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Sample records for tropical forest management

  1. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New...

  2. Management of Philippine tropical forests: Implications to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasco, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The first part of the paper presents the massive changes in tropical land management in the Philippines as a result of a {open_quotes}paradigm shift{close_quotes} in forestry. The second part of the paper analyzes the impacts of the above management strategies on global warming, in general, preserved forests are neither sinks not sources of greenhouse gasses (GHG). Reforestation activities are primarily net sinks of carbon specially the use of fast growing reforestation species. Estimates are given for the carbon-sequestering ability of some commonly used species. The last part of the paper policy recommendations and possible courses of action by the government to maximize the role of forest lands in the mitigation of global warming. Private sector initiatives are also explored.

  3. Tropical Forest Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Virginia. About "The Tropical Forest Foundation (TFF) is an international, non-profit, educational institution committed to advancing environmental stewardship, economic...

  4. Land cover change and remote sensing: Examples of quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics in tropical forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Su, Haiping; Fox, J.; Yarnasan, S.; Ekasingh, M.

    1995-06-01

    Research on human impacts or natural processes that operate over broad geographic areas must explicitly address issues of scale and spatial heterogeneity. While the tropical forests of Southeast Asia and Mexico have been occupied and used to meet human needs for thousands of years, traditional forest management systems are currently being transformed by rapid and far-reaching demographic, political, economic, and environmental changes. The dynamics of population growth, migration into the remaining frontiers, and responses to national and international market forces result in a demand for land to produce food and fiber. These results illustrate some of the mechanisms that drive current land use changes, especially in the tropical forest frontiers. By linking the outcome of individual land use decisions and measures of landscape fragmentation and change, the aggregated results shows the hierarchy of temporal and spatial events that in summation result in global changes to the most complex and sensitive biome -- tropical forests. By quantifying the spatial and temporal patterns of tropical forest change, researchers can assist policy makers by showing how landscape systems in these tropical forests are controlled by physical, biological, social, and economic parameters.

  5. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  6. (Collection of data on tropical forest inventories, Rome, Italy, March 20--25, 1989): Foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gillespie, A.

    1989-04-06

    All forestry information in the library of FAO was organized into country ''boxes,'' and all boxes for countries in tropical Asia and tropical America were searched for data on forest inventories. Information on location and extent of inventories and resulting stand and stock tables were obtained for (1) converting to biomass by using methods that were already developed and (2) calculating expansion factors (commercial volume to total biomass). This work was conducted by the University of Illinois (Drs. Sandra Brown, Principal Investigator, and Andrew Gillespie, Research Associate) for the Department of Energy's Energy Systems Program managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The travelers were successful in obtaining copies of some data for most countries in tropical Asia and tropical America. Most of the inventories for Asia were for only parts of countries, whereas most in America were national in scale. With the information gathered, the travelers will be able to make biomass estimates, geographically referenced, for many forest types representing thousands of hectares in most countries in these two tropical regions.

  7. Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management: A Path to Sustainable Environment and Development Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Based Forest (Natural) Resource Management:...

  8. Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement Jump to: navigation, search Name Norway-Indonesia-Forest Management Agreement AgencyCompany Organization Government of Norway,...

  9. Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon management, carbon credit trading, national reporting of greenhouse gas inventories to the United Nations Framework...

  10. National Forest Management Act of 1976 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The National Forest Management Act of 1976 is a federal law that governs the administration of national forests. This act requires the United States Forest Service to use a...

  11. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. The role of tropical forests on the world carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Lugo, A. E.; Liegel, B.

    1980-08-01

    Tropical forests constitute about half of the world's forest and are characterized by rapid rates of organic matter turnover and high storages of organic matter. Tropical forests are considered to be one of the most significant terrestrial elements in the equation that balances the carbon cycle of the world. As discussed in the paper by Tosi, tropical and subtropical latitudes are more complex in terms of climate and vegetation composition than temperate and boreal latitudes. The implications of the complexity of the tropics and the disregard of this complexity by many scientists is made evident in the paper by Brown and Lugo which shows that biomass estimates for tropical ecosystems have been overestimated by at least 100%. The paper by Brown shows that that rates of succession in the tropics are extremely rapid in terms of the ability of moist and wet forests to accumulate organic matter. Yet, in arid tropical Life Zones succession is slow. This leads to the idea that the question of whether tropical forests are sinks or sources of carbon must be analyzed in relation to Life Zones and to intensities of human activity in these Zones. The paper by Lugo presents conceptual models to illustrate this point and the paper by Tosi shows how land uses in the tropics also correspond to Life Zone characteristics. The ultimate significance of land use to the question of the carbon balance in a large region is addressed in the paper by Detwiler and Hall.

  12. Interannual variation of the surface temperature of tropical forests from satellite observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gao, Huilin; Zhang, Shuai; Fu, Rong; Li, Wenhong; Dickinson, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Land surface temperatures (LSTs) within tropical forests contribute to climate variations. However, observational data are very limited in such regions. This study used passive microwave remote sensing data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS), providing observations under all weather conditions, to investigate the LST over the Amazon and Congo rainforests. The SSM/I and SSMIS data were collected from 1996 to 2012. The morning and afternoon observations from passive microwave remote sensing facilitate the investigation of the interannual changes of LST anomalies on a diurnal basis. As a result of the variability ofmore » cloud cover and the corresponding reduction of solar radiation, the afternoon LST anomalies tend to vary more than the morning LST anomalies. The dominant spatial and temporal patterns for interseasonal variations of the LST anomalies over the tropical rainforest were analyzed. The impacts of droughts and El Niños on this LST were also investigated. Lastly, the differences between early morning and late afternoon LST anomalies were identified by the remote sensing product, with the morning LST anomalies controlled by humidity (according to comparisons with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis data).« less

  13. Survival and distribution of Vibrio cholerae in a tropical rain forest stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Rosas, N.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    For 12 months Vibrio cholerae and fecal coliforms were monitored along with 9 other water quality parameters at 12 sites in a rain forest watershed in Puerto Rico. Densities of V. cholerae and fecal coliforms were not significantly correlated even though the highest densities of both bacteria were found at a sewage outfall. High densities of V. cholerae were also found at pristine sites high in the watershed. V. cholerae and Escherichia coli were inoculated into membrane diffusion chambers, placed at two sites and monitored for 5 days on two different occasions. Two different direct count methods indicated that the density of E. coli and V. cholerae did not change significantly during the course of either study. Physiological activity, as measured by INT-reduction and relative nucleic acid composition declined for E. coli during the first 12 h then increased and remained variable during the remainder of the study. V. cholerae activity, as measured by relative nucleic acid concentrations, remained high and unchanged for the entire study. INT-reduction in V. cholerae declined initially but regained nearly all of it`s original activity within 48 h. This study suggests that V. cholerae is an indigenous organism in tropical freshwaters and that assays other than fecal coliforms or E. coli must be used for assessing public health risk in tropical waters.

  14. Impact of post-mining subsidence on nitrogen transformation in southern tropical dry deciduous forest, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, N.; Singh, R.S.; Singh, J.S.

    2009-04-15

    The goal of our research was to assess the impact of post-mining land subsidence, caused due to underground coal mining operations, on fine root biomass and root tips count; plant available nutrient status, microbial biomass N (MBN) and N-mineralization rates of a Southern tropical dry deciduous forest of Singareni Coalfields of India. The changes were quantified in all the three (rainy, winter and summer) seasons, in slope and depression microsites of the subsided land and an adjacent undamaged forest microsite. Physico-chemical characteristics were found to be altered after subsidence, showing a positive impact of subsidence on soil moisture, bulk density, water holding capacity, organic carbon content, total N and total P. The increase in all the parameters was found in depression microsites, while in slope microsites, the values were lower. Fine root biomass and root tips count increased in the subsided depression microsites, as demonstrated by increases of 62% and 45%, respectively. Soil nitrate-N and phosphate-P concentrations were also found to be higher in depression microsite, showing an increase of 35.68% and 24.74%, respectively. Depression microsite has also shown the higher MBN value with an increase over control. Net nitrification, net N-mineralization and MBN were increased in depression microsite by 29.77%, 25.72% and 34%, respectively. There was a positive relation of microbial N with organic C, fine root biomass and root tips.

  15. ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Operations Management and Support: Securing ARM Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Operations Management and Support: Securing ARM Data K. L. Nitschke South Pacific Regional Environment Programme Apia, Samoa L. Jones Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The Tropical Western Pacific Office (TWPO) (a) has been tasked with providing operational management and support for three (b) climate station instrument facilities in the Tropical Western pacific

  16. Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis of Baseline Carbon Emissions and Removal in Tropical Rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Benjamin Kroll; Carlos R. Vargas

    2006-01-10

    Conversion of tropical forest to agricultural land and pasture has reduced forest extent and the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation and reforestation can restore those ecosystem services. We have assessed forest species patterns, quantified deforestation and reforestation rates, and projected future baseline carbon emissions and removal in Amazon tropical rainforest at La Selva Central, Peru. The research area is a 4800 km{sup 2} buffer zone around the Parque Nacional Yanachaga-Chemillen, Bosque de Proteccion San Matias-San Carlos, and the Reserva Comunal Yanesha. A planned project for the period 2006-2035 would conserve 4000 ha of forest in a proposed 7000 ha Area de Conservacion Municipale de Chontabamba and establish 5600 ha of natural regeneration and 1400 ha of native species plantations, laid out in fajas de enriquecimiento (contour plantings), to reforest 7000 ha of agricultural land. Forest inventories of seven sites covering 22.6 ha in primary forest and 17 sites covering 16.5 ha in secondary forest measured 17,073 trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm. The 24 sites host trees of 512 species, 267 genera, and 69 families. We could not identify the family of 7% of the trees or the scientific species of 21% of the trees. Species richness is 346 in primary forest and 257 in the secondary forest. In primary forest, 90% of aboveground biomass resides in old-growth species. Conversely, in secondary forest, 66% of aboveground biomass rests in successional species. The density of trees of diameter {ge} 10 cm is 366 trees ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 533 trees ha{sup -1} in secondary forest, although the average diameter is 24 {+-} 15 cm in primary forest and 17 {+-} 8 cm in secondary forest. Using Amazon forest biomass equations and wood densities for 117 species, aboveground biomass is 240 {+-} 30 t ha{sup -1} in the primary sites and 90 {+-} 10 t ha{sup -1} in the secondary sites. Aboveground carbon density is 120 {+-} 15 t ha{sup -1} in primary forest and 40 {+-} 5 t ha{sup -1} in secondary forest. Forest stands in the secondary forest sites range in age from 10 to 42 y. Growth in biomass (t ha{sup -1}) as a function of time (y) follows the relation: biomass = 4.09-0.017 age{sup 2} (p < 0.001). Aboveground biomass and forest species richness are positively correlated (r{sup 2} = 0.59, p < 0.001). Analyses of Landsat data show that the land cover of the 3700 km{sup 2} of non-cloud areas in 1999 was: closed forest 78%; open forest 12%, low vegetation cover 4%, sparse vegetation cover 6%. Deforestation from 1987 to 1999 claimed a net 200 km{sup 2} of forest, proceeding at a rate of 0.005 y{sup -1}. Of those areas of closed forest in 1987, only 89% remained closed forest in 1999. Consequently, closed forests experienced disruption in the time period at double the rate of net deforestation. The three protected areas experienced negligible deforestation or slight reforestation. Based on 1987 forest cover, 26,000 ha are eligible for forest carbon trading under the Clean Development Mechanism, established by the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Principal components analysis showed that distance to nonforest was the factor that best explained observed patterns of deforestation while distance to forest best explained observed patterns of reforestation, more significant than elevation, distance to rivers, distance to roads, slope, and distance to towns of population > 400. Aboveground carbon in live vegetation in the project area decreased from 35 million {+-} 4 million t in 1987 to 34 million {+-} 4 million t in 1999. Projected aboveground carbon in live vegetation would fall to 33 million {+-} 4 million t in 2006, 32 million {+-} 4 million t in 2011, and 29 million {+-} 3 million t in 2035. Projected net deforestation in the research area would total 13,000 {+-} 3000 ha in the period 1999-2011, proceeding at a rate of 0.003 {+-} 0.0007 y{sup -1}, and would total 33,000 {+-} 7000

  17. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-02-07

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFO{trademark} exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer- coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the centerpoint of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  18. Geographical Distribution of Biomass Carbon in Tropical Southeast Asian Forests: A Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S

    2001-05-22

    A database was generated of estimates of geographically referenced carbon densities of forest vegetation in tropical Southeast Asia for 1980. A geographic information system (GIS) was used to incorporate spatial databases of climatic, edaphic, and geomorphological indices and vegetation to estimate potential (i.e., in the absence of human intervention and natural disturbance) carbon densities of forests. The resulting map was then modified to estimate actual 1980 carbon density as a function of population density and climatic zone. The database covers the following 13 countries: Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia (Campuchea), India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data sets within this database are provided in three file formats: ARC/INFOTM exported integer grids, ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) files formatted for raster-based GIS software packages, and generic ASCII files with x, y coordinates for use with non-GIS software packages. This database includes ten ARC/INFO exported integer grid files (five with the pixel size 3.75 km x 3.75 km and five with the pixel size 0.25 degree longitude x 0.25 degree latitude) and 27 ASCII files. The first ASCII file contains the documentation associated with this database. Twenty-four of the ASCII files were generated by means of the ARC/INFO GRIDASCII command and can be used by most raster-based GIS software packages. The 24 files can be subdivided into two groups of 12 files each. These files contain real data values representing actual carbon and potential carbon density in Mg C/ha (1 megagram = 10{sup 6} grams) and integer-coded values for country name, Weck's Climatic Index, ecofloristic zone, elevation, forest or non-forest designation, population density, mean annual precipitation, slope, soil texture, and vegetation classification. One set of 12 files contains these data at a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, whereas the other set of 12 files has a spatial resolution of 0.25 degree. The remaining two ASCII data files combine all of the data from the 24 ASCII data files into 2 single generic data files. The first file has a spatial resolution of 3.75 km, and the second has a resolution of 0.25 degree. Both files also provide a grid-cell identification number and the longitude and latitude of the center-point of each grid cell. The 3.75-km data in this numeric data package yield an actual total carbon estimate of 42.1 Pg (1 petagram = 10{sup 15} grams) and a potential carbon estimate of 73.6 Pg; whereas the 0.25-degree data produced an actual total carbon estimate of 41.8 Pg and a total potential carbon estimate of 73.9 Pg. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files, and ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW command syntax are provided to import the ARC/INFO exported integer grid files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  19. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  20. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several tropical forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Q.; Riley, W. J.; Tang, J.; Koven, C. D.

    2015-03-05

    Soil is a complex system where biotic (e.g., plant roots, micro-organisms) and abiotic (e.g., mineral surfaces) consumers compete for resources necessary for life (e.g., nitrogen, phosphorus). This competition is ecologically significant, since it regulates the dynamics of soil nutrients and controls aboveground plant productivity. Here we develop, calibrate, and test a nutrient competition model that accounts for multiple soil nutrients interacting with multiple biotic and abiotic consumers. As applied here for tropical forests, the Nutrient COMpetition model (N-COM) includes three primary soil nutrients (NH4+, NO3?, and POx (representing the sum of PO43?, HPO42?, and H2PO4?)) and five potential competitors (plantmoreroots, decomposing microbes, nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and mineral surfaces). The competition is formulated with a quasi-steady-state chemical equilibrium approximation to account for substrate (multiple substrates share one consumer) and consumer (multiple consumers compete for one substrate) effects. N-COM successfully reproduced observed soil heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions, free phosphorus, sorbed phosphorus, and free NH4+ at a tropical forest site (Tapajos). The overall model posterior uncertainty was moderately well constrained. Our sensitivity analysis revealed that soil nutrient competition was primarily regulated by consumer-substrate affinity rather than environmental factors such as soil temperature or soil moisture. Our results imply that the competitiveness (from most to least competitive) followed this order: (1) for NH4+, nitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (2) for NO3?, denitrifiers ~ decomposing microbes > plant roots, (3) for POx, mineral surfaces > decomposing microbes ~ plant roots. Although smaller, plant relative competitiveness is of the same order of magnitude as microbes. We then applied the N-COM model to analyze field nitrogen and phosphorus perturbation experiments in two tropical forest sites (in Hawaii and Puerto Rico) not used in model development or calibration. Under soil inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus elevated conditions, the model accurately replicated the experimentally observed competition among different nutrient consumers. Although we used as many observations as we could obtain, more nutrient addition experiments in tropical systems would greatly benefit model testing and calibration. In summary, the N-COM model provides an ecologically consistent representation of nutrient competition appropriate for land BGC models integrated in Earth System Models.less

  1. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R.; Mattson, W., J.

    2005-01-01

    Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

  2. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  3. Effects of harvest management practices on forest biomass and soil carbon in eucalypt forests in New South Wales, Australia: Simulations with the forest succession model LINKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranatunga, Kemachandra; Keenan, Rodney J.; Wullschleger, Stan D; Post, Wilfred M; Tharp, M Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Understanding long-term changes in forest ecosystem carbon stocks under forest management practices such as timber harvesting is important for assessing the contribution of forests to the global carbon cycle. Harvesting effects are complicated by the amount, type, and condition of residue left on-site, the decomposition rate of this residue, the incorporation of residue into soil organic matter and the rate of new detritus input to the forest floor from regrowing vegetation. In an attempt to address these complexities, the forest succession model LINKAGES was used to assess the production of aboveground biomass, detritus, and soil carbon stocks in native Eucalyptus forests as influenced by five harvest management practices in New South Wales, Australia. The original decomposition sub-routines of LINKAGES were modified by adding components of the Rothamsted (RothC) soil organic matter turnover model. Simulation results using the new model were compared to data from long-term forest inventory plots. Good agreement was observed between simulated and measured above-ground biomass, but mixed results were obtained for basal area. Harvesting operations examined included removing trees for quota sawlogs (QSL, DBH >80 cm), integrated sawlogs (ISL, DBH >20 cm) and whole-tree harvesting in integrated sawlogs (WTH). We also examined the impact of different cutting cycles (20, 50 or 80 years) and intensities (removing 20, 50 or 80 m{sup 3}). Generally medium and high intensities of shorter cutting cycles in sawlog harvesting systems produced considerably higher soil carbon values compared to no harvesting. On average, soil carbon was 2-9% lower in whole-tree harvest simulations whereas in sawlog harvest simulations soil carbon was 5-17% higher than in no harvesting.

  4. MCA 77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    77-5-303 - Standards for Forest Practices in Streamside Management Zones Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: MCA...

  5. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-04-29

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore » large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (66 ± 2%) was rapid (11 to 26 years; mean and SE: 18 ± 3 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial–millennial turnover was typically much less abundant (34 ± 3%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral-associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were statistically similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–25% of annual litter production. Observed trends in mineral-associated Δ14C over time could not be fit using the single-pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and Δ14C as compared with a more realistic two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils documented here are supported by findings from paired 14C studies in other types of ecosystems, and suggest that most mineral-associated C cycles relatively rapidly (decadal scales) across ecosystems that span a broad range of state factors.« less

  6. Large fluxes and rapid turnover of mineral-associated carbon across topographic gradients in a humid tropical forest: insights from paired 14C analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, S. J.; McNicol, G.; Natake, T.; Silver, W. L.

    2015-01-16

    It has been proposed that the large soil carbon (C) stocks of humid tropical forests result predominantly from C stabilization by reactive minerals, whereas oxygen (O2) limitation of decomposition has received much less attention. We examined the importance of these factors in explaining patterns of C stocks and turnover in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, using radiocarbon (14C) measurements of contemporary and archived samples. Samples from ridge, slope, and valley positions spanned three soil orders (Ultisol, Oxisol, Inceptisol) representative of humid tropical forests, and differed in texture, reactive metal content, O2 availability, and root biomass. Mineral-associated C comprised themore » large majority (87 ± 2%, n = 30) of total soil C. Turnover of most mineral-associated C (74 ± 4%) was rapid (9 to 29 years, mean and SE 20 ± 2 years) in 25 of 30 soil samples across surface horizons (0–10 and 10–20 cm depths) and all topographic positions, independent of variation in reactive metal concentrations and clay content. Passive C with centennial – millennial turnover was much less abundant (26%), even at 10–20 cm depths. Carbon turnover times and concentrations significantly increased with concentrations of reduced iron (Fe(II)) across all samples, suggesting that O2 availability may have limited the decomposition of mineral associated C over decadal scales. Steady-state inputs of mineral-associated C were similar among the three topographic positions, and could represent 10–30% of annual litterfall production (estimated by doubling aboveground litterfall). Observed trends in mineral-associated Δ14C over time could not be fit using the single pool model used in many other studies, which generated contradictory relationships between turnover and Δ14C as compared with a more realistic constrained two-pool model. The large C fluxes in surface and near-surface soils implied by our data suggest that other studies using single-pool Δ14C models of mineral-associated C dynamics, unconstrained by multiple time points, may have systematically underestimated C turnover.« less

  7. Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect on tropical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forests Climate change's effect on tropical forests Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect on tropical forests An expansive new project called Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments-Tropics aims to bring the future of tropical forests into much clearer focus April 1, 2015 Overhead view of Amazon forest, at risk from a warming climate. Photo credit: Hugo Glendinning Overhead view of Amazon forest, at risk from a warming climate. Photo credit: Hugo Glendinning Contact Los

  8. Global Forest Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Assessment 2010 (FRA 2010) covers all seven thematic elements of sustainable forest management: Extent of forest resources Forest biological diversity Forest health and...

