum cases were reported during the first 10 days and isolated cases were found to occur for about 2 months. The striking red colouration of the rainwater was found to be due to the suspension of microscopic red particles having the appearance of biological cells. These particles have no similarity with usual desert dust. An estimated minimum quantity of 50,000 kg of red particles has fallen from the sky through red rain. An analysis of this strange phenomenon further shows that the conventional atmospheric transport processes like dust storms etc. cannot explain this phenomenon. The electron microscopic study of the red particles shows fine cell structure indicating their biological cell like nature. EDAX analysis shows that the major elements present in these cell like particles are carbon and oxygen. Strangely, a test for DNA using Ethidium Bromide dye fluorescence technique indicates absence of DNA in these cells. In the context of a suspected link between a meteor airburst event and the red rain, the possibility for the extraterrestrial origin of these particles from cometary fragments is discussed.

  12. Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

    2014-02-10

    We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

  13. The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.

    2012-07-04

    Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open cells. Additional analyses of the same simulations show that the suppression of rain is well described in terms of cloud drop effective radius (re). Rain is initiated when re near cloud top is around 12-14 um. Cloud water starts to get depleted when column-maximum rain intensity (Rmax) exceeds 0.1 mm h-1. This happens when cloud-top re reaches 14 um. Rmax is mostly less than 0.1 mm h-1 at re<14 um, regardless of the cloud water path, but increases rapidly when re exceeds 14 um. This is in agreement with recent aircraft observations and theoretical observations in convective clouds so that the mechanism is not limited to describing marine stratocumulus. These results support the hypothesis that the onset of significant precipitation is determined by the number of nucleated cloud drops and the height (H) above cloud base within the cloud that is required for cloud drops to reach re of 14 um. In turn, this can explain the conditions for initiation of significant drizzle and opening of closed cells providing the basis for a simple parameterization for GCMs that unifies the representation of both precipitating and non-precipitating clouds as well as the transition between them. Furthermore, satellite global observations of cloud depth (from base to top), and cloud top re can be used to derive and validate this parameterization.

  14. Voluntary compliance with market-based environment poliy [sic] : evidence from the U.S. acid rain program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan Pablo

    The U.S. acid rain program, Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, is a pioneering experience in environmental regulation by setting a market for electric utility emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and by including ...

  15. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  16. "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road Princeton, NJ 08540-6649 "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones", Chun-Chieh Wu (National Taiwan University) Contact Information Website: Website...

  17. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  18. Tropical cyclone size in observations and in radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavas, Daniel Robert

    2013-01-01

    Tropical cyclone size remains an unsolved problem in tropical meteorology, yet size plays a significant role in the damage caused by tropical cyclones due to wind, storm surge, and inland freshwater flooding. This work ...

  19. Performance-based assessment of daylight on tropical buildings- a case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szu Cheng, CHIEN

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability in the Tropics For the visual performance ofSustainability in the Tropics Table 3 Metrics conducted to assess dayliglzting performanceSustainability in the Tropics APPROACH Description of the case study model Daylight performance

  20. Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potvin, Catherine

    Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama S E B) to estimate the carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation; and (3 show the potential for considerable carbon sequestration of tropical afforestation and highlight

  1. Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics* KAZUYOSHI KIKUCHI AND BIN WANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bin

    Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics* KAZUYOSHI KIKUCHI AND BIN WANG Department tropical precipitation are documented by using two complementary Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, and phase propagation characteristics of the diurnal precipitation. The oceanic regime is characterized

  2. UC leads effort to protect California forests from catastrophic fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warnert, Jeannette E

    2012-01-01

    because of its Humans and forest fire credibility on allof the 20th century, natural forest fires out forest fuelsto make Sierra Nevada forests more fire resil- ient is an

  3. Ensemble Tropical Rainfall Potential (eTRaP) Forecasts ELIZABETH E. EBERT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebert, Beth

    for more than 300 deaths in the United States during the period 1970­99, including 50 deaths related landfall in the United States between 2004 and 2008 shows that the eTRaP rain amounts are more accurate-h rain forecast based on estimated rain rates from microwave sensors aboard polar

  4. The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state: TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS AND SHEAR Citation Details...

  5. Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures Aiming Wu, William W Tang Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, USA Neural Networks (in press) December 11, 2005 title: Forecast of sea surface temperature 1 #12;Neural Network forecasts of the tropical Pacific sea

  6. CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN F. Williams A series of skipjack oceanography cruises is planned for two offshore areas in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean October 23 and arrived in Honolulu November 29; and the David Starr Jordan (Fishery-Oceanography C en t e

  7. Biological Oceanography of the Eastern Tropical Pacific: Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    540 Biological Oceanography of the Eastern Tropical Pacific: Summary of Existing Information Tuna Oceanography Research Program of the Institute of Marine Resources of the University of California Oceanography of the Eastern Tropical Pacific: Summary of Existing Information By MAURICE BLACKBURN tribution

  8. Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : . Computer models show skill in forecasting tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures one to two years in advance for Pacific Ocean observations that are the foundation of skillful ENSO forecasts: Moored buoys Drifting buoysaaaaaa Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific . Has a periodicity of 2­7 years

  9. Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel Scottish Association for Marine Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel Scottish Association for Marine Science Oban, Scotland 26 September 2010 8:30 am Welcome and logistics 8:40 The Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array M. J. McPhaden, NOAA/PMEL, Seattle, USA 9:00 Current status of TRITON and m-TRITON buoy array and its data system K. Ando and I. Ueki

  10. Hybrid coupled modeling of the tropical Pacific using neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Hybrid coupled modeling of the tropical Pacific using neural networks Shuyong Li, William W. Hsieh To investigate the potential for improving hybrid coupled models (HCM) of the tropical Pacific by the use: dynamical coupled models, statistical models and hybrid coupled models [Barnston et al., 1994]. A hybrid

  11. Ecological consequences of early Late Pleistocene megadroughts in tropical Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiners, Peter W.

