Sample records for tropical ecosystem model

  1. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  2. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  3. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://ocean.mit.edu/~mick/Downloads.html #12;What is the marine ecosystem limited Light limited Reveals environmental regulation of primary production #12;coccolithophores (CaCO3 of organic carbon Current Question: What regulatesC

  4. Volume 3 Number 2 2011 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Volume 3 · Number 2 · 2011 55 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with Adaptive Agents* Joseph Engler1 of innovation and its place in a global economy or ecosystem is presented. The model utilizes simple agents-based model of an innovation ecosystem is presented. The ecosystem is considered as an environment in which

  5. ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need canopy structure and partitions dynamic rates for a tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI structure and partitions dynamic rates in a tropical forest. In Review. Journal of Ecology. #12;PPA model

  6. Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data Dileep George, 1 Kazumi Saito, 2 Pat Langley, 1. Ecosystem models are used to interpret and predict the in- teractions of species and their environment. In this paper, we address the task of inducing ecosystem models from background knowledge and time- series data

  7. TROPICAL DEFORESTATION MODELLING: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT PREDICTIVE APPROACHES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TROPICAL DEFORESTATION MODELLING: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT PREDICTIVE APPROACHES-time discretisation; Remote Sensing; Neural Networks; Markov Chains; MCE; Dinamica; Risk management; Deforestation

  8. Intelligent spatial ecosystem modeling using parallel processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, T.; Costanza, R. (Maryland International Inst. for Ecological Economics, Solomons (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial modeling of ecosystems is essential if one's modeling goals include developing a relatively realistic description of past behavior and predictions of the impacts of alternative management policies on future ecosystem behavior. Development of these models has been limited in the past by the large amount of input data required and the difficulty of even large mainframe serial computers in dealing with large spatial arrays. These two limitations have begun to erode with the increasing availability of remote sensing data and GIS systems to manipulate it, and the development of parallel computer systems which allow computation of large, complex, spatial arrays. Although many forms of dynamic spatial modeling are highly amenable to parallel processing, the primary focus in this project is on process-based landscape models. These models simulate spatial structure by first compartmentalizing the landscape into some geometric design and then describing flows within compartments and spatial processes between compartments according to location-specific algorithms. The authors are currently building and running parallel spatial models at the regional scale for the Patuxent River region in Maryland, the Everglades in Florida, and Barataria Basin in Louisiana. The authors are also planning a project to construct a series of spatially explicit linked ecological and economic simulation models aimed at assessing the long-term potential impacts of global climate change.

  9. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  10. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  11. Carbon accumulation of tropical peatlands over millennia: a modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the global carbon cycle by storing about 40­90 Gt C in peat. Over the past several decades, tropical with lowering the water table and peat burning, releasing large amounts of carbon stored in peat the Holocene Peat Model (HPM), which has been successfully applied to northern temperate peatlands. Tropical

  12. Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature profiles using inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature ecosystem carbon budgets from micrometeorological methods remains nighttime ecosystem respiration theory to infer the two components of ecosystem respiration (aboveground and forest floor) from measured

  13. Chesapeake Bay ecosystem modeling program. Technical synthesis report 1993-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, S.B.; Boynton, W.R.; Kemp, W.M.; Wetzel, R.; Bartleson, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Contents: Ecosystem models for management; Ecosystem regession models; Patuxent River Sav-Littoral Ecosystem Process Model; Lower Chesapeake Bay Polyhaline Sav Model; Emergent Intertidal Marsh Process Model; Plankton-Benthos Ecosystem Process Model; Fish Bioenergetics Models; Linking Water Quality with Fish Habitat; Data Visualization; Publications and Scientific Presentations Resulting From This Research.

  14. Rehabilitation of Tropical Rainforest Ecosystems 24 25 October 2011, Kuala Lumpur

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    level in the Asian region is still high. Moreover, after the nuclear power plant accident caused phase activities in 2001 and has been monitoring atmospheric deposition and its impacts on ecosystems, dry deposition, soil and vegetation, and inland aquatic environment has been mostly conducted

  15. Oxygen: A Fundamental Property Regulating Pelagic Ecosystem Structure in the Coastal Southeastern Tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxygen: A Fundamental Property Regulating Pelagic Ecosystem Structure in the Coastal Southeastern questions about the role of temperature. Here we investigate the role of oxygen in structuring fish that the distribution of oxygen in the ocean is changing with uncertain consequences. Methodology/Principal Findings

  16. Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography model version 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography] Insights into how terrestrial ecosystems affect the Earth's response to changes in climate and rising contain detailed mechanistic representations of biological processes affecting terrestrial ecosystems

  17. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  18. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  19. An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

  20. ELSEVIER Ecological Economics 14(1995) 143-159 Ecological economic modeling and valuation of ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -economicmodeling; Ecosystem models; Patuxent River basin; Spatial modeling; Land use 1. Introduction In its report, Reducing of ecological systems. Startingwith an existing spatially articulated ecosystem model of the Pqtuxent River

  1. Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models Y. H; published 6 March 2003. [1] The behavior of three ecosystem models is analyzed for upwelling off the Oregon coast as a function of the number of model components. The first ecosystem model includes dissolved

  2. Interhemispheric Teleconnections from Tropical Heat Sources in Intermediate and Simple Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the prescribed tropical heating in both intensity and geographical extent and by inducing remote precipitation anomalies by interaction with the basic state. 1. Introduction Tropical heat sources can remotely influenceInterhemispheric Teleconnections from Tropical Heat Sources in Intermediate and Simple Models XUAN

  3. A Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    the local and remote stationary responses of the atmosphere to tropical heating anomalies is describedA Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies and forced with a localized heating for illustration. In the tropics, the baroclinic responses are familiar

  4. Initial design for a fish bioenergetics model of Pacific saury coupled to a lower trophic ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initial design for a fish bioenergetics model of Pacific saury coupled to a lower trophic ecosystem-0001, Japan ABSTRACT A fish bioenergetics model coupled with an ecosystem model was developed to reproduce ecosystem model were input to the bioenergetics model of saury as the prey densities. Although certain model

  5. Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Jian-Ping

    Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling Y. H. Spitz 2005; accepted 19 August 2005; published 22 October 2005. [1] Three-dimensional ecosystem response-based ecosystem model coupled to a high-resolution circulation model. We investigate, in particular, the influence

  6. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  7. Feedbacks in a simple prognostic tropical climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, S.C. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple four-cell model of the tropical atmosphere in equilibrium with its boundaries is introduced, which can support a variable diabatic circulation and prognostic temperature and humidity profiles. The model is used to predict atmospheric perturbations away from the observed base state. Prognostic variables include radiation, surface fluxes, and dynamic transports, with temperature and water vapor levels determined by conservation constraints. The model includes a specially developed water vapor scheme that performs favorably compared with observations. The model is used to simulate the local and nonlocal sensitivity of the tropical maritime atmosphere to changes in surface temperature and other boundary conditions at very large horizontal scales. The main findings are as follows: (i) The sensitivity of boundary layer convergence to sea surface temperature (SST) variations depends on the behavior of convective heating over cooler regions and may be overestimated by heuristic models that ignore or oversimplify thermodynamic and radiative constraints; (ii) The maintenance of humidity equilibrium over weakly convective areas is modulated by local radiative feedback; (iii) Evaporation feedbacks on SST may be overestimated by heuristic arguments that do not carefully treat atmospheric water transport. An explanation for the constant-relative humidity behavior of general circulation models under climate changes is also offered based on the results.

  8. Viability Kernel for Ecosystem Management Models Eladio Oca~na Anaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Viability Kernel for Ecosystem Management Models Eladio Oca~na Anaya Michel De Lara Ricardo task in general. We study the viability of nonlinear generic ecosystem models under preservation in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem. Key words: control theory; state constraints; viability; predator

  9. The trophic-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The trophic-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses Agrocampus ouest / INRA Ecologie et Sante´ des Ecosyste`mes, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, CS 84215, 35042 Rennes-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses. ­ ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi

  10. How important is diversity for capturing environmental-change responses in ecosystem models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowe, A. E. F.

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic plankton diversity. Diversity, however, may affect functions such as primary production ...

  11. Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

  12. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  13. Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recanati, Catherine

    Sensitivity of an Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model to the Coupling Method : Study of Tropical Cyclone) in a realistic configuration aiming at simulating the genesis and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica and Oceanic Coupled Models (AOCMs) which account for important air-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations

  14. Final Progress Report [Testing Climate Model Simulations of Tropical Cirrus Lifecycles: A Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soden, Brian J

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project integrates ARM data sets with satellite observations and model simulations to improve the representation of tropical cloud systems in climate models. We focus on describing and understanding relevant features of the lifecycle of tropical cirrus cloud systems using an innovative method which combines the Eulerian-based ARM measurements with Lagrangian information from geostationary satellites.

  15. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rivers: implications for ecosystem restoration: Final reportto CALFED. Ecosystem Restoration Program Agreement No.support tools to guide ecosystem restoration planning and

  16. Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensitivity of Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models to the Coupling Method : Example of Tropical Cyclone and propagation of tropical cyclone Erica. Sensitiv- ity tests to the coupling method are carried out-sea feedbacks. Separate integrations of the Corresponding author. Phone: +33 (0)4 76 51 48 60 Fax: +33 (0)4 76

  17. The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ¯ux , * J O S E P H P . M C F A D D E N ² and F . S T U A R T C H A P I N I I I ² 2 *The Ecosystems Center ecosystem CO2-exchange data along a transect in northern Alaska. We use an extant process-based model

  18. A coupled model study of the remote influence of enso on tropical Atlantic sst variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yue

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the tropical Atlantic response to the remote El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing, a Reduced Physics Â? Coupled Global Circulation Model (RP-CGCM) is developed, and four experiments are carried out. ...

  19. Meso-scale eects of tropical deforestation in Amazonia: preparatory LBA modelling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Meso-scale eects of tropical deforestation in Amazonia: preparatory LBA modelling studies A. J forest is good, above deforested areas (pasture) poor. The models' underestimate of the temperature Modelling studies with general circulation models have shown that large-scale deforestation of the Amazon

  20. Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Link, Percy Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

  1. [10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

  2. Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 105131 Tropical deforestation in Madagascar: analysis using hierarchical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Ecological Modelling 185 (2005) 105­131 Tropical deforestation in Madagascar: analysis using­effect relationships for deforestation at various scales has proven difficult even when rates of deforestation appear approach to develop a novel deforestation model for the eastern wet forested zone of Madagascar, a global

  3. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  4. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  5. Tropical Ecosystem and Soil Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    (CO2) Atmosphere (N2 is 80%) Ultimate source Ocean Parent rock material (via evaporation & recon · ENERGY Organisms need: Atmosphere (CO2) Atmosphere (N2 is 80%) Ultimate source Ocean Parent rock material, ...) · Water · ENERGY Organisms need: Atmosphere (CO2) Atmosphere (N2 is 80%) Ultimate source Ocean Parent rock

  6. Modeling vertical beta-diversity in tropical butterfly communities Thomas R. Walla, Steinar Engen, Philip J. DeVries and Russell Lande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devries, Philip J.

    Modeling vertical beta-diversity in tropical butterfly communities Thomas R. Walla, Steinar Engen vertical beta- diversity in tropical butterfly communities. Á/ Oikos 107: 610Á/618. We present a novel of structure present. Beta-diversity (MacArthur

  7. Demographic noise and resilience in a semi-arid ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Realpe-Gomez, John; Galla, Tobias; McKane, Alan J; Rietkerk, Max

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scarcity of water characterizing drylands forces vegetation to adopt appropriate survival strategies. Some of these generate water-vegetation feedback mechanisms that can lead to spatial self-organisation of vegetation. To date these phenomena have mostly been studied with models representing plants by a density of biomass, varying continuously in time and space. Such models disregard the discrete nature of plant individuals and their intrinsically stochastic behaviour. These features give rise to demographic noise, which can influence the qualitative dynamics of ecosystem models. In the present work we explore the effects of demographic noise on the resilience of a model semi-arid ecosystem. We introduce a spatial stochastic eco-hydrological hybrid model in which plants are modelled as discrete entities subject to stochastic dynamical rules, while the dynamics of surface and soil water are described by continuous variables. The model has a deterministic approximation very similar to previous continuous m...

  8. Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

  9. Applying the Patuxent Landscape Unit Model to human dominated ecosystems: the case of agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Applying the Patuxent Landscape Unit Model to human dominated ecosystems: the case of agriculture to be formulated in a general enough way to simulate all habitat elements within the landscape. Within the Patuxent River watershed, human dominated land uses, such as agriculture and urban land, are already 50

  10. A Multi-Dimensional Service Chain ecosystem model Frdrique Biennier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Multi-Dimensional Service Chain ecosystem model Frédérique Biennier1 , Régis Aubry1 , Youakim: these FP6 and FP7 projects results provide a consistent environment (including design, methods into account business constraints. To overcome this limit, we propose a multi-dimensional service-chain

  11. Ecological Modelling 174 (2004) 6784 Fuzzy pattern recognition of circadian cycles in ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecological Modelling 174 (2004) 67­84 Fuzzy pattern recognition of circadian cycles in ecosystems S: Pattern recognition; Decision support systems; Fuzzy systems; Eutrophication; Phytoplankton; Wastewater pattern recognition techniques. The algorithm is organised in three parts: in the first, typical patterns

  12. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  13. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  14. Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachnik, Justin Paul

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a series of work related to the representation of the Hadley circulation (HC) in atmospheric reanalyses and general circulation models (GCMs), with connections to the underlying tropical and subtropical cloud systems...

  15. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the simulation of tropical precipitation by the Community Climate Model, Version 3, developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. For an evaluation of the annual cycle of precipitation, ...