  9. Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect on tropical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forests Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect on tropical forests Alumni Link: Opportunities, News and Resources for Former Employees Latest Issue:September 2015 all issues All Issues » submit Multi-institutional project to study climate change's effect on tropical forests An expansive new project called Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments-Tropics aims to bring the future of tropical forests into much clearer focus May 1, 2015 Overhead view of Amazon forest, at risk

  10. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  11. Forest Monitoring for Action (FORMA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    online maps of tropical forest clearing, providing useful information for local and national forest conservation programs, as well as international efforts to curb greenhouse...

  12. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Sustainable ForestManagement: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye , Jayant; Makundi , Willy; Goldberg ,Beth; Andrasko , Ken; Sanchez , Arturo

    1997-07-01

    The International Workshop on Sustainable Forest Management: Monitoring and Verification of Greenhouse Gases was held in San Jose, Costa Rica, July 29-31, 1996. The main objectives of the workshop were to: (1) assemble key practitioners of forestry greenhouse gas (GHG) or carbon offset projects, remote sensing of land cover change, guidelines development, and the forest products certification movement, to offer presentations and small group discussions on findings relevant to the crucial need for the development of guidelines for monitoring and verifying offset projects, and (2) disseminate the findings to interested carbon offset project developers and forestry and climate change policy makers, who need guidance and consistency of methods to reduce project transaction costs and increase probable reliability of carbon benefits, at appropriate venues. The workshop brought together about 45 participants from developed, developing, and transition countries. The participants included researchers, government officials, project developers, and staff from regional and international agencies. Each shared his or her perspectives based on experience in the development and use of methods for monitoring and verifying carbon flows from forest areas and projects. A shared sense among the participants was that methods for monitoring forestry projects are well established, and the techniques are known and used extensively, particularly in production forestry. Introducing climate change with its long-term perspective is often in conflict with the shorter-term perspective of most forestry projects and standard accounting principles. The resolution of these conflicts may require national and international agreements among the affected parties. The establishment of guidelines and protocols for better methods that are sensitive to regional issues will be an important first step to increase the credibility of forestry projects as viable mitigation options. The workshop deliberations led to three primary outputs: (1) a Workshop Statement in the JI Quarterly, September, 1996; (2) the publication of a series of selected peer-reviewed technical papers from the workshop in a report of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL. 40501); and (3) a special issue of the journal ''Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change'', Kluwer Academic Publishers. The outputs will be distributed to practitioners in this field and to negotiators attending the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) deliberations leading up to the Third conference of Parties in Kyoto, in December 1997.

  13. EIS-0442: Reauthorization of Permits, Maintenance, and Vegetation Management on Western Area Power Administration Transmission Lines on Forest Service Lands, Colorado, Nebraska, and Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is being prepared jointly by DOE’s Western Area Power Administration and the U.S. Forest Service. The EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of Western’s proposed changes to vegetation management along its transmission line rights-of-way on National Forest System lands in Colorado, Utah, and Nebraska.

  14. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Plot M) - IL 04 Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A Plot M) - IL 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A/Plot M) (IL.04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site Documents Related to Palos Park Forest Preserve Site (A/Plot M) Surveillance of

  15. Quantifying And Predicting Wood Quality Of Loblolly And Slash Pine Under Intensive Forest Management Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard F. Daniels; Alexander Clark III

    2006-05-04

    The forest industry will increasingly rely on fast-growing intensively managed southern pine plantations to furnish wood and fiber. Intensive silvicultural practices, including competition control, stand density control, fertilization, and genetic improvement are yielding tremendous gains in the quantity of wood production from commercial forest land. How these technologies affect wood properties was heretofore unknown, although there is concern about the suitability of fast-grown wood for traditional forest products. A four year study was undertaken to examine the effects of these intensive practices on the properties of loblolly and slash pine wood by applying a common sampling method over 10 existing field experiments. Early weed control gets young pines off to a rapid start, often with dramatically increased growth rates. This response is all in juvenile wood however, which is low in density and strength. Similar results are found with early Nitrogen fertilization at the time of planting. These treatments increase the proportion of juvenile wood in the tree. Later, mid-rotation fertilization with Nitrogen and Phosphorus can have long term (4-8 year) growth gains. Slight reductions in wood density are short-lived (1-2 years) and occur while the tree is producing dense, stiff mature wood. Impacts of mid-rotation fertilization on wood properties for manufacturing are estimated to be minimal. Genetic differences are evident in wood density and other properties. Single family plantings showed somewhat more uniform properties than bulk improved or unimproved seedlots. Selection of genetic sources with optimal wood properties may counter some of the negative impacts of intensive weed control and fertilization. This work will allow forest managers to better predict the effects of their practices on the quality of their final product.

  16. EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western’s Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

  17. Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Products Forest Products Purchased energy remains the third largest manufacturing cost for the forest products industry-despite its extensive use of highly efficient co-generation technology. The industry has worked with AMO to develop a range of resources for further improving energy efficiency. Some current R&D projects and Energy Management resources will benefit the forest products industry. Analytical Studies & Other Publications Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprints

  18. Tropical Forest Trust | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Portland, Oregon. Overview "We focus on products and supply chains to bring about sustainable development. That's because we believe this is where the most concrete and powerful...

  19. Vietnam-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  20. Malaysia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  1. Papua New Guinea-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  2. Laos-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  3. Thailand-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    assessing, improving, and implementing REDD+- related forest policies; improving forest management; and encouraging equitable sharing of REDD+ benefits. The program will tailor...

  4. Integrated Forest Management Charter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Leslie A.

    2015-08-24

    The purpose of this charter is to establish, maintain, and implement programs for the protection, preservation, and enhancement of the land and water resources of Los Alamos National Laboratory in a changing climate.

  5. Office of Legacy Management

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Energy Office of Legacy Management JUL 1 0 2008 Alonso Ramirez, Scientific Director EI Verde Research Station Institute for Tropical Ecosystem Studies University of Puerto Rico...

  6. U.S. Forest Service - Biomass Activities and Tribal Projects

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opportunities for Partnership with the USDA Forest Service Faline Haven Office of Tribal Relations USDA Forest Service fhaven@fs.fed.us 202-205-1520 Forest Service/Tribal Relationship * "We envision a future where the Forest Service and Indian Tribes work collaboratively through government-to-government relationships to manage the resources entrusted to their care, a future where the Forest Service has the organizational structure, skills and policies to redeem our responsibilities in this

  7. Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho: Succession and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steele, R.; Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-04-01

    The report describes a taxonomic system for classifying plant succession in the Douglas-fir/white spirea habitat type in central Idaho. A total of 10 potential tree layer types, 35 shrub types, and 45 herb layer types are categorized. Diagonostic keys based on indicator species assist field identification of the types. Discussion of management implications includes pocket gopher populations, success of planted and natural tree seedlings, big-game and livestock forage preferences, and responses of major shrub and herb layer species to disturbances.

  8. Forest Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Carbon Cycle Terrestrial carbon stocks above- and belowground (in humus and litter layers, woody debris, and mineral soil) are not only sensitive to physical environmental controls (e.g., temperature, precipitation, soil moisture) but also to land use history/management, disturbance, "quality" of carbon input (a reflection of plant carbon allocation and species controls), and the microbial community. The relative importance of these controls on soil carbon storage and flux can

  9. Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesTropical Western Pacific TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical Convection Visiting the Site TWP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Tropical Western Pacific-Inactive Manus, Papua New Guinea: 2° 3' 39.64" S, 147° 25' 31.43" E Nauru Island: 0° 31' 15.6" S, 166° 54' 57.60" E Darwin, Australia: 12° 25' 28.56" S,

  10. EA-1629:Southwestern Power Administration Utility Corridor and Tower Site Vegetation Management; Ozark-St. Francis National Forest, Pope and Searcy Counties, Arkansas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Forest Service prepared an EA that evaluated the potential environmental impacts of amending a Southwestern Area Power Administration (SWPA) permit to allow herbicide application within SWPA transmission line rights-of-way in the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest. SWPA initially was a cooperating agency, and later ended its involvement in preparing the EA.

  11. Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-00-005 RPT(TWP)-010.006 LA-UR-004434 Tropical Western Pacific Site Science Mission Plan July - December 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract W-7405-ENG-36 Tropical Western Pacific Project Office Atmospheric and Climate Sciences Group (EES-8) Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 This report and previous versions are available electronically at the following web sites:

  12. Climate change and forests in India: note from the guest editors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravindtranath, N.H.; Aaheim, Asbjporn

    2010-12-23

    Forestry is one of the most important sectors in the context of climate change. It lies at the center-stage of global mitigation and adaptation efforts. Yet, it is one of the least understood sectors, especially in tropical zones, which constitute a significant portion of the global forests. Recently, there has been a growing interest in forests in addressing global climate change. The IPCC Assessment Report 4 (2007) Chapters related to forests have highlighted the limited number of studies on the impact of climate change on forests at the regional, national and sub-national level, while policy makers need information at these scales. Further, implication of projected climate change on mitigation potential of forest sector is only briefly mentioned in the IPCC report, with limited literature to support the conclusions. India is one among the top ten nations in the world in terms of forest cover. It is also sixth among the tropical countries in terms of forested area. As IPCC Assessment Report 5 work is about to be initiated soon, studies on the impact of climate change on forests as well as the mitigation potential of the forest sector, particularly at regional and national level, will be of great interest to the scientific and policy community. In order to conserve the carbon stored in forests and to reduce CO2 emissions from the forest sector, the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism is now being finalized under the UNFCCC. In this context, climate change itself may affect the mitigation potential significantly, and it is important to understand how vulnerable the forest carbon stock (biomass and soil) in the tropics is to the projected climate change. In fact, there is a need to study the impact of climate change on forests for all the major forested countries

  13. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  14. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality...

  15. ARM - Kiosks - Tropical Wester Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Wester Pacific Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Kiosks - Tropical Wester Pacific A Manus High School teacher is interviewed for the TWP kiosks. A Manus High School teacher is interviewed for the TWP kiosks. In July 2003, ARM Education and Outreach set out to develop

  16. Tropical Western Pacific CART Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) CART site, along the equator in the western Pacific Ocean. ... The two current island-based ARM Facilities Newsletter is published by Argonne National ...

  17. Guardian Energy Management Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guardian Energy Management Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name: Guardian Energy Management Solutions Address: 753 Forest Street, Suite 110 Place: Marlborough, Massachusetts...

  18. management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Management and Budget http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

  19. User`s guide for SeedCalc: A decision-support system for integrated pest management in slash pine seed orchards. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatzinger, C.W.; Dixon, W.N.

    1996-03-01

    SeedCalc, a decision-support system designed for use on personal computers, evaluates the consequences of different pest management strategies in slash pine (Pinus elliotti Engelm. var. elliottii) seed orchards. This interactive program allows managers to enter orchard survey data and manipulate pesticides applied, application equipment costs, insect damage rates, strobilus development rates and beginning population, and pesticide efficacy rates to develop a pest management program that best fits their needs. This guide provides user instructions for SeedCalc, presents screen and printer examples, and describes the structure, assumptions, default values and flow charts of the system.

  20. management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5%2A en Management and Budget http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

    P...

  1. UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac August 27, 2012 - 6:30pm Addthis Satellite image of Tropical Storm Isaac. | Courtesy of NOAA. Satellite image of Tropical Storm Isaac. | Courtesy of NOAA. April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Tropical Storm Isaac has impacted Florida and is expected to make landfall along the Gulf Coast by early morning on August 29. As thousands of Gulf Coast residents are without power, the Energy

  2. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  3. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Cripples Forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  4. Climate change cripples forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate change cripples forests Climate change cripples forests A team of scientists concluded that in the warmer and drier Southwest of the near future, widespread tree mortality will cause forest and species distributions to change substantially. October 1, 2012 A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the Southwest United States. Photo courtesy A. Park Williams. A dead pinon at the edge of the Grand Canyon, harbinger of the future for trees in the

  5. ARM - Black Forest News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Campaign Images Black Forest News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany January 15, 2008 Microwave Radiometers Put to the Test in Germany September 15, 2007...

  6. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Responses Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Environmental Appeals Responses Abstract...

  7. United States Forest Service - Forest Service Schedule of Proposed...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Actions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service Schedule of Proposed Actions Abstract The...

  8. AMF Deployment, Black Forest, Germany

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Germany Black Forest Deployment AMF Home Black Forest Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments CERA COPS Data University of Hohenheim COPS Website COPS Update, April 2009...

  9. ARM - Lesson Plans: Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Tropical Western Pacific These lesson plans were developed using the two volumes of Climate Change and Sea Level from the curriculum development project for the Tropical Western Pacific schools in Nauru,

  10. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine ( Pinus elliottii var. densa ) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmore » tree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.« less

  11. Tree Mortality following Prescribed Fire and a Storm Surge Event in Slash Pine (Pinus elliottiivar.densa) Forests in the Florida Keys, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sah, Jay P.; Ross, Michael S.; Snyder, James R.; Ogurcak, Danielle E.

    2010-01-01

    In fire-dependent forests, managers are interested in predicting the consequences of prescribed burning on postfire tree mortality. We examined the effects of prescribed fire on tree mortality in Florida Keys pine forests, using a factorial design with understory type, season, and year of burn as factors. We also used logistic regression to model the effects of burn season, fire severity, and tree dimensions on individual tree mortality. Despite limited statistical power due to problems in carrying out the full suite of planned experimental burns, associations with tree and fire variables were observed. Post-fire pine tree mortality was negatively correlated withmoretree size and positively correlated with char height and percent crown scorch. Unlike post-fire mortality, tree mortality associated with storm surge from Hurricane Wilma was greater in the large size classes. Due to their influence on population structure and fuel dynamics, the size-selective mortality patterns following fire and storm surge have practical importance for using fire as a management tool in Florida Keys pinelands in the future, particularly when the threats to their continued existence from tropical storms and sea level rise are expected to increase.less

  12. Forest products technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2006-07-18

    Report highlights DOE Industrial Technology Program co-funded R&D resulting in commercial energy-efficient technologies and emerging technologies helping the forest products industry save energy.

  13. USDA Forest Products Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Products Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: USDA Forest Products Laboratory Place: Madison, WI Website: www.fpl.fs.fed.us References: USDA Forest Products...

  14. Factors affecting the remotely sensed response of coniferous forest plantations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danson, F.M. ); Curran, P.J. )

    1993-01-01

    Remote sensing of forest biophysical properties has concentrated upon forest sites with a wide range of green vegetation amount and thereby leaf area index and canopy cover. However, coniferous forest plantations, an important forest type in Europe, are managed to maintain a large amount of green vegetation with little spatial variation. Therefore, the strength of the remotely sensed signal will, it is hypothesized, be determined more by the structure of this forest than by its cover. Airborne Thematic Mapper (ATM) and SPOT-1 HRV data were used to determine the effects of this structural variation on the remotely sensed response of a coniferous forest plantation in the United Kingdom. Red and near infrared radiance were strongly and negatively correlated with a range of structural properties and with the age of the stands but weakly correlated with canopy cover. A composite variable, related to the volume of the canopy, accounted for over 75% of the variation in near infrared radiance. A simple model that related forest structural variables to the remotely sensed response was used to understand and explain this response from a coniferous forest plantation.

  15. Nanotechnology for the Forest Products Industry Vision and Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalla, Rajai; Beecher, James; Caron, Robert; Catchmark, Jeffrey; Deng, Yulin; Glasser, Wolfgang; Gray, Derek; Haigler, Candace; Jones, Philip; Joyce, Margaret; Kohlman, Jane; Koukoulas, Alexander; Lancaster, Peter; Perine, Lori; Rodriguez, Augusto; Ragauskas, Arthur; Wegner, Theodore; Zhu, Junyong

    2005-03-01

    A roadmap for Nanotechnology in the Forest Products Industries has been developed under the umbrella of the Agenda 2020 program overseen by the CTO committee. It is expected that the use of new analytical techniques and methodologies will allow us to understand the complex nature of wood based materials and allow the dramatically enhanced use of the major strategic asset the US has in renewable, recyclable resources based on its well managed Forests.

  16. United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Guidance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: United States Forest Service - Forest Service NEPA Procedures and Guidance Abstract This...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Tropical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre Mather, James Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Jakob, Christian BMRC One of...

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) was a collaborative effort led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program ...

  19. How Communities Manage Forests | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FORZA Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Background analysis Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.rightsandresources.orgdocumentsfiles...

  20. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  1. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing June 18, 2008 - 4:29pm Addthis In an effort to encourage appropriate geothermal energy development on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Forest Service have prepared a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for geothermal leasing in the West, including Alaska. The draft PEIS considers all public lands and national

  2. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Committee on Natural Resources | Department of Energy National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands - Committee on Natural Resources By: Ingrid Kolb, Director Office of Management Subject: Proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park PDF icon Microsoft Word - 6.28.12 MA Final

  3. Lunty Tropical Fish Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lunty Tropical Fish Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Lunty Tropical Fish Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  4. International Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crops Research Institute for the Semi Arid Tropics Jump to: navigation, search Name: International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics Place: India Sector: Biofuels...

  5. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. ); Ravindranath, N.H.; Somashekhar, B.S.; Gadgil, M. . Center for Ecological Sciences and ASTRA); Deying, Xu . Research Inst. of Forestry)

    1992-08-01

    As part of the effort to understand the sources of carbon dioxide and other major greenhouse gases, the Tropical Forestry and Global Climate Change Research Network (F-7) was established. The countries taking part in the F-7 Network -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Thailand -- possess large tracts of tropical forests and together experience the bulk of large scale tropical deforestation. Integreation of work of indigenous researchers and institutions from the participating countries should allow for the gathering of on-site information into the more general and universally available base of knowledge. The information contained in this report represents the results of the first phase of the F-7 project, which had the explicit aim of providing quantitative data on forestry-related carbon emissions from India and China.

  6. Opal Creek Forest Preserve Act of 1994. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, August 8, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The legislative text proposes to provide for the establishment and management of the Opal Creek Forest Reserve in Oregon. The purpose of the Act is to protect and preserve the forests and watersheds in the Reserve. And to promote and conduct research regarding old-growth forests and for educators to provide scientifically credible information to the public.

  7. Montage Builders - Northern Forest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Montage Builders - Northern Forest SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse University, Onondaga Community College A 1,925 Square Foot Single Family Home: * 2 Stories, 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths * Est. Construction Cost: $243,082 * HERS Index Score: -5 * Estimated Monthly Energy Cost: $2 Location: Syracuse, NY - IECC Climate Zone 5 Design Strategy: Inspired by American Craftsman style architec- ture to fit the pattern language of the neighborhood. Optimized solar exposure for PV,

  8. FSM 2500 Watershed and Air Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FSM 2500 Watershed and Air ManagementLegal Abstract Forest Service manual setting forth policy for protection and development of soil and water resources shall be components...

  9. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the Bioeconomy Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Robert C. Abt, Professor of Natural Resource Economics and Management, North Carolina State University

  10. Final report for DOE Award # DE- SC0010039*: Carbon dynamics of forest recovery under a changing climate: Forcings, feedbacks, and implications for earth system modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; DeLucia, Evan H.; Duval, Benjamin D.

    2015-10-29

    To advance understanding of C dynamics of forests globally, we compiled a new database, the Forest C database (ForC-db), which contains data on ground-based measurements of ecosystem-level C stocks and annual fluxes along with disturbance history. This database currently contains 18,791 records from 2009 sites, making it the largest and most comprehensive database of C stocks and flows in forest ecosystems globally. The tropical component of the database will be published in conjunction with a manuscript that is currently under review (Anderson-Teixeira et al., in review). Database development continues, and we hope to maintain a dynamic instance of the entire (global) database.