    Ecological consequences of early Late Pleistocene megadroughts in tropical Africa Andrew S. Cohen conditions in tropical Africa occurred in several discrete episodes between 135 and 90 ka, as demonstrated]. This resulted in extraordinarily low lake levels, even in Africa's deepest lakes. On the basis of well dated

  12. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 2; published 31 January 2003. [1] The first view of stratospheric and tropospheric ozone variability in the Southern Hemisphere tropics is provided by a 3-year record of ozone soundings from the Southern Hemisphere

  13. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982004 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2004 tropical ozone climatology: 3 more than 3000 ozone profiles from 14 tropical and subtropical sites using balloon- borne technique might cause small station-to-station biases in the total ozone measurement. We present further

  14. Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisenden, Brian D.

    Climate change and tropical biodiversity: a new focus Jedediah Brodie1 , Eric Post2 and William F, Australia Considerable efforts are focused on the consequences of climate change for tropical rainforests climatic changes and human land use) remain understudied. Key concerns are that aridification could

  15. DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    1 DENMAN FORESTRY ISSUES SERIES Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Professor in Sustainable Resource Sciences, UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences PARTICIPANTS Tom Gower ­ Professor, Department of Forest Ecology and Management, University of Wisconsin,Madison, WI Rick

  16. Pursuing Carbon and ForestPursuing Carbon and Forest SustainabilitySustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Biomass Energy ProductionIn Forest Biomass Energy Production University of WashingtonCommissioner of Public Lands PeterPeter GoldmarkGoldmark''ss Forest Biomass Energy Initiative Pilot Projects 2009Pilot BioaviationBioaviation Fuel 2011Fuel 2011 #12;3 Forest Biomass Energy InitiativeForest Biomass Energy

  17. Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    and Concerns "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production" Craig PartridgeSpring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence May 15, 2012, 1-5:30 p.m., NHS Hall at CUH, UW Botanic Gardens School

  18. Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fire and Forest History in Mixed-Conifer Forests of Southwest Colorado Peter M. Brown, Rocky tree-ring data do we have to reconstruct fire & forest history? Fire scars: Cambial mortality caused Mountain Tree-Ring Research Rosalind Wu, San Juan National Forest Carissa Aoki, Colorado State University

  19. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector, 2004 Forest Resource Development and Sustainable Forestry Texas Forest Service College Station, Texas November 2006 #12;Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Texas economy. METHODS This study uses the input-output method to estimate the direct and total economic

  20. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  1. Forest Landowners' Guide to the Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federal income tax consid- erations for Forest Land, including capital costs, reforestation tax incentives, timber income and capital gains, government program cost-share payments, tax treatment of other forest

  2. Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 20012002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 An Agency of the Forestry Commission #12;#12;Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001­2002 Together with the Comptroller and Auditor General

  3. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  4. FINLAND SOURCES 2007 -Forest industry production Authorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The price development of the forest industry's end products, such as paper, has been negative for several

  5. Forests and The Texas Economy. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Jay O'; Williams, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    , while maintain ing a healthy forest environment, requires the cooperation and understanding of many individuals, groups, and organizations. This document provides a unique statistical base for understanding the current status of forestry in Texas... or wood-based industry is a part of the manufactur ing industry that is a vital component of Texas' diverse econ omy (Figures 5-1 to 5-3). As indicated below, Texas is one of the top producers of forest products in the country: ? Texas is one...

  6. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  7. SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    Suntana Utilization of Aboveground Forest Biomass for Sustainable Energy Development Lauren S. UrgensonSCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON WELCOME Tom Hinckley, Interim Director and Professor SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Ara Erickson (`04) Green Cities Director, Cascade

  8. 4, 27472779, 2004 Boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Boreal forest fires in 1997 and 1998: a seasonal comparison using transport model simulations, 2747­2779, 2004 Boreal forest fires 1997/1998 N. Spichtinger et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  9. Forest Research No. 37 May 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Research No. 37 May 2007 Contents m Editorial m Direct sowing ­ useful or useless details Forest Research - © Crown copyright 2007 Bluebells (Hyacinthoides non-scripta) are the epitome. ©AndreaKiewitt EcoThe Biodiversity and Conservation Newsletter of Ecology Division Forest Research type

  10. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS 1999 2000 3/31/96=1 S&P 500 S&P Non-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn; Pulp: MM tons) 0 20 40 60 80 1989 1999 1989 1999 1989 1999 Lumber-US Lumber-Canada Structural Panels

  11. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the economy ­ and demand for paper and wood -- is slowing. The recent softness in market pulp pricesFINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn. of Home Builders U.S. HOUSING STARTS Million

  12. 7, 49254979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes in the European free troposphere A. Petzold et al. Title forest fire plumes during the ICARTT-ITOP Experiment in summer 2004 A. Petzold1 , B. Weinzierl1 , H Correspondence to: A. Petzold (andreas.petzold@dlr.de) 4925 #12;ACPD 7, 4925­4979, 2007 Forest fire plumes

  13. 6, 32273264, 2006 Forest fire smoke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 3227­3264, 2006 Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Modeling of trace gases from the 1998 North Central Mexico forest fire smoke plume, as measured Forest fire smoke plume V. R. Kotamarthi et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions References

  14. Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Wildland Fire Protection Program NEBRASKA FOREST SERVICE HOW NEBRASKANS BENEFIT: · improved districts · increased firefighter knowledge of wildland fire suppression and prevention · reduced forest.nfs.unl.edu Dr. Scott Josiah State Forester & Director (402) 472-1467 sjosiah2@unl.edu Don Westover Wildland Fire

  15. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability http://www.icfpa.org/_documents/ICFPAStatement1.pdf #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3

  16. Sustainability the forest and paper industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainability the forest and paper industry ­ on its way to sustainability #12;Contents Introduction The Forest and Paper Industry's Economic Profile A Key Social Actor Sustainable Forestry Practices In Tune with the Environment The Forest and Paper Industry's Energy Profile 2 3 5 7 9 12 #12

  17. A little rain doesn't fix it: Farmers and ranchers remain cautious as drought continues 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisek, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    and climate, along with the #17;#19;.#16;#25; billion of agricultural losses in #25;#24;#23;#23; plus crop, hay and livestock losses, leave the question: What is the outlook for agricultural crops, forage and livestock this year? Agricultural outlook ?It... rain doesn?t #30;x it continued Forage outlook #31;e drought took a toll on pastures, leaving most ranchers without any hay to cut and bare spots in the forage for livestock. ?A lot of our pastures, speci#28;cally hay meadows, were probably...