  16. Effect of primary productivity and vertical mixing on PCB dynamics in planktonic model ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millard, E.S.; Minns, C.K.; Charlton, C.C.; Halfon, E. (Canada Centre for Inland Waters, Burlington, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiolabeled polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) [[sup 14]C]-Aroclor 1242 were added to large planktonic model ecosystems. Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of turbulent mixing and primary productivity on fate and transport of PCBs. High productivity increased the proportion of added PCBs that were adsorbed to particulate matter and sedimented. Retention of added PCBs within the model ecosystems increased the recovery in a budget of added PCBs. Volatilization losses increased at the high-mixing and low-productivity level. Highest recovery was with a high productivity-low mixing treatment. A third experiment was conducted in which PCBs adsorbed to clay were added to the hypolimnion of one model ecosystem. Results confirmed that PCBs unaccounted for in a budget of PCBs added to the epilimnion in the same manner were lost due to volatilization. A linear-fate model was developed to describe trends in PCB concentrations as well as fate of the added PCBs. Model parameters and predicted fate of added PCBs agreed closely with observed results. The model indicated that an unmeasured pool of particulate PCBs that were probably adsorbed to colloids and fine particulates was operationally measured with the soluble fraction.

  17. An overview of APECOSM, a spatialized mass balanced ``Apex Predators ECOSystem Model" to study physiologically structured tuna population dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    physiologically structured tuna population dynamics in their ecosystem Olivier Maury * IRD (Institut de Recherche by the organisms are modelled according to the DEB (dynamic energy budget) theory (Kooijmann, 2000) and the size-structured- mental variability and fishing on the structure and dynamics of pe- lagic ecosystems. APECOSM uses a size

  18. Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and inform DOE's energy decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models to increase results are incorporated into Earth system models to improve climate projections. e overarching goal of TES is to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models

  19. Atmospheric Horizontal Resolution Affects Tropical Climate Variability in Coupled Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna, Italy S. BEHERA, J.-J. LUO, AND S. MASSON Frontier Research model, SINTEX-Frontier (SINTEX-F), developed jointly at Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia that the Corresponding author address: A. Navarra, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Via Donato Creti 12

  20. A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Guy [EMBL-EBI] [EMBL-EBI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    EMBL-EBI's Guy Cochrane on "A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  1. A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Guy [EMBL-EBI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    EMBL-EBI's Guy Cochrane on "A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  2. Modeling High-Impact Weather and Climate: Lessons From a Tropical Cyclone Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Done, James; Holland, Greg; Bruyere, Cindy; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Suzuki-Parker, Asuka

    2013-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the societal impact of a weather event increases with the rarity of the event, our current ability to assess extreme events and their impacts is limited by not only rarity but also by current model fidelity and a lack of understanding of the underlying physical processes. This challenge is driving fresh approaches to assess high-impact weather and climate. Recent lessons learned in modeling high-impact weather and climate are presented using the case of tropical cyclones as an illustrative example. Through examples using the Nested Regional Climate Model to dynamically downscale large-scale climate data the need to treat bias in the driving data is illustrated. Domain size, location, and resolution are also shown to be critical and should be guided by the need to: include relevant regional climate physical processes; resolve key impact parameters; and to accurately simulate the response to changes in external forcing. The notion of sufficient model resolution is introduced together with the added value in combining dynamical and statistical assessments to fill out the parent distribution of high-impact parameters. Finally, through the example of a tropical cyclone damage index, direct impact assessments are resented as powerful tools that distill complex datasets into concise statements on likely impact, and as highly effective communication devices.

  3. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

  4. Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Projects Leads Nancy...

  5. EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Soil Composition http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebnewssoil-composition

  6. Statistical representation of clouds in a regional model and the impact on the diurnal cycle of convection during Tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    water static energy. Application of the parameterization in a regional model during a 30-day period of the Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides (TROCCINOX) experiment over southern Brazil demonstrates of cloud mass at tropospheric inversions (e.g., trade wind inversion, melting level, tropo- pause

  7. Photosynthesis of a temperate fallow C3 herbaceous ecosystem: measurements and model simulations at the leaf and canopy levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    - 1 - Photosynthesis of a temperate fallow C3 herbaceous ecosystem: measurements and model, 31057 Toulouse Cedex 1, France Abstract The objectives of the study were to characterize photosynthesis of temperate fallow C3 herbaceous species and examine the performance of a simple photosynthesis model (based

  8. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationCA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationBay–Delta Program. 2000. Ecosystem Restoration Program:

  9. Global well-posedness of strong solutions to a tropical climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jinkai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem to the TROPIC CLIMATE MODEL derived by Frierson-Majda-Pauluis in [Comm. Math. Sci, Vol. 2 (2004)] which is a coupled system of the barotropic and the first baroclinic modes of the velocity and the typical midtropospheric temperature. The system considered in this paper has viscosities in the momentum equations, but no diffusivity in the temperature equation. We establish here the global well-posedness of strong solutions to this model. In proving the global existence of strong solutions, to overcome the difficulty caused by the absence of the diffusivity in the temperature equation, we introduce a new velocity $w$ (called the pseudo baroclinic velocity), which has more regularities than the original baroclinic mode of the velocity. An auxiliary function $\\phi$, which looks like the effective viscous flux for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, is also introduced to obtain the $L^\\infty$ bound of the temperature. Regarding the uniqueness, we use the idea of p...

  10. The signature of ozone depletion on tropical temperature trends, as revealed by their seasonal cycle in model integrations with single forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    [1] The effect of ozone depletion on temperature trends in the tropical lower stratosphere is explored with an atmospheric general circulation model, and directly contrasted to the effect of increased greenhouse gases and ...

  11. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  12. Integrated observations and modelling of greenhouse gas budgets at the ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    at the ecosystem level in The Netherlands Eddy Moors | Han Dolman | Jan Elbers Arjan Hensen | Jan Duyzer | Petra at the ecosystem level in The Netherlands Authors Eddy Moors 6, Han Dolman 5, Jan Elbers 6, Arjan Hensen 1, Jan Kroon Elmar Veenendaal | Ko van Huissteden Fred Bosveld | Cor Jacobs | Wilma Jans Peter Kuikman | Linda

  13. Measuring and Modeling Interactions Between Groundwater, Soil Moisture, and Plant Transpiration in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    , reactive flow and transport code to describe the application of food-processing wastewater to agricultural in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems by Gretchen Rose Miller B.S. (University of Missouri, Rolla) 2002 M Transpiration in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems © 2009 by Gretchen Rose Miller #12;1 Abstract Measuring

  14. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  15. Sesso Temtica: Uso de satlites, modelos de ecossistemas e inventrios florestais para apoio s polticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    políticas de REDD+ (Informing REDD+ services with satellite, ecosystem models, and forest inventory a calibrated carbon cycle model, ORCHIDEE, using optical and radar remote sensing and forest inventory data

  16. Tropical forest responses to increasing [CO2]: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cernusak, Lucas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Winter, Klaus [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Dalling, James [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Holtum, Joseph [James Cook University; Jaramillo, Carlos [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Korner, Christian [University of Basel; Leakey, Andrew D.B. [University of Illinois; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Poulter, Benjamin [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Turner, Benjamin [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute; Wright, S. Joseph [Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elevated atmospheric [CO2] (ca) will undoubtedly affect the metabolism of tropical forests worldwide; however, critical aspects of how tropical forests will respond remain largely unknown. Here we review the current state of knowledge about physiological and ecological responses, with the aim of providing a framework that can help to guide future experimental research. Modelling studies have indicated that elevated ca can potentially stimulate photosynthesis more in the tropics than at higher latitudes, because suppression of photorespiration by elevated ca increases with temperature. However, canopy leaves in tropical forests could also potentially reach a high temperature threshold under elevated ca that will moderate the rise in photosynthesis. Belowground responses, including fine root production, nutrient foraging, and soil organic matter processing, will be especially important to the integrated ecosystem response to elevated CO2. Water-use efficiency will increase as ca rises, potentially impacting upon soil moisture status and nutrient availability. Recruitment may be differentially altered for some functional groups, potentially decreasing ecosystem carbon storage. Whole-forest CO2 enrichment experiments are urgently needed to test predictions of tropical forest functioning under elevated ca. Smaller scale experiments in the understory and in gaps would also be informative, and could provide stepping stones toward stand-scale manipulations.

  17. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

  18. Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 218 -229, December 2008 A coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model for I-D and 3-D applica-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinese Journal of Polar Science, Vol. 19, No.2, 218 - 229, December 2008 A coupled ice and Chukchi Seas is strongly influenced by the annual cycle of sea ice. Here pelagic and sea ice algal ecosystems coexist and interact with each other. Ecosystem modeling of sea ice associated phytoplankton

  19. Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones: An Investigation Using Convection-permitting Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, Sourav; Chen, J. P.; Cotton, William R.

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of aerosols effect on two tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal are investigated using a convection permitting model with two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the TCs are hardly affected by the changing aerosol types, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol contribution. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level which, in turn, forces the lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to other two perturbations of aerosol. All these studies show the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of CCN. The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian sub-continent, this study suggests pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

  20. Model ecosystem determination of the metabolic and environmental fate of tetrachloro-DDT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.B.; Metcalf, R.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A potential hazardous waste site investigation was conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency to determine whether ground water, surface water, or area soils and sediments were contaminated as a result of waster water discharges or improper solid waste disposal practices of a pesticide manufacturer. One of the compounds discharged into the environment was 1,1,1,2-tetrachloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane, commonly referred to as tetrachloro-DDT. Unlike a great many of the DDT analogs, tetrachloro-DDT has come under only limited scrutiny, mainly because it was dismissed as having poor insecticidal properties relative to DDT and other analogs. Its metabolism in ingesting organisms, and degradative pathways in the environment have consequently been left uncertain. This model ecosystem study was undertaken to examine the unanswered questions concerning the metabolic and environmental fate of tetrachloro-DDT. The relevance of this study pertains to disposal practices of pesticide manufacturers who use tetrachloro-DDT as a product precursor.

  1. The Dynamics and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason A.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through methodology unique for tropical cyclones in peer-reviewed literature, this study explores how the dynamics of moist convection affects the predictability of tropical cyclogenesis. Mesoscale models are used to perform short-range ensemble...

  2. A spatial ecosystem and populations dynamics model (SEAPODYM) Modeling of tuna and tuna-like populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Habitat modeling Movements Advection­diffusion Tuna Katsuwonus pelamis Thunnus obesus Pacific Ocean a b with two tuna species showing different biological characteristics, skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis

  3. The Political Economy of Deforestation in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Robin

    Tropical deforestation accounts for almost one-fifth of greenhouse gas emissions and threatens the world’s most diverse ecosystems. Much of this deforestation is driven by illegal logging. We use novel satellite data that ...

  4. The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Niño related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform­convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

  5. Atmospheric Feedbacks over the Tropical Pacific in Observations and Atmospheric General Circulation Models: An Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    that the bias is likely linked to a weaker relationship between the short-wave cloud forcing is a long-standing tropical bias in the CGCMs. The early hypotheses attribute this problem to the errors;4 errors may induce excessive equatorial upwelling upon coupling. The surface heating from the atmospheric

  6. Methane Fluxes Between Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere at Northern High Latitudes During the Past Century: A retrospective analysis with a process-based biogeochemistry model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in high-latitude soils of the Northern Hemisphere have changed over the past century ...

  7. Characterizing the performance of ecosystem models across time scales: A spectral analysis of the North American Carbon Program site-level synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietze, Michael; Vargas, Rodrigo; Richardson, Andrew D.; Stoy, Paul C.; Barr, Alan; Anderson, Ryan; Arain, M. A.; Baker, Ian; Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Jing Ming; Ciais, Philippe; Flanagan, Lawrence; Gough, Christopher; Grant, R. F.; Hollinger, D.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kucharik, Chris; Lafleur, Peter; Liu, Shuguang; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Luo, Yiqi; Munger, J. W.; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin; Price, David T.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Riley, William; Sahoo, Alok Kumar; Schaefer, Kevin; Suyker, Andrew E.; Tian, Hanqin; Tonitto, Christine; Verbeeck, Hans; Verma, Shashi B.; Wang, Weifeng; Weng, Ensheng

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem models are important tools for diagnosing the carbon cycle and projecting its behavior across space and time. Most assessments of model performance occur at individual temporal scales, but ecosystems respond to drivers at multiple time scales. Spectral methods, such as wavelet analyses, present an alternative approach that enables the identification of the dominant time scales contributing to model performance in the frequency domain. In this study we used wavelet analyses to synthesize the performance of twenty-one ecosystem models at nine eddy-covariance towers as part of the North American Carbon Program's site-level inter-comparison. This study expands upon previous single-site and single-model analyses to determine what patterns of model failure are consistent across a diverse range of models and sites.

  8. Please cite as: Kemp, W.M., W.R. Boynton and A.J. Hermann, 1995. Ecosystem modeling and energy analysis of submerged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Please cite as: Kemp, W.M., W.R. Boynton and A.J. Hermann, 1995. Ecosystem modeling and energy MODELING A N D ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION IN CHESAPEAI, and benthic microalgae). This model, which has been calibrated and venfied against independent data sets

  9. Using Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean RONG-HUA ZHANG State Key Laboratory of Satellite OceanUsing Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Environment Dynamics, Second Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Hangzhou, Zhejiang

  10. Simulating the connections of ENSO and the rainfall regime of East Africa and the upper Blue Nile region using a climate model of the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaroug, M. A. H.

    We simulate the observed statistical relationship between ENSO and the rainfall regime of the upper Blue Nile using the tropical-band version of the regional climate model RegCM4 (or Reg-TB). An ensemble of nine simulations ...

  11. ENVS 4000, Spring (Jan-Apr) 2006 Monitoring Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    systems depend on ecosystems for food, materials, energy, purification, enjoyment, a sense of place challenges. Adaptive ecosystem management depends on knowledge of system states and dynamics, and therefore and models for ecosystem monitoring and management, including Environmental Benefit Analysis, Environmental

  12. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  13. Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

  14. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  15. GCM simulation of the tropical mixing barriers in the lower stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yongyun

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-resolution SKYHI general circulation model is used to simulate tropical mixing behavior and to investigate mixing barriers in the tropical lower stratosphere. Results show that during the solstitial seasons a tropical weak-mixing zone...