  11. Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1987-08-31

    A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

  12. Forest Products (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest Products (2010 MECS) Forest Products (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321, 322) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014 View footprints for other sectors here. Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Forest Products More Documents & Publications MECS 2006 - Forest Products Cement (2010 MECS) Transportation

  13. MECS 2006 - Forest Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forest Products MECS 2006 - Forest Products Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Forest Products (NAICS 321, 322) Sector with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006) All available footprints and supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint PDF icon Forest Products More Documents & Publications Forest Products (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Cement MECS 2006 - Transportation Equipment

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  15. Tax Credit for Forest Derived Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest-derived biomass includes tree tops, limbs, needles, leaves, and other woody debris leftover from activities such as timber harvesting, forest thinning, fire suppression, or forest health m...

  16. Forest Carbon Index | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Carbon Index Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forest Carbon Index AgencyCompany Organization: Resources for the Future Partner: United Nations...

  17. Black Forest Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Black Forest Partners Jump to: navigation, search Name: Black Forest Partners Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94111 Product: San Francisco-based project developer focused on...

  18. Forest Carbon Portal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Trends Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.forestcarbonportal.com Forest Carbon Portal...

  19. Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Forest County Potawatomi Tribe AgencyCompany Organization US Department of...

  20. Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Supporting Small Forest Enterprises: A Facilitator's Toolkit Agency...

  1. Potential and cost of carbon sequestration in the Tanzanian forest sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    2001-01-01

    The forest sector in Tanzania offers ample opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) and sequestered carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems. More than 90% of the country's demand for primary energy is obtained from biomass mostly procured unsustainably from natural forests. This study examines the potential to sequester C through expansion of forest plantations aimed at reducing the dependence on natural forest for wood fuel production, as well as increase the country's output of industrial wood from plantations. These were compared ton conservation options in the tropical and miombo ecosystems. Three sequestration options were analyzed, involving the establishment of short rotation and long rotation plantations on about 1.7 x 106 hectares. The short rotation community forest option has a potential to sequester an equilibrium amount of 197.4 x 106 Mg C by 2024 at a net benefit of $79.5 x 106, while yielding a NPV of $0.46 Mg-1 C. The long rotation options for softwood and hardwood plantations will reach an equilibrium sequestration of 5.6 and 11.8 x 106 Mg C at a negative NPV of $0.60 Mg-1 C and $0.32 Mg-1 C. The three options provide cost competitive opportunities for sequestering about 7.5 x 106 Mg C yr -1 while providing desired forest products and easing the pressure on the natural forests in Tanzania. The endowment costs of the sequestration options were all found to be cheaper than the emission avoidance cost for conservation options which had an average cost of $1.27 Mg-1 C, rising to $ 7.5 Mg-1 C under some assumptions on vulnerability to encroachment. The estimates shown here may represent the upper bound, because the actual potential will be influenced by market prices for inputs and forest products, land use policy constraints and the structure of global C transactions.

  2. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 3, India and China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J.; Ravindranath, N.H.; Somashekhar, B.S.; Gadgil, M.; Deying, Xu

    1992-08-01

    As part of the effort to understand the sources of carbon dioxide and other major greenhouse gases, the Tropical Forestry and Global Climate Change Research Network (F-7) was established. The countries taking part in the F-7 Network -- Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria and Thailand -- possess large tracts of tropical forests and together experience the bulk of large scale tropical deforestation. Integreation of work of indigenous researchers and institutions from the participating countries should allow for the gathering of on-site information into the more general and universally available base of knowledge. The information contained in this report represents the results of the first phase of the F-7 project, which had the explicit aim of providing quantitative data on forestry-related carbon emissions from India and China.

  3. Modeling Transient Response of Forests to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that a high diversity of dominant life forms in Tennessee forests conveys resilience to disturbance such as climate change. Because of uncertainty in climate change and their effects, three climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) were used to simulate a range of potential climate conditions for the state. These climate changes derive from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B storyline that assumes rapid global economic growth. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in five ecological provinces using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation differences from the long-term average are more complex but less striking. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions for five ecological provinces from 1989 to 2300. Average output projects changes in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces in Tennessee with the greatest changes in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Projected declines in total tree biomass are followed by biomass recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The Southern Mixed Forest province results in less diversity in dominant trees as well as lower overall biomass than projections for the other four provinces. The biomass and composition changes projected in this study differ from forest dynamics expected without climate change. These results suggest that biomass recovery following climate change is linked to dominant tree diversity in the southeastern forest of the US. The generality of this observation warrants further investigation, for it relates to ways that forest management may influence climate change effects.

  4. Tropical BioEnergia SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BioEnergia SA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tropical BioEnergia SA Place: Edeia, Goias, Brazil Product: Tropical BioEnergia SA is a joint venture which will build and operate...

  5. ARM - Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    width"16"> Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) twp-ice-big One of the most complete data sets of tropical cirrus and convection observations ever...

  6. Forest Products Industry Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-04-01

    This document describes the forest products industry's research and development priorities. The original technology roadmap published by the industry in 1999 and was most recently updated in April 2010.

  7. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  8. Final Progress Report on Model-Based Diagnosis of Soil Limitations to Forest Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luxmoore, R.J.

    2004-08-30

    This project was undertaken in support of the forest industry to link modeling of nutrients and productivity with field research to identify methods for enhancing soil quality and forest productivity and for alleviating soil limitations to sustainable forest productivity. The project consisted of a series of related tasks, including (1) simulation of changes in biomass and soil carbon with nitrogen fertilization, (2) development of spreadsheet modeling tools for soil nutrient availability and tree nutrient requirements, (3) additional modeling studies, and (4) evaluation of factors involved in the establishment and productivity of southern pine plantations in seasonally wet soils. This report also describes the two Web sites that were developed from the research to assist forest managers with nutrient management of Douglas-fir and loblolly pine plantations.

  9. Colombia-US Forest Service Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-US Forest Service Program AgencyCompany Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area...

  10. Forest Genetics Ontario

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chippewa Indians A Climate Action Champion Community Tribal Leaders Forum Tribal Energy Systems: Climate Preparedness and Resiliency 4 March 2015 Thunder Valley Resort Kathleen Brosemer Environmental Program Manager A White House Initiative * To recognize communities that are leading in mitigation and adaptation to climate change. * 16 communities were selected * Cities, towns, and Tribes * San Francisco, Boston, Portland, Knoxville, Oberlin * Two Tribes: Blue Lake Rancheria, and the Sault

  11. Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

    2005-08-02

    A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

  12. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  13. US Forest Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleUSForestService&oldid442004...

  14. Forest Products Industry Profile | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest Products Industry Profile Forest Products Industry Profile Wood and paper products meet the everyday needs of consumers and businesses. They provide materials essential for communication, education, packaging, construction, shelter, sanitation, and protection. The U.S. forest products industry is based on a renewable and sustainable raw material: wood. It practices recovery and recycling in its operations. Its forests help the global carbon balance by taking up carbon dioxide from the

  15. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective PDF icon Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products - Douglas Gardner, University of Maine More Documents & Publications Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

  16. Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars Haynes, John Colorado State University Stephens, Graeme Colorado State University Category: Cloud Properties The results of an analysis of tropical cloud systems observed from a variety of vertically pointing radar systems are described. In particular, observations taken during five years of operation of the ARM millimeter wavelength radar system (MMCR) at Manus Island in the Tropical West Pacific region are characterized into

  17. Differences Between Tropical and Trade-Wind Shallow Cumuli

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Differences Between Tropical and Trade-Wind Shallow Cumuli For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

  18. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment: Overview

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment: Overview May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre Mather, James Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Jakob,...

  19. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStrai...

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsYear of Tropical Convection (YOTC) Campaign Links Year of Tropical Convection Website Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) 2008.05.01 - 2010.04.30 Lead Scientist : Sally McFarlane Abstract Example of a sonde profile available from the ARM Archive The realistic representation of tropical convection in global atmospheric models is a long-standing challenge for weather and global

  1. Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  2. Project risk and appeals in U.S. Forest Service planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Predmore, S. Andrew; Morse, Wayde C.; Seesholtz, David N.

    2013-09-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires U.S. Forest Service planning processes to be conducted by interdisciplinary teams of resource specialists to analyze and disclose the likely environmental impacts of proposed natural resource management actions on Forest Service lands. Multiple challenges associated with these processes have been a source of frustration for the agency. One of these challenges involves administrative appeals through which public entities can challenge a Forest Service decision following a NEPA process. These appeals instigate an internal review process and can result in an affirmation of the Forest Service decision, a reversal of that decision, or additional work that re-initiates all or part of the NEPA process. We examine the best predictors of appeals and their outcomes on a representative sample of 489 Forest Service NEPA processes that were decided between 2007 and 2009. While certain factors associated with pre-existing social contexts (such as a history of controversy) or pre-determined elements of a proposed action (such as the extraction of forest products) predispose certain processes to a higher risk of appeals, other practices and process-related strategies within the control of the agency also appear to bear meaningful influence on the occurrence of appeals and their outcomes. Appeals and their outcomes were most strongly related to programmatic, structural (turnover of personnel in particular), and relationship risks (both internal and external) within the processes, suggesting the need for greater focus within the agency on cultivating positive internal and external relationships to manage the risk of appeals. -- Highlights: ? We examined appeals and their outcomes on 489 U.S. Forest Service NEPA processes. ? Project type, context, team turnover, and personal relationships predicted appeals. ? External relationship management and staff turnover best predicted appeal outcomes. ? Positive internal and external relationships appear to reduce appeal risks.

  3. Data Management Facility Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, Nicole N

    2014-06-30

    The Data Management Facility (DMF) is the data center that houses several critical Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility services, including first-level data processing for the ARM Mobile Facilities (AMFs), Eastern North Atlantic (ENA), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Southern Great Plains (SGP), and Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites, as well as Value-Added Product (VAP) processing, development systems, and other network services.

  4. The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The impact of vertical shear on the sensitivity of tropical cyclogenesis to environmental rotation and thermodynamic state: TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS AND SHEAR Citation Details ...

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - Co-ordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and very low ozone concentrations in the tropical warm pool region permit short-lived halogenated compounds to be transported from the surface to the tropical tropopause layer,...

  6. Program Management Review Steering Committee Observations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Management Review Jim Dooley Forest Concepts, LLC Steering Committee Observations 2 Members Steering Committee: Member Affiliation Jim Dooley Forest Concepts, LLC Dean Dreamel ExxonMobil/University of California, Berkeley Jim Kellis DuPont Mike Lakeman Boeing and Algae Biomass Organization Valri Lightner DOE Loan Programs Office Jack McDonald Independent Shelie Miller University of Michigan Carol Werner Environmental and Energy Study Institute 3 Outline I. BETO Portfolio II. Coordination

  7. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  8. Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community Rooftop PV installation on the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Rooftop PV installation on the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi Community Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity

  9. Sustainable Nanomaterials from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Forest Products: Umaine Perspective Douglas Gardner, PhD. Advanced Structures & Composite Center Forest Bioproducts Research Institute School of Forest Resources, University of Maine Ligno-Cellulose: Maine's Niche to Compete in Nanotech Stone Age ....... Bronze Age .......... Iron Age ................ Nano Age? "From the Sawmill to the Nanomill?" Overarching Research Focus "Establish world-class R&D capacity in the field of ligno-cellulose derived nanomaterials

  10. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  11. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2011 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin.

  12. International Forest Policy Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: International Forest Policy Database AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry...

  13. Forest City Enterprises | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enterprises Jump to: navigation, search Name: Forest City Enterprises Place: Denver, CO Zip: 80238 Website: www.forestcity.net Coordinates: 39.7564482, -104.8863279 Show Map...

  14. CRiSTAL Forests | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Use: Simple Website: www.iisd.orgcristaltooldownload.aspxcristal-forests Cost: Free Related Tools CRED: A New Model of Climate and Development Applied Dynamic Analysis of...

  15. Tradewinds Forest Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tradewinds Forest Products Place: Hawaii Product: Firm developing a cogeneration plant for a sugar mill in Hawaii. References: Tradewinds...

  16. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    2008-01-15

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  17. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  18. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  19. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Laboratory Dynamos Professor Cary Forest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamos Professor Cary Forest University of Wisconsin - Madison Wednesday, June 5, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a U.s. DeParTmenT of energy faciliTy One of the most fundamental tenets of astrophysical plasma physics is that magnetic fields can be stretched and amplified by flowing plasmas. In the right geometry, this can even lead to the self-generation of magnetic fields from flow through the dynamo process, a positive feedback

  1. The Energy Department Prepares for Tropical Storm Karen | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy The Energy Department Prepares for Tropical Storm Karen The Energy Department Prepares for Tropical Storm Karen October 4, 2013 - 3:00pm Addthis Marissa Newhall Marissa Newhall Director of Digital Strategy and Communications What does this mean for me? Follow the latest news on Tropical Storm Karen by visiting the FEMA blog. Stay up-to-date on energy delivery impacts by reading twice-daily situation reports from the Energy Department. Visit ready.gov for more information about

  2. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and PAR) records from Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) and Tapajos National Forest (Brazil) to establish empirical relationships among directly measured cloud type and cover...

  3. Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Forest City Military Communities, Hawaii Place: Honolulu, HI Website: www.fcnavyhawaii.com References: Solar Technical Assistance Provided to Forest...

  4. Cambodia-Lowering Emissions in Asia's Forests (LEAF) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for GHG reductions, Build and institutionalize technical capacity for economic valuation of forest ecosystem services and monitoring changes in forest carbon stocks, and...

  5. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi...

  6. Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests...

  7. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment....

  8. USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Jump to: navigation, search Name: USFS Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Abbreviation: Humbolt-Toiyabe NF Address: 1200 Franklin Way Place:...

  9. Forest City High School Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High School Energy Purchaser Forest City Community School District Location Forest City IA Coordinates 43.266011, -93.653378 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  10. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  11. Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature climate change features forest research Nature climate change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of...

  12. Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  13. Forests and Climate Change Toolbox | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forests and Climate Change Toolbox Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Forests and Climate Change Toolbox AgencyCompany Organization: Center for...

  14. Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany...

  15. Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Jordan-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  16. Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  17. Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Russia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  18. Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  19. Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    www.leafasia.orglibraryusaid-leaf-accuracy-assessment-forest-and-lan Cost: Free Language: English Accuracy Assessment for Forest and Land Use Maps (English version)...

  20. Classifying forest productivity at different scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Energy Design Guidelines for High Performance Schools: Tropical Island Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    Design guidelines outline high performance principles for the new or retrofit design of K-12 schools in tropical island climates. By incorporating energy improvements into construction or renovation plans, schools can reduce energy consumption and costs.

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsTropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) Campaign Links TWP-ICE Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you...

  3. UNDP/GEF-Cambodia-Sustainable Forest Management | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    be carried out through community forestry activities to engage rural communities in nature conservation and create markets for sustainable bio-energy technologies to help curb...

  4. Solar technical assistance provided to Forest City military communities in Hawaii for incorporation of 20-30 MW of solar energy generation to power family housing for US Navy personnel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, Jeff; Merrigan, Tim; Boudra, Will; Miller, Ryan; Cisneros, Gabriela; Rosenthal, Andrew L.; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2010-06-01

    In May 2007, Forest City Military Communities won a US Department of Energy Solar America Showcase Award. As part of this award, executives and staff from Forest City Military Communities worked side-by-side with a DOE technical assistance team to overcome technical obstacles encountered by this large-scale real estate developer and manager. This paper describes the solar technical assistance that was provided and the key solar experiences acquired by Forest City Military Communities over an 18 month period.

  5. Aerosol Radiative Effects in the Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects in the Tropical Western Pacific A. M. Vogelmann Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California Introduction Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program observations are used to quantify the aerosol radiative effects in the climatically important Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). This quantification addresses two primary ARM objectives by (1) ascertaining the existing variability of the radiative forcing and its

  6. Arctic Stratus and Tropical Deep Convection. Integrating Measurements and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Arctic Stratus and Tropical Deep Convection. Integrating Measurements and Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Arctic Stratus and Tropical Deep Convection. Integrating Measurements and Simulations Final report summarizing published material. Authors: Ann, Fridlind [1] + Show Author Affiliations NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Washington, DC (United States) Publication Date: 2015-05-18 OSTI

  7. ARM - PI Product - Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsTropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al.,

  8. Lagrangian Diagnostics of Tropical Cirrus over TWP CART Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lagrangian Diagnostics of Tropical Cirrus over TWP CART Sites Horvath, Akos University of Miami Soden, Brian UM/RSMAS Category: Cloud Properties Cirrus clouds associated with tropical deep convection play an important role in regulating Earth's climate by influencing the radiative and moisture budgets of the upper troposphere. In this study, we sought to better understand the evolution of such clouds using geostationary satellite observations coupled with ground-based radar and lidar

  9. Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets.

  10. Energy-related pollution of semi-tropical and tropical nearshore ecosystems. Annual report, 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A.; Marcus, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The major components of the nearshore marine ecosystems in the subtropics and tropics (seagrasses, mangroves, and corals) are examined and compound sublethal and lethal effects from extremes in some energy-related effects (temperature, salinity and light) are discussed.

  11. Discriminant forest classification method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Barry Y.; Hanley, William G.; Lemmond, Tracy D.; Hiller, Lawrence J.; Knapp, David A.; Mugge, Marshall J.

    2012-11-06

    A hybrid machine learning methodology and system for classification that combines classical random forest (RF) methodology with discriminant analysis (DA) techniques to provide enhanced classification capability. A DA technique which uses feature measurements of an object to predict its class membership, such as linear discriminant analysis (LDA) or Andersen-Bahadur linear discriminant technique (AB), is used to split the data at each node in each of its classification trees to train and grow the trees and the forest. When training is finished, a set of n DA-based decision trees of a discriminant forest is produced for use in predicting the classification of new samples of unknown class.

  12. Forest succession at elevated CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

    2002-02-01

    We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

  13. Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

    2012-08-02

    Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

  14. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the

  15. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S. We used 10 Hz eddy flux signals and

  16. Forest Carbon … Sustaining an Important Climate Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Resilient Forests... Sustainable Communities Biomass 2014 Conference Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Session Washington D.C. 7/30/14 Dave Cleaves US Forest Service Climate Advisor Changing Forests...Enduring Values Changing Forests...Enduring Values Percent emissions offset by LULUCF Changing Forests...Enduring Values Based on U.S. EPA Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2011 Report

  17. Publications - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experiment. Phys. Plasmas 15, 055910 (2008). E. J. Spence, M. D. Nornberg, C. M. Jacobson, C. A. Parada, N.Z. Taylor, R. D. Kendrick, C. B. Forest. Turbulent Diamagnetism in...

  18. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  19. Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12 miles southwest of the boundary of LANL has not entered Lab property at this time. June 26, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  20. Forest County Potawatomi Community Wundar Hall Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Wundar Hall Project Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Review October 27, 2010 Mercedes E. Vega Legal Office Administrator Forest County Potawatomi Community 2 Background on Forest County Potawatomi Community  FCPC has trust land in northern Wisconsin and the City of Milwaukee.  Facilities include tribal government offices, a health and wellness center, a cultural museum, a former college campus, a hotel, two casinos and various other smaller support facilities and enterprises. 3

  1. Tropical cyclone motion and recurvature in TCM-90. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Rawinsonde and satellite data collected during the Tropical Cyclone Motion (TCM90) experiment, which was conducted during the summer of 1990 in the Western North pacific, is used to examine tropical cyclone steering motion and recurvature. TCM-90 composite results are compared with those found in a composite study using twenty-one years (1957-77) of Western North Pacific rawinsonde data during the same August-September period and also for all months during this same 21-year period. Both data sets indicate that the composite deep-layer-mean (850-300 mb) winds 5-7 deg from the cyclone center provide an important component of the steering flow for tropical cyclones. However, despite the rawinsonde data enhancements of the TCM-90 experiment, data limitations prevented an accurate observation of steering flow conditions at individual time periods or for the average of only 5-10 time periods when composited together.

  2. GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

    2005-03-22

    This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

  3. Deep forest rebounds from H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUBSCRIBE: Print Electronic (PDF) Manage | NEWSLETTERS | SPECIAL OFFERS | RSS | MOBILE | PLACE ADS | N.I.E. | CONTACT US thestate.com archives Web Search powered by YAHOO! SEARCH The news you want delivered to your e-mail! Get the SC Business Report Afternoon Newsletter. Quick Job Search Enter Keyword(s): Enter a City: Columbia Select a State: South Carolina Select a Category: All Job Categories Advanced Job Search | Search by Category The State Top Jobs » Sales and Customer Service

  4. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2014 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC), in collaboration with a selected contractor, will install and operate approximately 875 kilowatts (kW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems at a minimum of eight tribal facilities in Milwaukee and Forest Counties.