  18. Rain or Shine, Students Keep Their Race Cars Going - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel2 RadiometerRafael L. BrasRain or Shine,

  19. The Biogeography of the Cloud Forest Herpetofauna of Middle America, with Special Reference to the Sierra de las Minas of Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jonathan A.

    1982-12-01

    Moctezuma. An extensive tract of cloud forest extends along the eastern slopes of the Sierra Madre Oriental from northeastern Hidalgo to the Teziutlan area of Puebla. The crest of the Sierra Madre Oriental swings eastward to the east of Teziutlan... and forms a spur known locally as the Sierra de Teziutlan. Because of the orientation of this portion of the massif to prevailing winds, as well as the effects of a rain-shadow caused by the highlands of the Volcan Cofre de Perote, a disjunction of cloud...

  20. Forest Roads June 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    or encroach on streamside management zones (SMZs). Best Management Practices (BMP) compliance checks and streamside management zones will also be covered. This course is designed for foresters, timber buyers with numerous classroom and field exercises designed to improve the skills used in timber ac- cess road planning

  1. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    , and recreation. Some disturbances can be functions of both nat- ural and human conditions (e.g., forest fire ignition and spread) (Figure 2). Virginia H. Dale (e-mail: vhd@ornl.gov) is a senior scientist and Paul J. Hanson is a research scientist...

  2. Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blessinger, Christopher S; Guzzardo, Tyler; Livesay, Jake

    2012-07-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  3. The future of emissions trading in light of the acid rain experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, B.J.; Rico, R.

    1995-12-31

    The idea of emissions trading was developed more than two decades ago by environmental economists eager to provide new ideas for how to improve the efficiency of environmental protection. However, early emissions trading efforts were built on the historical {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} infrastructure which has dominated U.S. environmental protection until today. The {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} model initially had advantages that were of a very pragmatic character: it assured large pollution reductions in a time when large, cheap reductions were available and necessary; and it did not require a sophisticated government infrastructure. Within the last five years, large-scale emission trading programs have been successfully designed and started that are fundamentally different from the earlier efforts, creating a new paradigm for environmental control just when our understanding of environmental problems is changing as well. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the largest national-scale program--the Acid Rain Program--and from that experience, forecast when emission trading programs may be headed based on our understanding of the factors currently influencing environmental management. The first section of this paper will briefly review the history of emissions trading programs, followed by a summary of the features of the Acid Rain Program, highlighting those features that distinguish it from previous efforts. The last section addresses the opportunities for emissions trading (and its probable future directions).

  4. The red rain phenomenon of Kerala and its possible extraterrestrial origin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, G; Louis, Godfrey

    2006-01-01

    A red rain phenomenon occurred in Kerala, India starting from 25th July 2001, in which the rainwater appeared coloured in various localized places that are spread over a few hundred kilometers in Kerala. Maximum cases were reported during the first 10 days and isolated cases were found to occur for about 2 months. The striking red colouration of the rainwater was found to be due to the suspension of microscopic red particles having the appearance of biological cells. These particles have no similarity with usual desert dust. An estimated minimum quantity of 50,000 kg of red particles has fallen from the sky through red rain. An analysis of this strange phenomenon further shows that the conventional atmospheric transport processes like dust storms etc. cannot explain this phenomenon. The electron microscopic study of the red particles shows fine cell structure indicating their biological cell like nature. EDAX analysis shows that the major elements present in these cell like particles are carbon and oxygen. St...

  5. Overview of the oxidation and scavenging characteristics of April rains (OSCAR) experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easter, R.C.; Dana, M.T.; Thorp, J.M.; Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Raynor, G.S.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Tanner, R.L.; Shannon, J.D.

    1984-04-01

    The OSCAR (Oxidation and Scavenging Characteristics of April Rains) field experiment was conducted in April, 1981, as part of the MAP3S/RAINE program. The OSCAR study was designed to provide detailed characterizations of the physicochemical and dynamical features of selected cyclonic storm systems as they traversed the eastern U.S. Major experiment components included sequential precipitation chemistry measurements, aircraft measurements both in cloud and in clear air in storm inflow regions, surface-level air chemistry measurements, and supporting meteorological measurements. The precipitation chemisty network consisted of an intermediate-density network with 37 sampling sites covering the region from southern Ontario to Tennessee and from Illinois to New Hampshire, and a high-density network with 47 sampling sites located in a 100 by 100 km area in northeast Indiana. A total of four storm events were studied during the experiment. The report describes the design and operational aspects for the high-density and intermediate-density components of the experiment, and the composition of the integrated OSCAR data set which has been developed. A synoptic meteorological description of the four storm events studied during OSCAR is also provided. 17 references, 13 figures, 8 tables.

  6. Modelling chemical degradation of concrete during leaching with rain and soil water types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacques, D., E-mail: djacques@sckcen.b [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Environment, Health, and Safety, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Wang, L.; Martens, E.; Mallants, D. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK-CEN), Institute for Environment, Health, and Safety, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    Percolation of external water through concrete results in the degradation of cement and changes the concrete pore water and solid phase composition. The assessment of long-term degradation of concrete is possible by means of model simulation. This paper describes simulations of chemical degradation of cement for different types of rain and soil water at an ambient earth surface temperature (10 {sup o}C). Rain and soil water types were derived using generic equations and measurement of atmospheric boundary conditions representative for North-Belgium. An up-to-date and consistent thermodynamic model is used to calculate the geochemical changes during chemical degradation of the concrete. A general pattern of four degradation stages was simulated with the third stage being the geochemically most complex stage involving reactions with calcium-silicate hydrates, AFm and AFt phases. Whereas the sequence of the dissolution reactions was relatively insensitive to the composition of the percolating water, the duration of the different reactions depends strongly on the percolating water composition. Major identified factors influencing the velocity of cement degradation are the effect of dry deposition and biological activity increasing the partial pressure of CO{sub 2(g)} in the soil air phase (and thus increasing the inorganic carbon content in the percolating water). Soil weathering processes have only a minor impact, at least for the relatively inert sandy material considered in this study.