  16. Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

  17. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam April 21- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model

  18. Modeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas with Data Assimilation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Marine Science and Technology, Haoguo Hu - CILER, University of Michigan Overview This project will useModeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas-Investigators: Leo Oey - Princeton University, Tel Ezer - Old Dominion University, K. Mizobata - Tokyo University

  19. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    German, Donovan P.

    , accounting for the response of microbial communities to environmental parameters in Earth system models may

  20. Comprehensive ecosystem model-experiment synthesis using multiple datasets at two temperate forest free-air CO2 enrichment experiments: model performance and compensating biases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Anthony P [ORNL] [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL] [ORNL; DeKauwe, Martin G [Macquarie University] [Macquarie University; Medlyn, Belinda [Macquarie University] [Macquarie University; Zaehle, S [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry] [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Asao, Shinichi [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Dietze, Michael [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hickler, Thomas [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany] [Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany; Huntinford, Chris [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom] [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, United Kingdom; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Lomas, Mark [University of Sheffield] [University of Sheffield; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; McCarthy, Heather R [Duke University] [Duke University; Parton, William [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Prentice, I. Collin [Macquarie University] [Macquarie University; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Shusen [Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS)] [Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS); Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research] [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Warlind, David [Lund University, Sweden] [Lund University, Sweden; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman] [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL] [ORNL; Woodward, F. Ian [University of Sheffield] [University of Sheffield; Oren, Ram [Duke University] [Duke University; Norby, Richard J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a remarkable wealth of data to test the sensitivities of terrestrial ecosystem models (TEMs). In this study, a broad set of 11 TEMs were compared to 22 years of data from two contrasting FACE experiments in temperate forests of the south eastern US the evergreen Duke Forest and the deciduous Oak Ridge forest. We evaluated the models' ability to reproduce observed net primary productivity (NPP), transpiration and Leaf Area index (LAI) in ambient CO2 treatments. Encouragingly, many models simulated annual NPP and transpiration within observed uncertainty. Daily transpiration model errors were often related to errors in leaf area phenology and peak LAI. Our analysis demonstrates that the simulation of LAI often drives the simulation of transpiration and hence there is a need to adopt the most appropriate of hypothesis driven methods to simulate and predict LAI. Of the three competing hypotheses determining peak LAI (1) optimisation to maximise carbon export, (2) increasing SLA with canopy depth and (3) the pipe model the pipe model produced LAI closest to the observations. Modelled phenology was either prescribed or based on broader empirical calibrations to climate. In some cases, simulation accuracy was achieved through compensating biases in component variables. For example, NPP accuracy was sometimes achieved with counter-balancing biases in nitrogen use efficiency and nitrogen uptake. Combined analysis of parallel measurements aides the identification of offsetting biases; without which over-confidence in model abilities to predict ecosystem function may emerge, potentially leading to erroneous predictions of change under future climates.

  1. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  2. Leaf traits and foliar CO2 exchange in a Peruvian tropical montane cloud forest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Weg, Marjan

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCF) are one of the most fascinating, but least understood ecosystems in the world, and the interest in the carbon (C) cycle of TMCFs with regard to carbon sequestration and storage ...

  3. Development and testing of parameterizations for continental and tropical ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties in GCM and mesoscale models. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heymsfield, A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this research was to exploit measurements in clouds sampled during several field programs, especially from experiments in tropical regions, in a four-component study to develop and validate cloud parameterizations for general circulation models, emphasizing ice clouds. The components were: (1) parameterization of basic properties of mid- and upper-tropospheric clouds, such as condensed water content, primarily with respect to cirrus from tropical areas; (2) the second component was to develop parameterizations which express cloud radiative properties in terms of basic cloud microphysical properties, dealing primarily with tropical oceanic cirrus clouds and continental thunderstorm anvils, but also including altocumulus clouds; (3) the third component was to validate the parameterizations through use of ground-based measurements calibrated using existing and planned in-situ measurements of cloud microphysical properties and bulk radiative properties, as well as time-resolved data collected over extended periods of time; (4) the fourth component was to implement the parameterizations in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM) II or in the NOAA-GFDL model (by L. Donner GFDL) and to perform sensitivity studies.

  4. Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management

  5. Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    ). A small change in these radiative effects of water vapor and clouds can either offset or greatly amplify global warming, we find no significant correlation between the inter-model variations in the cloud albedo feedback during ENSO and the inter-model variations in the cloud albedo feedback during global warming

  6. Geomorphology and ecohydrology of water-limited ecosystems : a modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Daniel B. G. (Daniel Benjamin Gardiner), 1976-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of vegetation in shaping landforms and how these landforms respond to disturbances are the subjects of this work. A numerical model is developed to help develop a mechanistic understanding of the hydrological, ...

  7. Modeling the Direct and Indirect Effects of Atmospheric Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Keun-Hee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    precipitation even in the weakest hurricane. When comparing the model performance between aerosol indirect and direct effect by ensemble experiments, the adjustment time of the circulation due to modification of the aerosol radiative forcing by aerosol layers...

  8. Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

  9. Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Stem respiration in tropical forests along an elevation gradient in the Amazon and Andes A M A N D metabolism, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide as a by-product. Little is known of how autotrophic respiration components vary across environmental gradients, particularly in tropical ecosystems. Here, we

  10. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  11. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetlands has negative impacts on ecosystem services (i.e. ,economically quanti?able ecosystem bene?ts, such as rechargeincluded the loss of natural ecosystem functions and their

  12. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  13. Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeal, Karen Sue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

  14. Human behaviour and ecosystem services in sustainable farming landscapes : an agent-based model of socio-ecological systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillem, Eléonore E.

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    change (LUCC) brings uncertainty in the quantity and quality of ecosystem services supplied for the future generations. The processes of LUCC have been explored using top-down approaches at global and regional level but more recent methods have focused...

  15. Investigating Tropical Deforestation Using Two-Stage Spatially Misaligned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Investigating Tropical Deforestation Using Two-Stage Spatially Misaligned Regression Models Deepak Deforestation in the tropics has been a major concern in conservationscience for more than 20 years. Estimates of tropical deforestation over the past few decades have shown an alarming accelerationin forest lost. Concern

  16. Y. Tang W.W. Hsieh Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: II ENSO prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    skills shifted eastward in the 1990s. A nonlinear canonical correlation analysis of the zonal wind stress have to be parameterized; (3) proper initialization of the coupled model is difficult; and (4) the cost understanding of the coupled mechanisms and lower computing cost than a full CGCM (Blanke et al. 1997), and (3

  17. Mathematics 136 Calculus 2 Lab Day 3: Environmental Modeling (Tropical Forests Forever?)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    , 2014 Goals The logistic differential equation (1) dQ dt = kQ 1 - Q M can be used to model any quantity the greatest amount of plant material per unit area. This is often referred to as the plant biomass. Biomass, to simplify, plant biomass will be measured by the carbon content of the plants. The mean plant biomass on 1

  18. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  19. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model National Center for Atmospheric Research,* Boulder, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    into the boundary layer. The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation can be viewed in the context mixing above the boundary layer. In the latter, ventilation weakens the eyewall entropy front, resulting, an oscillatory intensity regime materializes and is tied to transient convective bursts and strong downdrafts

  20. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  1. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  2. ATS 742 Tropical Meteorology-Fall 2013 Instructor: Professor Eric Maloney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Tropical budgets: heat, moisture, moist static energy, kinetic/potential energy Week 3: Weak tropical temperature gradients. Week 4: How convection heats the tropical atmosphere. Hot towers and other vertical heating modes Week 5: Modeling tropical precipitation with the moist static energy (MSE) budget Week 6

  3. Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise businesses that interacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

    Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise ecosystems. We introduce the idea of creating an eco- system from a number of smart devices. This ecosystem is categorised as a micro ecosystem rather than macro ecosystem. The proposed model of this digital ecosystem

  4. Tropical cyclone-ocea~ interactions Isaac Ginis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Hurricane Andrew in 1992 exceeded 60 with nearly $30 billion damage. Tropical cyclone modeling efforts over of hurricane track predictions over the last 30 years, in contrast there has been no perceptible improvement

  5. Elements of tropical Pacific decadal variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuckar, Neven-Stjepan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the period from 1965 to 1999. Model results show Pacific basin decadal changes, including the prominent 1976-77 climate shift, in agreement with previous research. The reanalysis indicates an evolution intrinsic to the tropical Pacific which propagates...

  6. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystem Science SHARE Ecosystem Science Project the fate and function of ecosystems as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to...

  7. Accuracy of small footprint airborne LiDAR in its predictions of tropical moist forest stand structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    . Introduction Tropical forests offer a broad range of ecosystem services, from carbon sequestration to potential valuation of biodiversity compo- nents. But, forest conversion in the tropics has dramatically altered and verifiable", and this prompted renewed interest in providing standardized and reproducible methods of forest

  8. Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    their representation in Earth system models. Tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle

  9. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food production affect the land...

  10. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  11. 5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction To understand the behaviour of an ecosystem it is important to know its resource requirements. Though numerous resources are mobilized models have attempted to represent the growth of entire plants or of entire ecosystems based on physical

  12. Tropical Underdevelopment Jeffrey D. Sachs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mobilizing energy resources in tropical economies is emphasized as another significant contributor measure of economic development. Tropical and landlocked regions, by contrast ­ such as Bolivia, Chad

  13. Equilibrium Tropical Cyclone Size in an Idealized State of Axisymmetric Radiative–Convective Equilibrium*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavas, Daniel R.

    Tropical cyclone size remains an unsolved problem in tropical meteorology, yet size plays a significant role in modulating damage. This work employs the Bryan cloud model (CM1) to systematically explore the sensitivity of ...

  14. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  15. alpine lake ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Lake Ecosystem Modelling: an Integrated Approach INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic eutrophication of water bodies and its consequences are of concern especially to Assess...

  16. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  17. Oceanic Origins of Southwest Tropical Atlantic Biases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhao

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic General Circulation Model POP Parallel Ocean Program ROMS Regional Ocean Modeling System SEC South Equatorial Current SECC South Equatorial Counter Current SETA Southeast Tropical Atlantic SEUC South Equatorial UnderCurrent SLP Sea Level... SST bias ................................................................................... 5 1.3.2 SST bias in SETA ...................................................................................... 8 1.4 Objectives and Approach...

  18. Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Frederick

    Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange David M. Blersch dblersch Shade of Blue and You 21 September 2010 #12;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange UB's ERIE Program www

  19. Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : . Computer models show skill in forecasting tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures one to two years in advance for Pacific Ocean observations that are the foundation of skillful ENSO forecasts: Moored buoys Drifting buoysaaaaaa Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific . Has a periodicity of 2­7 years

  20. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  1. Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Model as Applied to Supplementation : Model Description, User Guide, and Theoretical Documentation for the Model Introduced in the Summary Report Series on Supplementation in the Columbia Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lestelle, Lawrence C.; Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the formulation and operation of a model designed to assist in planning supplementation projects. It also has application in examining a broader array of questions related to natural fish production and stock restoration. The model is referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) Model because of its utility in helping to diagnose and identify possible treatments to be applied to natural production problems for salmonids. It was developed through the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP), which was an initiative to help coordinate supplementation planning in the Columbia Basin. The model is operated within the spreadsheet environment of Quattro Pro using a system of customized menus. No experience with spreadsheet macros is required to operate it. As currently configured, the model should only be applied to spring chinook; modifications are required to apply it to fall chinook and other species. The purpose of the model is to enable managers to consider possible outcomes of supplementation under different sets of assumptions about the natural production system and the integration of supplementation fish into that system. It was designed to help assess uncertainty and the relative risks and benefits of alternative supplementation strategies. The model is a tool to facilitate both planning and learning; it is not a predictive model. This document consists of three principal parts. Part I provides a description of the model. Part II is a guide to running the model. Part III provides theoretical documentation. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of many of the model's parameters is provided in the appendix. This analysis was used to test whether the model produces consistent and reasonable results and to assess the relative effects of specific parameter inputs on outcome.

  2. Regional feedbacks among fire, climate, and tropical deforestation William A. Hoffmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Regional feedbacks among fire, climate, and tropical deforestation William A. Hoffmann1 December 2003. [1] Numerous studies with general circulation models suggest that tropical deforestation can to estimate the effect of tropical deforestation on fire risk through the McArthur forest fire danger index

  3. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  4. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

  5. Proper orthogonal decomposition approach and error estimation of mixed finite element methods for the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luo a , Jiang Zhu b , Ruiwen Wang b , I.M. Navon c Available online 8 May 2007 Abstract In this paper, the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model and the insufficient knowledge of air­sea exchange processes. The tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

  6. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  7. Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program AK-SG-99-01, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program · AK-SG-99-01, 1999 Ecosystem Considerations and the Limitations of Ecosystem Models in Fisheries Management: Insights for the implementation of ecosystem approaches. The major criticism of single- species models is that they cannot predict

  8. Monetising cultural ecosystem services? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinci, Igor

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT In the context of increasing degradation of the environment, the economic valuation of ecosystem services represents an attempt to quantify the contribution of nature to human wellbeing. This approach has been ...

  9. Methane efflux from boreal wetlands: Theory and testing of the ecosystem model Ecosys with chamber and tower flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    and tower flux measurements R. F. Grant Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta, Edmonton tower at a beaver pond in the BOREAS Northern Study Area. Spatial and temporal variation of CH4 effluxes in the model encompassed that measured by surface chambers and the flux tower. Both modeled and measured CH4

  10. Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliaga, Daniel G.

    Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes Michel Abdul Massih Philip Jarvis Purdue University Daniel G. Aliaga Carlos A. Vanegas a) b) c) Figure 1: This example demonstrates the need for urban ecosystems. The image in a) shows a terrain occupied by a wild ecosystem and b) displays the same ecosystem grown over

  11. Journal ofApplied F O RUM 4116? 174 Conservation and biological monitoring of tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    , Washington, DC 20013-7012, USA; ^Department of Plant Biology, University of Minnesota, 220 Biological approaches that could generate a constant stream of data from tropical ecosystems. We argue that data provide high-quality biological specimens and ecological informa- tion; statistical power will be high due

  12. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  13. A Model-Based Assessment and Design of a Tropical Indian Ocean Mooring Array PETER R. OKE AND ANDREAS SCHILLER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oke, Peter

    circulation model. This system produces maps of the depth of the 20°C isotherm (D20), representing interannual devices such as bottle casts or CTDs. Today, most ocean observations are gathered by satellite- borne

  14. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems D. A. NEHER Department of Biology, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA; E-mail: dneher, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i

  15. Surface Fluxes and Tropical Intraseasonal Variability: a Reassessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA 2 Department whose essential features -- its existence, energetics, spatial and temporal scales -- remain so be fundamental similarities in their energetics. General circulation models (GCMs) simulate tropical

  16. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  17. Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World www.wiley.com  The world’s ecosystems have always been 

  18. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  19. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  20. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  1. Productivity, detritus formation and grazing of the seagrass Thalassia testudinum Banks in Caribbean meadows: a simulative numerical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria-Rueda, Carlos Humberto

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The amount of organic carbon yield by the leaves of Thalassia compares well, and in many cases surpasses, average values reported for tropical rain forest and reef ecosystems and intensively cultivated agroecosystems such as hybrid corn, rice... course of my graduate studies. I extend my grat1tude to Dr, Rezneat Darnell, co-chairman of the committee, who initiated my interest in the top1c of ecosystem modeling. His constructive crit1cism and contr1bution to this work is fully appreciated. I...

  2. DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

  3. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  4. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  5. P h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n The Tropical Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature Bias in Coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    numerical model experiments using the NCAR community earth system model version 1 (CESM1). The tropic al

  6. The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Michael

    The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Australia. THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICS SCHOOL OF PHYSICS Abstract Ecosystems are systems. Ecosystems operate autonomously, by a process of self-regulation. Their flows of energy mean they cannot

  7. Influence of the tropical Atlantic versus the tropical Pacific on Caribbean rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Taylor Department of Physics, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica David B. Enfield Physical); KEYWORDS: Caribbean, rainfall, El Nin~o, tropical Atlantic, warm pool, model Citation: Taylor, M. A., D. B the two equatorial oceanic basins. Oppositely signed SST anomalies in the NINO3 region and the central

  8. Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses and error subspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, John J.

    Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses the seasonal ecosystem dynamics of the Lagoon of Venice and provide guidance on the monitoring and management stochastic ecosystem modeling components are developed to represent prior uncertainties in the Lagoon

  9. IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant on the ecosystem, even though the available scientific literature is scanty and somewhat contradictory and other infestants. A simple mathematical model may explain these data. 1 IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM

  10. An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 that an e-learning ecosystem is the next generation e- learning. However, the current models of e-learning ecosystems lack the support of underlying infrastructures, which can dynamically allocate the required

  11. Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a great array Desert steppe Desert ecosystems MainMain ecosystems of Mongolia High mountain ecosystemsHigh mountain ecosystems High mountain occupies 4.48% of the total territory of Mongolia. Mountain forest ecosystems

  12. The impact of upper tropospheric friction and Gill-type heating on the location and strength of the Tropical Easterly Jet: Idealized physics in a dry Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Samrat

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) with idealized and complete physics has been used to evaluate the Tropical Easterly Jet (TEJ) jet. In idealized physics, the role of upper tropospheric friction has been found to be important in getting realistic upper tropospheric zonal wind patterns in response to heating. In idealized physics, the location and strength of the TEJ as a response to Gill heating has been studied. Though the Gill model is considered to be widely successful in capturing the lower tropospheric response, it is found to be inadequate in explaining the location and strength of the upper level TEJ. Heating from the Gill model and realistic upper tropospheric friction does not lead to the formation of a TEJ.

  13. Combating tropical deforestation in Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellek, R.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article outlines the findings of Tropical Forestry Action Plan (TFAP), which was part of an international initiative on tropical deforestation. Ten specific recommendations are addressed. Haiti has lost more than 97% of its forestland, so emphasis should be placed on replenishing the forest cover.

  14. Private Lands, Public Goods: Engaging Landowners in Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferranto, Shasta Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practice: implementing ecosystem management objectives in2009. Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyondthe Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Proceedings of the

  15. Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology? Asking the question, What is tropical ecology? may seem akin to asking questions such as, Who is buried in Grant's tomb? Tropical ecology is the study of the ecology of tropical regions. But so what? Consider these questions: First, what is ecology? What are its

  16. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    dynamics by ecosystem models applied to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau S. Yi,1 N. Li,2 B. Xiang,3 X. Wang,1 B. In ecosystem, permafrost, and hydrology models, the consideration of soil surface temperature is generally and atmospheric factors on the estimation of soil surface temperature for alpine grassland ecosystems

  17. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  18. Global Patterns of Ecological Productivity and Tropical Forest Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    those measurements in addition to climate data to construct a suite of empirical models of NPP productivity (NPP) on a global scale and biomass accumulation across thee tropics. Scientists have been model of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), and its simplicity and relative accuracy has led

  19. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 February 2009 #12;2 #12;3 Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 buildings. By consuming solar energy in the process of evapotranspiration and blocking winter winds

  20. Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

  1. Influence of local and remote SST on North Atlantic tropical cyclone potential intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camargo, Suzana J.

    Influence of local and remote SST on North Atlantic tropical cyclone potential intensity Suzana J of local and remote sea surface temperature (SST) on the tropical cyclone potential intensity in the North Atlantic using a suite of model simulations, while separating the impact of anthropogenic (external

  2. Tropical ozone as an indicator of deep convection Ian Folkins and Christopher Braun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkins, Ian

    Tropical ozone as an indicator of deep convection Ian Folkins and Christopher Braun Department] The climatological ozone profile in the tropics is shaped like an ``S,'' with a minimum at the surface, a maximum. These features can be reproduced by a very simple model whose only free parameter is the mean ozone mixing ratio

  3. The relative importance of tropical variability forced from the North Pacific through ocean pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    forced through the atmosphere? To address this question, in this study we use an anomaly-coupled model), and with coupling con- fined to the Tropics and wind stress and heat fluxes in the North Pacific specified by output impact the tropics through ocean pathways. These two signals are forced by wind stress and surface heat

  4. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE THE DEPARTMENT an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Recommendations for Establishing an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure Foreword The Internet is one of the most

  5. Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Thomas R.

    Whether the characteristics of tropical cyclones have changed or will change in a warming climate — and if so, how — has been the subject of considerable investigation, often with conflicting results. Large amplitude ...

  6. P h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n The Tropical Atlantic Sea Surface Temperature Bias in Coupled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using the NCAR community earth system model version 1 (CESM1). The tropical Atlantic SST bias (simulated

  7. Tropical bases by regular projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hept, Kerstin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the tropical variety $\\mathcal{T}(I)$ of a prime ideal $I$ generated by the polynomials $f_1, ..., f_r$ and revisit the regular projection technique introduced by Bieri and Groves from a computational point of view. In particular, we show that $I$ has a short tropical basis of cardinality at most $r + \\codim I + 1$ at the price of increased degrees, and we provide a computational description of these bases.

  8. Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER, YUQING WANG, AND KEVIN HAMILTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Tropical Cyclone Changes in the Western North Pacific in a Global Warming Scenario MARKUS STOWASSER The influence of global warming on the climatology of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific basin Model version 2 (CCSM2) coupled global climate model. The regional model is first tested in 10 yr

  9. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  10. Role of ocean-atmosphere interactions in tropical cooling during the last glacial maximum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, A.B.G. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)] [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Philander, S.G.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model configured for the Last Glacial Maximum delivered a tropical climate that is much cooler than that produced by atmosphere-only models. The main reason is a decrease in tropical sea surface temperatures, up to 6{degree}C in the western tropical Pacific, which occurs because of two processes. The trade winds induce equatorial upwelling and zonal advection of cold water that further intensify the trade winds, and an exchange of water occurs between the tropical and extratropical Pacific in which the poleward surface flow is balanced by equatorward flow of cold water in the thermocline. Simulated tropical temperature depressions are of the same magnitude as those that have been proposed from recent proxy data. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  12. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  13. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  14. Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith.hanna@naturalengland.org.uk #12;Ecosystem services Constituents of well-beingSupporting­ecologicalprocesses:nutrient cycling:opportunityto achievewhatanindividualvaluesdoingandbeing Simplified from Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2003 #12;Source: MEA (2003) #12;Ecosystems

  15. Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian Hong-An

    Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclone’s intensity. An ...

  16. A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

  17. Estimating tropical cyclone precipitation risk in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    This paper uses a new rainfall algorithm to simulate the long-term tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology in Texas based on synthetic tropical cyclones generated from National Center for Atmospheric Research/National ...

  18. What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons? The overarching goal of Ecosystem Commons is to enhance the use of ecosystem services and related science in conservation at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information

  19. A multi-resolution ensemble study of a tropical urban environment and its interactions with the background regional atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xian-Xiang

    This study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with a single-layer urban canopy model to investigate the urban environment of a tropical city, Singapore. The coupled model was evaluated against available ...

  20. Asian Clinical Tropical Medicine Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Asian Clinical Tropical Medicine Bangkok, Thailand July 21 ­ August 3, 2012 Join the Faculty, and the University of Minnesota as they co-host the fourth Asian Clinical Tropical Medical Course in beautiful Bangkok, Thailand. Healthcare providers with experience and/or a special interest in clinical tropical

  1. Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

  2. Global Ensemble Predictions of 2009's Tropical Cyclones Initialized with an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamill, Tom

    1 Global Ensemble Predictions of 2009's Tropical Cyclones Initialized with an Ensemble Kalman models were initialized with the first 20 members of a 60member ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) using

  3. Tropical cyclones within the sedimentary record : analyzing overwash deposition from event to millennial timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Jonathan Dalrymple

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical cyclone activity over the last 5000 years is investigated using overwash sediments from coastal lagoons on the islands of Vieques, Puerto Rico and Koshikijima, Japan. A simple sediment transport model can reproduce ...

  4. A Mechanistic Study of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Changes on Tropical Atlantic Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Caihong

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . Using this new 2-1/2-layer RGO model as a dynamical tool, a systematic investigation of the role of oceanic processes in controlling tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature (SST) response to Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) changes...

  5. Report of theYokohama 2003 MODELTask Team Workshop to develop a marine ecosystem model of the North Pacific Ocean including pelagic fishes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bioenergetics models were expanded to the population- level and dynamically coupled to the lower trophic levels (LTL) of the NEMURO model. The individual fish bioenergetics model and the one-way coupling to NEMURO (i.e. NEMURO is run first and output is used to force the fish bioenergetics model) are described

  6. Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Fish, Wildlife, Ecosystem Monitoring and Evaluation Manager SUBJECT: Summary of Public and ISAB substitution), wildlife, habitat/ecosystem questions thereby balancing the currently predominant anadromous

  7. Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport,de Nantes JumpEcosystem Japan Co Ltd

  8. Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation by Oswald J. Schmitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation By Oswald J.Oswald J, Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation. Washington:when the protection of the ecosystem also extends outside of

  9. Size structuring of planktonic communities : biological rates and ecosystem dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taniguchi, Darcy Anne Akiko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nutrient enriched ecosystems. Limnology and Oceanographyin the pelagic ecosystem. Helgol. Wiss. Meeresunters. 30:Size-structured planktonic ecosystems: constraints, controls

  10. azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

  11. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  12. Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

  13. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass haÃ?1 yrÃ?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

  14. The tropical double description method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allamigeon, Xavier; Goubault, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a tropical analogue of the classical double description method allowing one to compute an internal representation (in terms of vertices) of a polyhedron defined externally (by inequalities). The heart of the tropical algorithm is a characterization of the extreme points of a polyhedron in terms of a system of constraints which define it. We show that checking the extremality of a point reduces to checking whether there is only one minimal strongly connected component in an hypergraph. The latter problem can be solved in almost linear time, which allows us to eliminate quickly redundant generators. We report extensive tests (including benchmarks from an application to static analysis) showing that the method outperforms experimentally the previous ones by orders of magnitude. The present tools also lead to worst case bounds which improve the ones provided by previous methods.