  5. Town of Forest City, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest City, North Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Town of Forest City Place: North Carolina Phone Number: 828-245-0149 Website: www.townofforestcity.c...

  6. Land Use and Watersheds: Human Influence on Hydrology and Geomorphology in Urban and Forest Areas. Water Science and Application Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigmosta, Mark S.; Burges, S J.

    2001-10-01

    What is the effect of urbanization and forest use on hydrologic and geomorphic processes? How can we develop land use policies that minimize adverse impacts on ecosystems while sustaining biodiversity? Land Use and Watersheds: Human Influence on Hydrology and Geomorphology in Urban and Forest Areas addresses these issues and more. By featuring watersheds principally in the American Pacific Northwest, and the effects of timber harvesting and road construction on stream flow, sediment yield and landslide occurrence, scientists can advance their understanding of what constitutes appropriate management of environments with similar hydro-climatic-geomorphic settings worldwide.

  7. Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use and Markets | Department of Energy Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets Breakout Session 2D-Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon - Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S.

  8. State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis Resource Type: Publications Website: moderncms.ecosystemmarketplace.comrepositorymoderncmsdocumentsSFCM State of the Forest Carbon Markets 2009 Screenshot...

  9. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - 6:29pm Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's administration building in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo from the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe. The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe's solar system is providing heating, cooling, and electricity to the Tribe's

  10. DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Potawatomi Community | Department of Energy Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community DOE Supports Renewable Energy Deployment Projects for Forest County Potawatomi Community July 21, 2014 - 12:03pm Addthis Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity in Milwaukee. | Image from Forest County Potawatomi Community Anaerobic digesters reduce pollution and generate electricity in Milwaukee. | Image from Forest County Potawatomi

  11. Directory of Tennessee's forest industries 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    A directory of primary and secondary forest industries is presented. Firm names and addresses are listed by county in alphabetical order. The following information is listed for each industry: type of plant, production and employee size class, products manufactured, and equipment. For the primary industries, the major species of trees used are listed. (MHR)

  12. Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

  13. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes) in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.

  14. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more » in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  15. The ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, W.E.; Barnes, F.J.; Ackerman, T.P.; Mather, J.H.

    1998-12-01

    The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 as part of the US Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiative and cloud processes in computer models used to predict climate change. The overall goal of the ARM program is to develop and test parameterizations of important atmospheric processes, particularly cloud and radiative processes, for use in atmospheric models. This goal is being achieved through a combination of field measurements and modeling studies. Three primary locales were chosen for extensive field measurement facilities. These are the Southern Great Plains of the United States, the Tropical Western Pacific, and the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean. This paper describes the ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific locale.

  16. Project Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Management Project Management MaRIE is the experimental facility needed to control the time-dependent properties of materials for national security science missions. It...

  17. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-03

    To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

  18. Property:SurfaceManager | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + COCONINO NF + AZA-009169 + COCONINO NF + AZA-009170 + COCONINO NF + AZA-009171 + FOREST SERVICE + AZA-009172 + FOREST SERVICE + AZA-009173 + FOREST SERVICE + AZA-009174 +...

  19. FACT SHEET U.S. Department of Energy Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tropical Western Pacific The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility established its second research facility, the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) field measurement site, in 1996. This site consists of three research facilities: Manus (established in 1996), Nauru (1998), and Darwin (2002). The data collected at these sites help scientists better understand the role of the tropics in modulating or controlling significant aspects of the global climate and improve models

  20. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  1. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 6, 2004 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-09-06

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  2. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 6, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-09-06

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  3. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 6, 2004 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-09-06

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  4. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (4:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  5. Power Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy Power Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy October 29, 2012 - 9:37pm Addthis Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone on the southern coast of New Jersey near Atlantic City at 8 p.m. with top sustained winds of 80 mph. | Photo courtesy of NOAA Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone on the southern coast of New Jersey near Atlantic City at 8 p.m. with top sustained winds of 80 mph. | Photo courtesy of NOAA Dan Leistikow Dan

  6. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  7. Tropical Africa: Land use, biomass, and carbon estimates for 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.; Gaston, G.; Daniels, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980 and describes a methodology that may be used to extend this data set to 1990 and beyond based on population and land cover data. The biomass data and carbon estimates are for woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with the possible magnitude of historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth`s land surface and includes those countries that for the most part are located in Tropical Africa. Countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and in southern Africa (i.e., Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Western Sahara) have maximum potential biomass and land cover information but do not have biomass or carbon estimate. The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{sup TM} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass-carbon values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  8. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drought-induced forest mortality Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest mortality Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint LANL-UNM studies. April 23, 2015 Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Piñon trees show increased susceptibility to drought when also subjected to rising temperatures. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications

  9. Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    relation to climatic provenance (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Forest phenology and a warmer climate - Growing season extension in relation to climatic provenance Predicting forest responses to warming climates relies on assumptions about niche and temperature sensitivity that remain largely untested. Observational studies have

  10. Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests Drought-induced tree mortality accelerating in forests Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have found that drought and heat-induced tree mortality is accelerating in many forest biomes as a consequence of a warming climate in their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change. May 19, 2015 Nathan McDowell examines an old, large tree, which could be impacted by future droughts. Nathan McDowell examines an old, large tree,

  11. Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Responses to a Warming Climate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest Responses to a Warming Climate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Plasticity of Photosynthesis: the Role of Acclimation in Forest Responses to a Warming Climate The increasing air temperatures central to climate change predictions have the potential to alter forest ecosystem function and structure by exceeding temperatures

  12. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community - 2011 Project |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Forest County Potawatomi Community - 2011 Project Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community - 2011 Project The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will conduct an energy efficiency feasibility study at Potawatomi Carter Casino Hotel (PCCH) in Northern Wisconsin. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. PDF icon November 2011 status report PDF icon November 2012 status report PDF icon March 2014 status report PDF icon

  13. Forest County Potawatomi Community: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Community: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Projects Mercedes Vega Forest County Potawatomi Community Milwaukee, Wisconsin 2 Background on Forest County Potawatomi Community Ø FCPC has trust land in northern Wisconsin and the City of Milwaukee. Ø Facilities include tribal government offices, a health and wellness center, a cultural museum, a former college campus, a hotel, two casinos and various other smaller support facilities and enterprises. 3 Forest County Potawatomi Community

  14. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements May 28, 2014 - 5:53pm Addthis A 2-megawatt anaerobic digester and biogas generation facility converts food waste into electricity to power 1,500 homes. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi Community. A 2-megawatt anaerobic digester and biogas generation facility converts food waste into electricity to power 1,500 homes. Photo from Forest County Potawatomi

  15. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  16. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  17. Impact of the Global Forest Industry on Atmospheric Greenhouse...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or for non wood forest products may also have a considerable role in the global carbon balance, but these are beyond the scope of this publication." References "Forestry...

  18. Forest Grove Light & Power- Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Forest Grove Light & Power offers a variety of rebates through Conservation Services Department. Rebates vary based on technology, and are available to residential, commercial, and/or...

  19. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will implement energy efficiency improvements in revitalizing its historic Milwaukee inner-city trust property.

  20. India-Legislation on Environment, Forests and Wildlife | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Environment, Forests and Wildlife1 Overview "Category Name Water Pollution Air Pollution Environment Protection Coastal Regulation Zone Delegation of Powers...

  1. River Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8978091, -87.8139483 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  2. Forest County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest County, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5341012, -79.2451149 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Forest View, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest View, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8086431, -87.7933895 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  4. Forest Hills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Hills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4197911, -79.8500487 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Forest Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5198364, -123.1106631 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  6. Forest City, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest City, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.6612, -81.445063 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  7. Lake Forest, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake Forest, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.6469661, -117.689218 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  8. Black Forest, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Black Forest, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.0130484, -104.7008083 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  9. Lake Forest, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lake Forest, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.3980165, -81.6737085 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  10. Forest Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest Hills, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.9594739, -85.4897456 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  11. Oak Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oak Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6028116, -87.7439384 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  12. Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developing Effective Forest Policy-A Guide AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics:...

  13. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as...

  14. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pine Energy Plantations High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations This abstract outlinse a project that is designing and demonstrating a...

  15. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Energy Efficiency Historic Building Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community (FCPC) will implement energy efficiency improvements in revitalizing its historic Milwaukee inner-city trust property.

  16. Forest County Potawatomi Recognized for Renewable Energy Achievements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fulfill its mission, Forest County Potowatomi Community Chief Financial Officer Kevin Hanson presented at the Tribal Leader Forum on "Financing and Investing in Tribal Renewable...

  17. Forest Service Handbook 2709.15 - Hydroelectric Handbook | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Forest Service Handbook 2709.15 - Hydroelectric HandbookPermitting...

  18. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study describes the U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program, which strongly encouraged employees to shut off their computers when leaving the office.

  19. Wake Forest, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Forest, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9798734, -78.5097228 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  20. WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Publications Website: pdf.wri.orgworkingpapersgfitenureindicatorssep09.pdf Cost: Free WRI-The Governance of Forests Toolkit Screenshot References: WRI-The Governance of...

  1. Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Data Management PDSF and IHEP, in Beijing, China, are the two main computing facitilies for the Daya Bay experiment with PDSF being used primarily by North American...

  2. Bibliographic Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bibliographic Management Bibliographic Management Manage citations, PDFs, and more from varied resources and databases to organize references, keep notes to stay ahead of the game. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email Bibliographic management tools allow you to: Compile, create, and organize bibliographic references in a single location Create bibliographies from those records, choosing from multiple output styles EndNote {http://www.endnote.com/} is hosted locally on your computer. The software can be

  3. MANAGEMENT ALERT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    COMMISSION FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Management Alert: Review of Allegations of Improper Disclosure of Confidential, Nonpublic...

  4. Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OAS-M-12-03 Management Alert: OAS-M-12-03 March 23, 2012 Purchase of Computers for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service at the Savannah River Site In October 2011, the OIG received a complaint that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (Agriculture) Forest Service - Savannah River (Forest Service) had purchased a number of computers under its Interagency Agreement (Agreement) with the Department of Energy's (Department) Savannah River Operations Office (SRO) that were not placed into

  5. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  6. Utilization of geothermal heat in tropical fruit-drying process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, B.H.; Lopez, L.P.; King, R.; Fujii, J.; Tanaka, M.

    1982-10-01

    The power plant utilizes only the steam portion of the HGP-A well production. There are approximately 50,000 pounds per hour of 360/sup 0/F water produced (approximately 10 million Btu per hour) and the water is currently not used and is considered a waste. This tremendous resource could very well be used in applications such as food processing, food dehydration and other industrial processing that requires low-grade heat. One of the applications is examined, namely the drying of tropical fruits particularly the papaya. The papaya was chosen for the obvious reason that it is the biggest crop of all fruits produced on the Big Island. A conceptual design of a pilot plant facility capable of processing 1000 pounds of raw papaya per day is included. This facility is designed to provide a geothermally heated dryer to dehydrate papayas or other tropical fruits available on an experimental basis to obtain data such as drying time, optimum drying temperature, etc.

  7. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Review of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge ... INTRODUCTION The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) is a land ...

  8. Teaching Managers How to Manage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hylko, J.M.

    2006-07-01

    Following graduation from a college or university with a technical degree, or through years of experience, an individual's training and career development activities typically focus on enhancing technical problem-solving skills. However, as these technical professionals, herein referred to as 'Techies', advance throughout their careers, they may be required to accept and adapt to the role of being a manager, and must undergo a transition to learn and rely on new problem-solving skills. However, unless a company has a specific manager-trainee class to address this subject and develop talent from within, an employee's management style is learned and developed 'on the job'. Both positive and negative styles are nurtured by those managers having similar qualities. Unfortunately, a negative style often contributes to the deterioration of employee morale and ultimate closing of a department or company. This paper provides the core elements of an effective management training program for 'Teaching Managers How to Manage' derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 's Voluntary Protection Program. Discussion topics and real-life examples concentrate on transitioning an employee from a 'Techie' to a manager; common characteristics of being a manager; the history and academic study of management; competition, change and the business of waste management; what to do after taking over a department by applying Hylko's Star of Success; command media; the formal and informal organizational charts; chain of command; hiring and developing high-degree, autonomous employees through effective communication and delegation; periodic status checks; and determining if the program is working successfully. These common characteristics of a strong management/leadership culture and practical career tips discussed herein provide a solid foundation for any company or department that is serious about developing an effective management training program for its employees. In turn, any employee in any work environment can begin using this information immediately if they want to become a better manager. (authors)

  9. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: ... Title: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW ...

  10. SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish, document, and maintain adequate purchasing systems. 2. To ensure contractors flow down contract requirements to subcontractors. WHY IS SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT? In many Department prime contracts a significant portion of the obligated dollars is spent on subcontract work. Due to the absence of a direct contractual

  11. Program Managers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    security. managers Advanced Scientific Computing Applied Mathematics: Pieter Swart, T-5 Computer Science: Pat McCormick, CCS-1 Computational Partnerships: Galen Shipman, CCS-7...

  12. acquisition management

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    the science, technology, and engineering base; and,

  13. Continue NNSA management reforms.


    • Our Values:<...

    • project management

      National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

      3%2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

    • project management

      National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

      %2A en Project Management and Systems Support http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsapmprojectmanagementandsystemssupport

    • Position Management

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      1992-06-23

      The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

    • Quality Management

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      The Office of Quality Management, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security develops policies and procedures to ensure the classification and control of information is effective and...

    • Energy Management

      Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

      Energy Management Utilize energy efficiency to improve your industrial customer's business performance without the cost of major capital improvements. Energy efficiency is not...

    • AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the United States Forest Service: Caribou-Targhee National Forest

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

      2014-06-01

      Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energys Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect and evaluate data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activitys Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect and evaluate data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest (CTNF) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles, or PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. ITSNA acknowledges the support of Idaho National Laboratory and CTNF for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by enthusiasm and support from the Forest Service and CTNF personnel.

    • EO 11988: Floodplain Management

      Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

      inland and coastal waters have long been recognized as having special values to our citizens. They have provided us with wildlife habitat, agricultural and forest products,...

    • Floodplain Management

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      Guidelines for Implementing Executive Order 11988, Floodplain Management, and Executive Order 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input October 8, 2015 1 Guidelines for Implementing E.O. 11988 and E.O. 13690 Contents Version Highlights ........................................................................................................................ 3 Glossary

  1. Effects of Projected Transient Changes in Climate on Tennessee Forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines transient effects of projected climate change on the structure and species composition of forests in Tennessee. The climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 were provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) that simulate the range of potential climate conditions for the state. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in the ecoregions by using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the five ecological provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation patterns are more complex with one model projecting wetter summers and two models projecting drier summers. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions in forest stands for the five ecological provinces of Tennessee from 1989 to 2300. These model runs suggest there will be a change in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces with the greatest changes occurring in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Most projections show a decline in total tree biomass followed by recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The changes in forest biomass and composition, as simulated in this study, are likely to have implications on forest economy, tourism, understory conditions, wildlife habitat, mast provisioning, and other services provided by forest systems.

  2. Restoring Sustainable Forests on Appalachian Mined Lands for Wood Products, Renewable Energy, Carbon Sequestration, and Other Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-12-01

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and Pennsylvania mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, one each in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. Regression models of chemical and physical soil properties were created in order to estimate the SOC content down the soil profile. Soil organic carbon concentration and volumetric percent of the fines decreased exponentially down the soil profile. The results indicated that one-third of the total SOC content on mined lands was found in the surface 0-13 cm soil layer, and more than two-thirds of it was located in the 0-53 cm soil profile. A relative estimate of soil density may be best in broad-scale mine soil mapping since actual D{sub b} values are often inaccurate and difficult to obtain in rocky mine soils. Carbon sequestration potential is also a function of silvicultural practices used for reforestation success. Weed control plus tillage may be the optimum treatment for hardwoods and white pine, as any increased growth resulting from fertilization may not offset the decreased survival that accompanied fertilization. Relative to carbon value, our analysis this quarter shows that although short-rotation hardwood management on reclaimed surface mined lands may have higher LEVs than traditional long-rotation hardwood management, it is only profitable in a limited set of circumstances.

  3. MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAJOR FOREST COMMUNITY TYPES OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT: AFIELD GUIDE BY STEVEN M. JONES, DAVID H. VAN LEAR, AND S. KNIGHT COX~/ JULY 1981 l1Research Forester, Professor, and Forestry Aide I, Department of Forestry, Clemson University, Clemson, S. C. 29631 This research was conducted under U. S. Depart- ment of Energy Contract No. DE-AS09-77SROI026 -i- Table of Contents INTRODUCTI ON. . . ~1ETHODS . CLASSIFICATION CONCEPTS SUCCESSIONAL PATTERNS USE OF THE GUIDE . . KEY TO THE MAJOR FOREST

  4. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 8, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-09-08

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances n the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, and county outage data are provided.

  5. STOIC: An Assessment of Coupled Model Climatology and Variability in Tropical Ocean Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davey, M.K.; Sperber, K.R.; Huddleston, M

    2000-08-30

    The tropics are regions of strong ocean-atmosphere interaction on seasonal and interannual timescales, so a good representation of observed tropical behavior is a desirable objective for coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (CGCMs). To broaden and update previous assessments (Mechoso et al. 1995, Neelin et al. 1992), two complementary projects were initiated by the CLIVAR Working Group on Seasonal to Interannual Prediction (WGSIP): the El Nino Simulation Intercomparison Project (ENSIP, by Mojib Latif) and STOIC (Study of Tropical Oceans In Coupled models). The aim was to compare models against observations to identify common weaknesses and strengths. Results from ENSIP concentrating on the equatorial Pacific have been described by Latif et al. (2000), hereafter ENSIP2000. A detailed report on STOIC is available via anonymous ftp at email.meto.gov.uk/pub/cr/ ''stoic'' and is summarized in Davey et al. (2000). The STOIC analyses extend beyond the equatorial Pacific, to examine behavior in all three tropical ocean regions.

  6. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 8, 2004 (10:00 AM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-08

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, and county outage data are provided.

  7. Tropical Storm Frances Situation Report, September 7, 2004 (10:00 PM EDT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-09-07

    The report provides highlights related to impacts of Tropical Storm Frances in the Florida area. Sections on electric information, oil and gas information, storm track, and county outage data are provided.

  8. Management Reminders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is normally shared by the HQ Program Manager a week prior to the scheduled mediation and is intented to serve as a reminder of the pertinent aspects of the mediation process.

  9. Conference Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-01-25

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for managing conferences sponsored or co-sponsored by the Department of Energy, including the National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 110.3. Canceled by DOE N 251.97.

  10. Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    prediction (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate prediction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate prediction We investigated the initial development of the double ITCZ in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM Version 3) in the central Pacific. Starting from a resting initial condition of the ocean in January, the model developed a warm bias of

  11. Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Processes (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem Processes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Amazon Column CO2 and CO Observations to Elucidate Tropical Ecosystem Processes Authors: Dubey, Manvendra Krishna [1] ; Parker, Harrison Alexander [1] ; Myers, Katherine Elizabeth [1] ; Wennberg, P [2] ; Wunch, D [2] ; Allen, N [3] ; Blavier, J-F [4] ; Keppel-Aleks, G [5] ; O'Dell, C [6] ; Miller, J [7] ; Michalak, A

  12. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download...

  13. Project Reports for Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  14. Lake Forest Park, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Lake Forest Park is a city in King County, Washington. It falls under Washington's 1st congressional district and...

  15. Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Cuts Emissions, Promotes Green Growth February 23, 2012 - ... In pursuit of its long-term energy goal of reducing its carbon footprint to zero, the ...

  16. City of Forest City, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .cityofforestcity.comdepar Facebook: https:www.facebook.compagesCity-of-Forest-City-IA142928346092 Outage Hotline: (641) 585-3574 or (641) 585-4343 References: EIA Form...

  17. Forest Glen, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Glen is a census-designated place in Montgomery County, Maryland.1 References US Census Bureau 2005 Place to 2006 CBSA...

  18. Roman Forest, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Roman Forest is a town in Montgomery County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 8th congressional district.12 References...

  19. Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C...

  20. Park Forest Village, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park Forest Village is a census-designated place in Centre County, Pennsylvania.1...

  1. Forest Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Park is a city in Hamilton County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 1st congressional...

  2. Park Forest, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Park Forest is a village in Cook County and Will County, Illinois. It falls under Illinois'...

  3. Forest Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Park is a village in Cook County, Illinois. It falls under Illinois' 3rd congressional...