  7. Mapping forests with Lidar provides flexible, accurate data with many uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Maggi; Tommaso, Stefania Di

    2015-01-01

    to develop inputs for forest fire behavior modeling, and tovegetation inputs for forest fire behavior modeling canopy (across public forests. Forest fire behavior models need a

  8. The Effect of Teleconnections on North Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Precipitation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yue

    2015-04-28

    -based) by quadrant with respect to the direction of movement and center of the TC (Source: Figure 4 in Zhu and Quiring, 2013) ................................................... 4 2.2. The 2A25 (c) TC rain, and (d) TC rain fraction based on 58 grid averages... is determined using a k-means cluster analysis. Here k = 3. The red circles and path represent straight-moving hurricanes. The black and blue circles and paths represent recurving hurricanes. Track paths are based on the average positions of the hurricanes...

  9. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    2008-01-15

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  10. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  11. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Tropical Resources Bulletin 1 TROPICALRESOURCESThe Bulletin of the Yale Tropical Resources Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    2012 49 Small Hydropower for Sustainable Energy Development in Northwestern Rural China Jing Ma, MEM, and Boundary-making in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil Alaine Ball, MFS 2012 31 The Political Ecology of Fire in the Andean-Patagonian Region of Argentina Daniela Marini, MFS 2012 II. ENERGY, CARBON, AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

  13. Persistent drying in the tropics linked to natural forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Amos; Zanchettin, Davide; Miller, Thomas; Kushnir, Yochanan; Black, David; Lohmann, Gerrit; Burnett, Allison; Haug, Gerald H.; Estrella-Martínez, Juan; Breitenbach, Sebastian F. M.; Beaufort, Luc; Rubino, Angelo; Cheng, Hai

    2015-07-14

    Approximately half of the world’s population lives in the tropics, and future changes in the hydrological cycle will impact not just the freshwater supplies but also energy production in areas dependent upon hydroelectric power. It is vital...

  14. Eddy formation and propagation in the eastern tropical Pacific 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

    1997-01-01

    Observations of eddies in the eastern tropical Pacific from TOPEX altimetry data show that there are seasonal and interannual variations in eddy activity. Comparisons between time of eddy formation and corresponding wind ...

  15. Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung-Eun

    Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

  16. Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worbs, H. E.

    1987-01-01

    . Another consideration is the high ventilation loads due to cooling the moist air prevalent in semi-tropical climates. This paper describes a computer program which assesses all the pertinent variables which comprise the annual heating and cooling energy...

  17. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical Grass Quality and Quantity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical Grass Quality and Quantity Onisimo Mutanga 7 April 2004, The Netherlands Prof. W. J. Bond University of Cape Town, South Africa #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing 1.2 Hyperspectral remote sensing

  18. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    Design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of K-12 schools in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into construction or renovation plans, schools can reduce energy consumption and costs.

  19. Tropical cyclone precipitation risk in the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shedd, Sandra Michael

    2015-01-01

    This thesis works to evaluate the new rainfall algorithm that is used to simulate longterm tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology throughout the southeastern United States. The TCP climatology is based on a fleet ...

  20. Future precipitation changes and their implications for tropical peatlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Future precipitation changes and their implications for tropical peatlands Wenhong Li,1 Robert E. Dickinson, R. Fu, G.-Y. Niu, Z.-L. Yang, and J. G. Canadell (2007), Future precipitation changes

  1. Precipitable water structure in tropical systems as estimated from TOVS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatfield, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The spatial and temporal structures of precipitable water (pW) in tropical systems are estimated using TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) radiances over ten cool seasons and two entire years. Statistical regression ...

  2. Layer inflow into precipitating convection over the western tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Houze, Robert A. Jr.; Chen, Shuyi S.

    2002-07-01

    A conceptual model of tropical convection frequently used in convective parametrization schemes is that of a parcel process in which boundary-layer air, characterized by high equivalent potential temperature, ascends to ...

  3. Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Lab 1 Accidents in the Primary & Secondary Forest Products Industry Center #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 2 Abitibi Paper Co. Camp 40 Thunder Bay, Ontario #12;Louisiana Forest Products Lab 3 Accidents in Forest Products Industry Accident Statistics Primary industry

  4. Chaotic Dynamics of Forest Fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Malarz; S. Kaczanowska; K. Kulakowski

    2002-04-25

    In the thermodynamic limit, a probabilistic cellular automaton can be approximated by a deterministic nonlinear map. Here we construct such a map for the forest fire problem. The construction is based on the results of the Monte Carlo simulation, performed on a square lattice of million cells. The results of the calculation are analyzed by means of the Hoshen--Kopelman algorithm (HKA). The only parameter of the map describes the probability that a tree appears at an empty cell during one time step. The obtained map seems to be non-differentiable at the percolation threshold. The Lyapunov exponent for the map is positive. Also, we found the cycle of length three by means of the method of symbolic dynamics. The results are illustrated by the experimental data on the forest fires in Canada in years 1970--2000. Although these data are fortunately far from thermodynamic limit, their qualitative character is reproduced for smaller lattices.

  5. An Examination of Version 5 Rainfall Estimates from the TRMM Microwave Imager, Precipitation Radar, and Rain Gauges on Global, Regional, and Storm Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    , and Rain Gauges on Global, Regional, and Storm Scales STEPHEN W. NESBITT1 AND EDWARD J. ZIPSER Department TRMM rainfall products with Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) global rain gauge analyses is done to evaluate the overall biases of the TMI and PR to "ground truth" to examine regional differences

  6. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings: Evidence from the US Acid Rain Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The US Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate in allowance trading, and whether regulatory activity at the state level would further complicate utilities` decision to trade allowances. This paper finds that public utility commission regulation has encouraged allowance trading activity in states with regulatory rulings, but that allowance trading activity has not been limited to states issuing regulations. Until there is evidence suggesting that significant additional cost savings could have been obtained if additional allowance trading activity had occurred in states without regulations or that utilities in states with regulations are still not taking advantage of all cost saving trading opportunities, this analysis suggests that there is little reason to believe that allowance trading activity is impeded by public utility commission regulations.

  7. Traces of Radioactive 131I in Rain Water Samples in Romania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margineanu, Romul; Apostu, Ana; Gomoiu, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of I-131 (T1/2 = 8.04 days) have been performed in IFIN-HH's underground laboratory situated in Unirea salt mine from Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The rain water samples were collected in March 27th in Brasov and March 27th and 29th in Slanic. The samples were measured using a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer equipped with a GeHP detector having a FWHM = 1.80 keV at 1332.48 keV at the second Co-60 gammaray, and a relative efficiency of 22.8 %. The results show a specific activity of I-131 of 0.35 \\pm 0.04 Bq/dm^3 in Brasov and 0.39 \\pm 0.04 Bq/dm^3, 0.13 \\pm 0.03 Bq/dm^3 and 0.71 \\pm 0.06 Bq/dm^3 in Slanic.