  15. Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration to restoreTo the extent possible, we need to restore historic conditions on the ecosystem scalehistoric conditions on the ecosystem scale to achieve these goalsto achieve these goals Habitat LossHabitat Loss #12

  16. Abstract--The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Francesco

    Abstract-- The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful emerging inter-company cooperative structures. One of the main advantages of an ecosystem companies of the ecosystem is an essential binding element among them. The intention of this paper

  17. Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services increasingly important in government policy in the last decade. Ecosystem services have also become a significant focus for government following the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA). Human wellbeing is a key

  18. Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittner, Thomas

    Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem ecosystems as a representative example of a geographic object. To achieve this goal we will develop a formalized framework for handling of the structure of ecosystem hierarchies. Our theory will be demonstrated

  19. Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism during of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545; and c Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia) Environmental sensor networks are developing rapidly to as- sess changes in ecosystems and their services. Some

  20. Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead-ing to impairment of natural ecosystem structure and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but coupling that potential with societal demands and eco- nomic feasibility.Valuation of ecosystem goods are ig- nored.Ascribing an economic value to some ecosystem goods and services,by contrastArticles Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead- ing to impairment of natural ecosystem

  1. Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    -Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael Köster · CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael Köster · CIG, TU

  2. Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Toward Predictions that Incorporate, Pocatello, Idaho 83209, USA; 2 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA; 3, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although

  3. essm.tamu.edu of Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    essm.tamu.edu Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life of Ecosystem Science and Management (ESSM) at Texas A&M University invites applications for graduate.D. students whose research will focus on the ecology and management of dryland ecosystems. James M. Carder

  4. Linking ecosystem and parasite Michel Loreau,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    13 CHAPTER 1 Linking ecosystem and parasite ecology Michel Loreau,1 Jacques Roy,2 and David Tilman3 Parasites are rarely considered in ecosystem studies. The current interest in the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, has stimulated the emergence of new synthetic approaches

  5. A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management Ratana Chuenpagdee,1 * Lisa Liguori,2 Dave ABSTRACT Although ecosystem-based management can lead to sustainable resource use, its successful imple the ecosystems with stakeholders' preferences is therefore needed. We propose here a 'Public Sen- timent Index

  6. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  7. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam November the appli- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific

  8. CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT CCLME Inception Workshop 2-3 November 2010. Two possible case studies are presented: the Imraguen social-ecosystem of the Banc d'Arguin National Park, the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate

  9. PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

  10. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments ­ NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report December 31, 2011 A progress Dynamics Model Used to Design Permafrost Simulator 2 Details at a Glance 3 Progress and Accomplishments 3 sample in a sleeve of highly conductive copper foil (shown in red) and then cooling coils placed

  11. affect ecosystem metabolism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike 9 Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: and agricultural ecosystems;...

  12. Tropical and Subtropical Cloud Transitions in Weather and Climate Prediction Models: The GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randall, David A.

    , Paris, France e Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada f, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia i Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia j Department of Earth for the season June­July­August

  13. Developing Model Constraints on Northern Extra-Tropical Carbon Cycling Based on measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, Ralph [UCSD-SIO

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to perform CO2 data syntheses and modeling activities to address two central questions: 1) how much has the seasonal cycle in atmospheric CO2 at northern high latitudes changed since the 1960s, and 2) how well do prognostic biospheric models represent these changes. This project also supported the continuation of the Scripps time series of CO2 isotopes and concentration at ten baseline stations distributed globally.

  14. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  15. Influence of Tropical Tropopause Layer Cooling on Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Susan

    Virtually all metrics of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity show substantial increases over the past two decades. It is argued here that cooling near the tropical tropopause and the associated decrease in tropical cyclone ...

  16. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  17. Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

  18. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry and climate change Manuel R adapt to this change. This paper discusses how tropical forestry practices can contribute to maintaining Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596 JKPWB, Jakarta 10065, Indonesia e-mail: m.guariguata@cgiar.org J. P

  20. Tropical Western Pacific CART Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z SiteManhattan ProjectMayARM-00-005Tropical

  1. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  2. Adler, R. F., H.-Y. M. Yeh, N. Prasad, W.-K. Tao, and J. Simpson, 1991: Microwave simulations of a tropical rainfall system with a three-dimensional cloud model. J.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Haiyan

    : Vertical motion characteristics of tropical cyclones determined with airborne Doppler radial velocity. J­953. Amayenc, P., M. Marzoug, and J. Testud, 1993: Analysis of crossbeam resolution effects in rainfall rate, 1999: On the effect of the melting layer on microwave emission of clouds over the ocean. J. Atmos. Sci

  3. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTriSolarEcosystem

  4. Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Tropical Forests: Ecosystem-Level Patterns and Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cusack, Daniela F.; Silver, Whendee; McDowell, William H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was kept in open plastic containers and maintained nearconditions in open plastic containers Biological Nitrogen

  5. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  6. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  7. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  8. The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex interrelationships, participants in the online ecosystem are deeply interdependent. These participants include consumers; online

  9. VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on and func9on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on Issue: ·Ecosystem condition affects the humans dependent on those ecosystems for life and livelihood. How do changes in ecosystem composition and function correlate with famine, exposure to harmful biotic

  10. Rescuing ecosystems from extinction cascades through compensatory perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagar Sahasrabudhe; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Food-web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and habitat degradation often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions, posing considerable challenges to ecosystem conservation efforts. Here we devise a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions using a predictive modeling framework. We show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal or population suppression of other specific species, which is a counterintuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not evident from local predator-prey relationships. In numerous cases, even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. These compensatory perturbations only exploit resources available in the system, and illustrate the potential of human intervention combined with predictive modeling for ecosystem management.

  11. Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming* JIAN MA change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model globally in response to SST warming. A diagnostic framework is developed based on a linear baroclinic model

  12. Cloud to ground lightning in tropical cyclone: a study of 34 West Atlantic tropical cyclones from 1986-1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coyne, John Michael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricane Tropical Storm Hurricane Hurricane Andrew Charley Arlene Floyd Alberto Chris Keith Allison Chantal Hugo Jerry Marco Ana Bob Fabian ?8 Andrew Danielle Earl Arlene Emily Alberto Beryl Gordon Allison Dean Erin Jerry Opal... Tropical Storm Hurricane Tropical Storm Hurricane Tropical Storm Hurricane Humcane Tropical Storm Hurricane Andrew Charley Arlene Floyd Alberto Chris Keith Allison Chantal Hugo Jerry Marco Ana Bob Fabian ?8 Andrew Danielle Earl...

  13. Stochastic and mesoscopic models for tropical convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences, New York penetrative convection to heights of 5­10 km with associated anvil towers of clouds. Observational data

  14. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 00, M 0, 1999 Huascaran # 18 O as an indicator of tropical climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Rayleigh distillation process, based on source air with a tem­ perature related to the tropical sea surface tropical mountain glaciers is reconsidered using a simple Rayleigh distillation model. It is shown that An and temperature [Dansgaard, 1965]. However, fractionation is a function not of the final temperature of a parcel

  15. Response of South American ecosystems to precipitation variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Bras, Rafael L [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Demography Model 2 is a dynamic ecosystem model and land surface energy balance model. ED2 discretizes landscapes of particular terrain and meteorology into fractional areas of unique disturbance history. Each fraction, defined by a shared vertical soil column and canopy air space, contains a stratum of plant groups unique in functional type, size and number density. The result is a vertically distributed representation of energy transfer and plant dynamics (mortality, productivity, recruitment, disturbance, resource competition, etc) that successfully approximates the behaviour of individual-based vegetation models. In previous exercises simulating Amazonian land surface dynamics with ED2, it was observed that when using grid averaged precipitation as an external forcing the resulting water balance typically over-estimated leaf interception and leaf evaporation while under estimating through-fall and transpiration. To investigate this result, two scenario were conducted in which land surface biophysics and ecosystem demography over the Northern portion of South America are simulated over {approx}200 years: (1) ED2 is forced with grid averaged values taken from the ERA40 reanalysis meteorological dataset; (2) ED2 is forced with ERA40 reanalysis, but with its precipitation re-sampled to reflect statistical qualities of point precipitation found at rain gauge stations in the region. The findings in this study suggest that the equilibrium moisture states and vegetation demography are co-dependent and show sensitivity to temporal variability in precipitation. These sensitivities will need to be accounted for in future projections of coupled climate-ecosystem changes in South America.

  16. Midlevel ventilation's constraint on tropical cyclone intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian Hong-An

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a TC's intensity. An idealized ...

  17. The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason Allen

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    cells and vortices are the respective source of PV production and building blocks for the meso-?-scale vortices. Finally, this thesis discusses issues related to the multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclone formation. For instance, the tracking...

  18. Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest Professor: 2009-present Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT). "Novel ecosystems, rapid change, and no

  19. Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact: current and future measures James the information needs of domain scientists, software component producers, infrastructure providers, and ecosystem conclude with policy recommendations #12;designed to improve insight into the scientific software ecosystem

  20. Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and how of Engineers #12;The Issue The Corps created an ecosystem restoration mission out of congressional authorities ecosystem services enough to reduce national welfare. Implementing projects under that mission requires

  1. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  2. Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report ARB Award No. 98 of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall University Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mangement Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall

  3. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Publishedbythe. ONeill, Harold A. Mooney, Osvaldo E. Sala, Amy J. Symstad, and David Tilman Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Critical processes at the ecosystem level influence

  4. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study National Planning Center of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study Prepared by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus

  5. Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ForReview Only Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer change, community assembly, ecosystem functioning, New Zealand Nothofagus (beech) forests, priority dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities Tadashi Fukami1,2,3 , Ian A

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rodriguez, Sebastien [Laboratoire AIM, Universite Paris 7/CNRS/CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp (France); Le Mouelic, Stephane [Laboratoire de Planetologie et Geodynamique, CNRS, UMR-6112, Universite de Nantes, 44000 Nantes (France); Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clark, Roger [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Nicholson, Phil [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Jaumann, Ralf [Institute of Planetary Exploration, Deutsche Zentrum, fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (Germany)

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  7. aerobic microbial ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Ecosystem Viable Yields CERN Preprints Summary: The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010....

  8. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

  9. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  10. JamesCookUniversity (JCU) es la principal universidad australiana en la zona tropical.JCU ofrece excelencia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    selva tropical, calentamiento global, turismo, medicina tropical y cuidado de la salud pública. JCU es

  11. Beneficial Bees and Pesky Pests: Three Essays on Ecosystem Services to Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Brian James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region considered. Ecosystem service valuations can usefullyand valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services.

  12. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  13. Rapid transport of East Asian pollution to the deep tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashfold, M. J.; Pyle, J. A.; Robinson, A. D.; Nadzir, M. S. M.; Phang, S. M.; Samah, A. A.; Ong, S.; Ung, H. E.; Peng, L. K.; Yong, S. E.; Harris, N. R. P.

    2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ., 2003; Hudman et al., 2004). East Asian pollution has also been shown to affect atmospheric composition further afield,25 in both western North America (Cooper et al., 2010) and Hawaii (Lin et al., 2014). 30707 ACPD 14, 30705–30726, 2014 Rapid transport... – 2010, doi:10.1029/95JD00025, 1996. 30707 Aschmann, J., Sinnhuber, B.-M., Atlas, E. L., and Schauffler, S. M.: Modeling the transport of very short-lived substances into the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere,10 Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 9237...

  14. Seasonal shift in the foraging niche of a tropical avian resident: resource competition at work?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedlicka, J A; Greenberg, R; Perfecto, I; Philpottt, S M; Dietsch, T V

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and migrant birds in Campeche, Mexico. Tropical Ecology 22:a dry tropical forest in Campeche, Mexico and found that

  15. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EB et al (2005) Valuing ecosystem services: toward bettershaping landscapes and ecosystems for human welfare. Scienceanalyzing, and managing ecosystem services. Front Ecol

  16. Payments for Ecosystems Services Findings and Perceptions from the USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Carbon Trading 13 6. Forestry Offsets 15 7. Tropical Deforestation 17 8. Conclusions 20 Glossary 21 of international agreement on tackling deforestation, PES has emerged as one way in which tropical deforestation

  17. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security Globalisation Climate Change Health Water Security Poverty Alleviation Finance Urbanisation Population Energy

  18. Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich Oregon State University, Corvallis. The emerging field of Ecosystem Informatics applies meth- ods from computer science and mathematics to address fundamental and applied problems in the ecosystem sciences. The ecosystem sciences are in the midst

  19. Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity Erika (sent for review July 27, 2009) Society places value on the multiple functions of ecosystems from ecosystems to provide threshold levels of up to eight ecosystem functions simultaneously. Across years

  20. At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    EDITORIAL At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science The science and management of ecosystems to- gether is one of the most dynamic fields of contem- porary ecology. Ecosystem science has disciplines. The scope of ecosystem science encom- passes bounded systems like watersheds as well as spatially

  1. Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures D.A. Neher a,*, J. Wu b understanding of performance among major ecosystem types is necessary before nematode community indices can and agricultural ecosystems; (2) compare nematode community composition among and within ecosystem types and report

  2. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S for the goods and services provided by natural ecosystems. However, relatively few studies have evalu- ated- ity to loss and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. ammonium diversity ecosystem function

  3. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

  4. Impact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    forecast errors of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. Tropical mass­windImpact Assessment of Simulated Doppler Wind Lidars with a Multivariate Variational Assimilation, De Bilt, Netherlands CHRISTOPHE ACCADIA AND PETER SCHL�SSEL European Organisation

  5. Validation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder temperature and moisture profiles over tropical oceans and their impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    ] Tropical cyclones are one of the costliest and deadliest natural disasters in the United States and other the potential for economic damage and deaths. However, due to the lack of the conventional observations over/I satellite rainfall rates results in improvements in hurricane track forecasts in the GEOS global model [Hou

  6. Tropical drought regions in global warming and El Nin~o teleconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Chia

    warming, and the drought regions are particularly likely to have substantial human impacts. [3] VariationsTropical drought regions in global warming and El Nin~o teleconnections J. D. Neelin Department; accepted 19 November 2003; published 24 December 2003. [1] Climate model global warming simulations predict

  7. Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Optimizing turbine withdrawal from a tropical reservoir for improved water quality in downstream using Itezhi-Tezhi Reservoir (Zambia) as a model system aims at defining optimized turbine withdrawal. The water depth of turbine withdrawals was varied in a set of simulations to optimize outflow water quality

  8. The Roles of an Expanding Wind Field and Inertial Stability in Tropical Cyclone Secondary Eyewall Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kossin, James P.

    of Mesoscale Severe Weather (MOE), Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China and Forecasting Model (WRF) is used to simulate secondary eyewall formation (SEF) in a tropical cyclone (TC) on the b plane. The simulated SEF process is accompanied by an outward expansion of kinetic energy

  9. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  10. Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 1 Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects Running Head: Edge effects across ecosystem types Key Words: biomass 59717-3460. hansen@montana.edu 25 February 2008 #12;Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 2

  11. Hurricane Earl, September 1, 2010/NOAA Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    Hurricane Earl, September 1, 2010/NOAA Tropical Cyclones A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT, 6 of which became hurricanes East Pacific Ocean: 15 tropical storms, 8 of which became hurricanes Central Pacific Ocean: 4 tropical storms, 2 of which became hurricanes Over a typical 2-year period, the U