  4. Forest Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Forest Park is a town in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. It falls under Oklahoma's 5th congressional...

  5. Forest County Potawatomi Community- 2010 Energy Efficiency Lighting Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Forest County Potawatomi Community ("FCPC" or "Tribe") owns a six-story parking facility that consists of two separate buildings located on fee land adjacent to its Milwaukee Bingo Casino operation.

  6. Forest Service Handbook 2709.11 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter 20 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Forest Service Handbook...

  7. Forest Service Handbook 2709.11 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Handbook 2709.11 - Special Uses Handbook, Chapter 10 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Forest...

  8. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges Reid Miner, Vice President, NCASI

  9. Impact of oil in the tropical marine environment. Technical pub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cintron, G.; Lugo, A.E.; Martinez, R.; Cintron, B.B.; Encarnacion, L.

    1981-11-01

    Oil spills have a devastating effect on biologically rich coastal environments. This report investigates this problem, covering damage by oil to biological systems, the use of dispersants (toxicity and considerations for dispersant use), impact of oil and dispersants on coral reefs, impact of oil on seagrass beds and sandy beaches, impact of oil on mangroves (seedling survival and tolerance, regeneration, forest type vulnerability, and cleanup and recovery activities in mangroves), conclusions, and recommendations. The study concludes that coral reefs and seagrass beds may escape significant spill damage if pollution is not chronic and if dispersants are not used. Sandy and rocky shores may be severely impacted but recover quickly. Mangroves are the most vulnerable coastal ecosystem. Recommendations are that oil spill contingency plans must be prepared for all areas, and that the necessary equipment for the plans must be in place.

  10. Towards Direct Simulation of Future Tropical Cyclone Statistics in a High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wehner, Michael F.; Bala, G.; Duffy, Phillip; Mirin, Arthur A.; Romano, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    We present a set of high-resolution global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations focusing on the model's ability to represent tropical storms and their statistics. We find that the model produces storms of hurricane strength with realistic dynamical features. We also find that tropical storm statistics are reasonable, both globally and in the north Atlantic, when compared to recent observations. The sensitivity of simulated tropical storm statistics to increases in sea surface temperature (SST) is also investigated, revealing that a credible late 21st century SST increase produced increases in simulated tropical storm numbers and intensities in all ocean basins. Whilemore » this paper supports previous high-resolution model and theoretical findings that the frequency of very intense storms will increase in a warmer climate, it differs notably from previous medium and high-resolution model studies that show a global reduction in total tropical storm frequency. However, we are quick to point out that this particular model finding remains speculative due to a lack of radiative forcing changes in our time-slice experiments as well as a focus on the Northern hemisphere tropical storm seasons.« less

  11. Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nature Climate Change Features Forest Research Nature Climate Change features Los Alamos forest research The print issue features as its cover story the tree-stress research of LANL scientist A. Park Williams and partners from the U.S. Geological Survey, University of Arizona and several other organizations. February 27, 2013 Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after the 2011 Las Conchas fire. Image by Craig D. Allen, USGS. Burned trees in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico after

  12. A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potawatomi Community - A Case Study | Department of Energy A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study A Design-Builder's Perspective: Anaerobic Digestion, Forest County Potawatomi Community - A Case Study Presented by Jason Rieth, Industrial Construction Executive at Miron Construction at the April 16, 2013, Community-Scale Anaerobic Digesters CommRE Webinar. PDF icon mironconstruction_rieth.pdf More Documents & Publications

  13. Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science lectures Forests and climate change focus of Frontiers in Science lectures LANL researcher Nate McDowell will discuss climate change and its effects on forest systems. March 31, 2014 Nathan McDowell measures photosynthesis at the SUrvival MOrtality project (SUMO) drought experiments site. Nathan McDowell measures photosynthesis at the SUrvival MOrtality project (SUMO) drought experiments site. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "The data

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles | Department of Energy National Parks and Forest Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: AVTA - Evaluating National Parks and Forest Service Fleets for Plug-in Electric Vehicles The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. Through the AVTA, Idaho National Laboratory

  15. Forest County Potawatomi Community Parking Ramp and Wundar Hall Projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Energy Program Review Forest County Potawatomi Community Parking Ramp and Wundar Hall Projects Background on Forest County Potawatomi Community  FCPC has trust land in northern Wisconsin and City of Milwaukee  Facilities in northern Wisconsin include tribal government offices, a health and wellness center, a cultural museum, a casino and hotel and various other smaller support facilities and enterprises. Trust Land in Milwaukee Project Greenfire  In late 2007, FCPC established

  16. Forest County Potawatomi Community: Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Systems

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Forest County Potawatomi Community Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Systems Presented by: Nathan Karman Legal Department Forest County Potawatomi Community March 27, 2014 "Let us share our natural resources for the good of our People. Let us work for clean air and water and pray for the courage to stand up to those who would abuse our Mother Earth. So be it." - Bemwetek (Elder James Thunder) Excerpt from 2007 Class I Air Redesignation Public Hearing Prayer Community's Commitment to

  17. Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes | Department of Energy Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes Montage Builders Northern Forest, Ryerson University Selected as Grand Winners of First Student Design Competition for Zero Energy Ready Homes April 29, 2014 - 2:15pm Addthis To help cut energy waste and improve U.S. energy productivity, the Energy

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Converting Sustainable Forest Products into Fuel

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Converting Sustainable Forest Products into Fuel: What it takes to have a successful wood pellet manufacturing business Presented at The Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies Forum July 9, 2014 Converting Sustainable Forest Products into Fuel: What it takes to have a successful wood pellet manufacturing business Presented at The Biomass Renewable Energy Opportunities and Strategies Forum July 9, 2014 Presented by Dr. William Strauss President, FutureMetrics Director, Maine Energy

  19. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, Kolby; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J.; Martin, Scot T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  20. Chemical composition of biomass from tall perennial tropical grasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prine, G.M.; Stricker, J.A.; Anderson, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The tall perennial tropical grasses, elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schum.), sugarcane and energycane (Saccharum sp.) and erianthus (Erianthus arundenaceum (Retz) Jesw.) have given very high oven dry biomass yields in Florida and the warm Lower South USA. No good complete analyses of the chemical composition of these grasses for planning potential energy use was available. We sampled treatments of several tall grass demonstrations and experiments containing high-biomass yielding genotypes of the above tall grass crops at several locations in Florida over the two growing seasons, 1992 and 1993. These samples were analyzed for crude protein, NDF, ADF, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and IVDMD or IVOMD. The analysis for the above constituents are reported, along with biomass yields where available, for the tall grass accessions in the various demonstrations and experiments. Particular attention is given to values obtained from the high-yielding tall grasses grown on phosphatic clays in Polk County, FL, the area targeted by a NREL grant to help commercialize bioenergy use from these crops.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management LMS 3047FER Page 1 of 2 02/02/2010 Fernald Preserve Institutional Control Inspection Date Dec. 2011 Inspector SM Stoller Area Institutional Controls Type of Finding (See Definitions Page) Follow Up Institutional Control Signage Barrier Groundskeeping Other Description Photo? (File No.) Corrected Maintenance Req'd Cont. Observation Access Points South Access NO FINDINGS No North Access NO FINDINGS No Eco Park NO FINDINGS No Forest Demo NO

  2. Oracle Management Tool Suite

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-06-01

    The Oracle Management Tool Suite is used to automatically manage Oracle based systems. This includes startup and shutdown of databases and application servers as well as backup, space management, workload management and log file management.

  3. The U.S. Forest Service's analysis of cumulative effects to wildlife: A study of legal standards, current practice, and ongoing challenges on a National Forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Courtney A.

    2012-01-15

    Cumulative effects analysis (CEA) allows natural resource managers to understand the status of resources in historical context, learn from past management actions, and adapt future activities accordingly. U.S. federal agencies are required to complete CEA as part of environmental impact assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Past research on CEA as part of NEPA has identified significant deficiencies in CEA practice, suggested methodologies for handling difficult aspects of CEA, and analyzed the rise in litigation over CEA in U.S. courts. This article provides a review of the literature and legal standards related to CEA as it is done under NEPA and then examines current practice on a U.S. National Forest, utilizing qualitative methods in order to provide a detailed understanding of current approaches to CEA. Research objectives were to understand current practice, investigate ongoing challenges, and identify impediments to improvement. Methods included a systematic review of a set of NEPA documents and semi-structured interviews with practitioners, scientists, and members of the public. Findings indicate that the primary challenges associated with CEA include: issues of both geographic and temporal scale of analysis, confusion over the purpose of the requirement, the lack of monitoring data, and problems coordinating and disseminating data. Improved monitoring strategies and programmatic analyses could support improved CEA practice.

  4. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2014-06-02

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  5. Global warming accelerates drought-induced forest death

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nathan; Pockman, William

    2013-07-09

    Many southwestern forests in the United States will disappear or be heavily altered by 2050, according to a series of joint Los Alamos National Laboratory-University of New Mexico studies. Nathan McDowell, a Los Alamos plant physiologist, and William Pockman, a UNM biology professor, explain that their research, and more from scientists around the world, is forecasting that by 2100 most conifer forests should be heavily disturbed, if not gone, as air temperatures rise in combination with drought. "Everybody knows trees die when there's a drought, if there's bark beetles or fire, yet nobody in the world can predict it with much accuracy." McDowell said. "What's really changed is that the temperature is going up," thus the researchers are imposing artificial drought conditions on segments of wild forest in the Southwest and pushing forests to their limit to discover the exact processes of mortality and survival. The study is centered on drought experiments in woodlands at both Los Alamos and the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico. Both sites are testing hypotheses about how forests die on mature, wild trees, rather than seedlings in a greenhouse, through the ecosystem-scale removal of 50 percent of yearly precipitation through large water-diversion trough systems.

  6. Daytime turbulent exchange between the Amazon forest and the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzjarrald, D.R.; Moore, K.E. ); Cabral, M.R. ); Scolar, J. ); Manzi, A.O.; de Abreau Sa, L.D. )

    1990-09-20

    Detailed observations of turbulence just above and below the crown of the Amazon rain forest during the wet season are presented. The forest canopy is shown to remove high-frequency turbulent fluctuations while passing lower frequencies. Filter characteristics of turbulent transfer into the Amazon rain forest canopy are quantified. In spite of the ubiquitous presence of clouds and frequent rain during this season, the average horizontal wind speed spectrum and the relationship between the horizontal wind speed and its standard deviation are well described by dry convective boundary layer similarity hypotheses originally found to apply in flat terrain. Diurnal changes in the sign of the vertical velocity skewness observed above and inside the canopy are shown to be plausibly explained by considering the skewness budget. Simple empirical formulas that relate observed turbulent heat fluxes to horizontal wind speed and variance are presented. Changes in the amount of turbulent coupling between the forest and the boundary layer associated with deep convective clouds are presented in three case studies. Even small raining clouds are capable of evacuating the canopy of substances normally trapped by persistent static stability near the forest floor. Recovery from these events can take more than an hour, even during midday.

  7. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James A. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

    2005-06-08

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots is 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site is 13.5 acres. During the reporting period we compiled and evaluated all soil properties measured on the study sites. Statistical analysis of the properties was conducted, and first year survival and growth of white pine, hybrid poplars, and native hardwoods was assessed. Hardwood species survived better at all sites than white pine or hybrid poplar. Hardwood survival across treatments was 80%, 85%, and 50% for sites in Virginia, West Virginia, and Ohio, respectively, while white pine survival was 27%, 41%, and 58%, and hybrid poplar survival was 37%, 41%, and 72% for the same sites, respectively. Hybrid poplar height and diameter growth were superior to those of the other species tested, with the height growth of this species reaching 126.6cm after one year in the most intensive treatment at the site in Virginia. To determine carbon in soils on these sites, we developed a cost-effective method for partitioning total soil carbon to pedogenic carbon and geogenic carbon in mine soils. We are in the process of evaluating the accuracy and precision of the proposed carbon partitioning technique for which we are designing an experiment with carefully constructed mine soil samples. In a second effort, as part of a mined land reforestation project for carbon sequestration in southwestern Virginia we implemented the first phase of the carbon monitoring protocol that was recently delivered to DOE.

  8. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data from the Duke Forest FACE Facility

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOEÆs Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. The Duke University FACE website actually presents information on several FACE experiments. The Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-I) facility is located in the Blackwood Division of the Duke Forest. It consists of four free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) plots that provide elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and four plots that provide ambient CO2 control. The system has been in operation since June, 1994 in the prototype plot, and since August, 1996 in the three additional plots. The prototype plot and its reference were halved with a barrier inserted in the soil in 1998 to conduct, together with five additional plot pairs, CO2 X soil nutrient enrichment experiments. The rest of the plots were partitioned in early 2005 and incorporated into the CO2 X nutrient experiment. To increase statistical power, four additional ambient plots were established in January, 2005, halved, and one half of each fertilized. [copied from http://face.env.duke.edu/description.cfm] The Duke FACE home page makes information available from both completed and ongoing projects, provides a searchable database of publications and presentations, and data, images, and links to related websites.

  9. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Data from the Duke Forest FACE Facility

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOEs Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. The Duke University FACE website actually presents information on several FACE experiments. The Forest-Atmosphere Carbon Transfer and Storage (FACTS-I) facility is located in the Blackwood Division of the Duke Forest. It consists of four free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) plots that provide elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and four plots that provide ambient CO2 control. The system has been in operation since June, 1994 in the prototype plot, and since August, 1996 in the three additional plots. The prototype plot and its reference were halved with a barrier inserted in the soil in 1998 to conduct, together with five additional plot pairs, CO2 X soil nutrient enrichment experiments. The rest of the plots were partitioned in early 2005 and incorporated into the CO2 X nutrient experiment. To increase statistical power, four additional ambient plots were established in January, 2005, halved, and one half of each fertilized. [copied from http://face.env.duke.edu/description.cfm] The Duke FACE home page makes information available from both completed and ongoing projects, provides a searchable database of publications and presentations, and data, images, and links to related websites.

  10. Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1997-04-11

    The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

  11. Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-01

    Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

  12. Management Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Deep Borehole Disposal (DBD) Performance Assessment Geoff Freeze Sandia National Laboratories Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice Annual Technical Exchange Meeting Richland, WA December 16, 2015 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. Environmental Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-12

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  14. Environmental Management

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-07

    Another key aspect of the NNSS mission is Environmental Management program, which addresses the environmental legacy from historic nuclear weapons related activities while also ensuring the health and safety of present day workers, the public, and the environment as current and future missions are completed. The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management site receives low-level and mixed low-level waste from some 28 different generators from across the DOE complex in support of the legacy clean-up DOE Environmental Management project. Without this capability, the DOE would not be able to complete the clean up and proper disposition of these wastes. The program includes environmental protection, compliance, and monitoring of the air, water, plants, animals, and cultural resources at the NNSS. Investigation and implementation of appropriate corrective actions to address the contaminated ground water facilities and soils resulting from historic nuclear testing activities, the demolition of abandoned nuclear facilities, as well as installation of ground water wells to identify and monitor the extent of ground water contamination.

  15. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Forest-tundra_LANL-28 Jan-2015.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Circumpolar pattern Why Why focus focus on on the the subarctic subarctic forest? forest? Models predict: * Rapid advance of trees and shrubs i p t l b l i in response to global...

  17. File:03-FD-d - Forest Service Special Use Authorization.pdf ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-FD-d - Forest Service Special Use Authorization.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:03-FD-d - Forest Service Special Use Authorization.pdf...

  18. Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Bioenergy Demand in a Market Driven Forest Economy (U.S. South) Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the...

  19. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW ... Title: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW ...

  20. Environmental Management System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System (EMS) is a set of processes and practices that enable an organization to reduce its...

  1. ORISE: Emergency Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Emergency Management Effective emergency management relies on thorough integration of preparedness plans at all levels of government. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science...

  2. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G Satyanarayana, M. Krishnakumar, V. Dhaman, Reji k.

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  3. ARM - PI Product - A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsA Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a

  4. M E Environmental Management Environmental Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration, EM-10 Office of D&D and Facility Engineering, EM-13 Facility Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) D&D Program Map Addendum: Impact of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) on EM's D&D

  5. US forests and global change - precolonization to the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerbe, J.I.

    1997-12-31

    The forests of the United States and manufacture of products from raw materials produced in the forests are significant for the international global economy and for amelioration of threatening global climate change. This paper explores the conditions of the forests as a result of changing anthropogenic influences, and how these conditions might impact on global change.

  6. Best Management Practice #1: Water Management Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful water management program starts with developing a comprehensive water management plan. This plan should be included within existing facility operating plans.

  7. Chemical Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2006 May 2006 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 1 of 3) U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S.

  8. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  9. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  10. Your Records Management Responsibilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Your Records Management Responsibilities Table of Contents INTRODUCTION RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT RECORDS MANAGEMENT IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IMPORTANCE OF RECORDS MANAGEMENT YOUR RECORDS MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES RECORDS MANAGEMENT LIFE CYCLE ELECTRONIC RECORDS & RECORDKEEPING LAW, REGULATION, AND POLICY ASSISTANCE RECORDS MANAGEMENT TERMS 2 INTRODUCTION If you are a government employee or contractor working for a federal agency, records management is part of your

  11. Energy Management and Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Tuesday Webcast for Industry covers how to become a Certified Energy Manager and Certified Practitioner in Energy Management Systems

  12. Integrated Safety Management Policy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    INTEGRATED SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM DESCRIPTION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Environmental Management Headquarters May 2008 Preparation: Braj K. sin& Occupational Safety and Health Manager Office of Safety Management Concurrence: Chuan-Fu wu Director, Offlce of Safety Management Deputy Assistant Secretary for safe& Management andoperations Operations Officer for 1 Environmental Management Approval: Date p/-g Date Environmental Management TABLE OF CONTENTS

  13. Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service Meet Energy Champion John O'Connor of the USDA Forest Service March 11, 2011 - 12:50pm Addthis USDA Forest Service energy champs John O'Connor, Bob Allen and Brian DeRousseau USDA Forest Service energy champs John O'Connor, Bob Allen and Brian DeRousseau April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs John O'Connor has worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest

  14. Radiative Energy Balance in the Tropical Tropopause Layer: An Investigation with ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Qiang

    2013-10-22

    The overall objective of this project is to use the ARM observational data to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation effects in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which is crucial for improving the simulation and prediction of climate and climate change. In last four and half years, we have been concentrating on (i) performing the comparison of the ice cloud properties from the ground-based lidar observations with those from the satellite CALIPSO lidar observations at the ARM TWP sites; (ii) analyzing TTL cirrus and its relation to the tropical planetary waves; (iii) calculating the radiative heating rates using retrieved cloud microphysical properties by combining the ground-based lidar and radar observations at the ARM TWP sites and comparing the results with those using cloud properties retrieved from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations; (iv) comparing macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidar observations; (v) improving the parameterization of optical properties of cirrus clouds with small effective ice particle sizes; and (vi) evaluating the enhanced maximum warming in the tropical upper troposphere simulated by the GCMs. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the 12 referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER64769.

  15. Snag characteristics and dynamics following natural and artificially induced mortality in a managed loblolly pine forest.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarnoch, Stanley J.; Vukovich, Mark A.; Kilgo, John C.; Blake, John I.

    2013-06-10

    A 14-year study of snag characteristics was established in 41- to 44-year old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands in southeastern USA. During the initial 5.5 years, no stand manipulation or unusually high-mortality events occurred. Afterwards, three treatments were applied consisting of trees thinned and removed, trees felled and not removed, and artificial creation of snags produced by girdling and herbicide injection. The thinned treatments were designed to maintain the same live canopy density as the snag-created treatment, disregarding snags that remained standing.We monitored snag height, diameter, density, volume, and bark percentage; the number of cavities was monitored in natural snags only. During the first 5.5 years, recruitment and loss rates were stable, resulting in a stable snag population. Large snags (?25 cm diameter) were common, but subcanopy small snags (10 to <25 cm diameter) dominated numerically. Large natural snags survived (90% quantile) significantly longer (6.09.4 years) than smaller snags (4.46.9 years). Large artificial snags persisted the longest (11.8 years). Cavities in natural snags developed within 3 years following tree death. The mean number of cavities per snag was five times greater in large versus small snags and large snags were more likely to have multiple cavities, emphasizing the importance of mature pine stands for cavity-dependent wildlife species.

  16. PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  Overview  Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects  Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing of Project Planning Elements  Elements of Deactivation Project Planning  Examples From Project Management Plans Overview The purpose here is to assist project managers and project planners in creating a project plan by providing examples and pointing to information that have been successfully used by others in

  17. Forest Products Footprint, December 2010 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2010-06-01

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map fuel energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing industry sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released due to the combustion of fuel. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high-level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The energy data is primarily provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), and therefore reflects consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  18. Forest Products Footprint, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-17

    Manufacturing energy and carbon footprints map energy consumption and losses, as well as greenhouse gas emissions from fuel consumption, for fifteen individual U.S. manufacturing sectors (representing 94% of all manufacturing energy use) and for the entire manufacturing sector. By providing energy consumption and emissions figures broken down by end use, the footprints allow for comparisons of energy use and emissions sources both within and across sectors. The footprints portray a large amount of information for each sector, including: * Comparison of the energy generated offsite and transferred to facilities versus that generated onsite * Nature and amount of energy consumed by end use within facilities * Magnitude of the energy lost both outside and inside facility boundaries * Magnitude of the greenhouse gas emissions released as a result of manufacturing energy use. Energy losses indicate opportunities to improve efficiency by implementing energy management best practices, upgrading energy systems, and developing new technologies. Footprints are available below for each sector. Data is presented in two levels of detail. The first page provides a high- level snapshot of the offsite and onsite energy flow, and the second page shows the detail for onsite generation and end use of energy. The principle energy use data source is the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), for consumption in the year 2006, when the survey was last completed.

  19. Environmental Management System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System (EMS) is a set of processes and practices that enable an organization to reduce its environmental impacts and increase its operating efficiency.. August 1, 2013 Environmental Management System at LANL Environmental Management System at LANL View larger image »

  20. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitats in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  1. Forestry herbicide influences on biodiversity and wildlife habitat in Southern forests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karl V.; Miller, James, H.

    2004-07-01

    Abstract In the southern United States, herbicide use continues to increase for timber management in commercial pine (Pinus spp.) plantations, for modifying wildlife habitats, and for invasive plant control. Several studies have reported that single applications of forestry herbicides at stand initiation have minor and temporary impacts on plant communities and wildlife habitat conditions, with some reports of enhanced habitat conditions for both game and nongame species. Due to the high resiliency of floral communities, plant species richness and diversity rebound rapidly after single herbicide treatments, with short- and long-term compositional shifts according to the selectivity and efficacy of the herbicide used. Recently, however, a shift to the Southeast in North American timber supplies has resulted in increased forest management intensity. Current site-preparation techniques rely on herbicide combinations, often coupled with mechanical treatments and >1 years of post-planting applications to enhance the spectrum and duration of vegetation control. This near-total control of associated vegetation at establishment and more rapid pine canopy closure, coupled with shortened and repeated rotations, likely will affect plant diversity and wildlife habitat quality. Development of mitigation methods at the stand and landscape levels will be required to minimize vegetative and wildlife impacts while allowing continued improvement in pine productivity. More uncertain are long-term impacts of increasing invasive plant occupation and the projected increase in herbicide use that will be needed to reverse this worsening situation. In addition, the potential of herbicides to meet wildlife management objectives in areas where traditional techniques have high social costs (e.g., prescribed fire) should be fully explored.

  2. Assessing human health risk in the USDA forest service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, D.R.

    1990-12-31

    This paper identifies the kinds of risk assessments being done by or for the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Forest Service. Summaries of data sources currently in use and the pesticide risk assessments completed by the agency or its contractors are discussed. An overview is provided of the agency`s standard operating procedures for the conduct of toxicological, ecological, environmental fate, and human health risk assessments.

  3. Presentations - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Presentations UW Madison Madison Dynamo Experiment Presentations MDE HomeLinksNewsBackgroundPublicationsPresentationsContactsMDE People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Workshops Dynamo Theory Program, Kavli Institute for Theoretical physics, UC-Santa Barbara, May 5-July 18, 2008. Cary Forest, Sodium Dynamo Experiments on Two Continents: History and Current Successes Modeling

  4. Fast Pyrolysis Conversion Tests of Forest Concepts' Crumbles. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santosa, Daniel M.; Zacher, Alan H.; Eakin, David E.

    2012-04-02

    The report describes the work done by PNNL on assessing Forest Concept's engineered feedstock using the bench-scale continuous fast pyrolysis system to produce liquid bio-oil, char and gas. Specifically, bio-oil from the following process were evaluated for its yield and quality to determine impact of varying feed size parameters. Furthermore, the report also describes the handling process of the biomass and the challenges of operating the system with above average particle size.

  5. Contacts - Madison Dynamo Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Contacts UW Madison Madison Dynamo Experiment Contacts MDE HomeLinksNewsBackgroundPublicationsPresentationsContactsMDE People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Group Members Prof. Cary Forest - Principal Investigator Nicholas Zane Taylor - Research Assistant Elliot Kaplan - Research Assistant Mark Nornberg - Staff Scientist Kian Rahbarnia - Post doc Collaborators Erik Spence - Associate

  6. Contacts - Plasma Couette Experiment - Cary Forest Group - UW Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Contacts UW Madison Plasma Couette Experiment Contacts PCX HomeResearch MissionPhysics TopicsDeviceDiagnosticsContacts LinksPCX People CPLA Home Directory Publications Links University of Wisconsin Physics Department Department of Energy National Science Foundation Contacts Principal Investigator Cary B. Forest Graduate Student Cami Collins Engineers John Wallace Mike Clark Undergraduate Researchers Jonathan Jara-Almonte Kristine Garot

  7. NREL Helps Industry Partner Commercialize Promising Technology For Forest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Products Industry Industry Partner Commercialize Promising Technology For Forest Products Industry For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., April 3, 1997 -- The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently signed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with Minerals Technologies, Inc. of Bethlehem, Penn. to conduct research to improve the quality of paper derived from thermomechanical pulp (TMP). The 17-month

  8. Microsoft Word - 2010O-03 DOE-RL Manager.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-RL Manager Recommendations 2010O-03 Adopted June 4, 2010 Page 1 June 4, 2010 Inés Triay Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management EM-1/Forestal Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: Department of Energy Richland Operations Manager Recommendations Dear Ms Triay, Thank you for encouraging the Hanford Advisory Board (Board) and me to provide recommendations regarding the selection of the next U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland

  9. Identification of sediment sources in forested watersheds with surface coal mining disturbance using carbon and nitrogen isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.F.

    2009-10-15

    Sediments and soils were analyzed using stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry and carbon and nitrogen elemental analyses to evaluate the their ability to indicate land-use and land management disturbance and pinpoint loading from sediment transport sources in forested watersheds disturbed by surface coal mining. Samples of transported sediment particulate organic matter were collected from four watersheds in the Southern Appalachian forest in Kentucky. The four watersheds had different surface coal mining history that were classified as undisturbed, active mining, and reclaimed conditions. Soil samples were analyzed including reclaimed grassland soils, undisturbed forest soils, geogenic organic matter associated with coal fragments in mining spoil, and soil organic matter from un-mined grassland soils. Statistically significant differences were found for all biogeochemical signatures when comparing transported sediments from undisturbed watersheds and surface coal mining disturbed watersheds and the results were attributed to differences in erosion sources and the presence of geogenic organic matter. Sediment transport sources in the surface coal mining watersheds analyzed using Monte Carlo mass balance un-mixing found that: {delta}{sup 15}N showed the ability to differentiate streambank erosion and surface soil erosion; and {delta} {sup 13}C showed the ability to differentiate soil organic matter and geogenic organic matter. This suggests that streambank erosion downstream of surface coal mining sites is a significant source of sediment in coal mining disturbed watersheds. The results suggest that the sediment transport processes governing streambank erosion loads are taking longer to reach geomorphologic equilibrium in the watershed as compared with the surface erosion processes.

  10. John Angelis named Manager, Information Resource Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    access; computer applications development; video and teleconferencing support; and WIPP computer security. As manager, Angelis oversees the overall acquisition, development,...

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV March 10, 2011 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Payments Surge Past $4 Billion U.S. Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS * More than $4 BILLION in Recovery Act payments are accelerating environmental cleanup

  12. Hydrologic responses of a tropical catchment in Thailand and two temperate/cold catchments in north America to global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, T.Y.; Ahmad, Z.

    1997-12-31

    The hydrologic impact or sensitivities of three medium-sized catchments to global warming, one of tropical climate in Northern Thailand and two of temperate climate in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins of California, were investigated.

  13. A Reassessment of the Integrated Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Surface Chlorophyll in the Western Subtropical North Atlantic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltz, Gregory R.; Balaguru, Karthik; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2015-02-28

    The impact of tropical cyclones on surface chlorophyll concentration is assessed in the western subtropical North Atlantic Ocean during 19982011. Previous studies in this area focused on individual cyclones and gave mixed results regarding the importance of tropical cyclone-induced mixing for changes in surface chlorophyll. Using a more integrated and comprehensive approach that includes quantification of cyclone-induced changes in mixed layer depth, here it is shown that accumulated cyclone energy explains 22% of the interannual variability in seasonally-averaged (JuneNovember) chlorophyll concentration in the western subtropical North Atlantic, after removing the influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The variance explained by tropical cyclones is thus about 70% of that explained by the NAO, which has well-known impacts in this region. It is therefore likely that tropical cyclones contribute significantly to interannual variations of primary productivity in the western subtropical North Atlantic during the hurricane season.

  14. Digital Data Management Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Digital Data Management Plans Digital Data Management Plans Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter, energy, space, and time. Plans HAWC gamma-Ray Observatory Data Management Plan (pdf)

  15. DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and...

  16. Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies Project Manager's Guide to Managing Impact and Process Evaluation Studies This report provides a...

  17. Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities Manager's Desk Reference on Human Capital Management Flexibilities The purpose of this document is to provide DOE ...

  18. Tropical Western Pacific site science mission plan. Semiannual project report, January--June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T.; Mather, J.; Clements, W.; Barnes, F.

    1998-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was created in 1989 as part of the US Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiative and cloud processes in computer models used to predict climate change. The overall goal of the ARM program is to develop and test parameterizations of important atmospheric processes, particularly cloud and radiative processes, for use in atmospheric models. This goal is being achieved through a combination of field measurements and modeling studies. Three primary locales were chosen for extensive field measurement facilities. These are the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States, the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO). This Site Science Mission Plan [RPT(TWP)-010.000] describes the ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific locale.

  19. Linkages of Remote Sea Surface Temperatures and Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Activity Mediated by the African Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

    2015-01-28

    Warm sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in North Atlantic and Mediterranean (NAMED) can influence tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the tropical East Atlantic by modulating summer convection over western Africa. Analysis of 30 years of observations show that the NAMED SST is linked to a strengthening of the Saharan heat low and enhancement of moisture and moist static energy in the lower atmosphere over West Africa, which favors a northward displacement of the monsoonal front. These processes also lead to a northward shift of the African easterly jet that introduces an anomalous positive vorticity from western Africa to the main development region (50W20E; 10N20N) of Atlantic TC. By modulating multiple processes associated with the African monsoon, this study demonstrates that warm NAMED SST explains 8% of interannual variability of Atlantic TC frequency. Thus NAME SST may provide useful predictability for Atlantic TC activity on seasonal-to-interannual time scale.

  20. BETO Active Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Active Project Management Bioenergy Technologies Office - Program Management Review 6/25/15 Liz Moore Technology Manager eere.energy.gov Program Managers * Manages portfolio within their technology area * Establishes technical and cost goals * Strategic planning for technology area * Budget preparation/justification for technology portfolio * Identifies needs for workshops and FOAs * Oversees portfolio reviews including high-level project status Technology Managers * Plans/conducts

  1. Observed Regimes of Mid-Latitude.and Tropical Cirrus Microphysical Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observed Regimes of Mid-Latitude and Tropical Cirrus Microphysical Behavior A. D. Del Genio and A. B. Wolf National Aeronautics Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah L. M. Miloshevich National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Little is known about the climatological microphysical properties of cirrus clouds. Thus, general circulation model (GCM) cirrus parameterizations often

  2. "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones",

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chun-Chieh Wu (National Taiwan University) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab July 27, 2012, 12:00pm to 1:15pm Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Smagorinsky Seminar Room Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton University Forrestal Campus 201 Forrestal Road Princeton, NJ 08540-6649 "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones", Chun-Chieh Wu (National Taiwan University) Contact Information Website: Website

  3. Microbase Cloud Products and Associated Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microbase Cloud Products and Associated Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific J. H. Mather and S. A. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The microbase value added product (Miller et al. 2003) provides a standardized framework for calculating and storing continuous retrievals of cloud microphysical properties including liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), and cloud droplet size. Microbase is part of the larger broadband heating

  4. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  5. Supply Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Logistics Management organization (NSL), Supply Chain Services (NS), Chief Administrative Office (N). NSL manages the warehousing of materials; the investment...

  6. Safety Management System Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Safety Management Systems provide a formal, organized process whereby people plan, perform, assess, and improve the safe conduct of work. The Safety Management System is institutionalized through...

  7. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Management About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us Land Management Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size...

  8. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  9. Analysis of Renewable Energy Potential on U. S. National Forest Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvolanek, E.; Kuiper, J.; Carr, A.; Hlava, K.

    2013-12-13

    In 2005, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) completed an assessment of the potential for solar and wind energy development on National Forest System (NFS) public lands managed by the US Department of Agriculture, U.S. Forest Service (USFS). This report provides an update of the analysis in the NREL report, and extends the analysis with additional siting factors for solar and wind energy. It also expands the scope to biomass and geothermal energy resources. Hydropower is acknowledged as another major renewable energy source on NFS lands; however, it was not analyzed in this project primarily because of the substantially different analysis that would be needed to identify suitable locations. Details about each renewable energy production technology included in the study are provided following the report introduction, including how each resource is converted to electrical power, and examples of existing power plants. The analysis approach was to use current and available Geographic Information System (GIS) data to map the distribution of the subject renewable energy resources, major siting factors, and NFS lands. For each major category of renewable energy power production, a set of siting factors were determined, including minimum levels for the renewable energy resources, and details for each of the other siting factors. Phase 1 of the analysis focused on replicating and updating the 2005 NREL analysis, and Phase 2 introduced additional siting factors and energy resources. Source data were converted to a cell-based format that helped create composite maps of locations meeting all the siting criteria. Acreages and potential power production levels for NFS units were tabulated and are presented throughout this report and the accompanying files. NFS units in the southwest United States were found to have the most potentially suitable land for concentrating solar power (CSP), especially in Arizona and New Mexico. In total, about 136,032 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for CSP development, potentially yielding as much as 13,603 megawatts (MW) of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. For photovoltaic solar power (PV), the top NFS units were more widely distributed than CSP. Notably, more than 150,000 acres in Comanche National Grassland in Colorado were found to be potentially suitable for PV development, accounting for more than 25% of the potentially suitable NFS lands combined. In total, about 564,698 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for PV development, potentially yielding as much as 56,469 MW of electricity, assuming 10 acres per MW. NFS units most suitable for wind power are concentrated in the northern Great Plains. In total, about 3,357,792 acres of NFS lands were found potentially suitable for wind development, potentially yielding as much as 67,156 MW of electricity, assuming 50 acres per MW. Of that area, 571,431 acres (11,429 MW) are located within the Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act Land in Montana. NFS lands in Alaska have considerable wind resources, but other siting factors eliminated almost the entire area. The southwest coast of Chugach National Forest, near Seward, Alaska, maintains the majority of the remaining acreage. NFS units with highly suitable biomass resources are located from Idaho to Louisiana. In total, about 13,967,077 acres of NFS lands are potentially highly suitable for biomass from logging and thinning residue development. Of that, 1,542,247 acres is located in Fremont-Winema National Forest in Oregon. Not surprisingly, most NFS units have at least some level of potentially suitable biomass resources. In general, biomass resources such as these could significantly offset consumption of coal and petroleum-based fuels. NFS units deemed potentially highly suitable for enhanced geothermal system (EGS) development were distributed widely from California to Virginia, accounting for some 6,475,459 acres. Mark Twain National Forest in Missouri has the largest area of all the NFS units, with 900,637 acres. While more rigorous studies are needed for siting geothermal plants, especially those regarding the geological characteristics of specific sites, current results suggest a significant potential for geothermal power generation within many NFS units. The first phase of analysis for solar and wind resources sought to replicate the 2005 NREL methodology using updated source data.1 The total acres meeting the criteria for all NFS lands were lower in the updated assessment compared to the 2005 NREL analysis because the earlier assessment included all land that fell within NFS administrative boundaries rather than only NFS-managed land within them. Acreages were again lower when refined screening factors were added, as would be expected. These remaining areas are of greater interest because they adhere to a broader set of criteria. As this study illustrates, GIS data availability for renewable energy resources and major screening factors has reached a point where national screening level studies can effectively assess the levels and spatial distributions for potentially renewable energy technology development. More detailed siting studies, land use planning, and environmental compliance assessments are essential before individual projects can be permitted and built. However, this study can serve to inform resource managers and planners of where these technologies are most likely to be investigated and proposed; help prioritize efforts to continue informed and sustainable development of renewable power generation within the United States; and help characterize the role of the USFS in this arena. The authors caution against using the areas reported in the results as a final and definitive estimate of suitability for these technologies. The analysis is most useful for determining locations that should be examined more fully, and for identifying regional and national trends.

  10. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.

    2002-04-16

    This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

  11. Long-Term Operation Of Ground-Based Atmospheric Sensing Systems In The Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark; Jones, Larry J.; Porch, W. M.; Apple, Monty L.; Widener, Kevin B.

    2004-10-14

    Three semi-autonomous atmospheric sensing systems were installed in the tropical western Pacific region. The first of these Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Stations (ARCS) began operation in 1996. Each ARCS is configured as a system-of-systems since it comprises an ensemble of independent instrument systems. The ARCS collect, process, and transmit large volumes of cloud, solar and thermal radiation, and meteorological data to support climate studies and climate-modeling improvements as part of the U.S Department of Energys Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Data from these tropical ARCS stations have been used for satellite ground-truth data comparisons and validations, including comparisons for MTI and AQUA satellite data. Our experiences with these systems in the tropics led to modifications in their design. An ongoing international logistics effort is required to keep gigabytes per day of quality-assured data flowing to the ARM programs archives. Design criteria, performance, communications methods, and the day-to-day logistics required to support long-term operations of ground-based remote atmospheric sensing systems are discussed. End-to-end data flow from the ARCS systems to the ARM Program archives is discussed.

  12. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feedstocks Principal Investigator: Steve Taylor Organization... Service, Corley Land Services, Tigercat * Project management ... University, Auburn, AL. Journal Articles and Proceedings ...

  13. Fleet Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fleet Management Fleet Management Fleet management includes commercial and agency owned motor vehicles such as cars, vans, trucks, and buses. Fleet (vehicle) management at the...

  14. Ross Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ross Management Place: Goldendale, Washington State Product: Ross Management is the management parent for a group of family owned...

  15. Forest Products Sector (NAICS 321 and 322) Energy and GHG Combustion Emissions Profile, November 2012

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis 2.3 FOREST PRODUCTS SECTOR (NAICS 321 AND 322) 2.3.1. Overview of the Forest Products Manufacturing Sector The forest products sector produces thousands of products from renewable raw materials (wood) that are essential for communication, packaging, consumer goods, and construction. The sector is divided into two major categories: Wood Product Manufacturing (NAICS 321) and Paper Manufacturing (NAICS 322). These industries are

  16. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Paper Industry | Department of Energy Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Pulp and Paper Industry PDF icon pulppaper_profile.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Forest Products: Report for AIChE Pulp and Paper Industry Energy Bandwidth Study Report Steam System Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries

  17. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI Pallardy, Stephen G 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL...

  18. Using Atmosphere-Forest Measurements To Examine The Potential For Reduced Downwind Dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viner, B.

    2015-10-13

    A 2-D dispersion model was developed to address how airborne plumes interact with the forest at Savannah River Site. Parameters describing turbulence and mixing of the atmosphere within and just above the forest were estimated using measurements of water vapor or carbon dioxide concentration made at the Aiken AmeriFlux tower for a range of stability and seasonal conditions. Stability periods when the greatest amount of mixing of an airborne plume into the forest were found for 1) very unstable environments, when atmospheric turbulence is usually at a maximum, and 2) very stable environments, when the plume concentration at the forest top is at a maximum and small amounts of turbulent mixing can move a substantial portion of the plume into the forest. Plume interactions with the forest during stable periods are of particular importance because these conditions are usually considered the worst-case scenario for downwind effects from a plume. The pattern of plume mixing into the forest was similar during the year except during summer when the amount of plume mixed into the forest was nearly negligible for all but stable periods. If the model results indicating increased deposition into the forest during stable conditions can be confirmed, it would allow for a reduction in the limitations that restrict facility operations while maintaining conservative estimates for downwind effects. Continuing work is planned to confirm these results as well as estimate specific deposition velocity values for use in toolbox models used in regulatory roles.

  19. Simulating the Impacts of Disturbances on Forest Carbon Cycling in North America: Processes, Data, Models, and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shuguang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Hicke, J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Zhao, Shuqing; Chen, Jing Ming; Edburg, Steve; Hu, Yueming; Liu, Jinxun; McGuire, A. David; Xiao, Jingfeng; Keane, Robert; Yuan, Wenping; Tang, Jianwu; Luo, Yiqi; Potter, Christopher; Oeding, Jennifer

    2011-11-08

    Disturbances disrupt the forest structures and alter forest resources, substrate availability, or the physical environment. Understanding disturbances and their impacts is critical for a better quantification of North American carbon dynamics. We reviewed the status and major challenges in simulating the impacts of disturbances on forest carbon cycling in North America from the perspectives of process understanding, disturbance characterization, and modeling, and found some major issues. First, we do not have adequate continentally-consistent disturbance databases to support the NACP missions. Community effort, in collaborating with the modeling community, should be designated to systematically define international standards for disturbance databases with explicit inclusion of uncertainty measurements, adequate spatial and temporal resolutions, and explicit and quantifiable linkages with model simulations. Second, there is a need to develop effective and comprehensive process-based procedures or algorithms that can be used to quantify the immediate and long-term impacts of disturbances on forest succession, soils, microclimate, and cycles of carbon, water, and nutrients. These algorithms should be evaluated not only on the carbon cycle but also on the simulations of vegetation succession, alterations of soil and microclimate, and water and nutrients dynamics because adequate simulations of carbon dynamics rely on the correct quantification of the changes of soil and vegetation conditions. Third, the scaling challenges have rarely been addressed at the continental scale. We do not understand which processes and properties at a given temporal or spatial scales are critical while others can be simplified when we try to balance the North American carbon budget. Previous and current model simulations at the continental scale did not incorporate a full suite of disturbances information (because they do not exist as described above), and therefore provided little insight on the relative importance of various disturbances at the continent and regional scales on the carbon cycle. Fourth, our capability of simulating the occurrences and severity of disturbances under climate change and management futures are very limited. Fifth, uncertainty exists in every step of the effort to simulating the impacts of disturbances on carbon dynamics. Procedures are needed to quantify the uncertainty of model inputs or data layers, model parameters, and model structures, and their impacts on model simulations. Working together, modelers and data layer developers can identify the most uncertain areas and develop working hypotheses to reduce the uncertainty.

  20. Career Map: Construction Manager

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Wind Program's Career Map provides job description information for Construction Manager positions.

  1. Managing Your User Account

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Managing Your Account Managing Your User Account Use the NERSC Information Management (NIM) system to customize your user account and keep your personal information up-to-date. See the NIM User's Guide, especially the "Managing Your User Account with NIM" section. Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:2

  2. Environmental Management System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental Management System is a systematic method for assessing mission activities, determining the environmental impacts of those activities, prioritizing improvements, and measuring results. May 30, 2012 The continuous improvement cycle Our Environmental Management System encourages continuous improvement of our environmental performance. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM

  3. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  4. Visions of success and achievement in recreation-related USDA Forest Service NEPA processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Marc J.; Blahna, Dale J.; Cerveny, Lee K.; Mortimer, Michael J.

    2009-07-15

    The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is incorporated into the planning and decision-making culture of all natural resource agencies in the U.S. Yet, we know little about how the attitudes and internal interactions of interdisciplinary (ID) teams engaged in NEPA processes influence process outcomes. We conducted a web-based survey of 106 ID team leaders involved with environmental analyses (EA) or environmental impact statements (EIS) for projects dealing with recreation and travel management on national forests. We explore how they define success in these processes and identify factors most powerfully associated with perceptions of positive outcomes. The survey revealed a tremendous diversity in definitions of success. Strong correlations between the perceived importance of particular indicators of success and their achievement suggest that pre-conceived notions may often help to shape process outcomes. Regression analyses revealed the following factors as the best predictors of ID team leaders' perception of an 'excellent outcome': achievement of the agency mission, whether compromise had taken place between the interested parties, team satisfaction and harmony, timely process completion, and project implementation. Yet, respondents consistently ranked compromise with interested parties and team member satisfaction among the least important measures of successful NEPA processes. Results suggest that clarifying appropriate measures of success in NEPA processes across the agency could make ID team performance more consistent. The research also suggests that greater attention to ID team interactions, both internally and between teams and interested publics, could result in better outcomes.

  5. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PID was an agency-wide program launched through piloting and mul- tiple phases with strong leadership support and a cross-functional team. Outreach material spoke to multiple motivations. U.S. Forest Service's Power-IT-Down Program The Power-IT-Down (PID) program, in effect from 2013-2015, strongly encour- aged employees to shut off their computers when leaving the offce. The U.S. For- est Service did not initially launch the program agency-wide, but frst piloted it on a voluntary basis in one

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - Forest County Potawatomi Project Greenfire

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The traditional values of the Forest County Potawatomi Community teach us to respect all living things, to take only what we need from mother earth, and to preserve the air, water, and soil for our children. Reflecting these values, we take leadership in creating a sustainable and healthy world. We resolve to reduce our own environmental impacts and to take steps to remedy the impacts of others. We encourage others to do the same. We also seek legislative and policy changes that protect the

  7. Manager`s views of public involvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branch, K.M.; Heerwagen, J.; Bradbury, J.

    1995-12-01

    Four issues commonly form the framework for debates about the acceptability of proposed projects or technologies--the substantive decision or technological choice; the treatment of the community by the proponent organization; the way the decision-making process has been structured and managed; and the status of institutional safeguards and protection. One of the clear messages of cultural theory is that differences in perspectives are a normal and inevitable part of society, and that attempts to resolve differences by persuasion are not likely to work. These findings are useful when considering the goals and possibilities of public involvement as a decision-making tool, and when designing or evaluating public involvement training programs for managers. The research reported here examines the viewpoints and concerns of managers and decision-makers about the four issues identified above, with particular emphasis on their perspectives and concerns about opening decision-making processes to the public and about managers` roles and responsibilities for structuring and managing open decision-making processes. Implications of these findings for public involvement training for managers is also discussed. The data presented in this paper were obtained from face-to-face interviews with managers and decision-makers with experience managing a variety of hazardous waste management decision-making processes. We conducted these interviews in the course of four separate research projects: needs assessments to support the design and development of a public involvement training program for managers; a study of community residents` and managers` perspectives on the chemical stockpile disposal program; an evaluation of the effectiveness of public involvement training for managers in the Department of Energy; and a study to develop indicators of the benefits and costs of public involvement.

  8. Proposed Resource Management Plan/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Ely District

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Ely District Record of Decision and Approved Resource Management Plan August 2008 COOPERATING AGENCIES: Great Basin National Park Lincoln County Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest Nye County Nellis Air Force Base White Pine County Nevada Department of Transportation Duckwater Shoshone Tribe Nevada Division of Minerals Ely Shoshone Tribe Nevada Department of Wildlife Moapa Band of Paiutes Nevada State Historic Preservation Office Yomba Shoshone Tribe BLM Mission Statement It is the mission of the

  9. Agenda 2020: A Technology Vision and Research Agenda for America's Forest, Wood and Paper Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1994-11-01

    In November 1994, the forest products industry published Agenda 2020: A Technology Vision and Research Agenda for America's Forest, Wood and Paper Industry, which articulated the industry's vision. This document set the foundation for collaborative efforts between the industry and the federal government.

  10. Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon – Sustaining an Important Climate Service: Roles of Biomass Use and Markets David Cleaves, Climate Change Advisor to the Chief, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  11. Nitrogen Deposition to and Cycling in a Deciduous Forest

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pryor, Sara C.; Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Carreiro, Margaret; Davis, Melissa L.; Hartley, Anne; Jensen, Bjame; Oliphant, Andrew; Randolph, Melissa J. C.; Schoof, Justin T.

    2001-01-01

    The project described here seeks to answer questions regarding the role increased nitrogen (N) deposition is playing in enhanced carbon (C) sequestration in temperate mid-latitude forests, using detailed measurements from an AmeriFlux tower in southern Indiana (Morgan-Monroe State Forest, or MMSF). The measurements indicate an average atmosphere-surface N flux of approximately 6 mg-N m -2 day -1 during the 2000 growing season, with approximately 40% coming from dry deposition of ammonia (NH 3 ), nitric acid (HNO 3 ), and particle-bound N. Wet deposition and throughfall measurements indicate significant canopy uptake of N (particularly NH 4 +) at themore »site, leading to a net canopy exchange (NCE) of –6 kg-N ha -1 for the growing season. These data are used in combination with data on the aboveground C:N ratio, litterfall flux, and soil net N mineralization rates to indicate the level of potential perturbation of C sequestration at this site. « less

  12. Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-11-15

    Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

  13. Responsible Asia Forest Trade (RAFT) Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Development Mission for Asia (USAID RDMA) in Bangkok. RAFT is managed by The Nature Conservancy (TNC) in partnership with International Union for Conservation of Nature...

  14. Before the House Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director Office of Management Subject: Proposed Manhattan Project National Historical Park PDF icon Microsoft Word - 6.28.12 MA Final Testimony More Documents & Publications...

  15. Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G.; Tharp, M Lynn; Fogel, Jonah

    2009-02-01

    Effects of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species on the ecology of the Cumberland forests

  16. Modeling tropical Pacific sea surface temperature with satellite-derived solar radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, R.; Blumenthal, M.B.

    1994-12-01

    Two independent datasets for the solar radiation at the surface derived from satellites are compared. The data derived from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is for the net solar radiation at the surface whereas the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data is for the downward flux only and was corrected with a space- and time-varying albedo. The ISCCP net flux is at all times higher than the ERBE flux. The difference can be divided into an offset that decreases with latitude and another component that correlates with high tropical cloud cover. With this latter exception the two datasets provide spatial patterns of solar flux that are very similar. A tropical Pacific Ocean model is forced with these two datasets and observed climatological winds. The upward heat flux is parameterized taking into account separately the longwave radiative, latent, and sensible heat fluxes. Best fit values for the uncertain parameters are found using an optimization procedure that seeks to minimize the difference between model and observed SST by varying the parameters within a reasonable range of uncertainty. The SST field the model produces with the best fit parameters is the best the model can do. If the differences between the model and data are larger than can be accounted for by remaining uncertainties in the heat flux parameterization and forcing data then the ocean model must be held to be at fault. Using this method of analysis, a fundamental model fault is identified. Inadequate treatment of mixed layer/entrainment processes in upwelling regions of the eastern tropical Pacific leads to a large and seasonally varying error in the model SST. Elsewhere the model SST is insufficiently different from observed to be able to identify model errors.

  17. A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin; Perlack, Robert D; Blackwelder, D. Brad; Muth, David J.; Hess, J. Richard

    2008-08-01

    To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

  18. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  19. Women of Waste Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PHOENIX - For the seventh year at the Waste Management Conference, EM contractor Fluor hosted a discussion on the expanding role of women in environmental management this month in a panel session attended by more than 250 people.

  20. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-18

    This Guide provides non-mandatory risk management approaches for implementing the requirements of DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-7.

  1. Information Technology Project Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-12-03

    The Order provides program and project management direction for the acquisition and management of IT projects, investments, and initiatives. Cancels DOE G 200.1-1. Admin Chg 1 approved 1-16-2013.

  2. Loan Specialist (Risk Management)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Loan Programs Office (LPO), Risk Management Division (RMD), and Enterprise Risk Management & Compliance Branch. The LPO mission...

  3. LFRG Program Management Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the EM  Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Program Management Plan (LFRG PMP) is to establish the LFRG roles and responsibilities, the LFRG management processes,...

  4. Management Associate I

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an analyst and advisor to an organization's manager and other managers within the organization within BPA. The position serves as a point of...

  5. Stage Gate Management Guide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stage Gate Management in the Biomass Program February 2005 Revision 2 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW............................................................................................................................. 4 STAGE GATE MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................... 4 STAGE GATE PROCESS AND LONG RANGE STRATEGIC PROGRAM PLANNING ........................ 5 GATE REVIEWS

  6. Earned Value Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) uses Earned Value Management (EVM) as a project management tool that measures actual performance of work scope and the associated cost and schedule compared to...

  7. Improving Project Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Improving Project Management Report of the Contract and Project Management Working Group November 2014 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................... 2 2. Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 2.1 Summary of

  8. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, supersedes DOE O 410.2.

  9. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-01-12

    The purpose of this guide is to describe effective risk management processes. The continuous and iterative process includes updating project risk documents and the risk management plan and emphasizes implementation communication of the risks and actions taken.

  10. System Management Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-02-22

    MacPatch is Mac OS X system management software solution. It's used for patching, software distribution and inventory.

  11. ORISE: Emergency Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Emergency Management Effective emergency management relies on thorough integration of preparedness plans at all levels of government. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)-an interagency integrator of emergency management capabilities-brings government agencies together to ensure a prompt and well-coordinated response to a variety of emergency situations. Whether preparations are focused on natural or man-made hazards, ORISE's team of operations planners are

  12. emergency management systems

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9%2A en Building International Emergency Management Systems http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsemergencyoperationscounterterrorisminternationalprograms-1

  13. Financial Management Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-31

    The Order defines requirements for effective financial management and adherence to DOE and applicable external financial management requirements and sets forth standards for ensuring the integrity and responsiveness of financial management and the accuracy and reliability of DOEs financial statements. Supersedes DOE O 2200.13.

  14. Energy Manager Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Managers from leading manufacturing companies share lessons learned from implementing energy savings projects in these one-hour webinars. Topics include real-world challenges like creating a climate for successful project implementation, gaining management support, and obtaining financing. Each webinar highlights a different topic and features an energy manager from a different Better Plants Partner.

  15. Energy, Data Management, Reporting

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design the Strategy | Deliver Efficiency | Sustain Results Energy, Data Management, Reporting This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. - - Agenda ● About Schneider Electric ● Enterprise wide Data Management ● Outputs ● Foundation and results ● Part of a complete energy management solution Schneider Electric Sustainability Services 2014 2 - - Schneider Electric Sustainability Services 2014 3 Schneider Electric - the global

  16. Project Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Management Project Management Some of the Project Management Division’s many functions involve developing risk management plans, managing project risks, and providing input on prime contractor performance. Some of the Project Management Division's many functions involve developing risk management plans, managing project risks, and providing input on prime contractor performance. Employees in our Project Management Division address projects' planning and execution, as specified in

  17. Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

    2012-06-01

    Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are presented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices. Capsule: "Combining dynamical modeling of high-impact weather using traditional regional climate models with statistical techniques allows for comprehensive sampling of the full distribution, uncertainty estimation, direct assessment of impacts, and increased confidence in future changes."

  18. Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

    2013-10-19

    Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are resented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices.

  19. A coupled theory of tropical climatology: Warm pool, cold tongue, and Walker circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengyu Liu; Boyin Huang

    1997-07-01

    Based on results from analytic and general circulation models, the authors propose a theory for the coupled warm pool, cold tongue, and Walker circulation system. The intensity of the coupled system is determined by the coupling strength, the local equilibrium time, and latitudinal differential heating. Most importantly, this intensity is strongly regulated in the coupled system, with a saturation level that can be reached at a modest coupling strength. The saturation west-east sea surface temperature difference (and the associated Walker circulation) corresponds to about one-quarter of the latitudinal differential equilibrium temperature. This regulation is caused primarily by the decoupling of the SST gradient from a strong ocean current. The author`s estimate suggests that the present Pacific is near the saturation state. Furthermore, the much weaker Walker circulation system in the Atlantic Ocean is interpreted as being the result of the influence of the adjacent land, which is able to extend into the entire Atlantic to change the zonal distribution of the trade wind. The theory is also applied to understand the tropical climatology in coupled GCM simulations, in the Last Glacial Maximum climate, and in the global warming climate, as well as in the regulation of the tropical sea surface temperature. 41 refs., 15 figs.

  20. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  1. Records Management | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Records Management Records and Files The Department of Energy (DOE) Records Management Program provides oversight, guidance, and direction to ensure proper documentation...

  2. Carbon nanotube forests growth using catalysts from atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Bingan; Zhang, Can; Esconjauregui, Santiago; Xie, Rongsi; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-04-14

    We have grown carbon nanotubes using Fe and Ni catalyst films deposited by atomic layer deposition. Both metals lead to catalytically active nanoparticles for growing vertically aligned nanotube forests or carbon fibres, depending on the growth conditions and whether the substrate is alumina or silica. The resulting nanotubes have narrow diameter and wall number distributions that are as narrow as those grown from sputtered catalysts. The state of the catalyst is studied by in-situ and ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We demonstrate multi-directional nanotube growth on a porous alumina foam coated with Fe prepared by atomic layer deposition. This deposition technique can be useful for nanotube applications in microelectronics, filter technology, and energy storage.

  3. Forest stand development patterns in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenheaver, C.A.; Matthews, J.M.; Showalter, J.M.; Auch, W.E.

    2006-07-01

    Composition of southern Appalachian forests are influenced by disturbance and topography. This study examined six stands in southwestern Virginia. Within each stand, a 0.3-ha plot was established, and all trees and saplings were measured and aged. Burned stands had lower densities of saplings and small trees, but appeared to have greater Quercus regeneration. Ice damage from the 1994 ice storm was most evident in Pinus strobus saplings. A stand on old coal-mine slag appeared to be experiencing a slower rate of succession than other sites. A variety of stand development patterns were observed, but one common pattern was that oak-hickory overstories had different species in their understory, which may indicate future changes in species composition.

  4. Managing a Process Safety Management inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulvey, N.P. [AcuTech Consulting, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Process Safety Management (PSM) regulations (29 CFR {section} 1910.119) have been in effect for almost three years. State level risk management programs, in New Jersey, California, and Delaware have been in effect for over six years. More recently, Nevada and Louisiana have enacted process safety management programs. These regulations have had a significant impact on all phases of plant operations, including preliminary design, construction, startup, and operations. Through proper planning and the commitment of resources, many facilities are beginning to realize the benefits of well developed PSM programs. This paper will discuss in greater detail some of these benefits, and in particular, the subject of governmental inspections of facilities for process safety management programs.

  5. The relationship of ecosystem management to NEPA and its goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.G.; Randolph, J.

    2000-07-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was intended to promote a systematic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to planning and decision making, including the integration of the natural and social sciences and the design arts. NEPA critics have cited three key shortcomings in its implementation: (1) a lack of engagement with the NEPA process early in the planning process through interdisciplinary collaboration; (2) a lack of rigorous science and the incorporation of ecological principles and techniques; and (3) a lack of emphasis on the Act's substantive goals and objectives. In recent years and independent of NEPA, a policy of ecosystem management has been developed, which represents a fundamental change from a fragmented, incremental planning and management approach to a holistic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary land and resource management effort. The authors postulate that by incorporating ecosystem management principles in their planning and decisionmaking, federal agencies can address the shortcomings in NEPA implementation and move closes to NEPA's intent. A case analysis of EISs prepared by the USDA Forest Service before and after adopting an ecosystem management approach supports their hypothesis.

  6. Long-term successional forest dynamics: species and community responses to climatic variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul; Todd Jr, Donald E; Hanson, Paul J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Question: Are tree dynamics sensitive to climatic variability, and do tree species differ in their responses to climatic variability? Hence, is vulnerability of forest communities to climatic variability depending on stand composition? Location: Mixed young forest at Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, East-Tennessee, USA. Methods: Using a long-term data set (1967-2006), we analyzed temporal forest dynamics at the tree and species level, and we analyzed community dynamics for forest stands that different in their initial species composition (i.e., Chestnut Oak, Oak-Hickory, Pine, and Yellow poplar stands). Using summer drought and growing season temperature as defined climate drivers, we evaluated relationships between forest dynamics and climate across levels of organization. Results: Over the 4-decade studied period, forest communities underwent successional change and substantially increased their biomass. Variation in summer drought and growing season temperature contributed to temporal biomass dynamics for some tree species, but not for others. Stand-level responses to climatic variability were shown to be related to responses of specific component species; however, not for Pine stands. Pinus echinata, the dominant species in stands initially identified as Pine stands, decreased over time due to periodical outbreaks of the pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis). The outbreaks on Walker Branch could not be directly related to climatic conditions. Conclusions: Our results imply that vulnerability of developing forests to predicted climate conditions is stand-type dependent, and hence, is a function of species composition. Autogenic successional processes (or insect outbreaks) were found to prevail over climatic variability in determining long-term forest dynamics for stands dominated by sensitive species, emphasizing the importance of studying interactions between forest succession and climate change.