  8. Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Stephen

    Windthrow Hazard Mapping using GIS, Canadian Forest Products TFL 30, McGregor Model Forest. Final in north central BC. Using ArcView Geographic Information System (GIS), buffers 25m deep were created

  9. The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator for Ag Contamination in Tropical Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator determined in the brown alga Lobophora variegata, using radiotracer techniques. Results indicate that this widely distributed alga could be a useful bioindicator species for surveying silver contamination

  10. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  11. Week 4, Rain in my Brain On top of the Harbor Cone, Otago Peninsula, Pacific Ocean in the distance.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Week 4, Rain in my Brain On top of the Harbor Cone, Otago Peninsula, Pacific Ocean in the distance of the ocean or of this beautiful city from on-high and it all comes back that we're here, a dream come true

  12. Volcanic Ash Fall--A "Hard Rain" of Abrasive Particles U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V Volcanic Ash Fall--A "Hard Rain" of Abrasive Particles U.S. Department of the Interior U olcanic ash consists of tiny jagged particles of rock and natural glass blasted into the air by a volcano. Ash can threaten the health of people and live- stock, pose a hazard to flying jet aircraft, damage

  13. IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    IMPROVED MICROWAVE REMOTE SENSING OF HURRICANE WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATES USING THE HURRICANE@mail.ucf.edu ABSTRACT The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a new imaging technology microwave remote sensor for hurricane observations that is currently under development by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

  14. Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Alan

    Fire disturbance and forest structure in an old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest, southern Cascades, USA Alan H. Taylor Abstract Questions: Did fire regimes in old-growth Pinus ponderosa forest change a pattern of continuous regeneration or is regeneration episodic and related to fire disturbance or fire

  15. The Economic Importance of New Hampshire's Forest-Based Economy FOREST-BASED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    recreational opportunities and store carbon, all while providing us a valuable renewable resource and important forest products, it also provides an economic motivation for forest landowners to keep their land products manufacturing, pulp and paper manufacturing, wood energy, and the forest-based recreational

  16. Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect on forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ecosystem's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy's natural capacity toA forest ecosystem's natural capacity to capture energy, capture energy, sustain life10/13/2010 1 Increasing carbon dioxideIncreasing carbon dioxide & its effect on forest& its effect

  17. Terms of Reference AFF Forest certification experts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the review develop training modules on forest certification (One expert, for all regions and also, identify opportunities and challenges, analyse institutional and technical training needs and based

  18. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  19. Recreation and Tourism and the Future in Lodgepole Pine Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    trees Local economy Less people visiting = less spending Forest Fires Ski Resort Concerns Forest Fires of a forest fire. Vail Eagle County Vail $500,000 for thinning -2008 Helicopter to remove beetle infected

  20. Physiological responses of a black spruce forest to weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-01-01

    a black spruce forest to weather Michael L. Goulden, • Bruceresponses of the forest to weather. The annual rates ofgross forest CO 2 exchange to weather is required before the

  1. Forest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim

    2015-01-01

    forests tend to yield more water. Further reading: Bales RC,et al. 2011. Forests and Water in the Sierra Nevada: SierraForest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra

  2. The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    The Impact of Boreal Forest Fire on Climate Warming J. T.analysis of a boreal forest fire, integrating the effects ofnet effect of a boreal forest fire on climate, on the basis

  3. The Junkyard in the Jungle: Transnational, Transnatural Nature in Karen Tei Yamashita’s Through the Arc of the Rain Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simal, Begoña

    2010-01-01

    narrator  how  a  huge  parking  lot  is  discovered  in part of this peculiar parking lot  now contains “a large enough, the abandoned “parking lot” is found  by teams of 

  4. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  5. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community...

  6. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A...

  7. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover...

  8. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar...

  9. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  10. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource...

  11. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  12. Regulation and Moral Hazard in Forest Concessions in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbinotto Neto, Giácomo; Tillmann, Eduardo A; Ratnieks, Ianes

    2012-01-01

    and Forest Concessions in Brazil. Planejamento e Políticaswelfare maximization in Brazil. Rio de Janeiro: IPEA, 1998.in Forest Concessions in Brazil Eduardo A. Tillmann MS.

  13. Grazing Management in Broadleaf Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norbu, Lungten

    2002-01-01

    in 1953 sums up in support of forest grazing by stating that "grazing on the commercial timberland offers few complications as long as grazing is managed so that forage is not damaged. If forage is not damaged, there will be no damage to timber... and Development in the Philippines”, Proceedings of a workshop "on Integration of Ruminants into Plantation Systems in Southeast Asia " at Lake Toba, North Sumatra, Indonesia ACIAR proceedings No 64, Editors-B.F. Mullen and H.M. Shelton 5. Chamling, K...

  14. The North American Forest Sector Outlook Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consumption patterns for wood products and bioenergy. Markets for wood products, which mainly are destined in the forest sector of North America 21 3.1 Forest inventory 21 3.2 Aggregate production, consumption, Canada, carbon sequestration, climate change, consumption, demand, econometric, EFSOS, export, fellings

  15. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Agriculture, Forest Products and Commercial Fishing ECONOMICENGINE NORTHEAST #12;Dear Reader, We and Commercial Fishing. This report confirms what we all know, but sometimes take for granted. Agriculture, commercial fishing and the forest products industries are all important contributors to the Northeast economy

  17. Design techniques for forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design techniques for forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Design by the Forestry Commission in 1998 as `Forest design planning: a guide to good practice'. This revised second edition published in 2014. ISBN: 978-0-85538-894-2 Forestry Commission (2014). Design techniques

  18. A Yale Forest Forum Series Publication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community Tyrrell Sustaining Rural Communities and Forests A summary of a forum and workshop exploring the links between rural community viability and sustainable forestry #12;Issue SummaryPage 3 | Contents Contents

  19. New England Forests: The Path to Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    on forests for the quality and abundance of our region's outstanding drinking water. Forests cool and clean could be more certain that our wood is harvested sustainably and is not contributing to environmental fossil fuels extracted from deep within the earth at great cost to our environment and the climate