  12. Species Loss and Aboveground Carbon Storage in a Tropical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunker, Daniel E.

    of tropical tree species on carbon storage by simulating 18 possible extinction scenarios within a well-studied 50-hectare tropical forest plot in Panama, which contains 227 tree species. Among extinction as well as the size and longevity of tropical trees. Instead, we simulated species extinctions

  13. LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL TERMS & CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE TERMS & CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS October 2003 #12 in accordance with these Terms and Conditions; · "School" shall mean the London School of Hygiene & Tropical of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine · "School Purchasing Officer" shall mean the Postholder, Mr Keith Flanders

  14. Malaria Centre London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    Malaria Centre London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK October 2014 MalariaCentreReport2012-14LondonSchoolofHygiene&TropicalMedicine #12;#12;Contents Director;2 Director's message London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Despite being preventable and treatable

  15. Patch dynamics in a landscape modified by ecosystem engineers Justin P. Wright, William S. C. Gurney and Clive G. Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patch dynamics in a landscape modified by ecosystem engineers Justin P. Wright, William S. C. We use data collected on the population dynamics of a model engineer, the beaver, to estimate the per

  16. Reducing the uncertainties in carbon emissions fromReducing the uncertainties in carbon emissions from tropical deforestation -the BIOMASS mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from tropical deforestation - the BIOMASS mission Shaun Quegan University of Sheffield x average biomassCem = deforested area x average biomass (UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Good Practice Guide 2003) #12;How well is biomass known? Model Model + SatelliteInterpolation Model

  17. MalariaCentreReport2010-11LondonSchoolofHygiene&TropicalMedicine London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    MalariaCentreReport2010-11LondonSchoolofHygiene&TropicalMedicine London School of Hygiene Dessens; DTM&H students in laboratory 24 February 2011. Copyright London School of Hygiene & Tropical Publications 114 Members 130 Abbreviations 134 #12;2Director's Message London School of Hygiene & Tropical

  18. A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

  19. To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Elizabeth N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    goals and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecosystems 3:Kumar. 2008. Valuation of ecosystem services: A psycho-

  20. 6, 1064910672, 2006 Extinction in tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Stephens et al., 1990). The radiative influence of a given cirrus cloud depends mostly on the delicate balance between its albedo effect and its greenhouse effect. The dominant effect is globally unknownACPD 6, 10649­10672, 2006 Extinction in tropical ice clouds from lidar, Nephelometer V. Noel et al

  1. Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within a larger natural ecosystem. An Eco-Logical guide waschanges in the Great Lakes ecosystem from the introductionfor a State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) Pre-

  2. Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Oran R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management Preparergovernance to assist ecosystem-based management initiativesCurrent Large Marine Ecosystem. This geographic scope

  3. Species diversity and foundation species: Potential indicators of fisheries yields and marine ecosystem functioning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracken, Matthew E.S.; Bracken, B. E.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning: a consensus ofWood. 1995. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: coastalSection 6. Biodiversity and ecosystem function: ecosys- tem

  4. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear dynamics in ecosystem response to climatic change:alteration within ecosystems. Conservation Biology 10: 1163-Paruelo, 1998. The value of ecosystem services: putting the

  5. Hydraulic controls on river biota and the consequence for ecosystem processes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limm, Michael Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of macroinvertebrates in stream ecosystem function. Annualin marine and freshwater ecosystems. Canadian Journal ofanimals in freshwater ecosystems. Annual Review of Ecology

  6. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developinghabitat and essential ecosystems. There are a variety ofdo very little to promote ecosystem sustainability. Concern

  7. An Assessment of Ecosystem Services Provided by Street Trees in Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOONSAWAD, NATTHANIJ

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecologicalquantification and valuation of ecosystem services using i-their valuation Although research on ecosystem services has

  8. Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmosphere Model Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model CCSM-sprabhat.png Global warming will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. In this...

  9. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  10. ADVANCED TROPICAL METEOROLOGY: METR 5453.001 T R 11:30-12:45, NWC 5820

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and their limitations. - Why study the tropics separately? Examples of major tropical circulations on weather. - Easterly waves. 5. Tropical Cyclones What are they? How do they differ from extratropical cyclones cyclones: operations and research. - Predictability aspects of tropical cyclones. - Tropical cyclones

  11. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  12. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  13. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  14. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and spatial distribution of ecosystems and users, the spatial relation- ships between them, and the presence; Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2003). Despite their importance for human well-being, eco- system services

  15. ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

  16. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  17. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Chapin, F. S; Harden, J. W; Neff, J. C; Harmon, M. E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F A. Bazzaz. August 2002 NET ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTION 1993.Net exchange of CO2 in a mid-latitude forest. ScienceN. , and E. -D. Schulze. 1999. Net CO, and H,O fluxes from

  18. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  19. Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line: a Case Study on Digital increases the number of software ecosystems: software platforms developed and maintained in a decentralized YourCast from a single system to a medium- scale ecosystem, we show how organizing it as a multiple

  20. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  1. Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST to Convey Publication Metadata Peter Kraker1, Austria {pkraker, afessl, phoefler, slind}@know-center.at Abstract. In this paper we present an ecosystem of this ecosystem, semantically enriched RSS feeds are used for dissemination. These feeds are complemented

  2. California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy Winter 2014 Mondays, 4 Applying reconciliation ecology to aquatic ecosystems in California. Peter Moyle and Melanie Truan, UC of Chief Counsel, State Water Resources Control Board Feb. 10 Reconciling ecosystem goals for San Francisco

  3. Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Mikls Herdon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Drivers Miklós Herdon1 , Mária Raffai2 , Ádám of the Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE) has been come life in order to build an Internet-based environment in which businesses will be able to interact with each other more efficiently. In a Digital Ecosystem

  4. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 that time, ecosystem restoration has advanced from planning to implementation; progress in research has

  5. Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review SelfStudy Document April, 2008 #12;ii Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review April, 2008 Table of Contents 1.0 Department of Ecosystem Science

  6. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    . Despite this uncertainty, new methods of ecosystem service valuation are suggesting that the economicRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1 benefits of restoration can outweigh costs. Payment for Ecosystem Service schemes could therefore provide

  7. The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

  8. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 1 16 .06.2008 Pastoral system and herders communities Professor D.Dorligsuren Programme Coordinator "Green Gold" Pasture Ecosystem Management Programme Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development, Mongolia "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management

  9. Urban Ecosystems, 7: 267281, 2004 c 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, David

    the quality and utility of urban growth models. Having an empirical basis for making claims about construction. Fine scale design decisions about storm water movement or planting de- sign are unlikelyUrban Ecosystems, 7: 267­281, 2004 c 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured

  10. Ecosystem Service Supply and Vulnerability to Global Change in Europe Dagmar Schrter,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracia, Carlos

    , UK. 5 University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. 6 National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Madrid, Spain. 7. 17 Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. 18 Lund University, Lund, Sweden. 19 ecosystem models and scenarios of climate and land use greenhouse gas concentrations, climate factors

  11. Water and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    model (UPFLOW) suggested that at TS groundwater supplied an importanWater and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas Agropecuaria Parana´, INTA, Ruta 11 km 12.5, 3101 Oro Verde, Argentina 1. Introduction Biogeochemical exchange

  12. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

  13. Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary · Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

  14. Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potvin, Catherine

    Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama S E B) to estimate the carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation; and (3 show the potential for considerable carbon sequestration of tropical afforestation and highlight

  15. australian tropical savannas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results in warmer and drier climate of tropical savannas increases temperatures and wind speeds and decreases precipitation and relative humidity Jackson, Robert B. 2...

  16. Energy saving strategies with personalized ventilation in tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen; Chandra Sekhar, Chandra Sekhar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a personalized ventilation system in the tropics, in:edged-mounted task ventilation system, Indoor Air, Vol. 14 (a chair-based personalized ventilation system, Building and

  17. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStraitTidalEnergyProject,TenaxEnergyTropicalTidalTestCentre,&o...

  18. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox,...

  19. "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road Princeton, NJ 08540-6649 "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones", Chun-Chieh Wu (National Taiwan University) Contact Information Website: Website...

  20. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3 Management Strategies4 5 Andrew James Hansen6 Ecology property, ecosystem energy levels, which,14 while once widely recognized as important, has received little

  1. Comparison of reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Céline; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a comparison of two reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods: the SEEK filter and the R-4D-Var. A hybridization of the two, combining the variational framework and the sequential evolution of covariance matrices, is also preliminarily investigated and assessed in the same experimental conditions. The comparison is performed using the twin-experiment approach on a model of the Tropical Pacific domain. The assimilated data are simulated temperature profiles at the locations of the TAO/TRITON array moorings. It is shown that, in a quasi-linear regime, both methods produce similarly good results. However the hybrid approach provides slightly better results and thus appears as potentially fruitful. In a more non-linear regime, when Tropical Instability Waves develop, the global nature of the variational approach helps control model dynamics better than the sequential approach of the SEEK filter. This aspect is probably enhanced by the context of the experiments in tha...

  2. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 16, 277–and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.

  3. Heating in the tropical atmosphere: what level of detail is critical for accurate MJO simulations in GCMs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heating in the tropical atmosphere: what level of detail is critical for accurate MJO simulations processes that affect heating in some facet. In this study, we examine various heating adjustments in Community Atmospheric Model version 4 (CAM4) to determine what the vertical and horizontal heating

  4. Chapter Number1 Biomass Prediction in Tropical Forests:2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chapter Number1 Biomass Prediction in Tropical Forests:2 The Canopy Grain Approach3 Christophe France9 1. Introduction10 The challenging task of biomass prediction in dense and heterogeneous tropical different forest structures may indeed present similar above ground biomass (AGB) values.13 This is probably

  5. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Andrew-Category 4· Category 4 Hurricane - Winds 131-155 mph. Wall failures in homes and complete roofHurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known

  6. The Maslov dequantization, idempotent and tropical mathematics: A brief introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Litvinov

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a brief introduction to idempotent and tropical mathematics. Tropical mathematics can be treated as a result of the so-called Maslov dequantization of the traditional mathematics over numerical fields as the Planck constant $\\hbar$ tends to zero taking imaginary values.

  7. Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers David L. Carr are significantly associated at the global and regional scales, evidence for population links to deforestation of thought on population­environment theories relevant to deforestation in tropical agricultural frontiers

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Formulation of a tropical town energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ORIGINAL PAPER Formulation of a tropical town energy budget (t-TEB) scheme Hugo Abi Karam & Augusto /Accepted: 18 August 2009 # Springer-Verlag 2009 Abstract This work describes the tropical town energy) as observed in the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ; -22° S; -44° W) in Brazil. Reasoning about

  9. The iron nutrition of tropical foliage plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Harvey Joe

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extraction of Fe from fresh leaves proved to be a good indicator of the Fe status of plants. It consistently gave higher correlations with chlorophyll concentration than other methods tested. Conversely, total Fe analysis on dried leaves did not always... resolve the correct Fe status of the plant. The studies also suggested that P and the ratio of P/0. 1 N HC1-Fe may be important parameters in the diagnosis of Fe status. In a screening of 11 tropical foliage plants, Ficus benj ami ha and Nephroiepi...

  10. UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries | Department ofDepartmentChinaUPDATE: Tropical

  11. ARM - Lesson Plans: Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPastSurfaceTheTropical

  12. The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the Krill Species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a Coupled Ecosystem and Individual Based Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Jeffrey G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows parameters for bioenergetics (ingestion, respiration,robust set of data on the bioenergetics and physiology of E.time in the model. Bioenergetics. The bioenergetics of the

  13. The Influence of Seasonal and Decadal Trends in Coastal Ocean Processes on the Population Biology of the krill species Euphausia pacifica: Results of a coupled ecosystem and individual based modeling study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorman, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    allows parameters for bioenergetics (ingestion, respiration,robust set of data on the bioenergetics and physiology of E.time in the model. Bioenergetics. The bioenergetics of the

  14. Labyrinthine clustering in a spatial rock-paper-scissors ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juul, Jeppe; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial rock-paper-scissors ecosystem, where three species interact cyclically, is a model example of how spatial structure can maintain biodiversity. We here consider such a system for a broad range of interaction rates. When one species grows very slowly, this species and its prey dominate the system by self-organizing into a labyrinthine configuration in which the third species propagates. The cluster size distributions of the two dominating species have heavy tails and the configuration is stabilized through a complex, spatial feedback loop. We introduce a new statistical measure that quantifies the amount of clustering in the spatial system by comparison with its mean field approximation. Hereby, we are able to quantitatively explain how the labyrinthine configuration slows down the dynamics and stabilizes the system.

  15. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  16. On the Wavelength of the Rossby Waves Radiated by Tropical Cyclones KYLE D. KROUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    of tropical cyclones; the theory then predicts the zonal separation distance of such tropical cyclone pairsOn the Wavelength of the Rossby Waves Radiated by Tropical Cyclones KYLE D. KROUSE Department cyclone (TC). In some cases, such disturbances undergo tropical cyclogenesis, resulting in a pair

  17. anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Anthropogenic impacts such as fishing and eutrophication are significant challenges to the sustainable management of aquatic ecosystems....