  7. ORO Names New Assistant Manager for Environmental Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office names John Eschenberg as its Assistant Manager for Environmental Management.

  8. DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation and Solutions | Department of Energy Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions PDF icon DOE Jobs Online (Hiring Manager), Office of Human Capitol Management Innovation and Solutions More Documents & Publications PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA -

  9. New Particle Formation and Growth in an Isoprene-Dominated Ozark Forest:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    From Sub-5 nm to CCN-Active Sizes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect New Particle Formation and Growth in an Isoprene-Dominated Ozark Forest: From Sub-5 nm to CCN-Active Sizes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: New Particle Formation and Growth in an Isoprene-Dominated Ozark Forest: From Sub-5 nm to CCN-Active Sizes Particle Investigations at a Northern Ozarks Tower: NOx, Oxidant, Isoprene Research (PINOT-NOIR) were conducted in a Missouri forest dominated by isoprene emissions,

  10. CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM A long-term experiment to measure carbon and water fluxes was initiated in 2004 as part of the Ameriflux network in a second-growth oak-hickory forest in central Missouri. Ecosystem-scale (~ 1 km2) canopy gas exchange (measured by eddy-covariance methods),

  11. Line Management Perspective: Office of Environmental Management (EM) |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Line Management Perspective: Office of Environmental Management (EM) Line Management Perspective: Office of Environmental Management (EM) Addthis Description Slide Presentation by Matthew Moury, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Safety, Security and Quality Programs, Office of Environmental Management. EFCOG Integrated Safety Management Work Planning and Control. Biography: Matthew Moury View All Videos

  12. BLM and Forest Service Consider Large-Scale Geothermal Leasing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geothermal Leasing June 18, 2008 - 4:29pm Addthis In an effort to encourage appropriate geothermal energy development on public lands, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the...

  13. Philippines: Environment and natural resource management study. World Bank country study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This study addresses the most significant issues of natural-resource management in the Philippines. These include the disappearence or degradation of forests; erosion and changes in hydrological regimes; the conversion of mangrove swamps to fishponds; degradation of coral reefs; and depletion of nearshore fisheries through overfishing and destructive techniques. The issues addressed concern the extent and rate of degradation of these resource stocks, the impact thereof on the national economy, and the scope for ameliorative measures through policy responses, management changes, and investments. The Government is responsible for management of public resources, which include over half of the land area of the Philippines as well as the coastal waters. Historically, public management has been less than optimal, as evidenced by an unsustainable rate of deforestation and the recent stagnation or decline in extractive fisheries.

  14. Strategies for Successful Energy Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on energy management for the portfolio manager initiative

  15. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

  16. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  17. 16 U.S.C. 1600 et seq.: Chapter 36: Forest and Rangeland Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1600 et seq.: Chapter 36: Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: 16...

  18. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  19. The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab March 26, 2015 The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide By the end of the century, the...

  20. Configuration Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-27

    The purpose of this standard is to define the objectives of a configuration management process for DOE nuclear facilities (including activities and operations), and to provide detailed examples and supplementary guidance on methods of achieving those objectives. Configuration management is a disciplined process that involves both management and technical direction to establish and document the design requirements nd the physical configuration of the nuclear facility and to ensure that they remain consistent with each other and the documentation.

  1. Senior Management - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Senior Management Who We Are JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance & Advisory Boards Operations & Administration Who we are Overview JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Our Achievements Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Our People Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance &

  2. Data Management Policy The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Policy The guidelines below describe Data Management procedures, processes and resources that need to be understood by both user projects and in-house research. 1. Limited data management resources. The CNMS has limited data storage resources and storage capacity varies depending upon the instruments used. User data stored at CNMS will only be retained up to three months past the termination date of a user project. There is no lifetime retention. Users are expected to migrate their

  3. Office of Personnel Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Personnel Management October 2014 Questions & Answers 1 Pathways Programs 5 CFR Parts 213, 302, 315, and 362 Questions and Answers Background Executive Order 13562 Recruiting and Hiring Students and Recent Graduates dated December 27, 2010, authorized two new excepted service hiring authorities and consolidated them with a revised Presidential Management Fellows Program to establish the Pathways Programs for students and recent graduates. The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM)

  4. Effects of overstory composition and prescribed fire on fuel loading across a heterogeneous managed landscape in the southeastern USA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    In the southeastern USA, land use history, forest management and natural geomorphic features have created heterogeneous fuel loads. This apparent temporal and spatial variation in fuel loads make it difficult to reliably assess potential fire behavior from remotely sensed canopy variables to determine risk and to prescribe treatments. We examined this variation by exploring the relationships between overstory forest vegetation attributes, recent fire history, and selected surface fuel components across an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape. Measurements of dead and live vegetation components of surface fuels were obtained from 624 permanent plots, or about 1 plot per 100 ha of forest cover. Within forest vegetation groups, we modeled the relationship between individual surface fuel components and overstory stand age, basal area, site quality and recent fire history, then stochastically predicted fuel loads across the landscape using the same linkage variables. The fraction of the plot variation, i.e., R2, explained by predictive models for individual fuel components ranged from 0.05 to 0.66 for dead fuels and 0.03 to 0.97 for live fuels in pine dominated vegetation groups. Stand age and basal area were generally more important than recent fire history for predicting fuel loads. Mapped fuel loads using these regressor variables showed a very heterogeneous landscape even at the scale of a few square kilometers. The mapped patterns corresponded to stand based forest management disturbances that are reflected in age, basal area, and fire history. Recent fire history was significant in explaining variation in litter and duff biomass. Stand basal area was positively and consistently related to dead fuel biomass in most groups and was present in many predictive equations. Patterns in live fuel biomass were related to recent fire history, but the patterns were not consistent among forest vegetation groups. Age and basal area were related to live fuels in a complex manner that is likely confounded with periodic disturbances that disrupt stand dynamics. This study complements earlier hazardous fuels research in the southeastern USA, and indicates that succession, disturbance, site quality and decomposition interact with forest management practices to create variable spatial and temporal conditions. The inclusion of additional land use, disturbance history, and soil-topographic variables coupled to improved sampling methods may increase precision and subsequent fuel mapping.

  5. High Performance Energy Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Performance Energy Management Reduce energy use and meet your business objectives By applying continuous improvement practices similar to Lean and Six Sigma, the BPA Energy Smart...

  6. Asset Management Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency and Fish and Wildlife asset categories. The CAB, in consultation with affected business units and the Asset Management Executive Sponsors, determines whether and how...

  7. Information Exchange management site

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-01

    Django site used to manage the approved information exchanges (content models) after creation and public comment at https://github.com/usgin-models.

  8. SLURM Resource Manager is

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SLURM Resource Manager is Coming to NERSC - 1 - Helen He NUG Meeting, 11/06/2015 What is SLURM * In simple word, SLURM is a workload manager, or a batch scheduler. * SLURM stands for Simple Linux U?lity for Resource Management. * SLURM unites the cluster resource management (such as Torque) and job scheduling (such as Moab) into one system. Avoids inter-tool complexity. * As of June 2015, SLURM is used in 6 of the top 10 computers, including the #1 system, Tianhe-2, with over 3M cores. - 2 -

  9. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  10. Acquisition Career Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-05-14

    The order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Management Program. Supersedes DOE O 361.1B.

  11. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  12. Environmental Management System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of those activities, prioritizing improvements, and measuring results. May 30, 2012 The continuous improvement cycle Our Environmental Management System encourages continuous...

  13. Parallel integrated thermal management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennion, Kevin; Thornton, Matthew

    2014-08-19

    Embodiments discussed herein are directed to managing the heat content of two vehicle subsystems through a single coolant loop having parallel branches for each subsystem.

  14. ORISE: Peer Review Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management Man participating in a peer review The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) ensures that scientific reviews are conducted in a professional manner and...

  15. Logistics Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Petroleum Reserves (OPR) manages the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) and is responsible for establishing policies, goals, and priorities for the...

  16. Digital Data Management Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental understanding of matter, energy, space, and time. Plans HAWC gamma-Ray Observatory Data Management Plan (pdf)...

  17. Dreissenid Mussel Prevention, Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management, Research, Coordination, and Outreach for the Columbia River Basin A Roadmap to Make Strategic Investments in Federal Columbia River Power System and Technology...

  18. Dreissenid Mussel Prevention, Management, ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management, Research, Coordination, and Outreach for the Columbia River Basin A Roadmap to Make Strategic Investments in Federal Columbia River Power System and Technology...

  19. Radioactive Waste Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1984-02-06

    To establish policies and guidelines by which the Department of Energy (DOE) manages tis radioactive waste, waste byproducts, and radioactively contaminated surplus facilities.

  20. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-02-03

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for implementing and maintaining a cost-effective records management program throughout the Department of Energy.

  1. Change Control Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-29

    The Guide provides a suggested approach and uniform guidance for managing project and contract changes through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3B. No cancellation.

  2. Records Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-07-26

    The Order sets forth requirements and responsibilities for establishing and maintaining a program for the efficient and economical management of records and information assets.

  3. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the ... Etiquette 4 Workplace Charging Challenge Carrie Giles carrie.giles@icfi.com Learn More: ...

  4. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  5. Management Control Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-04-18

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy Management Control Program. Cancels DOE O 413.1. Canceled by DOE O 413.1B.

  6. E M Environmental Management

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    E M Environmental Management safety performance cleanup closure EM RECOVERY ACT TOP LINE MESSAGES * The Department estimates the 6 billion Recovery Act investment has allowed us...

  7. International Commitments Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-11-18

    This Order establishes a process to manage the Department's International Commitments under the administrative direction of the Office of Policy and International Affairs. No cancellation.

  8. Financial Management Handbook - Complete

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Systems and Organization Chapter 4-4 ... Non-Integrated Site Facility Management Contractors & Non-Facility ... Employee Data via DBLink GL Journal Entries via SFTP ...

  9. Project Management Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Version) See Figure 3-3. 19. Administrative Controls 1. Provisions relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to...

  10. NREL Announces Management Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies such as solar energy, wind energy, fuels development and building research. ... He will manage service and support activities such environment, safety and health, finance ...

  11. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  12. Grants Management Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Science manages fundamental research programs in basic energy sciences, biological and environmental sciences, and computational science. In addition, the Office of Science is the...

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADVISORY BOARD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The mercury issue involves both surface water and subsurface issues. The team is working with Dr. David Watson, the Oversight Manager at the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences ...

  14. Advisory Committee Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-10-22

    The Manual provides detailed DOE requirements, responsibilities, processes, and procedures for the establishment, operation, and management of advisory committees. Supersedes DOE M 510.1-1.

  15. Information Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-21

    This revised Order is needed to clarify the roles and responsibilities, policies, and procedures for effectively managing IT investments to ensure mission success.

  16. Comprehensive Emergency Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-11-02

    The Order establishes policy and assigns roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System. Supersedes DOE O 151.1B.

  17. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and...

  18. Management's Discussion & Analysis Profile

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adjusted Net Revenue is net revenue after removing the effects of certain debt management actions, in particular the Debt Service Reassignment, from prior years. These debt...

  19. Asset Management Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Asset-Management-Strategies Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives...

  20. REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI Citation Details In-Document Search Title: REGULATION OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND WATER USE IN A OZARK FOREST: PROPOSING A NEW STRATEGICALLY LOCATED AMERIFLUX TOWER SITE IN MISSOURI by June 14, 2004, the MOFLUX site was fully

  1. High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Biomass Program Review High Tonnage Forest Biomass Production Systems from Southern Pine Energy Plantations DE-EE0001036 S. Taylor (Auburn University), R. Rummer (USDA Forest Service), F. Corley (Corley Land Services), G. Somerville (Tigercat), O. Fasina (Auburn University), J. Fulton (Auburn University), T. McDonald (Auburn University), M. Smidt (Auburn University), T. Gallagher (Auburn University) This project is designing and demonstrating a high productivity system to harvest, process,

  2. Integrated Safety Management and Environmental Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section Number Title Effective Date Supersedes Environment, Health, and Safety 6-1 Integrated Safety Management and Environmental Management 11/20/13 2-1 dated 10/01/12 6-1 dated 07/14/09 6-2 dated 11/15/12 6-3 dated 01/11/10 6-4 dated 12/13/12 6-5 dated 09/29/09 6-1-(11/2013), Page 1 of 2 Policy In support of NREL's mission and values, the Laboratory commits to: * Conducting work in a manner that protects the health and safety of workers and the public, Laboratory property, and the environment

  3. Characteristics of tropical cyclones in high-resolution models in the present climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Sobel, Adam H.; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Daehyun; Kumar, Arun; Lim, Young -Kwon; Reed, Kevin A.; Roberts, Malcolm J.; Scoccimarro, Enrico; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Wang, Hui; Zhao, Ming; Henderson, Naomi

    2014-12-05

    The global characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) simulated by several climate models are analyzed and compared with observations. The global climate models were forced by the same sea surface temperature (SST) fields in two types of experiments, using climatological SST and interannually varying SST. TC tracks and intensities are derived from each model's output fields by the group who ran that model, using their own preferred tracking scheme; the study considers the combination of model and tracking scheme as a single modeling system, and compares the properties derived from the different systems. Overall, the observed geographic distribution of global TC frequency was reasonably well reproduced. As expected, with the exception of one model, intensities of the simulated TC were lower than in observations, to a degree that varies considerably across models.

  4. Tuberous legumes: preliminary evaluation of tropical Australian and introduced species as fuel crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxon, E.C.

    1981-04-01

    The evaluation of native and introduced legumes with starch-storing roots or tubers was undertaken to test whether plants traditionally collected as food by Australian aborigines might have a role in the development of crops for liquid fuel production (by fermentation of carbohydrates to ethanol). Tuberous-rooted legumes from overseas were planted at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, division of Tropical Crops and Pastures, Kimberley Research Station, Western Australia (15/sup 0/39'S, 128/sup 0/42'E) in December 1974, March 1978 and February 1979. Roots from the latter plantings were harvested in June 1979. Native plant material was collected during visits to aboriginal communities in the Kimberleys between April and June 1979. The native and introduced specimens were analyzed for fermentable carbohydrate and protein content. Several native plants appear more promising than introduced species as liquid fuel crops.

  5. Characteristics of tropical cyclones in high-resolution models in the present climate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shaevitz, Daniel A.; Camargo, Suzana J.; Sobel, Adam H.; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Daehyun; Kumar, Arun; LaRow, Timothy E.; Lim, Young -Kwon; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Reed, Kevin A.; et al

    2014-12-05

    The global characteristics of tropical cyclones (TCs) simulated by several climate models are analyzed and compared with observations. The global climate models were forced by the same sea surface temperature (SST) fields in two types of experiments, using climatological SST and interannually varying SST. TC tracks and intensities are derived from each model's output fields by the group who ran that model, using their own preferred tracking scheme; the study considers the combination of model and tracking scheme as a single modeling system, and compares the properties derived from the different systems. Overall, the observed geographic distribution of global TCmore » frequency was reasonably well reproduced. As expected, with the exception of one model, intensities of the simulated TC were lower than in observations, to a degree that varies considerably across models.« less

  6. DOE Office of Environmental Management Project and Contract Management

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improvement Timeline | Department of Energy Acquisition » DOE Office of Environmental Management Project and Contract Management Improvement Timeline DOE Office of Environmental Management Project and Contract Management Improvement Timeline Improving DOE contract and project management is a top priority of the Department's senior management and entire organization. View some highlights of EM's improvement actions here. PDF icon DOE Office of Environmental Management Contract and Project

  7. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  8. Assessing Impacts of Climate Change on Forests: The State of Biological Modeling

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Dale, V. H.; Rauscher, H. M.

    1993-04-06

    Models that address the impacts to forests of climate change are reviewed by four levels of biological organization: global, regional or landscape, community, and tree. The models are compared as to their ability to assess changes in greenhouse gas flux, land use, maps of forest type or species composition, forest resource productivity, forest health, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat. No one model can address all of these impacts, but landscape transition models and regional vegetation and land-use models consider the largest number of impacts. Developing landscape vegetation dynamics models of functional groups is suggested as a means to integrate the theory of both landscape ecology and individual tree responses to climate change. Risk assessment methodologies can be adapted to deal with the impacts of climate change at various spatial and temporal scales. Four areas of research development are identified: (1) linking socioeconomic and ecologic models, (2) interfacing forest models at different scales, (3) obtaining data on susceptibility of trees and forest to changes in climate and disturbance regimes, and (4) relating information from different scales.

  9. Environmental surveillance of the Palos Park Forest Preserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golchert, N.W.; Sedlet, J.; Hayes, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    This is the second report describing an ongoing environmental surveillance program conducted at the Palos Park Forest Preserve near Chicago, Illinois. The Preserve was a site of a nuclear research laboratory (Site A) from 1943 to 1956 and a radioactive waste burial site (Plot M) from 1944 to 1949. An extensive radiological characterization of the site was conducted from February 1976 to August 1977, and tritium in the form of water was found to be the only radionuclide that migrated from the nuclear facilities. The results were published in US Department of Energy Report DOE/EV-0005/7. The present report summarizes the earlier findings and gives the detailed results of the work from August 1977 through December 1981. The vertical and horizontal distribution of tritium within the glacial till was determined from measurements of tritium in soil moisture. Chemical and radiochemical analyses were performed on a number of wells in the area. Tritiated water continued to be the only species that was observed to have migrated from the Plot M area. Migration from the Site A area was not observed. The concentration of tritium at the Red Gate Woods well, 1200 ft downgradient from Plot M, continued to show the seasonal fluctuations of high concentrations in the winter and low concentrations in the summer. Monitoring of the Palos Park area is continuing.

  10. GHG Management Institute curriculum | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inventories * 302 GHG Accounting for Forest Projects * 311 GHG Accounting for Landfill Methane Projects (forthcoming) * 312 GHG Accounting for Coalmine Methane Projects * 321 GHG...

  11. Comprehensive Emergency Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-11-01

    To establish policy and to assign and describe roles and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Emergency Management System. The Emergency Management System provides the framework for development, coordination, control, and direction of all emergency planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, response, and recovery actions. Canceled by DOE O 151.1B. Cancels DOE O 151.1.

  12. Risk Management Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-16

    This Guide provides a framework for identifying and managing key technical, schedule, and cost risks through applying the requirements of DOE O 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, dated 7-28-06. Canceled by DOE G 413.3-7A, dated 1-12-11. Does not cancel other directives.

  13. Procurement and Materials Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement and Materials Management U.S. Department of Energy | Who We Are | Current Requests for Proposal | Requests for Information | Expression of Interest | Subcontractor Information | Small Business Home Washington River Protection Solutions | Hanford.gov | Energy.gov Procurement and Materials Management Small Business Resources Small Business Calendar Terms & Conditions Procedures to Subcontractors Instructions Forms Vendor Registration Solicitations Small Bus. Events Procedures

  14. Metadata management staging system

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-08-01

    Django application providing a user-interface for building a file and metadata management system. An evolution of our Node.js and CouchDb metadata management system. This one focuses on server functionality and uses a well-documented, rational and REST-ful API for data access.

  15. Integrated Landscape Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 23, 2015 Ian Bonner Idaho National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Sustainability Technology Area 4.2.1.20 Integrated Landscape Management 2 | Bioenergy Technologies Office PROJECT GOAL * OBJECTIVE - Develop model based innovative landscape design methods that estimate increased biomass availability, improve soil, water, and air quality, and reduce grower losses through subfield management decisions.

  16. Information Collection Management Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-10-11

    This Order sets forth DOE requirements and responsibilities for implementing the information collection management provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 and the Office of Management and Budgets implementing regulation Controlling Paperwork Burdens on the Public, as contained in 5 CFR 1320. No cancellation.

  17. Integrated Safety Management (ISM)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrated Safety Management provides a platform for active sharing of the ISM-related documents, tools, and processes being utilized across the Department to accomplish the goals of ISM. You'll find archival documents and procedures as well as information on the very latest innovative approaches being undertaken to improve safety management.

  18. Energy Management Webinar Series

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boost your knowledge on how to implement an energy management system through this four-part webinar series from the Superior Energy Performance program. Each webinar introduces various elements of the ISO 50001 energy management standard—based on the Plan-Do-Check-Act approach—and the associated steps of DOE's eGuide for ISO 50001 software tool.

  19. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel. The BNL Fire Department is the lead on wildfire suppression. However, the BNL Natural Resource Manager will be assigned to all wildland fires as technical resource advisor.

  20. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.