  20. Economic Impact of the Texas Forest Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and paper products. The Texas forest sector also produces many value-added forest products such as millwork, wood kitchen cabinets, prefabricated wood buildings, wood furniture, and various paper products in terms of total industry output, value-added, employment, and labor income. Total industry output

  1. Riparian Forest Grows Trees fall in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riparian Forest Grows Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave the littoral zone "Life" Cycle of Coarse Woody Habitat #12;Riparian Forest Grows What factors drive the species composition and stand factors drive the species composition and stand structure? Trees Die Trees fall in the lake Trees leave

  2. Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kristina Ariel

    2005-01-01

    This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

  3. Equilibrium Tropical Cyclone Size in an Idealized State of Axisymmetric Radiative–Convective Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavas, Daniel Robert

    Tropical cyclone size remains an unsolved problem in tropical meteorology, yet size plays a significant role in modulating damage. This work employs the Bryan cloud model (CM1) to systematically explore the sensitivity of ...

  4. A climatology of tropical synoptic scale behavior from TOVS-estimated precipitable water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Morgan Douglas

    1996-01-01

    Tropical synoptic scale behavior is examined using 3 to 8 day filtered precipitable water (PW) estimated from TOVS operational satellite observations for 24 three-month seasons. Zonally-oriented tropical convergence zones ...

  5. The role of piscivores in a species-rich tropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layman, Craig Anthony

    2004-11-15

    Much of the world's species diversity is located in tropical and sub-tropical ecosystems, and a better understanding of the ecology of these systems is necessary to stem biodiversity loss and assess community- and ...

  6. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  7. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01

    eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past 3 M.Y. ,in the western tropical Pacific Ocean in the Holocene epoch,eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–

  8. Tropical cyclone motion and recurvature in TCM-90. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Rawinsonde and satellite data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Motion (TCM90) experiment, which was conducted during the summer of 1990 in the Western North pacific, is used to examine tropical cyclone steering motion and recurvature. TCM-90 composite results are compared with those found in a composite study using twenty-one years (1957-77) of Western North Pacific rawinsonde data during the same August-September period and also for all months during this same 21-year period. Both data sets indicate that the composite deep-layer-mean (850-300 mb) winds 5-7 deg from the cyclone center provide an important component of the steering flow for tropical cyclones. However, despite the rawinsonde data enhancements of the TCM-90 experiment, data limitations prevented an accurate observation of steering flow conditions at individual time periods or for the average of only 5-10 time periods when composited together.

  9. Climate controls on the variability of fires in the tropics and subtropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Werf, Guido R; Randerson, James T; Giglio, Louis; Gobron, Nadine; Dolman, A. J

    2008-01-01

    released from peat and forest fires in Indonesia duringThis contrasts with forest fires that are likely to burn in

  10. Acid rain regs will be falling on utilities in '84, but not too hard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smock, R.

    1984-01-01

    Regulations will probably call for sulfur dioxide scrubber retrofits on some older power plants in 1984, but because the action will likely be administrative under the Clean Air Act rather than new legislation, the rulings will be less harsh. A response to Canadian pressures was delayed when administration attention focused on military problems and rejected the first Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposals submitted by the new director as too costly. Failure to take action in 1984, however, will be politically damaging to the administration during an election year. A lack of scientific data hampers decision making, but EPA scientists predict there will be enough information by 1988 to accurately quantify acid-rain damage. EPA must decide which states to include in the regulations, how much to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions, and how to allocate quotas. Complicating the issue is the effect on the jobs of high-sulfur coal miners and the high capital costs of scrubbers. A low-cost retrofit may be possible with a furnace-injection technique now under study. 2 figures, 3 tables. (DCK)

  11. The divergent wind component in data sparse tropical wind fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Bruce Alan

    1985-01-01

    THE DIVERGENT WIND COMPONENT IN DATA SPARSE TROPICAL WIND FIELDS A Thesis by BRUCE ALAN SNYDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology THE DIVERGENT WIND COMPONENT IN DATA SPARSE TROPICAL WIND FIELDS A Thesis by BRUCE ALAN SNYDER Approved as to style and content by: James P. McGuirk (Co-Chairman) Aylmer IL Thompson (Co-Chairman) W. Homer...

  12. Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location MinHo Kwon,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location Tim Li,1 MinHo Kwon,1,3 Ming Zhao,3 Jong) is used to investigate the change of tropical cyclone frequency in the North Pacific under global warming, and W. Yu (2010), Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L

  13. An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

  14. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  15. Multivariate Data Assimilation in the Tropics by Using Equatorial Waves NEDJELJKA ZAGAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zagar, Nedjeljka

    Multivariate Data Assimilation in the Tropics by Using Equatorial Waves NEDJELJKA ZAGAR 1 multivariate assimila- tion methodology. This applies to both dry and moist idealized tropical systems as well as to a 4D-Var NWP assimilation system. Key words: Tropics, Data assimilation, 4D-Var, Multivariate

  16. Estimating recharge thresholds in tropical karst island aquifers: Barbados, Puerto Rico and Guam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banner, Jay L.

    Estimating recharge thresholds in tropical karst island aquifers: Barbados, Puerto Rico and Guam in tropical island aquifers, such as Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico, are significantly influenced by tropical of rainfall. The karst aquifers on Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico have similar rainwater and groundwater

  17. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review J. Timothy Pennington a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, J. Timothy

    , Peru Abstract The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km2 of ocean between 23.5°N phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific Pacific. Seasonal cycles are weak over much of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, although several

  18. Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2] Eddy diffusivity of the surface velocity field in the tropical Pacific Ocean was estimated using diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2. Results, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10), 3154, doi:10

  19. Regional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    in the tropical eastern Pacific and western Indian Ocean than in the tropical western Pacific and eastern IndianRegional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening* HIROKI TOKINAGA, SHANG-PING XIE, AND AXEL TIMMERMANN International Pacific Research Center, SOEST

  20. Recent widening of the tropical belt from global tropopause statistics: Sensitivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birner, Thomas

    Recent widening of the tropical belt from global tropopause statistics: Sensitivities Thomas Birner 2010. [1] Several recent studies have shown evidence for a widening of the tropical belt over the past of the resulting widening trend of the tropical belt to these thresholds is investigated using four different

  1. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest Lacey Act Amendment f. EU renewable (wood) energy policies Forests, Markets, Policy & PracticeGlobal Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI Forests, Markets, Policy & Practice Shanghai, China

  2. Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Richard "Hao"

    Forest Fire Modeling and Early Detection using Wireless Sensor Networks MOHAMED HEFEEDA Simon Fraser University, Canada Forest fires cost millions of dollars in damages and claim many human lives for early detection of forest fires. We first present the key aspects in modeling forest fires. We do

  3. Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May 2012 Responsible Investment in the Forest Sector Recommendations for Institutional Investors by New Forests Asset Management Pty Limited ("New Forests"). The material in this report is from sources believed by New Forests to be reliable, but the information is not warranted and may contain errors

  4. Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23November 12, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Forests, Foraging and Fires August 23­November 12, 2014 Forests, Foraging and Fires Catherine, Shannon Durbin is fascinated by the conflict between the role of fire in maintaining healthy forests beauty of forest fires." In the installation Thank You, Fog, Spencer Finch presents 60 photographs made

  5. LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 5 Doc_info_start Title: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan: Date_of_Release: File Type: MS Word Local Name: LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan Category: Overview: 004s001 Revision: a Doc_info_end #12;LBTO Forest Fire Contingency Plan 4 TO SECURE THE LBTO ENCLOSURE

  6. Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix 30 Fire Effects on Key Ecological Processes in Forested Ecosystems The following paragraphs on fire effects on forest succession are from Stickney (1982) Forest Succession ...the severity of the pre-disturbance forest herb species also demonstrated the ability to survive fire, particularly those

  7. Forest Enterprise Scotland Head Office 1 Highlander Way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;2 Scotland'sNationalForestEstate2013-2016 The role of Scotland's National Forest Estate Commission Picture Library unless otherwise stated. Designed by Whitenoise Creative for Forestry Commission of Forestry Commission Scotland charged with managing the National Forest Estate. Scotland's National Forest

  8. Educational Needs of Southern Forest Landowners October 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    use tax rolls to develop forest landowner databases. Once developed, newsletters, pamphlets, brochures

  9. The role of land surface processes on the mesoscale simulation of the July 26, 2005 heavy rain event over Mumbai, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The role of land surface processes on the mesoscale simulation of the July 26, 2005 heavy rain Mesoscale convection Weather research and forecast model Indian summer monsoon Land surface processes

  10. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  11. 5 February 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Small and Medium Sized Primary Forest Products Processors Author: Smith, Robert L.; Cesa , Edward T

  12. 25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER -FOREST SECTOR / FORESTY PRODUCTS INTEREST GROUP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25 November 2014 SENT TO LSU AGCENTER/LOUISIANA FOREST PRODUCTS DEVELOPMENT CENTER - FOREST SECTOR://www.scientificamerican.com/article/should-american-wood-fuel-european-power/Energy & Sustainability a seafaring protest during a forest industry conference. Participants at this week's Mid-Atlantic Forest

  13. The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The management of fire-prone forests, especially within the national forests of the west, is one). Many forests, however, have been degraded over the past century by misguided fire management, as well fire regimes in some forest types (Covington and Moore 1994; Schoennagel et al. 2004). Key structural

  14. GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2005-03-22

    This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

  15. The Common Occurrence of Highly Supercooled Drizzle and Rain near the Coastal Regions of the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chemke, Rei; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; Rasmussen, R M.; McDonough, Frank; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Jonsson, Haf; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cazorla, Alberto; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-05

    The formation of highly supercooled rain was documented by aircraft observations in clouds at a wide range of conditions near the coastal region of the western United States. Several case studies are described in detail using combined cloud and aerosol measurements to document both the highly super-cooled condition and the relatively pristine aerosol conditions under which it forms. The case studies include: (1) Marine convective clouds over the coastal waters of northern California, as measured by cloud physics probes flown on a Gulfstream-1 aircraft during the CALWATER campaign in February and early March 2011. The clouds had extensive drizzle in their tops, which extended downward to the 0°C isotherm as supercooled rain. Ice multiplication was observed only in mature parts of the clouds where cloud water was already depleted. (2) Orographically triggered convective clouds in marine air mass over the foothills of the Sierra Nevada to the east of Sacramento, as measured in CALWATER. Supercooled rain was observed down to -21°C. No indications for ice multiplication were evident. (3) Orographic layer clouds over Yosemite National Park, also measured in CALWATER. The clouds had extensive drizzle at -21°C, which intensified with little freezing lower in the cloud, and (4) Supercooled drizzle drops in layer clouds near Juneau, Alaska, as measured by the Wyoming King Air as part of a FAA project to study aircraft icing in this region. Low concentrations of CCN was a common observation in all these clouds, allowing for the formation of clouds with small concentration of large drops that coalesced into supercooled drizzle and raindrops. Another common observation was the absence of ice nuclei and/or ice crystals in measurable concentrations was associated with the persistent supercooled drizzle and rain. Average ice crystal concentrations were 0.007 l-1 at the top of convective clouds at -12°C and 0.03 l-1 in the case of layer clouds at -21°C. In combination these two conditions provide ideal conditions for the formation of highly supercooled drizzle and rain. These results help explain the anomalously high incidences of aircraft icing at cold temperatures in U.S. west coast clouds (Bernstein et al., 2004) and highlight the need to include aerosol effects when simulating aircraft icing with cloud models. These case studies can also serve as benchmarks for explicit cloud microphysics models attempting to simulate the formation of precipitation in these types of pristine conditions.

  16. WMO/CAS/WWW SEVENTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON TROPICAL CYCLONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    .smith@lmu.de Working Group Members: Zhuo Wang (Univ. Illinois, USA), David Raymond (New Mexico Tech., New Mexico, USA (i.e. thunderstorm activity) and a definite cyclonic surface wind circulation (Holland 1993)." Notably, this definition does not invoke any wind threshold. The same glossary defines a tropical

  17. Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    plants through open stomata: this process (transpiration) cools the plant and facilitates transportReduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration Jung-Eun Lee,1 in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of transpiration for this difference

  18. In Situ Survival of Genetically Engineered Microorganisms in a Tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    . Alvarez, G. M. Yumet, and C. L. Santiago Department of Biology, P.O. Box 23360, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 00931-3360 T. C. Hazen Savannah River Laboratory, Environmental Sciences microorganisms (GEMs) and their interactions with the environmental microbiota of a tropical river

  19. MET 416: TROPICAL ANALYSIS AND FORECASTING Spring Semester 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    current (nowcasting) and expected weather, using all available real-time operational weather data Exam 4/9 Summer trade-wind weather based on HaRP 4/11-16 Large-scale influences, Diurnal cycle to the development of tropical storm systems and mesoscale weather. Lectures will include a forecasting perspective

  20. Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Y. Tang Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability Received: 20 Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), an intermediate complexity dynamical ocean model cou- pled to either), hybrid models (e.g., Barnett et al. 1993; Balmaseda et al. 1994,1995), and fully coupled general

  1. Tropical Pacific mid-latitude teleconnections in medieval times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Kim

    records from widely distributed regions around the planet, and in many cases is consistent with a cool centennial-scale drought, elevated incidence of wild fire, cool sea surface temperatures (SSTs) along). Proxy records from the tropical Pacific Ocean show contemporaneous changes indicating cool central

  2. The efficiency of diabatic heating and tropical cyclone intensification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Roger K.

    The efficiency of diabatic heating and tropical cyclone intensification Roger K. Smitha and Michael cyclones to the increasing "efficiency" of diabatic heating in the cyclone's inner core region associated with deep convection. The efficiency, in essence the amount of temperature warming compared to the amount

  3. Tropical geometry of statistical models Lior Pachter and Bernd Sturmfels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcolli, Matilde

    for graphical models in statistical learning theory (5), but it differs from other (more classical) notionsTropical geometry of statistical models Lior Pachter and Bernd Sturmfels Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Communicated by Stephen E. Fienberg, Carnegie Mellon University

  4. Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 19982000 tropical ozone climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Anne

    Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) 1998­2000 tropical ozone climatology 1. Comparison with Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) and ground-based measurements Anne M. Thompson,1 Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project and established from operational sites, provided over 1000 ozone

  5. Geochronology of Quaternary glaciations from the tropical Cordillera Huayhuash, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark, Bryan G.

    Geochronology of Quaternary glaciations from the tropical Cordillera Huayhuash, Peru Sarah R. Hall to peaks >4800 m a.s.l. Geomorphology and geochronology in the nearby Cordillera Blanca and Junin Plain et al., 2005a, b) and thus completes a north-south glacial geochronologic transect spanning w1

  6. AGCM Precipitation Biases in the Tropical Atlantic M. BIASUTTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    AGCM Precipitation Biases in the Tropical Atlantic M. BIASUTTI Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory precipitation in the Southern Hemisphere in boreal spring and in the Caribbean region in boreal summer precipitation maximum does not occur there. This is the case even though these GCMs accurately place the maximum

  7. Getting Our Feet Wet: Water Management at Mt. Laguna in Cleveland National Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, William Cade

    2013-01-01

    rain gardens, soil amendments, permeable pavements, and infiltration devices could offer potential solutions to problems of water

  8. The impacts and implications of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forest composition and albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalwhereas latent energy fluxes in spruce forests, with theirenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:

  9. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, B. M; Randerson, J. T; Bonan, G. B

    2013-01-01

    stand age on the bo- real forest energy balance, Agr. Forestenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:diox- ide and energy fluxes, Agr. Forest Meteorol. , 96,

  10. Fire effects on net radiation and energy partitioning: Contrasting responses of tundra and boreal forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, S. D; Randerson , J. T.; Beringer, J.; Chapin , F. S

    2005-01-01

    EFFECTS ON SURFACE ENERGY EXCHANGE forest: Evidence from1998), Energy balance storage terms in a mixed forest,and energy exchanges of a boreal black spruce forest, J.

  11. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09

    Managing pine forests for the production of pine straw is a promising new enterprise in East Texas. This publication explains the processes and equipment needed to harvest and market pine straw....

  12. A Blueprint for Forest Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Integrated Market-Based Value-Added Forest Sector Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Economic Development Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder analysis Sustainability Other Issues Environmental Political Community Development Issues Stakeholder

  13. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  14. Working Paper #7 Louisiana Forest Products Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    -rich communities. Further, secondary forest products wages often exceed average wages of other jobs in rural areas companies (12). In addition, export oriented timber related #12;3 companies may offer rural communities

  15. Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    Building Emergency Response Plan Forest Science Centre (Including the Advanced Wood Processing;Building Emergency Response Plan 17/05/2013 Page 1 Table of Contents Emergency Telephone Numbers ......................................................................................................................... 5 Life Safety Systems and Building Features

  16. BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT: EUCALYPTUS & FOREST LAW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Other: A. 4% to sawmills B. Wood pellets C. in Brazil. Specializations include: Wood construction, Industrialization and marketing of forest products system Short rotations of 6-7 years Managed for Fiber or Fuel-wood http

  17. 2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    2014 Urban Forest Symposium Tom Hinckley Professor Emeritus May 24, 2014 #12;Questions, temperature, ppt, extremes) #12;Simple Model: Carbon and Stress Leaf GrowthCarbon Production Carbon Storage, solarization · Growing season ­ Soil moisture ­ Atmospheric (wind, temperature, humidity, radiation) ­ Outcomes

  18. Universal scaling of forest fire propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Porterie; Pierre, Clerc Jean; Nouredine, Zekri; Zekri, Lotfi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we use a variant of the Watts-Strogatz small-world model to predict wildfire behavior near the critical propagation/nonpropagation threshold. We find that forest fire patterns are fractal and that critical exponents are universal, which suggests that the propagation/nonpropagation transition is a second-order transition. Universality tells us that the characteristic critical behaviour of propagation in real (amorphous) forest landscapes can be extracted from the simplest network model.

  19. Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    of Mato Grosso, Brasil, Water Resour. Res. , 38(6), 1094,2009 Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradientFigueira (2004), Seasonality of water and heat fluxes over a

  20. Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    M. V. Ligo, O. M. R. Cabral, and M. A. F. Silva Dias (2002),O. Manzi, 2 Osvaldo M. Cabral, 3 Scott D. Miller, 4 Michaelmodel.iag.usp.br) O. M. Cabral, Embrapa Meio Ambiente,