  18. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  19. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  20. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  1. Tropical Resources Bulletin 1 TROPICALRESOURCESThe Bulletin of the Yale Tropical Resources Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    2012 49 Small Hydropower for Sustainable Energy Development in Northwestern Rural China Jing Ma, MEM, and Boundary-making in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil Alaine Ball, MFS 2012 31 The Political Ecology of Fire in the Andean-Patagonian Region of Argentina Daniela Marini, MFS 2012 II. ENERGY, CARBON, AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

  2. Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance flux–based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance S.Uncertainty of annual net ecosystem productivity estimatedand par- titioning of ecosystem respiration in a southern

  3. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous United States by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Lianhong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defensible annual sums of net ecosystem exchange. Agri. For.contrasting Florida ecosystems. Ecol. App. 9, 936- Clark,S. , 2002. Seasonality of ecosystem respiration and gross

  4. Near-surface remote sensing of canopy architecture and land-atmosphere interactions in an oak savanna ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngryel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007). Reduction of ecosystem productivity and respirationR. (2005). On the separation of net ecosystem exchange intoassimilation and ecosystem respiration: review and improved

  5. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  6. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993), Terrestrial ecosystem production – a process modeland H. L. Gholz (2005), Ecosystem and understory water andestimating per-pixel ecosystem C fluxes. Geophy. Res.

  7. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations in three ecosystems. Marine Biology 82 (2), 199–2009. Subtropical ocean ecosystem structure chang- es forcedrecent collapse of coastal ecosystems. Science 293, 629–637.

  8. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  9. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  10. EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

  11. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  12. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  13. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  14. Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Locatelli Carbon sequestration is recognised as a global ecosystem service (see box on next page such as the global climate (through carbon sequestration), the quantity and quality of water and the force of windsS Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store carbon, forests contribute

  15. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  16. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  17. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  18. Global mapping of ecosystem services and conservation priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and ecosystem services. biodiversity carbon hotspots Global 200 conservation planning Efforts to conserve wild: the goods and services from ecological systems that benefit people (e.g., water purification, carbon sequestration, and crop pollination). These ``ecosystem services'' are currently the focus of intensive re

  19. Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services and poverty and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework' Ecosystem Services, vol 7, pp. 34­45., 10.1016/j.ecoser.2013 services and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework$ Janet A. Fisher a,n , Genevieve Patenaude

  20. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  1. City ecosystem resilience analysis in case of disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asprone, D; Latora, V; Manfredi, G; Nicosia, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the tasks of urban and hazard planning is to mitigate the damages and minimize the costs of the recovery process after catastrophic events. The rapidity and the efficiency of the recovery process are referred to as resilience. A mathematical definition of the resilience of an urban community has not yet identified. In this paper we propose and test a methodology for the assessment of urban resilience a catastrophic event. The idea is to merge the concepts of the engineering resilience and the ecosystem resilience. As first step we suggest a way to model an urban community inside the framework of complex network theory. Hence, to model the city as a whole, we identify hybrid networks, composed by human elements, i.e. the citizens, and physical networks, i.e. urban lifelines and infrastructures. As second step, we define and evaluate a class of efficiency indexes on the hybrid networks. By modelling the disasters of the physical components and the subsequent recovery process, and by measuring the efficie...

  2. annual tropical cyclone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEASONAL AND MONTHLY FORECASTS Geosciences Websites Summary: 10 12.25 8 5.75 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) (96.2) 130 170 170 150 148 100 68 Net Tropical't press us too hard on...

  3. WMO/CAS/WWW SIXTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP on TROPICAL CYCLONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    to Human and Economic Losses Rapporteur: Roger A. Pielke, Jr. Center for Science and Technology Policy.2.3 Tropical cyclone case studies a) India b) Australia c) United States 5.2.4 Differing views of the role

  4. ambiente tropical um: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract. We show that the tropicalization of an irreducible May 18, 2012. 1089 12;1090 DUSTIN CARTWRIGHT AND SAM PAYNE real closed fields with convex valuation Payne, Sam 460...

  5. Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worbs, H. E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of heating and cooling equipment in semi-tropical climates presents some design considerations and limitations not so prevalent in temperate climates. In some cases, the heating season may be non-existent for all practical purposes...

  6. american tropical cyclone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 Cross-equatorial influences of a South American cold surge on the development of two eastern North Pacific tropical cyclones Texas A&M...

  7. The NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a dramatic effect on the overall amount of radiation and heat the Earth's atmosphere contains. These systems Rica in the Gulf of Panama are remarkably intense for tropical maritime systems due to a number

  8. african tropical forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cory C. Cleveland1,4, and Alan R in tropical rain forests may be among the highest on earth. However, data supporting this contention are rare Cleveland, Cory 116 THE WEST...

  9. african tropical forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cory C. Cleveland1,4, and Alan R in tropical rain forests may be among the highest on earth. However, data supporting this contention are rare Cleveland, Cory 116 THE WEST...

  10. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  11. Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday of ecosystem services, its history and rise to prominence. We then explore the ways in which ecosystem services can be valued, measured and monetized by society, across

  12. Let's talk about symbiosis! 9:15 Matthias Horn, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science Welcome Session 1 9:30 Julie Klose Session 2 11:30 Buck Hanson, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science 13:30 Daryl Domman, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

  13. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inputs of nitrogen to forest ecosystems in south- ern Chile:forms, ?uxes, and sources. Ecosystems 3: 590–5.Ecosystems (2009) 12: 417–433 DOI: 10.1007/s10021-009-9232-x

  14. PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division rate functions of planktonic ecosystems has been hypothesized to add stability or persistence planktonic ecosystem, one indirect and two direct. 1) The indirect measure, copepod stage frequency

  15. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1029/2010JG001390, 2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxesdioxide fluxes of black spruce ecosystems in eastern Northof a stand?replacing fire on ecosystem CO 2 exchange of a

  16. Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900 provided by ecosystems, from food and medicines to a stable climate, clean water and storm protection. This course provides an introduction to the ecosystem ecology

  17. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  18. Restoration in the Anacostia river watershed: An ecosystem management case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, L.R.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses various aspects of an ecosystem approach to watershed restoration as illustrated by the Anacostia River Watershed Restoration initiative. This information was derived from a case study conducted as part of the Interagency Ecosystem Management Initiative (IEMI), an outgrowth of a recommendation in the National Performance Review. The purpose of this study was to identify components of the ecosystem approach used in the Anacostia initiative that may be useful to other ecosystem restoration and management initiatives in the future. Water quality and ecological conditions within the Anacostia River watershed have become degraded due to urban and suburban development and other activities in the watershed over the last two centuries. An intergovernmental partnership has been formed to cooperatively assess the specific problems in the basin and to direct and implement restoration efforts. The Anacostia initiative includes a number of cooperative efforts that cross political boundaries, and involves numerous states, local agencies, civic groups, and private individuals in addition to the Federal players. In contrast with some of the other case studies in the IEMI, the Anacostia restoration effort is primarily driven by state and local governments. There has, however, been Federal involvement in the restoration and use of Federal grants. In addition, the establishment of a forum for setting goals, priorities and resolving differences was viewed as essential. Closer relationships between planning and regulatory functions can help advance the restoration goals. Public participation, including education, outreach and involvement, is essential to viable ecosystem initiatives. Comprehensive planning and modeling must be balanced with continuous visible results in order to sustain administrative and public support for the initiative.

  19. The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator for Ag Contamination in Tropical Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator determined in the brown alga Lobophora variegata, using radiotracer techniques. Results indicate that this widely distributed alga could be a useful bioindicator species for surveying silver contamination

  20. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  1. California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, MC 3110, University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor Mediterranean species. In this changed ecosystem, grazing and pastoral practices can benefit native wildlife, and land, livestock, and ecosystem service markets. Keywords: transhumance, oak woodlands, ecosystem

  2. A Functional Test Platform for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yang [ORNL] [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; King, Anthony Wayne [ORNL] [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL] [ORNL; Schuchart, Joseph [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A functional test platform is presented to create direct linkages between site measurements and the process-based ecosystem model within the Community Earth System Models (CESM). The platform consists of three major parts: 1) interactive user interfaces, 2) functional test model and 3) observational datasets. It provides much needed integration interfaces for both field experimentalists and ecosystem modelers to improve the model s representation of ecosystem processes within the CESM framework without large software overhead.

  3. Differential effects of extreme drought on production and respiration: synthesis and modeling analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Z.; Thomey, M. L.; Mowll, W.; Litvak, M.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Collins, S. L.; Pockman, W. T.; Smith, M. D.; Knapp, A. K.; Luo, Y.

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremes in climate may severely impact ecosystem structure and function, with both the magnitude and rate of response differing among ecosystem types and processes. We conducted a modeling analysis of the effects of extreme ...

  4. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  5. Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

  6. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute control during this interval. During the 1st year after harvest, K concentrations tripled in shallow soil

  7. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  8. arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

  9. Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

  10. Stakeholder value network analysis for the mobile services ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind, A. S. (Amarnath Sury)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile services ecosystem has evolved and continues to evolve at a rapid pace adjusting to the different players competing to be part of the value creation and capture. This thesis attempts to capture a holistic view ...

  11. aquatic ecosystem restoration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. A. Aguirre 2006-01-01 124 Climate change as an ecosystem architect: Implications to rare plant ecology, conservation, and restoration CiteSeer Summary: Recent advances in...

  12. agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

  13. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  14. Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kristina Ariel

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

  15. Vertical flux, ecology and dissolution of radiolaria in tropical oceans : implications for the silica cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Kozo

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiolarians which settle through the oceanic water column were recovered from three stations (western Tropical Atlantic-Station E, central Tropical Pacific-P1 and Panama Basin-PB) using PARFLUX sediment traps in moored ...

  16. The Role of Mineralogy in Organic Matter Stabilization in Tropical Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Role of Mineralogy in Organic Matter Stabilization in Tropical Soils Wipawan Thaymuang,1 Irb) and mineralogy. This study investigated the mineral properties and OM stabilization in 12 surface tropical soil

  17. Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard Alex R temperatures (Tb) of the tropical Caribbean lizard Anolis cristatellus at nine sites representing two habitat

  18. LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    1 LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 2000 REQUEST help. NB. The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has the right to ask for clarification

  19. London School of Hygiene & Tropical The School is a world-leading centre for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine The School is a world-leading centre for research information Registry London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Keppel Street London WC1E 7HT UNITED KINGDOM

  20. Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 , Lingzhi believed that an E-Learning ecosystem is the next generation E-Learning. Nowadays, the current trend of Web-Learning ecosystem. A mashup approach to an E-Learning ecosystem enhances the flourish and sustainability of E

  1. Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di.2.1 Ecosystem Resource Dynamics, with Emphasis on Primary Production 11.2.2 Ecosystem Stability, with Emphasis.3.5 Biodiversity Effects on Human Disease Regulation 11.4 Biodiversity Effects on the Provision of Marine Ecosystem

  2. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  3. Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, David. S.

    Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias Department ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially

  4. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem services Forest , and there is consensus that this can decrease ecosystem functioning and services2­7 . It remains unclear, though, whether few8 or many9 of the species in an ecosystem are needed to sustain the provisioning of ecosystem

  5. Ris-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions Merete Bang Selsted Risø-PhD-63(EN) July 2010 #12;Author: Merete Bang Selsted Title: Ecosystem environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems

  6. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America B. D. Amiro,1 A. G, and New Brunswick). Net ecosystem production (NEP) showed a carbon loss from all ecosystems following a standreplacing disturbance, becoming a carbon sink by 20 years for all ecosystems and by 10 years for most

  7. The Lifecycles of Apps in a Social Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloumann, Isabel; Kleinberg, Jon; Wu, Shaomei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apps are emerging as an important form of on-line content, and they combine aspects of Web usage in interesting ways --- they exhibit a rich temporal structure of user adoption and long-term engagement, and they exist in a broader social ecosystem that helps drive these patterns of adoption and engagement. It has been difficult, however, to study apps in their natural setting since this requires a simultaneous analysis of a large set of popular apps and the underlying social network they inhabit. In this work we address this challenge through an analysis of the collection of apps on Facebook Login, developing a novel framework for analyzing both temporal and social properties. At the temporal level, we develop a retention model that represents a user's tendency to return to an app using a very small parameter set. At the social level, we organize the space of apps along two fundamental axes --- popularity and sociality --- and we show how a user's probability of adopting an app depends both on properties of t...

  8. Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (2004–2010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

  9. Tropical Forestry Researchat the USDA Forest Service's Instituteof Pacific Islands Forestry1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Tropical Forestry Researchat the USDA Forest Service's Instituteof Pacific Islands Forestry1 C greater emphasis on tropical forestry management and research was provided by the International Forestry Islands Forestry in Hawaii, the Institute of Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico, and the U S . Forest

  10. Developing versus Nondeveloping Disturbances for Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part I: North Atlantic*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Developing versus Nondeveloping Disturbances for Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part I: North Atlantic the characteristic differences of tropical disturbances that eventually develop into tropical cyclones (TCs) versus for TC genesis in the North Atlantic. When the east and west (separated by 408W) Atlantic are examined

  11. Notes and Correspondence Are Tropical Cyclones Less Effectively Formed by Easterly Waves in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsing-Chang "Mike"

    tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific. By carefully separating easterly waves from the lowerNotes and Correspondence Are Tropical Cyclones Less Effectively Formed by Easterly Waves@iastate.edu #12;1 Abstract It has been observed that the percentage of tropical cyclones originating from easterly

  12. Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity BRIAN TANG AND KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity BRIAN TANG AND KERRY EMANUEL ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hy to assess how ventilation affects tropical cyclone intensity via two possible pathways: the first through

  13. Regional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    in the tropical eastern Pacific and western Indian Ocean than in the tropical western Pacific and eastern IndianRegional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening* HIROKI TOKINAGA, SHANG-PING XIE, AND AXEL TIMMERMANN International Pacific Research Center, SOEST

  14. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review J. Timothy Pennington a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, J. Timothy

    , Peru Abstract The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km2 of ocean between 23.5°N phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific Pacific. Seasonal cycles are weak over much of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, although several

  15. Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2] Eddy diffusivity of the surface velocity field in the tropical Pacific Ocean was estimated using diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2. Results, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10), 3154, doi:10

  16. Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location MinHo Kwon,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location Tim Li,1 MinHo Kwon,1,3 Ming Zhao,3 Jong) is used to investigate the change of tropical cyclone frequency in the North Pacific under global warming, and W. Yu (2010), Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L

  17. Interactions between the tropical ISO and midlatitude low-frequency flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Interactions between the tropical ISO and midlatitude low-frequency flow Lin-Lin Pan Æ Tim Li Abstract In this study, we investigate the interaction between the tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO study the role of the syn- optic eddy feedback in the midlatitude response to the tropical ISO forcing

  18. An Analytical Model for Tropical Relative Humidity DAVID M. ROMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romps, David M.

    the distribution of water vapor will change with warming. Water vapor is the atmosphere's most powerful greenhouse gas, and changes in its distribution can have significant implications for radiative forcing. A first

  19. Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    estimate. The Climate Dynamics (2002) 19: 331­342 DOI 10.1007/s00382-002-0230-3 Y. Tang Department of Earth August 2001 / Accepted: 11 January 2002 / Published online: 10 April 2002 � Springer-Verlag 2002 Abstract with ENSO peaks in winter, indicating that the seasonal cycle is important in the low-frequency oscillations

  20. Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen) and a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity

  1. Adjustment of the Remote Tropical Climate to El Nio Conditions BENJAMIN R. LINTNER* AND JOHN C. H. CHIANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lintner, Benjamin Richard

    convective heating anomalies that in turn cause remote tropical changes through a suite of tele- connectedAdjustment of the Remote Tropical Climate to El Niño Conditions BENJAMIN R. LINTNER* AND JOHN C. H) ABSTRACT The adjustment of the tropical climate outside the Pacific (the "remote Tropics") to the abrupt

  2. Possible linkages between Saharan dust and tropical cyclone rain band invigoration in the eastern Atlantic during NAMMA-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    for tropical cyclogenesis, it also provides an infusion of cloud condensation and ice nuclei which can

  3. Temporal Changes in a Tropical Nekton Assemblage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temporal Changes in a Tropical Nekton Assemblage and Performance of a Prawn Selective Gear TING and weights of 39 trials conductedfor a selective prawning gear whose performance in bycatch reduc tionI., 1975; Rob erts, 1978; Allen and Coates, 1990), but is extremely rich in the marine coun terpart

  4. Environmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    - son 1974; Webster et al. 2005), and the Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index (Bell et al. 2000, the PDI is also accumulated over each year. Annually accumulated integral metrics such as ACE and PDI showEnvironmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL Program

  5. Low beta diversity of herbivorous insects in tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basset, Yves

    LETTERS Low beta diversity of herbivorous insects in tropical forests Vojtech Novotny1 , Scott E) and fruit (fruitflies, Diptera) found a low rate of change in species composition (beta diversity) across 75 of kilo- metres. Low beta diversity was also documented in groups with differing host specificity

  6. Variable Responses of Lowland Tropical Forest Nutrient Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Variable Responses of Lowland Tropical Forest Nutrient Status to to play a key role in nutrient retention. We discuss our findings in the context of possible impacts Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 387 #12;growth not only alters forests' nutrient demands but also

  7. Detection of iodine monoxide in the tropical free troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    19, 2012) Atmospheric iodine monoxide (IO) is a radical that catalytically destroys heat trapping in the remote tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) (2­4). IO further affects the oxidative capacity iodine species over the remote ocean remain poorly understood (11, 14) but are currently thought

  8. TROPICAL MULTIPLICATION MAPS AND THE GIESEKER-PETRI THEOREM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Sam

    TROPICAL MULTIPLICATION MAPS AND THE GIESEKER-PETRI THEOREM DAVID JENSEN AND SAM PAYNE Abstract. We. Supported in part by NSF grants DMS­1068689 and CAREER DMS­1149054. 1 #12;2 DAVID JENSEN AND SAM PAYNE v1 w1 by the addition or deletion of a bridge are canonically isomorphic, and these isomorphisms respect the images of the

  9. Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree A. Elizabeth Arnold* , Luis Carlos Meji species examined to date harbors endophytic fungi within its asymptomatic aerial tissues, such that endophytes rep- resent a ubiquitous, yet cryptic, component of terrestrial plant communities. Fungal

  10. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  11. Tropical mountain cradles of dry forest diversity Christopher W. Dick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    * *Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Panama´; and Department of Ecology radiated at vastly different times, so fo- cus on a single taxon would be mislead- ing. On the side of rain- ple, the dry forest legume clade Leu- caena underwent endemic radiation in southwest Mexico beginning

  12. Transport of carbon monoxide from the tropics to the extratropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November), biomass burning in the southern tropics produces large-scale plumes of CO. These plumes can biomass-burning regions generally rises into the middle and upper troposphere, where it is entrained. For example, it is now clear that the main population areas in the northern hemisphere (North America, Europe

  13. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  14. Technical Report: Investigation of Carbon Cycle Processes within a Managed Landscape: An Ecosystem Manipulation and Isotope Tracer Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffis, Timothy J; Baker, John M; Billmark, Kaycie

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to provide a better scientific understanding of carbon cycle processes within an agricultural landscape characteristic of the Upper Midwest. This project recognizes the need to study processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales to reduce uncertainty in ecosystem and landscape-scale carbon budgets to provide a sound basis for shaping future policy related to carbon management. Specifically, this project has attempted to answer the following questions: 1. Would the use of cover crops result in a shift from carbon neutral to significant carbon gain in corn-soybean rotation ecosystems of the Upper Midwest? 2. Can stable carbon isotope analyses be used to partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components? 3. Can this partitioning be used to better understand the fate of crop residues to project changes in the soil carbon reservoir? 4. Are agricultural ecosystems of the Upper Midwest carbon neutral, sinks, or sources? Can the proposed measurement and modeling framework help address landscape-scale carbon budget uncertainties and help guide future carbon management policy?

  15. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  16. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  17. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  18. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Computational study of atmospheric transfer radiation on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado-Correal, Camilo; Castaño, Gabriel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative transfer models explain and predict interaction between solar radiation and the different elements present in the atmosphere, which are responsible for energy attenuation. In Colombia there have been neither measurements nor studies of atmospheric components such as gases and aerosols that can cause turbidity and pollution. Therefore satellite images cannot be corrected radiometrically in a proper way. When a suitable atmospheric correction is carried out, loss of information is avoided, which may be useful for discriminating image land cover. In this work a computational model was used to find radiative atmospheric attenuation (300 1000nm wavelength region) on an equatorial tropical desert (La Tatacoa, Colombia) in order to conduct an adequate atmospheric correction.

  20. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  1. Feasibility study for a tropical island sea kayaking ecotourism business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eldergill, Mary Alexandria

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hours e:;ploring the north shore of Coral Bay". The tour wil 1 make two stops to view unusual underwater ecosystems which visitor s to St. John do not normally snorkel or dive on ? ? rocky shore, and mangrove lagoon. These two habitats will be e... adjacent to Water Creek Lagoon (See Tour Nap on page 12). Kayakers will secure boats and retrieve snorkel gear- afterwhich guides will deliver a short orientation to mangrove ecosystems. Illustrations of organisms likely to be seen will be passed around...

  2. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We foundPerennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; b Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US Department

  3. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  4. Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

  5. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  6. Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

  7. Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results from field experiments fire frequency Woody mortality Introduction of exotic grasses Is cover dominated by annuals or short intensity precipitation Low wind speeds Low P/PE High variability High intensity precipitation High wind

  8. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  9. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  10. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  11. Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

  12. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis design. This paper explores how to support energy as a first-class operating system resource. En- ergy the limited energy resource among competing tasks. 1. INTRODUCTION Traditionally, the operating system plays

  13. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  14. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  15. Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

  16. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  17. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  19. Optical Sensing of Ecosystem Carbon Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Solar Induced Fluorescence (peaks at 690 and 735 nm) #12;GEP = ! fAPAR PARin Where: GEP is the gross and absorbed carbon - In existing models ! is assigned a maximum value based on cover type and downregulated Calibration panel AMSPEC FUSION #12;SK-Old Aspen Seasonality: NDVI, EVI, GEP Data from T. Hilker, T.A. Black

  20. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  1. Digging deeper: Fine root responses to rising atmospheric [CO2] in forested ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental evidence from a diverse set of forested ecosystems indicates that CO2 enrichment may lead to deeper rooting distributions. While the causes of greater root production at deeper soil depths under elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]) require further investigation, altered rooting distributions are expected to affect important ecosystem processes. The depth at which fine roots are produced may influence root chemistry, physiological function, and mycorrhizal infection, leading to altered nitrogen (N) uptake rates and slower turnover. Also, soil processes such as microbial decomposition are slowed at depth in the soil, potentially affecting the rate at which root detritus becomes incorporated into soil organic matter. Deeper rooting distributions under elevated [CO2] provide exciting opportunities to use novel sensors and chemical analyses throughout the soil profile to track the effects of root proliferation on carbon (C) and N cycling. Models do not currently incorporate information on root turnover and C and N cycling at depth in the soil, and modification is necessary to accurately represent processes associated with altered rooting depth distributions. Progress in understanding and modeling the interface between deeper rooting distributions under elevated [CO2] and soil C and N cycling will be critical in projecting the sustainability of forest responses to rising atmospheric [CO2].

  2. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  3. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), up and walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opgenoorth, Lars; Faith, Daniel P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    valuation, and accounting (3d)  Platform goal  Strengthen the science?policy interface for biodiversity and ecosystem services   

  4. Perspective Climate change and the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    than THC shutdown? The answer to this question would tell us much about the confidence one can put in climate model predictions. Several energy flows that powerfully affect our climate come to a confluence by re- leasing their heat to the atmosphere. To sustain the cycle, the newly cooled waters must somehow

  5. SEDIMENTS, SEC 4 SEDIMENT-ECOLOGY INTERACTIONS POSITION PAPER Anthropogenic pollutants affect ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ecosystem services of freshwater sediments: the need for a "triad plus x" approach Sabine Ulrike Gerbersdorf ecosystem services such as nutrient recycling or self-purification which extend beyond the aquatic systems, microbiological/molecular approaches to unravel changes of microbial ecosystems, up

  6. 2012 NSTIC/IDtrust Workshop: "Technologies and Standards Enabling the Identity Ecosystem"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    2012 NSTIC/IDtrust Workshop: "Technologies and Standards Enabling the Identity Ecosystem" March, Gartner 9:30 am Keynote Mapping the Global IDentity Ecosystem Speakers: Karen O'Donoghue, ISOC and Lucy Lynch, ISOC 10:00 am Panel: Gaps and Challenges for Advancing the Global Identity Ecosystem

  7. Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process Janet R to occur with climate change will likely influence how predators indirectly affect an essential ecosystem and severity of droughts (1, 2). Changes in rainfall will likely affect ecosystem processes such as primary

  8. The Loss of Ecosystem Services on the Yucatn Peninsula in the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    The Loss of Ecosystem Services on the Yucatán Peninsula in the 21st Century Case study: mangrove loss in Mexico (MX) & Belize (BZ) Natallia Leuchanka Environmental Science: Ecosystems; International Reardon #12;#12;Akumal, Mexico (MX) Sarteneja, Belize (BZ) #12;· Ecosystem: a dynamic complex of plant

  9. Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy-makers, society and scientists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy-makers, society and scientists B., Martinez C., Imbach P., 2009. Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy and livelihoods depend largely on ecosystem services, policies for adaptation to climate change should take

  10. Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations and differences in ecosystem and plant type responses to global change M . T. VA N W I J K *w , K, Darwin Building, King Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JU, UK, wThe Ecosystem Center, Marine

  11. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River ­ Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Planning Center Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Restoration Plan

  12. Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Matthew

    1 Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications Peter Q. Olsson1 ecosystem processes. During the two autumnal stages (Early Snow and Early Cold) soils remain warm, unfrozen with the least amount of biological activity and have the least impact on the ecosystem. However, Early Snow

  13. A site-based approach to delivering rangeland ecosystem Joel BrownA,C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A site-based approach to delivering rangeland ecosystem services Joel BrownA,C and Neil Mac Range, Las Cruces, NM 88003-0003, USA. B CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia. C Corresponding author. Email: joelbrow@nmsu.edu Abstract. Rangeland ecosystems are capable of providing an array

  14. Anchoring policy development around stable points : an approach to regulating the co-evolving ICT ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    to regulating the co-evolving ICT ecosystem David D. Clark MIT Computer Science of the natural rates of change in different parts of the ecosystem, and examine why hinder its feasibility in the ICT ecosystem. As a means to achieve more

  15. November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem More than 99% of food worldwide comes from the soil ecosystem. Rapid ero- sion of soil is reducing food production--and causing ecosystem. --DAVID PIMENTAL College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University Soil and biological

  16. How Do Developers React to API Deprecation? The Case of a Smalltalk Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    How Do Developers React to API Deprecation? The Case of a Smalltalk Ecosystem Romain Robbes PLEIAD extent and impact of these API changes in practice, on an entire software ecosystem associated effects across an entire ecosystem. Our case study subject is the development community gravitating around

  17. Disturbance dynamics and ecosystem-based forest management KALEV JO~ GISTE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREFACE Disturbance dynamics and ecosystem-based forest management KALEV JO~ GISTE1 , W. KEITH and Analysis Program, St Paul, Minnesota, USA Ecosystem-based management is intended to bal- ance ecological ecosystem is usually defined through productivity, biodiversity, stability or other terms. However

  18. Climate-sensitive ecosystem carbon dynamics along the soil chronosequence of the Damma glacier forefield,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate-sensitive ecosystem carbon dynamics along the soil chronosequence of the Damma glacier formation and ecosystem development. We determined soil carbon and nitrogen contents and their stable by small end moraines that resulted from two gla- cier re-advances. The net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB

  19. Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from Microbes to Jellyfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    SYMPOSIUM Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from, Engineering and Applied Science, Pasadena, CA, 91125, USA From the symposium ``Marine Ecosystem Engineers@si.edu Synopsis Ecosystem engineers are species that alter the physical environment in ways that create new

  20. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing