Sample records for tropical convection observed

  1. Passive microwave observations of mesoscale convective systems over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Gary Rae

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents high resolution passive microwave measurements obtained in the western Pacific warm pool region. These measurements represent the first comprehensive observations of convection over the tropical oceans, and were obtained from...

  2. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  3. Stochastic and mesoscopic models for tropical convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences, New York penetrative convection to heights of 5­10 km with associated anvil towers of clouds. Observational data

  4. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  5. Vertical profiles of radar reflectivity of convective cells in tropical and mid-latitude mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Kurt Reed

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    meteorological phenomenon of particular interest to forecasters is the mesoscale convective system (MCS). Chappell (1986) defines an MCS as "any multicellular storm or group of interacting storms that suggests some organization in its forcing". An MCS...VERTICAL PROFILES OF RADAR REFLECTIVITY OF CONVECTIVE CELLS IN TROPICAL AND MID-LATITUDE MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS A Thesis by KURT REED LUTZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  6. Final Technical Report for "Radiative Heating Associated with Tropical Convective Cloud Systems: Its Importance at Meso and Global Scales"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Courtney

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating associated with tropical cloud systems drive the global circulation. The overall research objectives of this project were to i) further quantify and understand the importance of heating in tropical convective cloud systems with innovative observational techniques, and ii) use global models to determine the large-scale circulation response to variability in tropical heating profiles, including anvil and cirrus cloud radiative forcing. The innovative observational techniques used a diversity of radar systems to create a climatology of vertical velocities associated with the full tropical convective cloud spectrum along with a dissection of the of the total heating profile of tropical cloud systems into separate components (i.e., the latent, radiative, and eddy sensible heating). These properties were used to validate storm-scale and global climate models (GCMs) and were further used to force two different types of GCMs (one with and one without interactive physics). While radiative heating was shown to account for about 20% of the total heating and did not have a strong direct response on the global circulation, the indirect response was important via its impact on convection, esp. in how radiative heating impacts the tilt of heating associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a phenomenon that accounts for most tropical intraseasonal variability. This work shows strong promise in determining the sensitivity of climate models and climate processes to heating variations associated with cloud systems.

  7. Convective Signals from Surface Measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal has been detected using observations from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). With downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and fractional sky cover from the ACRF TWP Manus site, and the statistical tools of wavelet and spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals from surface observations spanning the period from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-retrieved values of precipitation from the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP), and interpolated outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) satellite measurements from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for the same location. Our results indicate that the MJO convective signal has a strong seasonal-to-interannual evolution that is likely correlated with the interannual variability of El Ni ˜no Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  8. Tropical ozone as an indicator of deep convection Ian Folkins and Christopher Braun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkins, Ian

    Tropical ozone as an indicator of deep convection Ian Folkins and Christopher Braun Department] The climatological ozone profile in the tropics is shaped like an ``S,'' with a minimum at the surface, a maximum. These features can be reproduced by a very simple model whose only free parameter is the mean ozone mixing ratio

  9. October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    October 1986 R. H. Johnson 721 Lower-Tropospheric Warming and Drying in Tropical Mesoscale components of tropical mesoscale convective systems. It is found that while the apparent heat source Q1 of mesoscale downdrafts within the mesoscale convective systems. The warming and drying at low levels

  10. Constructing a Merged CloudPrecipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of observations from three radars--the S-band dual-polarization Doppler radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile, and radiative heating rate retrievals. With this dataset the full spectrum of tropical convective clouds during, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Corresponding author address: Dr. Zhe Feng, Pacific

  11. Vertical structure of tropical oceanic convective clouds and its relation to precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    data are collocated with precipitation rates from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR high tops that are nearly two km deeper than moderately raining or non- raining high clouds. Rain rate.1029/2007GL032811. 1. Introduction [2] Tropical convection plays an important role in the energy and moisture

  12. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  13. The sensitivity of tropical convective precipitation to the direct radiative forcings of black carbon aerosols emitted from major regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien

    Previous works have suggested that the direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) aerosols are able to force a significant change in tropical convective precipitation ranging from the Pacific and Indian Ocean to ...

  14. Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Mather, James H.; Liu, Xiaodong

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signals have been detected using highly sampled observations from the U.S. DOE ARM Climate Research Facility located at the Tropical Western Pacific Manus site. Using downwelling shortwave radiative fluxes and derived shortwave fractional sky cover, and the statistical tools of wavelet, cross wavelet, and Fourier spectrum power, we report finding major convective signals and their phase change from surface observations spanning from 1996 to 2006. Our findings are confirmed with the satellite-gauge combined values of precipitation from the NASA Global Precipitation Climatology Project and the NOAA interpolated outgoing longwave radiation for the same location. We find that the Manus MJO signal is weakest during the strongest 1997-1998 El Nin˜o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) year. A significant 3-5-month lead in boreal winter is identified further between Manus MJO and NOAA NINO3.4 sea surface temperature (former leads latter). A striking inverse relationship is found also between the instantaneous synoptic and intraseasonal phenomena over Manus. To further study the interaction between intraseasonal and diurnal scale variability, we composite the diurnal cycle of cloudiness for 21-MJO events that have passed over Manus. Our diurnal composite analysis of shortwave and longwave fractional sky covers indicates that during the MJO peak (strong convection), the diurnal amplitude of cloudiness is reduced substantially, while the diurnal mean cloudiness reaches the highest value and there are no significant phase changes. We argue that the increasing diurnal mean and decreasing diurnal amplitude are caused by the systematic convective cloud formation that is associated with the wet phase of the MJO, while the diurnal phase is still regulated by the well-defined solar forcing. This confirms our previous finding of the anti-phase relationship between the synoptic and intraseasonal phenomena. The detection of theMJOover the Manus site provides further opportunities in using other ground-based remote sensing instruments to investigate the vertical distributions of clouds and radiative heatings of the MJO that currently is impossible from satellite observations.

  15. Properties of inflow and downdraft air of tropical mesoscale convective systems and the effect of downdrafts on the surface fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Jeane Margaret

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPERTIES OF INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE FLUXES A Thesis by JEANE MARGARET GRIFFITH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MAS'IER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Meteorology PROPERTIES OF THE INFLOW AND DOWNDRAFT AIR OF TROPICAL MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND THE EFFECT OF DOWNDRAFTS ON THE SURFACE...

  16. Application of the 85 GHz ice scattering signature to a global study of mesoscale convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devlin, Karen Irene

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has long been observed that tropical convection tends to cluster, organizing into multicellular mesoscale convective systems (MCS), In convective towers, updrafts on the order of 10 m s-I favor the formation of large, precipitation-sized ice...

  17. Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK AND WILLIAM R. COTTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK (Manuscript received 30 December 2005, in final form 4 October 2006) ABSTRACT Mesoscale convective systems of usefulness in operational forecasting. 1. Introduction Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) frequently de

  18. Statistical representation of clouds in a regional model and the impact on the diurnal cycle of convection during Tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    water static energy. Application of the parameterization in a regional model during a 30-day period of the Tropical Convection, Cirrus and Nitrogen Oxides (TROCCINOX) experiment over southern Brazil demonstrates of cloud mass at tropospheric inversions (e.g., trade wind inversion, melting level, tropo- pause

  19. Radiative and Convective Driving of Tropical High Clouds TERENCE L. KUBAR, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, AND ROBERT WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    ). It is also shown that thin high cloud, which has a positive net radiative effect on the topRadiative and Convective Driving of Tropical High Clouds TERENCE L. KUBAR, DENNIS L. HARTMANN thick high cloud, which is a better proxy for precipitation than outgoing longwave radiation (OLR

  20. Properties of tropical convection observed by ARM millimeter-radars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  2. The QBO's influence on lightning production and deep convection in the tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Celina Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) flash densities and ten years (1998-2007) of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) deep convective and stratiform rainfall and convective echo top heights are analyzed. The QBO can be linked to deep convection through two hypothesized mechanisms: 1) modulation...

  3. Convective-Scale Variations in the Inner-Core Rainbands of a Tropical Cyclone ANTHONY C. DIDLAKE JR. AND ROBERT A. HOUZE JR.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Convective-Scale Variations in the Inner-Core Rainbands of a Tropical Cyclone ANTHONY C. DIDLAKE JR secondary eyewall forms at a certain radius, subsidence occurring along its inner edge separates it from the primary eyewall. 1. Introduction Improving intensity forecasts of tropical cyclones al- most certainly

  4. Convective-scale variations in the inner-core rainbands of a tropical cyclone Submitted for publication in Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Convective-scale variations in the inner-core rainbands of a tropical cyclone Submitted inner edge separates it from the primary eyewall. #12;3 1. Introduction Improving intensity forecasts of tropical cyclones almost certainly requires a better understanding of the structure and dynamics

  5. Impact of Aerosols on Tropical Cyclones: An Investigation Using Convection-permitting Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazra, Anupam; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Taraphdar, Sourav; Chen, J. P.; Cotton, William R.

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of aerosols effect on two tropical cyclones over Bay of Bengal are investigated using a convection permitting model with two-moment mixed-phase bulk cloud microphysics scheme. The simulation results show the role of aerosol on the microphysical and dynamical properties of cloud and bring out the change in efficiency of the clouds in producing precipitation. The tracks of the TCs are hardly affected by the changing aerosol types, but the intensity exhibits significant sensitivity due to the change in aerosol contribution. It is also clearly seen from the analyses that higher heating in the middle troposphere within the cyclone center is in response to latent heat release as a consequence of greater graupel formation. Greater heating in the middle level is particularly noticeable for the clean aerosol regime which causes enhanced divergence in the upper level which, in turn, forces the lower level convergence. As a result, the cleaner aerosol perturbation is more unstable within the cyclone core and produces a more intense cyclone as compared to other two perturbations of aerosol. All these studies show the robustness of the concept of TC weakening by storm ingestion of high concentrations of CCN. The consistency of these model results gives us confidence in stating there is a high probability that ingestion of high CCN concentrations in a TC will lead to weakening of the storm but has little impact on storm direction. Moreover, as pollution is increasing over the Indian sub-continent, this study suggests pollution may be weakening TCs over the Bay of Bengal.

  6. Equilibrium Tropical Cyclone Size in an Idealized State of Axisymmetric Radiative–Convective Equilibrium*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavas, Daniel R.

    Tropical cyclone size remains an unsolved problem in tropical meteorology, yet size plays a significant role in modulating damage. This work employs the Bryan cloud model (CM1) to systematically explore the sensitivity of ...

  7. Overshooting Convection from High-resolution NEXRAD Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, David

    2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Rocky Mountains. Overshooting convection is most common over the high plains, and there is a pronounced seasonal and diurnal cycle present. The majority of overshooting systems occur during the warm season, and a diurnal maximum of overshooting occurs...

  8. Improving Convection Parameterization Using ARM Observations and NCAR Community Atmosphere Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guang J [Scripps Institution of Oceanography

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlight of Accomplishments: We made significant contribution to the ASR program in this funding cycle by better representing convective processes in GCMs based on knowledge gained from analysis of ARM/ASR observations. In addition, our work led to a much improved understanding of the interaction among aerosol, convection, clouds and climate in GCMs.

  9. Convective structure in rapidly intensifying tropical cyclones as depicted by passive microwave measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Steve

    include: mesovorticies [Nolan and Montgomery, 2002], convective asymmetries [Braun et al., 2006], and vortical hot towers (VHTs) under high wind shear [Molinari and Vollaro, 2010]. Conversely, RI has been

  10. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  11. Total lightning observations of severe convection over North Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinney, Christopher Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Density GSD Gridded Source Density LDAR Lightning Detection and Ranging MCS Mesoscale Convective System MSI Mesocyclone Strength Index MxFED Maximum Flash Extent Density MxFIDT Maximum Flash Initiation Density Total MxGSD Maximum Gridded Source.......................................................................................... 1 1.2 Background ....................................................................................... 4 1.3 Thesis Objectives and Hypothesis...................................................... 19 2. DATA AND METHODOLOGY...

  12. Convection?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. EQUILIBRIUM VS. ACTIVATION CONTROL OF LARGE-SCALE VARIATIONS OF TROPICAL DEEP CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapes, Brian

    convective cloud systems. This essay highlights the distinction between processes which supply moisture separations of the LSVDC problem are reviewed. Scale separation, though rigorous, is artificial, since net cloudiness, are exam- ined as examples. Lower boundary flux enhancements and deep lifting exert both

  14. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 1: Deep Convective Updraft Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, A. C.; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Collis, Scott M.; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Snow reflectivity can exceed 40 dBZ in a two-moment scheme when a constant bulk density of 100 kg m-3 is used. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to area rather than volume should somewhat alleviate this problem. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations. This is associated with large amounts of liquid water above the freezing level in updraft cores. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of large rainwater contents lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. Strong simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted, with some showing supercell characteristics. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 meters to 100 meters weakens strong updrafts, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may partly be a product of interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and large-scale environmental biases that promote different convective modes and strengths than observed.

  15. Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

  16. Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle: 1. Persistence of cusp proton aurora K. Throp, M. Lockwood,1 B. S. Lanchester, and S. K employ a numerical model of cusp ion precipitation and proton aurora emission to fit variations

  17. Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Reverse convection and cusp proton aurora: Cluster, polar and image observation Q.-G. Zong a,b,*, TT) at Earth. Cusp proton aurora was caused by the leading phase of the CME. Cusp proton aurora generally of the cusp proton aurora shifted about 30° from dawnside to duskside when IMF By changed from À10 to 5 n

  18. Photo: Bruno Marty / IRD Observed and expected changes to the tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    are also occurring, due to the build-up of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere simulations 104 3.2 Features of the tropical Pacific Ocean 105 3.2.1 Large-scale currents 105 3.2.2 Ocean.3 Observed and projected changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean 141 3.3.1 Large-scale currents 141 3.3.2 Ocean

  19. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  20. Wintertime observations of SubTropical Mode Water formation within the Gulf Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Terrence M.

    Wintertime observations of SubTropical Mode Water formation within the Gulf Stream Terrence M) within the eastward-flowing Gulf Stream as it forms during strong winter cooling. Shipboard observations that the deepest wintertime mixed layers (MLs) of EDW were found immediately south of the GS, and the distribution

  1. A Satellite Study of Tropical Moist Convection and Environmental Variability: A Moisture and Thermal Budget Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masunaga, Hirohiko

    radiometer and scatterometer aboard different platforms. Satellite measurements of atmospheric parameters of moisture and dry static energy and their vertical flux at cloud base from satellite observations alone convergence for highly organized systems; 2) FT diabatic heating is largely offset on an instantaneous basis

  2. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TROPICAL SYNOPTIC SCALE MOISTURE FIELDS OBSERVED FROM THE NIMBUS ? 7 SMMR A Thesis by JEFFREY DAVID FINK Submitted to the OfFice of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... ( iliember) AIarshnll J. 1VIcVnrlnnd ( (tlemb er ) James Il. Scoggins (Read of Departnrent) i%lay 1989 ns ABSTRACT Tropical Synoptic Scale Moisture Fields Observed from the NIMBUS ? 7 SMMR. (May 1989) Jefl'rey David Fink, B. S. , Texas A...

  3. Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

  4. Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, doi:10.1002/ 2013JC009339. 1. Introduction [2] Mesoscale eddy

  5. Tropical precipitation variability and convectively coupled equatorial waves1 on submonthly time-scales in reanalyses and TRMM2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    convection plays a vital role in global climate by driving large-scale circulation,41 releasing latent heat, modulating radiative forcing, and most importantly redistributing water in42 the earth system. Due to complex

  6. Air-sea interaction at contrasting sites in the Eastern Tropical Pacific : mesoscale variability and atmospheric convection at 10°N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, J. Thomas (John Thomas), 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of ocean dynamics in driving air-sea interaction is examined at two contrasting sites on 125°W in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean using data from the Pan American Climate Study (PACS) field program. Analysis ...

  7. Variability of tropical cyclone track density in the2 North Atlantic: Observations and high-resolution3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    ; Emanuel 2005a)59 and the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE; Bell et al. 2000). Our focus here is on60 1 1 Variability of tropical cyclone track density in the2 North Atlantic: Observations #12; 2 Abstract23 24 Interannual-decadal variability of tropical cyclone (TC) track density

  8. Observations, dynamics and predictability of the mesoscale convective vortex event of 10-13 June 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawblitzel, Daniel Patrick

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    with varying resolutions. It is determined that the ability of a forecast model to accurately predict this MCV event is directly related to its ability to simulate convection. It is also shown that the convective-resolving Weather Research and Forecast (WRF...

  9. Observations of prolific transient luminous event production above a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil F. T. São Sabbas,1 M. J. Taylor,2 P.D. Pautet,2 M. Bailey convective system (MCS) over Argentina, as part of the third sprite campaign in Brazil. GOES infrared (IR a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A

  10. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  11. The Dynamics and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason A.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through methodology unique for tropical cyclones in peer-reviewed literature, this study explores how the dynamics of moist convection affects the predictability of tropical cyclogenesis. Mesoscale models are used to perform short-range ensemble...

  12. Observations of tropical cirrus properties in the pilot radiation observation experiment using lidar and the CSIRO ARM filter radiometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Platt, C.M.R.; Young, S.A.; Manson, P.J.; Patterson, G.R. [CSIRO, Victoria (Australia)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow beam fast filter radiometer has been developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The radiometer is intended to operate alongside a lidar at ARM sites in a lidar/radiometer (LIRAD) configuration. The radiometer detects in three narrow bands at 8.62-, 10.86-, and 12.04-m central wavelengths in the atmospheric window. In addition, it has a variable field aperture that varies the radiance incident on the detector and also allows the field of view to be tailored to that of a lidar used in the LIRAD technique. The radiometer was deployed in the ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment (PROBE) at Kavieng, Papua New Guinea in January-February 1993. The radiometer worked satisfactorily and appeared to be very stable. The radiometer was compared with a previous CSIRO radiometer and the improved performance of the ARM instrument was very evident. The ARM radiometer was also compared with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratories (ETL) interferometer and gave closely equivalent radiances. The LIRAD method was used at Kavieng to obtain the optical properties of cirrus clouds. Continuous observations of water vapor path obtained by the NOAA ETL microwave radiometer were employed to allow for the strong tropical water vapor absorption and emission. Cirrus cells that developed on one morning, independent of other clouds, had measured infrared emittances varying from <0.1 to 1.0.

  13. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  14. Relationships between tropical cyclone intensity and satellite based indicators of inner core convection: 85 GHz ice scattering signature and lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecil, Daniel Joseph

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -1' radius minimum PCT and lightning in Hurricane Felix. . . . . 48 22 Hurricane Luis best track, 12 UTC 27 August - 0 UTC 11 September 1995. . . ?50 23 Luis 85 GHz PCT iield at 0748 V TC 29 August 1995. . . . . . 57 24 Luis OTD lightning observations... at 2348 UTC 28 August 1995. . . . . 25 Luis 85 GHz PCT field at 0905 UTC 30 August 1995. . . . 54 26 Luis 85 GHz PCT field at 2017 UTC 31 August 1995. . . . . . . . 27 Luis 85 GHz PCT field at 0841 UTC 2 September 1995. . . . 28 Luis 85 GHz PCT field...

  15. The frequency of tropical precipitating clouds as observed by the TRMM PR and ICESat/GLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Sean Patrick

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    METHODOLOGY??????????????????? 11 A. Data??????????????????? 11 B. Analysis Method?????????????? 12 III COINCIDENT SCAN ANALYSIS????????????... 18 IV TROPICAL PRECIPITATING CLOUD FRACTION????? 23 V CONCLUSION????????????????????.. 31..., with land-ocean separation included.??????????????. 15 4 a) Horizontal scan and b) cross-section of a sample coincident case from 20 October 2003 over the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo?????????????????????............. 19 5 Histograms...

  16. Atmospheric Feedbacks over the Tropical Pacific in Observations and Atmospheric General Circulation Models: An Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Dezheng

    that the bias is likely linked to a weaker relationship between the short-wave cloud forcing is a long-standing tropical bias in the CGCMs. The early hypotheses attribute this problem to the errors;4 errors may induce excessive equatorial upwelling upon coupling. The surface heating from the atmospheric

  17. The CLIMODE Field Campaign Observing the Cycle of Convection and Restratification over the Gulf Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, L.

    A major oceanographic field experiment is described, which is designed to observe, quantify, and understand the creation and dispersal of weakly stratified fluid known as “mode water” in the region of the Gulf Stream. ...

  18. Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds in Saudi Arabia, David J Delene and Jeffrey S Tilley, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Case study of the 9 April 2009 `brown' cloud: Observations and modeling of convective clouds indicated a color change in the accumulated ice. Specifically, the ice color changed from white, during concentrations observed (as well as other changes in the convective cloud properties that were documented

  19. Aircraft Observations of Sub-cloud Aerosol and Convective Cloud Physical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axisa, Duncan

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focuses on aircraft observational studies of aerosol-cloud interactions in cumulus clouds. The data were collected in the summer of 2004, the spring of 2007 and the mid-winter and spring of 2008 in Texas, central Saudi Arabia...

  20. THE ROLE OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARAMETERIZATION IN THE SIMULATION OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS AND ANVIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE ROLE OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICS PARAMETERIZATION IN THE SIMULATION OF MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS in the Simulation of Mesoscale Convective Systems and Anvil Clouds in the Tropical Western Pacific K. Van Weverberg1 cloud microphysics in the simulation of mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in the tropical western

  1. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  2. Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joonsuk

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The tropics is a very important region in terms of earth’s radiation budget because the net radiative heating is largest in the tropics and that surplus energy is redistributed by the circulations of oceans and atmospheres. Moreover, a large number...

  3. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  4. Observations of new aerosol particle formation in a tropical urban Raghu Betha a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spracklen, Dominick

    -19, Singapore 117576, Singapore b School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, United. These nucleation events were frequently observed during the SW monsoon period, but were rarely seen during the NE events were suppressed. Ã? 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Atmospheric aerosols

  5. Observations of tropical clouds from the upgraded MMCR at Darwin and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation

  6. Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachnik, Justin Paul

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents a series of work related to the representation of the Hadley circulation (HC) in atmospheric reanalyses and general circulation models (GCMs), with connections to the underlying tropical and subtropical cloud systems...

  7. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  8. ATS 742 Tropical Meteorology-Fall 2013 Instructor: Professor Eric Maloney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Tropical budgets: heat, moisture, moist static energy, kinetic/potential energy Week 3: Weak tropical temperature gradients. Week 4: How convection heats the tropical atmosphere. Hot towers and other vertical heating modes Week 5: Modeling tropical precipitation with the moist static energy (MSE) budget Week 6

  9. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  10. Respective roles of shallow convection and stratiform rainfall on the simulation of Madden-Julian Oscillation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Joshua Xiouhua [IPRC/SOEST/UH; Wang, Bin [IPRC& DM/SOEST/UH; Yeh, Hsi-Chyi

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Respective Roles of Shallow Convection and Stratiform Rainfall on the Simulation of Madden Julian Oscillation Joshua Xiouhua Fu IPRC, SOEST, University of Hawaii The IPRC/UH Hybrid-coupled GCM (HcGCM), which combined ECHAM-4 AGCM with UH intermediate ocean model, produces robust Tropical Intra-Seasonal Oscillations including the boreal-winter MJO and boreal-summer Monsoon Intra-Seasonal Oscillation. In this study, two sets of sensitivity experiments (i.e., short-term retrospective forecast of one MJO event observed during TOGA COARE and long-term free integrations) have been carried out to understand the respective roles of shallow-convection and stratiform rainfall on the simulations and predictions of the MJO. Major findings are summarized as following: Shallow-convection ahead of MJO deep convection moistens the lower-troposphere and preconditions the movement of the MJO. Present study shows that this process is very important to the eastward propagating speed of the MJO. A significant fraction of stratiform rainfall (~30%; stratiform part vs. total rainfall) is needed for ECHAM-4 to have a robust MJO. The above findings suggest that in addition to deep convection, shallow convection and stratiform rainfall needs to be well represented in conventional GCMs to ensure a robust model MJO.

  11. Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an important practical conclusion of the study: the obtained results on NN ensembles as a stochastic physics parametrization show a realistic possibility of development of NN convection parametrization for climate (and NWP) models based on learning cloud physics from CRM/SAM simulated data.

  12. HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 HEAT TRANSFERS IN A DOUBLE SKIN ROOF VENTILATED BY NATURAL CONVECTION IN SUMMER TIME P. H and the sheet metal: This is ventilation by natural convection. The remaining conductive heat from the sheet or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers

  13. Adjustment of the Remote Tropical Climate to El Nio Conditions BENJAMIN R. LINTNER* AND JOHN C. H. CHIANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lintner, Benjamin Richard

    convective heating anomalies that in turn cause remote tropical changes through a suite of tele- connectedAdjustment of the Remote Tropical Climate to El Niño Conditions BENJAMIN R. LINTNER* AND JOHN C. H) ABSTRACT The adjustment of the tropical climate outside the Pacific (the "remote Tropics") to the abrupt

  14. Development and evaluation of a convection scheme for use in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel, K.A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate] [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Program for Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate; Zivkovic-Rothman, M. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cumulus convection is a key process in controlling the water vapor content of the atmosphere, which is in turn the largest feedback mechanism for climate change in global climate models. Yet scant attention has been paid to designing convective representations that attempt to handle water vapor with fidelity, and even less to evaluating their performance. Here the authors attempt to address this deficiency by designing a representation of cumulus convection with close attention paid to convective water fluxes and by subjecting the scheme to rigorous tests using sounding array data. The authors maintain that such tests, in which a single-column model is forced by large-scale processes measured by or inferred from the sounding data, must be carried out over a period at least as long as the radiative-subsidence timescale--about 30 days--governing the water vapor adjustment time. The authors also argue that the observed forcing must be preconditioned to guarantee integral enthalpy conservation, else errors in the single-column prediction may be falsely attributed to convective schemes. Optimization of the new scheme`s parameters is performed using one month of data from the intensive flux array operating during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment, with the aid of the adjoint of the linear tangent of the single-column model. Residual root-mean-square errors, after optimization, are about 15% in relative humidity and .8 K in temperature. It is difficult to reject the hypothesis that the residual errors are due to noise in the forcing. Evaluation of the convective scheme is performed using Global Atmospheric Research Program Atlantic Tropical Experiment data. The performance of the scheme is compared to that of a few other schemes used in current climate models. It is also shown that a vertical resolution better than 50 mb in pressure is necessary for accurate prediction of atmospheric water vapor.

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rodriguez, Sebastien [Laboratoire AIM, Universite Paris 7/CNRS/CEA-Saclay, DSM/IRFU/SAp (France); Le Mouelic, Stephane [Laboratoire de Planetologie et Geodynamique, CNRS, UMR-6112, Universite de Nantes, 44000 Nantes (France); Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clark, Roger [U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Nicholson, Phil [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Jaumann, Ralf [Institute of Planetary Exploration, Deutsche Zentrum, fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt (Germany)

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  16. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  17. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  18. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  19. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  20. Feedbacks in a simple prognostic tropical climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwood, S.C. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple four-cell model of the tropical atmosphere in equilibrium with its boundaries is introduced, which can support a variable diabatic circulation and prognostic temperature and humidity profiles. The model is used to predict atmospheric perturbations away from the observed base state. Prognostic variables include radiation, surface fluxes, and dynamic transports, with temperature and water vapor levels determined by conservation constraints. The model includes a specially developed water vapor scheme that performs favorably compared with observations. The model is used to simulate the local and nonlocal sensitivity of the tropical maritime atmosphere to changes in surface temperature and other boundary conditions at very large horizontal scales. The main findings are as follows: (i) The sensitivity of boundary layer convergence to sea surface temperature (SST) variations depends on the behavior of convective heating over cooler regions and may be overestimated by heuristic models that ignore or oversimplify thermodynamic and radiative constraints; (ii) The maintenance of humidity equilibrium over weakly convective areas is modulated by local radiative feedback; (iii) Evaporation feedbacks on SST may be overestimated by heuristic arguments that do not carefully treat atmospheric water transport. An explanation for the constant-relative humidity behavior of general circulation models under climate changes is also offered based on the results.

  1. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  2. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  3. Seismic Constraints on Interior Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanasoge, S M; DeRosa, M L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We constrain the velocity spectral distribution of global-scale solar convective cells at depth using techniques of local helioseismology. We calibrate the sensitivity of helioseismic waves to large-scale convective cells in the interior by analyzing simulations of waves propagating through a velocity snapshot of global solar convection via methods of time-distance helioseismology. Applying identical analysis techniques to observations of the Sun, we are able to bound from above the magnitudes of solar convective cells as a function of spatial convective scale. We find that convection at a depth of $r/R_\\odot = 0.95$ with spatial extent $\\ell <20$, where $\\ell$ is the spherical harmonic degree, comprise weak flow systems, on the order of 15 m/s or less. Convective features deeper than $r/R_\\odot = 0.95$ are more difficult to image due to the rapidly decreasing sensitivity of helioseismic waves.

  4. Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

  5. Convective heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  6. Convective heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, R.M.

    1983-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation. 14 figs.

  7. Convective heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thorogood, Robert M. (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heater for heating fluids such as a coal slurry is constructed of a tube circuit arrangement which obtains an optimum temperature distribution to give a relatively constant slurry film temperature. The heater is constructed to divide the heating gas flow into two equal paths and the tube circuit for the slurry is arranged to provide a mixed flow configuration whereby the slurry passes through the two heating gas paths in successive co-current, counter-current and co-current flow relative to the heating gas flow. This arrangement permits the utilization of minimum surface area for a given maximum film temperature of the slurry consistent with the prevention of coke formation.

  8. The Sensitivity of Intraseasonal Variability in the NCAR CCM3 to Changes in Convective Parameterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    The Sensitivity of Intraseasonal Variability in the NCAR CCM3 to Changes in Convective@atmos.washington.edu. #12;1 Abstract The NCAR CCM3.6 simulation of tropical intraseasonal variability in zonal winds and pre- cipitation can be improved by implementing the McRAS convection scheme of Sud and Walker. The default CCM3

  9. Analysis of the Tropical Tropopause Layer Cirrus in CALIPSO and MLS Data - A Water Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tao

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two mechanisms appear to be primarily responsible for the formation of cirrus clouds in Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL): detrainment from deep convective anvils and in situ initiation. Here we propose to identify TTL cirrus clouds by analyzing...

  10. Microphysical Effects Determine Macrophysical Response for Aerosol Impacts on Deep Convective Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Chen, Qian; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Jinqiang; Yan, Hongru

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep convective clouds (DCCs) play a crucial role in the general circulation and energy and hydrological cycle of our climate system. Anthropogenic and natural aerosol particles can influence DCCs through changes in cloud properties, precipitation regimes, and radiation balance. Modeling studies have reported both invigoration and suppression of DCCs by aerosols, but none has fully quantified aerosol impacts on convection life cycle and radiative forcing. By conducting multiple month-long cloud-resolving simulations with spectral-bin cloud microphysics that capture the observed macro- and micro-physical properties of summer convective clouds in the tropics and mid-latitudes, this study provides the first comprehensive look at how aerosols affect cloud cover, cloud top height (CTH), and radiative forcing. Observations validate these simulation results. We find that microphysical aerosol effects contribute predominantly to increased cloud cover and CTH by inducing larger amount of smaller but longer lasting ice particles in the stratiform/anvils of DCCs with dynamical aerosol effects contributing at most ~ 1/4 of the total increase of cloud cover. The overall effect is a radiative warming in the atmosphere (3 to 5 W m-2) with strong surface cooling (-5 to -8 W m-2). Herein we clearly identified mechanisms more important than and additional to the invigoration effects hypothesized previously that explain the consistent signatures of increased cloud tops area and height by aerosols in DCCs revealed by observations.

  11. Radiative Heating of the ISCCP Upper Level Cloud Regimes and its Impact on the Large-scale Tropical Circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wei; Schumacher, Courtney; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative heating profiles of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud regimes (or weather states) were estimated by matching ISCCP observations with radiative properties derived from cloud radar and lidar measurements from the Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites at Manus, Papua New Guinea, and Darwin, Australia. Focus was placed on the ISCCP cloud regimes containing the majority of upper level clouds in the tropics, i.e., mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), deep cumulonimbus with cirrus, mixed shallow and deep convection, and thin cirrus. At upper levels, these regimes have average maximum cloud occurrences ranging from 30% to 55% near 12 km with variations depending on the location and cloud regime. The resulting radiative heating profiles have maxima of approximately 1 K/day near 12 km, with equal heating contributions from the longwave and shortwave components. Upper level minima occur near 15 km, with the MCS regime showing the strongest cooling of 0.2 K/day and the thin cirrus showing no cooling. The gradient of upper level heating ranges from 0.2 to 0.4 K/(day?km), with the most convectively active regimes (i.e., MCSs and deep cumulonimbus with cirrus) having the largest gradient. When the above heating profiles were applied to the 25-year ISCCP data set, the tropics-wide average profile has a radiative heating maximum of 0.45Kday-1 near 250 hPa. Column-integrated radiative heating of upper level cloud accounts for about 20% of the latent heating estimated by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR). The ISCCP radiative heating of tropical upper level cloud only slightly modifies the response of an idealized primitive equation model forced with the tropics-wide TRMM PR latent heating, which suggests that the impact of upper level cloud is more important to large-scale tropical circulation variations because of convective feedbacks rather than direct forcing by the cloud radiative heating profiles. However, the height of the radiative heating maxima and gradient of the heating profiles are important to determine the sign and patterns of the horizontal circulation anomaly driven by radiative heating at upper levels.

  12. Mesoscale Simulation of Tropical Cyclones in the South Pacific: Climatology and Interannual Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesoscale Simulation of Tropical Cyclones in the South Pacific: Climatology and Interannual is shown to reproduce a wide range of mesoscale convective systems. Tropical cyclones grow from the most related to mesoscale in- teractions, which also affect TC tracks and the resulting occurrence. 1

  13. Modeling convection in the Greenland Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Vikas

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed examination of the development of a deep convection event observed in the Greenland Sea in 1988-89 is carried out through a combination of modeling, scale estimates, and data analysis. We develop a prognostic ...

  14. Marangoni convection in droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Daniel

    We consider a small droplet of water sitting on top of a heated superhydrophobic surface. A toroidal convection pattern develops in which fluid is observed to rise along the surface of the spherical droplet and to accelerate ...

  15. Kinematical relations among radar-observed water concentrations, vertical motions, and liquid-water drop-size spectra in convective clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Runnels, Robert Clayton

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of return settling are often cloudless or consist of cumulus clouds which have had their growth impeded. If conditions in the atmosphere are favorable, convection cells form and the updraft areas associated with these cells develop into cumulonimbus... and time, M & M(x, y, z, t). The x- and y-directions are horizontal and z-direction is positive toward the zenith. If the quantity M is conservative, the local rate of change at a fixed locality (the local change) can be represented by the following...

  16. SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shouhong

    SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

  17. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  18. Solar Dynamics, Rotation, Convection and Overshoot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanasoge, S; Roth, M; Schou, J; Schuessler, M; Thompson, M J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss recent observational, theoretical and modeling progress made in understanding the Sun's internal dynamics, including its rotation, meridional flow, convection and overshoot. Over the past few decades, substantial theoretical and observational effort has gone into appreciating these aspects of solar dynamics. A review of these observations, related helioseismic methodology and inference and computational results in relation to these problems is undertaken here.

  19. ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael

    2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

  20. ARM Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) Product

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Michael

    ARM soundings are used to determine Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), Convective Inhibition (CIN) and associated properties, using the following relationships;

  1. Cold domes over the warm pool: a study of the properties of cold domes produced by mesoscale convective systems during TOGA COARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caesar, Kathy-Ann Lois

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are known to cool the subcloud layer by the introduction of penetrative downdrafts to the surface, resulting in the formation of cold domes (also known as cold pools). Five MCSs sampled during the Tropical Ocean...

  2. Impact of Secondary Eyewall Heating on Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change* XIAQIONG ZHOU, BIN WANG, XUYANG GE, AND TIM LI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bin

    Impact of Secondary Eyewall Heating on Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change* XIAQIONG ZHOU, BIN WANG is to explore the factors that might influence the intensity change of tropical cyclones (TCs) associated. Introduction Concentric eyewalls usually refer to two or more quasi-circular eyewalls separated by a convective

  3. Parameterizing deep convection using the assumed probability density function method

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Storer, R. L.; Griffin, B. M.; Höft, J.; Weber, J. K.; Raut, E.; Larson, V. E.; Wang, M.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their coarse horizontal resolution, present-day climate models must parameterize deep convection. This paper presents single-column simulations of deep convection using a probability density function (PDF) parameterization. The PDF parameterization predicts the PDF of subgrid variability of turbulence, clouds, and hydrometeors. That variability is interfaced to a prognostic microphysics scheme using a Monte Carlo sampling method.The PDF parameterization is used to simulate tropical deep convection, the transition from shallow to deep convection over land, and midlatitude deep convection. These parameterized single-column simulations are compared with 3-D reference simulations. The agreement is satisfactory except when the convective forcing is weak.more »The same PDF parameterization is also used to simulate shallow cumulus and stratocumulus layers. The PDF method is sufficiently general to adequately simulate these five deep, shallow, and stratiform cloud cases with a single equation set. This raises hopes that it may be possible in the future, with further refinements at coarse time step and grid spacing, to parameterize all cloud types in a large-scale model in a unified way.« less

  4. The convective structures associated with cloud-to-ground lightning in TOGA COARE Mesoscale Convective Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restivo, Michael Edward

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    suggested that the threshold of about 40 dBZ at the -10 C level for rapid cloud electrification found in New Mexico by Dye et al. (1989) could be valid for tropical convection as well. Orville and Henderson (1986), and Goodman and Christian (1993), have... along with small ice and supercooled liquid water for cloud electrification and lightning to occur. Since most oceanic VPRR drop off rapidly above the freezing level compared to continental VPRR, this would provide evidence that the updraft velocities...

  5. Convective cores in galactic cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kritsuk; T. Plewa; E. Mueller

    2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use hydrodynamic simulations with adaptive grid refinement to study the dependence of hot gas flows in X-ray luminous giant elliptical galaxies on the efficiency of heat supply to the gas. We consider a number of potential heating mechanisms including Type Ia supernovae and sporadic nuclear activity of a central supermassive black hole. As a starting point for this research we use an equilibrium hydrostatic recycling model (Kritsuk 1996). We show that a compact cooling inflow develops, if the heating is slightly insufficient to counterbalance radiative cooling of the hot gas in the central few kiloparsecs. An excessive heating in the centre, instead, drives a convectively unstable outflow. We model the onset of the instability and a quasi-steady convective regime in the core of the galaxy in two-dimensions assuming axial symmetry. Provided the power of net energy supply in the core is not too high, the convection remains subsonic. The convective pattern is dominated by buoyancy driven large-scale mushroom-like structures. Unlike in the case of a cooling inflow, the X-ray surface brightness of an (on average) isentropic convective core does not display a sharp maximum at the centre. A hybrid model, which combines a subsonic peripheral cooling inflow with an inner convective core, appears to be stable. We also discuss observational implications of these results.

  6. Convection, granulation and period jitter in classical Cepheids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neilson, Hilding R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses of recent observations of the sole classical Cepheid in the Kepler field, V1154 Cygni, found random changes of about 30 minutes in the pulsation period. These period changes challenge standard theories of pulsation and evolution because the period change is non-secular, and explaining this period jitter is necessary for understanding stellar evolution and the role of Cepheids as precise standard candles. We suggest that convection and convective hot spots can explain the observed period jitter. Convective hot spots alter the timing of flux maximum and minimum in the Cepheid light curve, hence change the measured pulsation period. We present a model of random hot spots that generate a localized flux excess that perturbs the Cepheid light curve and consequently the pulsation period which is consistent with the observed jitter. This result demonstrates how important understanding convection is for modeling Cepheid stellar structure and evolution, how convection determines the red edge of the instability...

  7. Assimilation of Simulated Polarimetric Radar Data for a Convective Storm Using the Ensemble Kalman Filter. Part I: Observation Operators for Reflectivity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    the Weather Sur- veillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D), the radial velocity and equivalent radar reflectivity and reflectivity link the model velocity compo- nents to the observed radial velocity and the model hydrometeor melting model that defines the water fraction in the melting snow or hail. The effect of varying density

  8. Increase in the Intensity of Postmonsoon Bay of Bengal Tropical Cyclones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The post-monsoon (October-November) tropical cyclone (TC) season in the Bay of Bengal has spawned many of the deadliest storms in recorded history. Here it is shown that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs, and the contribution of major TCs to total TC power, increased during 1981-2010. It is found that changes in environmental parameters are responsible for the observed increases in TC intensity. Increases in sea surface temperature and upper ocean heat content made the ocean more conducive to TC development, while enhanced convective instability made the atmosphere more favorable for the growth of TCs. The largest changes in the atmosphere and ocean occurred in the eastern Bay of Bengal, where nearly all major TCs form. These changes are part of positive linear trends, suggesting that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs may continue to increase in the future.

  9. Tropical Cyclone Intensification from Asymmetric Convection: Energetics and Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, David S.

    and some new methods of analysis. The model equations have been changed to be more consistent and available potential energies are presented for both asymmetric and symmetric motions, and these are used to quantify the flow of energy from localized, asymmetric heat sources to kinetic energy of the wind field

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurface Heat

  11. Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5Let us countLighting SignLiisa

  12. Patterns of Convection in the Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalms Village95-1999) HeegerPatrick

  13. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A. [University of Washington Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  14. Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

  15. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, Ronald

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect of the adjacent conditioned zones was properly accounted for by the BLASTeffects of this observation on the accuracy of results from the programs, the convection code was used iteratively with BLAST

  16. Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plant, Robert

    Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

  17. Tropical Underdevelopment Jeffrey D. Sachs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mobilizing energy resources in tropical economies is emphasized as another significant contributor measure of economic development. Tropical and landlocked regions, by contrast ­ such as Bolivia, Chad

  18. Investigations in Southeast Texas Precipitating Storms: Modeled and Observed Characteristics, Model Sensitivities, and Educational Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopper, Larry

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    triply-nested mesoscale model simulations are conducted for each case using single- and double- moment microphysics with four convective treatments (i.e., two convective parameterizations and explicit vs. parameterized convection at 9 km). Observed...

  19. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and OilPhaseObservation of aof

  20. The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Niño related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform­convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

  1. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  2. 1234 VOLUME 42J O U R N A L O F A P P L I E D M E T E O R O L O G Y Radiative and Microphysical Characteristics of Deep Convective Systems in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    precipitation radar and Geostationary Meteorological Satellite infrared radiometer measurements are used%. In cases in which the convective available potential energy (CAPE) is large, deep convective clouds roles in producing the high albedos of tropical anvil clouds. A comparison of the radiative heating

  3. Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : . Computer models show skill in forecasting tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures one to two years in advance for Pacific Ocean observations that are the foundation of skillful ENSO forecasts: Moored buoys Drifting buoysaaaaaa Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific . Has a periodicity of 2­7 years

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Formulation of a tropical town energy budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ORIGINAL PAPER Formulation of a tropical town energy budget (t-TEB) scheme Hugo Abi Karam & Augusto /Accepted: 18 August 2009 # Springer-Verlag 2009 Abstract This work describes the tropical town energy) as observed in the Metropolitan Area of Rio de Janeiro (MARJ; -22° S; -44° W) in Brazil. Reasoning about

  5. Notes and Correspondence Are Tropical Cyclones Less Effectively Formed by Easterly Waves in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsing-Chang "Mike"

    tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific. By carefully separating easterly waves from the lowerNotes and Correspondence Are Tropical Cyclones Less Effectively Formed by Easterly Waves@iastate.edu #12;1 Abstract It has been observed that the percentage of tropical cyclones originating from easterly

  6. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  7. A numerical study of orographic effects on moist convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert Doyle

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based on a typical synoptic situation across the mountain range of northern Honshu, Japan. Wind shear, stability~ and moisture were varied from the basic situation to observe the effects of induced vertical motion on the different clouds which formed... forecaster in Japan. Convective systems were noted as they crossed the Sea oi' Japan and changes to these systems ovserved as they crossed the mountain ranges of Japan. Some convective systems would move across the Sea of Japan caus1ng consecutive reports...

  8. Natural convection airflow and heat transport in buildings: experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, G.F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of natural convection airflow in passive solar buildings are described. Particular results are given for two buildings supplementing other data already published. A number of generalizations based on the monitoring of the 15 buildings are presented. It is concluded that energy can be reasonably well distributed throughout a building by natural convection provided suitable openings are present and that the direction of heat transport is either horizontally across or upward.

  9. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  10. Magneto-convection in a sunspot umbra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schuessler; A. Voegler

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a realistic simulation of 3D radiative magneto-convection in a strong background magnetic field corresponding to the conditions in sunspot umbrae are shown. The convective energy transport is dominated by narrow upflow plumes with adjacent downflows, which become almost field-free near the surface layers. The strong external magnetic field forces the plumes to assume a cusp-like shape in their top parts, where the upflowing plasma loses its buoyancy. The resulting bright features in intensity images correspond well (in terms of brightness, size, and lifetime) to the observed umbral dots in the central parts of sunspot umbrae. Most of the simulated umbral dots have a horizontally elongated form with a central dark lane. Above the cusp, most plumes show narrow upflow jets, which are driven by the pressure of the piled-up plasma below. The large velocities and low field strengths in the plumes are effectively screened from spectroscopic observation because the surfaces of equal optical depth are locally elevated, so that spectral lines are largely formed above the cusp. Our simulations demonstrate that nearly field-free upflow plumes and umbral dots are a natural result of convection in a strong, initially monolithic magnetic field.

  11. Laser induced natural convection and thermophoresis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, C.Y.; Cipolla, J.; Morse, T.F.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of axial laser volumetric heating and forced convection on the motion of aerosol particles in a vertical tube has been studied. The asymptotic case of constant wall temperature provides simple temperature and velocity profiles that determine the convection and thermophoretic motion of small aerosol particles. For the case in which the flow (in the absence of laser heating) is downward, the laser heating induces upward buoyant motion near the tube center. When the laser heating is taken to be constant (a small absorption limit), a velocity profile may be found that will minimize the distance over which particles are deposited on the wall. Such an observation may have some bearing on the manufacture of preforms from which optical fibers are drawn.

  12. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model National Center for Atmospheric Research,* Boulder, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    into the boundary layer. The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation can be viewed in the context mixing above the boundary layer. In the latter, ventilation weakens the eyewall entropy front, resulting, an oscillatory intensity regime materializes and is tied to transient convective bursts and strong downdrafts

  13. THE DOMINANCE OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam, E-mail: jmurphy@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: jdolence@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: burrows@astro.princeton.edu [Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-dimensional instabilities have become an important ingredient in core-collapse supernova (CCSN) theory. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the driving mechanism of the dominant instability. We compare our parameterized three-dimensional CCSN simulations with other buoyancy-driven simulations and propose scaling relations for neutrino-driven convection. Through these comparisons, we infer that buoyancy-driven convection dominates post-shock turbulence in our simulations. In support of this inference, we present four major results. First, the convective fluxes and kinetic energies in the neutrino-heated region are consistent with expectations of buoyancy-driven convection. Second, the convective flux is positive where buoyancy actively drives convection, and the radial and tangential components of the kinetic energy are in rough equipartition (i.e., K{sub r} {approx} K{sub {theta}} + K{sub {phi}}). Both results are natural consequences of buoyancy-driven convection, and are commonly observed in simulations of convection. Third, buoyant driving is balanced by turbulent dissipation. Fourth, the convective luminosity and turbulent dissipation scale with the driving neutrino power. In all, these four results suggest that in neutrino-driven explosions, the multi-dimensional motions are consistent with neutrino-driven convection.

  14. Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canaan, R.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

  15. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situtations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others or to reduce the number of heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures is predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Natural convective loops that can occur in buildings are described and a few design guidelines are presented.

  16. Mechanisms of Remote Tropical Surface Warming during El Nio JOHN C. H. CHIANG AND BENJAMIN R. LINTNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lintner, Benjamin Richard

    temperature) for the remote tropical surface warming. Over the remote oceans, latent heat flux acting throughMechanisms of Remote Tropical Surface Warming during El Niño JOHN C. H. CHIANG AND BENJAMIN R.10) simulations of the 1997/98 El Niño that the observed "remote" (i.e., outside the Pacific) tropical land

  17. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  18. Simulated Convective Invigoration Processes at Trade Wind Cumulus Cold Pool ZHUJUN LI AND PAQUITA ZUIDEMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    convection and cold pools using a nested­Weather Research and Fore- casting Model simulation of 19 January ratio drops in simulated cold pools fall within the envelope of observed cases, and the wind enhancement pools invigorating convection at their downwind boundary and suppressing thermals in- side the stable

  19. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection can provide adequate heat distribution in many situations that arise in buildings. This is appropriate, for example, in passive solar buildings where some rooms tend to be more strongly solar heated than others. Natural convection can also be used to reduce the number of auxiliary heating units required in a building. Natural airflow and heat transport through doorways and other internal building apertures are predictable and can be accounted for in the design. The nature of natural convection is described, and a design chart is presented appropriate to a simple, single-doorway situation. Experimental results are summarized based on the monitoring of 15 passive solar buildings which employ a wide variety of geometrical configurations including natural convective loops.

  20. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (?) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a ? of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing ? to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  1. AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment): Observations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation for Modeling Studies Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, C; Del Genio, A; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Klein, S; Leung, L Ruby; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Wu, X; Xie, S

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep convection in the tropics plays an important role in driving global circulations and the transport of energy from the tropics to the mid-latitudes. Understanding the mechanisms that control tropical convection is a key to improving climate modeling simulations of the global energy balance. One of the dominant sources of tropical convective variability is the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), which has a period of approximately 30–60 days. There is no agreed-upon explanation for the underlying physics that maintain the MJO. Many climate models do not show well-defined MJO signals, and those that do have problems accurately simulating the amplitude, propagation speed, and/or seasonality of the MJO signal. Therefore, the MJO is a very important modeling target for the ARM modeling community geared specifically toward improving climate models. The ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) period coincides with a large international MJO initiation field campaign called CINDY2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011) that will take place in and around the Indian Ocean from October 2011 to January 2012. AMIE, in conjunction with CINDY2011 efforts, will provide an unprecedented data set that will allow investigation of the evolution of convection within the framework of the MJO. AMIE observations will also complement the long-term MJO statistics produced using ARM Manus data and will allow testing of several of the current hypotheses related to the MJO phenomenon. Taking advantage of the expected deployment of a C-POL scanning precipitation radar and an ECOR surface flux tower at the ARM Manus site, we propose to increase the number of sonde launches to eight per day starting in about mid-October of the field experiment year, which is climatologically a period of generally suppressed conditions at Manus and just prior to the climatologically strongest MJO period. The field experiment will last until the end of the MJO season (typically March), affording the documentation of conditions before, during, and after the peak MJO season. The increased frequency of sonde launches throughout the experimental period will provide better diurnal understanding of the thermodynamic profiles, and thus a better representation within the variational analysis data set. Finally, a small surface radiation and ceilometer system will be deployed at the PNG Lombrum Naval Base about 6 km away from the ARM Manus site in order to provide some documentation of scale variability with respect to the representativeness of the ARM measurements.

  2. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  3. Convection induced by radiative cooling of a layer of participating medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasanna, Swaminathan, E-mail: prasannaswam@gmail.com [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288 92295, Chatenay-Malabry, France and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295, Chatenay-Malabry (France)] [Laboratoire EM2C, CNRS UPR 288 92295, Chatenay-Malabry, France and Ecole Centrale Paris, Grande Voie des Vignes 92295, Chatenay-Malabry (France); Venkateshan, S. P., E-mail: spv@iitm.ac.in [HTTP Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering IIT Madras, Chennai (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations and experiments have been conducted to study the effect of radiative cooling on natural convection in a horizontal layer of a participating medium enclosed between isothermal opaque wall and radiatively transparent wall and exposed to a cold background. The study is of relevance to a nocturnal boundary layer under clear and calm conditions. The focus of the study is to capture the onset of convection caused by radiative cooling. The experiments have been designed to mimic the atmospheric radiative boundary conditions, and hence decoupling convection and radiation boundary conditions. Planck number Pl and optical thickness of the layer ?{sub H} are the two important parameters that govern the interaction between radiation and convection. The radiation-convection coupling is a strong function of length scale. Convection sets up within first few seconds for all the experiments. Strong plume like convection is observed for the experimental conditions used in the present study. Both simulations and experiments confirm that radiative cooling increases substantially with decrease in emissivity of the bottom wall. Radiative cooling is strongly influenced by the nongray nature of the participating medium, especially when strong emission from the medium escapes to space, in the window region of the atmosphere. Accurate representation of radiative properties is critical. Linear stability analysis of onset of convection indicates that radiation stabilizes convection as Pl decreases. The observations are similar to the case of Rayleigh Bénard convection in a radiating gas. However, for both experimental and numerical conditions, the observed Rayleigh numbers are much greater than the critical Rayleigh number. To conclude, the role of radiation is to drive and sustain convection in the unstable layer.

  4. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  5. A Climatology of Tropical Anvil and Its Relationship to the Large-Scale Circulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Wei

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of anvil formation, and to provide a more realistic assessment of the radiative impact of tropical anvil on the large-scale circulation. Based on 10 years (1998-2007) of observations, anvil observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM...

  6. Natural convection airflow measurement and theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Jones, G.F.; Yamaguchi, Kenjiro

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is a major mechanism for heat distribution in many passive solar buildings, especially those with sunspaces. To better understand this mechanism, observations of air velocities and temperatures have been made in 13 different houses that encompass a wide variety of one- and two-story geometries. This paper extends previous reports. Results from one house are described in detail, and some generalizations are drawn from the large additional mass of data taken. A simple mathematical model is presented that describes the general nature of airflow and energy flow through an aperture.

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  8. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  9. Radar, satellite, and lightning characteristics of select mesoscale convective systems in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toracinta, Ernest Richard

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the observation of high negative flash counts coincident with convective cores having small reflectivity lapse rates in the mixed phase region is consistent with the presence of large ice particles aloft. Positive CG flashes were mostly located in low reflectivity...

  10. MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Robert A. Houze Jr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Robert A. Houze Jr. Department of Atmospheric Sciences University; published 31 December 2004. [1] Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have regions of both convective and stratiform precipitation, and they develop mesoscale circulations as they mature. The upward motion takes

  11. Combating tropical deforestation in Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellek, R.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article outlines the findings of Tropical Forestry Action Plan (TFAP), which was part of an international initiative on tropical deforestation. Ten specific recommendations are addressed. Haiti has lost more than 97% of its forestland, so emphasis should be placed on replenishing the forest cover.

  12. NATURAL CONVECTION IN ROOM GEOMETRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, Fred; Kammerud, R.; Ruberg, K.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in room geometries in two and three dimensions. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment reported here. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single thermal zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. The results indicate that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may be in error by as much as 50% as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure. It is also found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface.

  13. Final Progress Report [Testing Climate Model Simulations of Tropical Cirrus Lifecycles: A Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soden, Brian J

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project integrates ARM data sets with satellite observations and model simulations to improve the representation of tropical cloud systems in climate models. We focus on describing and understanding relevant features of the lifecycle of tropical cirrus cloud systems using an innovative method which combines the Eulerian-based ARM measurements with Lagrangian information from geostationary satellites.

  14. Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Copyrighted Material What Is Tropical Ecology? Asking the question, What is tropical ecology? may seem akin to asking questions such as, Who is buried in Grant's tomb? Tropical ecology is the study of the ecology of tropical regions. But so what? Consider these questions: First, what is ecology? What are its

  15. Improvements to simulation of Madden Julian Oscillation due to deep1 convection parameterization modifications in the Community Climate2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    coherent structures, which are43 important features of observed MJOs. The conclusions are supported by two, and small-scale convection (e.g., Blade and Hartmann 1993; Hu and Randall 1995;53 Kemball-Cook and Weare. 1999). A key factor in improving MJO simulation is the convective58 parameterization. Many tests have

  16. Heat transfers in a double-skin roof ventilated by natural convection in summer time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biwole, Pascal; Pompeo, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The double-skin roofs investigated in this paper are formed by adding a metallic screen on an existing sheet metal roof. The system enhances passive cooling of dwellings and can help diminishing power costs for air conditioning in summer or in tropical and arid countries. In this work, radiation, convection and conduction heat transfers are investigated. Depending on its surface properties, the screen reflects a large amount of oncoming solar radiation. Natural convection in the channel underneath drives off the residual heat. The bi-dimensional numerical simulation of the heat transfers through the double skin reveals the most important parameters for the system's efficiency. They are, by order of importance, the sheet metal surface emissivity, the screen internal and external surface emissivity, the insulation thickness and the inclination angle for a channel width over 6 cm. The influence of those parameters on Rayleigh and Nusselt numbers is also investigated. Temperature and air velocity profiles on seve...

  17. Mesoscale flows in large aspect ratio simulations of turbulent compressible convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a very large aspect ratio (42.6) numerical simulation of fully compressible turbulent convection in a polytropic atmosphere, and focus on the properties of large-scale flows. Mesoscale patterns dominate the turbulent energy spectrum. We show that these structures, which had already been observed in Boussinesq simulations by Cattaneo et al. (2001), have a genuine convective origin and do not result directly from collective interactions of the smaller scales of the flow, even though their growth is strongly affected by nonlinear transfers. If this result is relevant to the solar photosphere, it suggests that the dominant convective mode below the Sun's surface may be at mesoscales.

  18. Mesoscale environmental models accompanying convection in the Texas HIPLEX region / by Mark Edward Humbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Mark Edward

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with convection is upward motion at all levels with a maximum value just prior to max1mum convect1ve intensity. Days without convection showed a cont1nual vertical turbulent m1xing of moisture from a shallow boundary layer to the 700 mb level. Lack... of 4 g kg 1 are observed. The moisture content increases at the 22 Post Big Spring Midland Robert Lee 4 500 mb cn 0 O m 8 L. cn 6 x 4 2 700 mb . . ~ ''. ~' . ~ / r 12 10 850 mb 15 18 21 00 03 Time (GNT hours) Fig. 9. Time profiles...

  19. Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Thomas R.

    Whether the characteristics of tropical cyclones have changed or will change in a warming climate — and if so, how — has been the subject of considerable investigation, often with conflicting results. Large amplitude ...

  20. Tropical bases by regular projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hept, Kerstin

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the tropical variety $\\mathcal{T}(I)$ of a prime ideal $I$ generated by the polynomials $f_1, ..., f_r$ and revisit the regular projection technique introduced by Bieri and Groves from a computational point of view. In particular, we show that $I$ has a short tropical basis of cardinality at most $r + \\codim I + 1$ at the price of increased degrees, and we provide a computational description of these bases.

  1. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  2. Mesoscale convective complex vs. non-mesoscale convective complex thunderstorms: a comparison of selected meteorological variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoofard, Michael Eugene

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE CCMPLLX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis MICHAkL EUGENE JJOOFARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AJkM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subj ect: Meteorology MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX VS. NON-MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE COMPLEX THUNDERSTORMS: A COMPARISON OF SELECTED METEOROLOGICAL VARIABLES A Thesis...

  3. Advection, Moistening, and Shallow-to-deep Convection Transitions During the Initiation and Propagation of Madden-Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Landu, Kiranmayi; Long, Charles N.

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Using observations from the 2011 AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign over the Indian Ocean and a high-resolution regional model simulation, the processes that lead to the rapid shallow-to-deep convection transitions associated with the initiation and eastward propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are examined. By tracking the evolution of the depth of several thousand individual model simulated precipitation features, the role of and the processes that control the observed midtropospheric moisture buildup ahead of the detection of deep convection are quantified at large and convection scales. The frequency of shallow-to-deep convection transitions is found to be sensitive to this midlevel moisture and large-scale uplift. This uplift along with the decline of large-scale drying by equator-ward advection causes the moisture buildup leading to the initiation of the MJO. Convection scale moisture variability and uplift, and large-scale zonal advection play secondary roles.

  4. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  5. AERIAL MEASUREMENTS OF CONVECTION CELL ELEMENTS IN HEATED LAKES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa-Aleman, E; Saleem Salaymeh, S; Timothy Brown, T; Alfred Garrett, A; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Linda Nichols, L

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Power plant-heated lakes are characterized by a temperature gradient in the thermal plume originating at the discharge of the power plant and terminating at the water intake. The maximum water temperature discharged by the power plant into the lake depends on the power generated at the facility and environmental regulations on the temperature of the lake. Besides the observed thermal plume, cloud-like thermal cells (convection cell elements) are also observed on the water surface. The size, shape and temperature of the convection cell elements depends on several parameters such as the lake water temperature, wind speed, surfactants and the depth of the thermocline. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Clemson University are collaborating to determine the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and thermal convection intensity. Laboratory experiments at Clemson University have demonstrated a simple relationship between the surface heat flux and the standard deviation of temperature fluctuations. Similar results were observed in the aerial thermal imagery SRNL collected at different locations along the thermal plume and at different elevations. SRNL will present evidence that the results at Clemson University are applicable to cooling lakes.

  6. Numerical analysis of heat transfer by conduction and natural convection in loose-fill fiberglass insulation--effects of convection on thermal performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmas, A.A.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional code for solving equations of convective heat transfer in porous media is used to analyze heat transfer by conduction and convection in the attic insulation configuration. The particular cases treated correspond to loose-fill fiberglass insulation, which is characterized by high porosity and air permeability. The effects of natural convection on the thermal performance of the insulation are analyzed for various densities, permeabilities, and thicknesses of insulation. With convection increasing the total heat transfer through the insulation, the thermal resistance was found to decrease as the temperature difference across the insulating material increases. The predicted results for the thermal resistance are compared with data obtained in the large-scale climate simulator at the Roof Research Center using the attic test module, where the same phenomenon has already been observed. The way the wood joists within the insulation influence the start of convection is studied for differing thermophysical and dynamic properties of the insulating material. The presence of wood joists induces convection at a lower temperature difference.

  7. Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian Hong-An

    Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a tropical cyclone’s intensity. An ...

  8. A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

  9. Estimating tropical cyclone precipitation risk in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    This paper uses a new rainfall algorithm to simulate the long-term tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology in Texas based on synthetic tropical cyclones generated from National Center for Atmospheric Research/National ...

  10. NISTIR 6095 Horizontal Convective Condensation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NISTIR 6095 Horizontal Convective Condensation of Alternative Refrigerants within a Micro-Fin Tube Horizontal Convective Condensation of Alternative Refrigerants Within a Micro-Fin Tube Mark A. Kedzierski J for flow boiling pressure drop in a smooth tube. Correlation of the pressure drop measurements suggested

  11. Collective phase description of oscillatory convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, Yoji, E-mail: ykawamura@jamstec.go.jp [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan)] [Institute for Research on Earth Evolution, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama 236-0001 (Japan); Nakao, Hiroya [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)] [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Informatics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We formulate a theory for the collective phase description of oscillatory convection in Hele-Shaw cells. It enables us to describe the dynamics of the oscillatory convection by a single degree of freedom which we call the collective phase. The theory can be considered as a phase reduction method for limit-cycle solutions in infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, namely, stable time-periodic solutions to partial differential equations, representing the oscillatory convection. We derive the phase sensitivity function, which quantifies the phase response of the oscillatory convection to weak perturbations applied at each spatial point, and analyze the phase synchronization between two weakly coupled Hele-Shaw cells exhibiting oscillatory convection on the basis of the derived phase equations.

  12. Diamagnetic pumping near the base of a stellar convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. L. Kitchatinov; G. Rüdiger

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The property of inhomogeneous turbulence in conducting fluids to expel large-scale magnetic fields in the direction of decreasing turbulence intensity is shown as important for the magnetic field dynamics near the base of a stellar convection zone. The downward diamagnetic pumping confines a fossil internal magnetic field in the radiative core so that the field geometry is appropriate for formation of the solar tachocline. For the stars of solar age, the diamagnetic confinement is efficient only if the ratio of turbulent magnetic diffusivity of the convection zone to the (microscopic or turbulent) diffusivity of the radiative interiour is larger than 10^5. Confinement in younger stars require still larger diffusivity ratio. The observation of persistent magnetic structures on young solar-type stars can thus provide evidences for the nonexistence of tachoclines in stellar interiors and on the level of turbulence in radiative cores.

  13. Asian Clinical Tropical Medicine Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Asian Clinical Tropical Medicine Bangkok, Thailand July 21 ­ August 3, 2012 Join the Faculty, and the University of Minnesota as they co-host the fourth Asian Clinical Tropical Medical Course in beautiful Bangkok, Thailand. Healthcare providers with experience and/or a special interest in clinical tropical

  14. EVIDENCE FOR CONVECTION IN SUNSPOT PENUMBRAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharti, L.; Solanki, S. K.; Hirzberger, J., E-mail: bharti@mps.mpg.d [Max-Planck-Institute fuer sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 2, 37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of twisting motions in penumbral filaments in sunspots located at heliocentric angles from 30{sup 0} to 48{sup 0} using three time series of blue continuum images obtained by the Broadband Filter Imager (BFI) on board Hinode. The relations of the twisting motions to the filament brightness and the position within the filament and within the penumbra, respectively, are investigated. Only certain portions of the filaments show twisting motions. In a statistical sense, the part of the twisting portion of a filament located closest to the umbra is brightest and possesses the fastest twisting motion, with a mean twisting velocity of 2.1 km s{sup -1}. The middle and outer sections of the twisting portion of the filament (lying increasingly further from the umbra), which are less bright, have mean velocities of 1.7 km s{sup -1} and 1.35 km s{sup -1}, respectively. The observed reduction of brightness and twisting velocity toward the outer section of the filaments may be due to reducing upflow along the filament's long axis. No significant variation of twisting velocity as a function of viewing angles was found. The obtained correlation of brightness and velocity suggests that overturning convection causes the twisting motions observed in penumbral filament and may be the source of the energy needed to maintain the brightness of the filaments.

  15. Radar Observations of MJO and Kelvin Wave Interactions During DYNAMO/AMIE/CINDY2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePasquale, Amanda Michele

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a tropical phenomenon that exists on the time scale of 30-90 days, commonly initiates over the Indian Ocean and slowly propagates into the western Pacific as a series of convective events, which have time scales...

  16. SUMMARY OF 2013 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHORS' SEASONAL AND TWO-WEEK FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In addition, Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) was the lowest that has been observed since 1983. This year Cyclone Energy (ACE) (92) 165 165 142 30 32% Net Tropical Cyclone Activity (NTC) (103%) 175 175 150 43 42SUMMARY OF 2013 ATLANTIC TROPICAL CYCLONE ACTIVITY AND VERIFICATION OF AUTHORS' SEASONAL AND TWO

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSIENT LUMINOUS EVENT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    OBSERVATIONS OF TWO TRANSIENT LUMINOUS EVENT- PRODUCING MESOSCALE CONVECTIVE SYSTEMS Timothy LangC by positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) lightning can lead to transient luminous events (TLEs; Williams 1998; Lyons

  18. Convective Cooling and Passive Stack Improvements in Motors (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennion, K.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses current research at NREL in convective cooling and passive stack improvements in motors.

  19. Structure and evolution of a convective band MCS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdes-Manzanilla, Arturo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Mesoscale Convective Complex apparently aided in the formation of new lines of convection behind the primary convective line of the system. This process was repeated twice in the storm life cycle and led to multiple bands of convection...

  20. Analysis of Precipitation Using Satellite Observations and Comparisons with Global Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murthi, Aditya

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The primary goal is to study the annual cycle of rainfall over four land regions of the tropics namely, the Indian monsoon, the Amazon, tropical Africa and the North American monsoon. The results...

  1. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural convection between spaces in a building which play a major role in energy transfer are discussed. Two situations are investigated: Convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway sizing equation is given for the single door case. Data from airflow monitoring in one two-story house and summary data for five others are presented. The nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  2. Conclusions Observed enhancement in convection heat transfer coefficient in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    in de-ionized water Commercial System Heater Insulation Water block · The water block replaces/min) di-water 1% nanofluid 0.5% nanofluid Results: Calculated Thermal Conductivity 0.45 0.5 0.55 0.6 0.65 0.7 0.75 0.8 0.85 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 thermalconductivity(W/mK) volume loading (%) calculated di-water

  3. Title: Radar-observed convective characteristics during TWP-ICE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-Resolved Study91Title:

  4. The divergent wind component in data sparse tropical wind fields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Bruce Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    boundary data were estimated by linear extrapolation from inner to outer grid points. Comparisons of level Illb wind data and cloud drift winds were made using Geostationary Operational Environmental Satelhte (GOES) West observed winds obtained from... for 0000 GMT 25 January 1979 were drawn and subjectively compared. Claudy regions viewed in enhanced GOES West imagery were superimposed on these streamline fields to determine whether the aliased wind fields correlated well with the convective activity...

  5. Circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Våge, Kjetil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of the circulation and convection in the Irminger Sea are investigated using a variety of in-situ, satellite, and atmospheric reanalysis products. Westerly Greenland tip jet events are intense, small-scale wind ...

  6. Tropical Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mather, James

    We have generated a suite of products that includes merged soundings, cloud microphysics, and radiative fluxes and heating profiles. The cloud microphysics is strongly based on the ARM Microbase value added product (Miller et al., 2003). We have made a few changes to the microbase parameterizations to address issues we observed in our initial analysis of the tropical data. The merged sounding product is not directly related to the product developed by ARM but is similar in that it uses the microwave radiometer to scale the radiosonde column water vapor. The radiative fluxes also differ from the ARM BBHRP (Broadband Heating Rate Profile) product in terms of the radiative transfer model and the sampling interval.

  7. Origins of convective activity over Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strager, Christopher Stephen

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORIGINS OF CONVECTIVE ACTIVITY OVER PANAMA A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER STEPHEN STRAGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989... Major Subject: Meteorology ORIGINS OF CONVECTIVE ACTIVITY OVER PANAMA A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER STEPHEN STRAGER Approved as to style and content by: Steven W. ons (Chair of Committee) Kenneth C. Brundidge (Member) Rud lf J. Freund ( ember...

  8. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Kollias, Pavlos [McGill University; Giangrande, Scott

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  9. Seismic Sounding of Convection in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanasoge, Shravan; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our Sun, primarily composed of ionized hydrogen and helium, has a surface temperature of 5777~K and a radius $R_\\odot \\approx 696,000$ km. In the outer $R_\\odot/3$, energy transport is accomplished primarily by convection. Using typical convective velocities $u\\sim100\\,\\rm{m\\,s^{-1}}$ and kinematic viscosities of order $10^{-4}$ m$^{2}$s$^{-1}$, we obtain a Reynolds number $Re \\sim 10^{14}$. Convection is thus turbulent, causing a vast range of scales to be excited. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, of the convecting fluid is very low, of order $10^{-7}$\\,--\\,$10^{-4}$, so that the Rayleigh number ($\\sim Re^2 Pr$) is on the order of $10^{21}\\,-\\,10^{24}$. Solar convection thus lies in extraordinary regime of dynamical parameters, highly untypical of fluid flows on Earth. Convective processes in the Sun drive global fluid circulations and magnetic fields, which in turn affect its visible outer layers ("solar activity") and, more broadly, the heliosphere ("space weather"). The precise determination of the depth of sola...

  10. The tropical double description method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allamigeon, Xavier; Goubault, Eric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a tropical analogue of the classical double description method allowing one to compute an internal representation (in terms of vertices) of a polyhedron defined externally (by inequalities). The heart of the tropical algorithm is a characterization of the extreme points of a polyhedron in terms of a system of constraints which define it. We show that checking the extremality of a point reduces to checking whether there is only one minimal strongly connected component in an hypergraph. The latter problem can be solved in almost linear time, which allows us to eliminate quickly redundant generators. We report extensive tests (including benchmarks from an application to static analysis) showing that the method outperforms experimentally the previous ones by orders of magnitude. The present tools also lead to worst case bounds which improve the ones provided by previous methods.

  11. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.8: Relationship among mesoscale convective complex (MCC)C. J. Anderson, 2008: Idealized mesoscale convective system205. Houze, R. , 2004: Mesoscale convective systems. Reviews

  12. A comparison of tropical mesoscale convective systems in El Nino and La Nina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zolman, Jody Lynn

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Snow exclusion areas (After Mohr and Zipser 1996b). January Area Elevation m 65-83W 10N-20S &4000 65-75W 20-25S &3800 65-75W 65-75W 0-1 OW 30-50E 50-110E 25-30S 30-35S 25-35N 30-35N 25-35N &3600 &3000 ALL ALL ALL February Area Elevation...(m) 65-83W 5N-20S &4000 65-75W 20-30S &3500 65-75W 0-1 OW 30-35S 25-35N &3000 ALL 30-50E 50-120E 90-120E 30-35N 25-35N 25-35N ALL &1000 &800 March Area Elevation m) April Area Elevation m) May Area Elevation(m June Area Elevation...

  13. A Simple Multicloud Parameterization for Convectively Coupled Tropical Waves. Part II: Nonlinear Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    , British Columbia, Canada ANDREW J. MAJDA Department of Mathematics, and Center for Atmosphere Ocean clouds, and deep penetrative cumulus clouds (Lin and Johnson 1996; Johnson et al. 1999). Furthermore

  14. Intersecting Cold Pools: Convective Cloud Organization by Cold Pools over Tropical Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergy International Fuel7Radiative Transfer

  15. Influence of Tropical Tropopause Layer Cooling on Atlantic Hurricane Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Susan

    Virtually all metrics of Atlantic tropical cyclone activity show substantial increases over the past two decades. It is argued here that cooling near the tropical tropopause and the associated decrease in tropical cyclone ...

  16. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

    2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  17. Convection automated logic oven control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, M.A.; Eke, K.I. [Apollo U.S.A. Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)] [Apollo U.S.A. Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few years, there has been a greater push to bring more automation to the cooling process. There have been attempts at automated cooking using a wide range of sensors and procedures, but with limited success. The authors have the answer to the automated cooking process; this patented technology is called Convection AutoLogic (CAL). The beauty of the technology is that it requires no extra hardware for the existing oven system. They use the existing temperature probe, whether it is an RTD, thermocouple, or thermistor. This means that the manufacturer does not have to be burdened with extra costs associated with automated cooking in comparison to standard ovens. The only change to the oven is the program in the central processing unit (CPU) on the board. As for its operation, when the user places the food into the oven, he or she is required to select a category (e.g., beef, poultry, or casseroles) and then simply press the start button. The CAL program then begins its cooking program. It first looks at the ambient oven temperature to see if it is a cold, warm, or hot start. CAL stores this data and then begins to look at the food`s thermal footprint. After CAL has properly detected this thermal footprint, it can calculate the time and temperature at which the food needs to be cooked. CAL then sets up these factors for the cooking stage of the program and, when the food has finished cooking, the oven is turned off automatically. The total time for this entire process is the same as the standard cooking time the user would normally set. The CAL program can also compensate for varying line voltages and detect when the oven door is opened. With all of these varying factors being monitored, CAL can produce a perfectly cooked item with minimal user input.

  18. Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Glaciation temperatures of convective clouds ingesting desert dust, air pollution and smoke from observations show that desert dust and heavy air pollution over East Asia have similar ability to glaciate desert dust, air pollution and smoke from forest fires, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L21804, doi:10

  19. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Stressed horizontal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    in the Gullmarfjord on the west coast of Sweden. When the wind swept over the fjord, the water at the surface flowed to the suggestion of Munk & Wunsch (1998) that mechanical energy sources -- such as the wind stress observed by Sandstr¨om (1908) -- are necessary to sustain the ocean circulation. Recent work on horizontal convection

  20. Stellar models with mixing length and T(tau) relations calibrated on 3D convection simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salaris, Maurizio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) The calculation of the thermal stratification in the superadiabatic layers of stellar models with convective envelopes is a long standing problem of stellar astrophysics, and has a major impact on predicted observational properties like radius and effective temperature. The Mixing Length Theory, almost universally used to model the superadiabatic convective layers, contains effectively one free parameter to be calibrated --alpha(ml)-- whose value controls the resulting effective temperature. Here we present the first self-consistent stellar evolution models calculated by employing the atmospheric temperature stratification, Rosseland opacities, and calibrated variable alpha(ml) (dependent on effective temperature and surface gravity) from a large suite of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations of stellar convective envelopes and atmospheres for solar stellar composition (Trampedach et al. 2013). From our calculations (with the same composition of the radiation hydrodynamics simulatio...

  1. Asteroseismic Diagnostics of Stellar Convective Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anwesh Mazumdar; Sarbani Basu; Braxton L. Collier; Pierre Demarque

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the small frequency separations as diagnostics of the mass of the convective core and evolutionary stage of solar-type stars. We demonstrate how the small separations can be combined to provide sensitive tests for the presence of convective overshoot at the edge of the core. These studies are focused on low degree oscillation modes, the only modes expected to be detected in distant stars. Using simulated data with realistic errors, we find that the mass of the convective core can be estimated to within 5% if the total stellar mass is known. Systematic errors arising due to uncertainty in the mass could be up to 20%. The evolutionary stage of the star, determined in terms of the central hydrogen abundance using our proposed technique, however, is much less sensitive to the mass estimate.

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry and climate change Manuel R adapt to this change. This paper discusses how tropical forestry practices can contribute to maintaining Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596 JKPWB, Jakarta 10065, Indonesia e-mail: m.guariguata@cgiar.org J. P

  3. Tropical Western Pacific CART Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z SiteManhattan ProjectMayARM-00-005Tropical

  4. A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH ATTACHED WALL JETS By WEIXIU KONGQuest Information and Learning Company. #12;II A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS

  5. LARGE EDDY SIMULATION OF NATURAL AND MIXED CONVECTION AIRFLOW INDOORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    coordinate Greek symbols : Thermal expansion coefficient t : Time step : Filter size : Kinematic viscocity convection, such as winter heating by a baseboard heater; forced convection, such as free cooling in shoulder

  6. Fluidized bed boiler convective zone tube replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A major problem with the Georgetown University Atomspheric-Pressure, Fluidized-Bed Combustor-Boiler (GU AFBC) experienced during the first six years of operation was tube erosion. Previous corrective measures for in-bed tube erosion appeared to be effective, but excessive wear of the convective zone tubes was still occurring, and the entire heat transfer tube bundle in the boiler required replacement. In the planned project,the eroded tubes would be replaced, and the convective zone modified to eliminate the problem. Progress is discussed.

  7. Convection and dynamo action in B stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustson, Kyle C; Toomre, Juri

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Main-sequence massive stars possess convective cores that likely harbor strong dynamo action. To assess the role of core convection in building magnetic fields within these stars, we employ the 3-D anelastic spherical harmonic (ASH) code to model turbulent dynamics within a 10 solar mass main-sequence (MS) B-type star rotating at 4 times the solar rate. We find that strong (900 kG) magnetic fields arise within the turbulence of the core and penetrate into the stably stratified radiative zone. These fields exhibit complex, time-dependent behavior including reversals in magnetic polarity and shifts between which hemisphere dominates the total magnetic energy.

  8. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  9. Observational and numerical study of Atlantic tropical instability waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qiaoyan

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    (solid line) and Atlantic ATL3 index (dot line) from 1998 to 2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4 The scheme of Radon transform to estimate wave characteristics from the longitude-time TIW distribution... variance is computed at each point, then averaged over the active TIW region. We use this filter to derive anomaly fields of SST. After the filtering, the Radon transform technique is applied to estimate the propagation characteristics of the TIW. The Radon...

  10. Tropical anvil cirrus evolution from observations and numerical simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z SiteManhattanPacific: A Year in Darwin

  11. The impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    of Climate, 21, 638 Sriver & Huber, 2007, Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropicalThe impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface. One way to parameterise this process

  12. Convection and convective overshooting in stars more massive than 10 $M_\\odot$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie, Jin; Lv, Guoliang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, four sets of evolutionary models are computed with different values of the mixing length parameter $\\alpha_{\\rm p}$ and the overshooting parameter $\\delta_{\\rm ov}$. The properties of the convective cores and the convective envelopes are studied in the massive stars. We get three conclusions: First, the larger $\\alpha_{\\rm p}$ leads to enhancing the convective mixing, removing the chemical gradient, and increasing the convective heat transfer efficiency. Second, core potential $\\phi_{\\rm c} = M_{\\rm c} / R_{\\rm c}$ describes sufficiently the evolution of a star, whether it is a red or blue supergiant at central helium ignition. Third, the discontinuity of hydrogen profile above the hydrogen burning shell seriously affect the occurrence of blue loops in the Hertzsprung--Russell diagram.

  13. Operating temperatures for a convectively cooled recessed incandescent light fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Toor, I.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test results are given for the operation of a recessed incandescent light fixture intended for residential use. The fixture is labeled for use in direct contact with attic thermal insulation. Temperature control of the powered fixture is provided by convective heat transfer from the ceiling side of the fixture. The fixture was operated at power levels up to two times the rated power of 75 watts and under thermal insulations up to R-40. In all operating configurations tested the fixture surface in contact with attic insulation was found to be less than 175/sup 0/C. The observed surface temperatures are judged to be safe for operation in contact with loose-fill or batt-type insulations. It was observed that the power leads inside one fixture configuration are exposed to temperatures as high as 168/sup 0/C. The electrical insulation could, therefore, have a limited life. The properties of the internal fixture wiring were not, however, studied in detail.

  14. The effect of convection on pulsational stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Houdek

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A review on the current state of mode physics in classical pulsators is presented. Two, currently in use, time-dependent convection models are compared and their applications on mode stability are discussed with particular emphasis on the location of the Delta Scuti instability strip.

  15. Convective Instability of a Boundary Layer with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    proportional to the integral over the depth of the lithosphere of the 19 #12;ratio of thermal buoyancy. Such instabilities are driven by the negative thermal buoyancy of the cold lithosphere and retarded largely for driving convective downwelling. For non-Newtonian viscosity with power law exponent n and temperature

  16. Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides et d and absolute instabilities in Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow Benoît PIER Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides flow type often disrupt oil-well drilling By implementing a detailed instability analysis, the dynamics

  17. Radiative Energy Balance in the Tropical Tropopause Layer: An Investigation with ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Qiang

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project is to use the ARM observational data to improve our understanding of cloud-radiation effects in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL), which is crucial for improving the simulation and prediction of climate and climate change. In last four and half years, we have been concentrating on (i) performing the comparison of the ice cloud properties from the ground-based lidar observations with those from the satellite CALIPSO lidar observations at the ARM TWP sites; (ii) analyzing TTL cirrus and its relation to the tropical planetary waves; (iii) calculating the radiative heating rates using retrieved cloud microphysical properties by combining the ground-based lidar and radar observations at the ARM TWP sites and comparing the results with those using cloud properties retrieved from CloudSat and CALIPSO observations; (iv) comparing macrophysical properties of tropical cirrus clouds from the CALIPSO satellite and from ground-based micropulse and Raman lidar observations; (v) improving the parameterization of optical properties of cirrus clouds with small effective ice particle sizes; and (vi) evaluating the enhanced maximum warming in the tropical upper troposphere simulated by the GCMs. The main results of our research efforts are reported in the 12 referred journal publications that acknowledge the DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER64769.

  18. CONVECTION THEORY AND SUB-PHOTOSPHERIC STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, David; Meakin, Casey; Young, Patrick A., E-mail: darnett@as.arizona.ed, E-mail: casey.meakin@gmail.co, E-mail: patrick.young.1@asu.ed [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As a preliminary step toward a complete theoretical integration of three-dimensional compressible hydrodynamic simulations into stellar evolution, convection at the surface and sub-surface layers of the Sun is re-examined, from a restricted point of view, in the language of mixing-length theory (MLT). Requiring that MLT use a hydrodynamically realistic dissipation length gives a new constraint on solar models. While the stellar structure which results is similar to that obtained by Yale Rotational Evolution Code (Guenther et al.; Bahcall and Pinsonneault) and Garching models (Schlattl et al.), the theoretical picture differs. A new quantitative connection is made between macro-turbulence, micro-turbulence, and the convective velocity scale at the photosphere, which has finite values. The 'geometric parameter' in MLT is found to correspond more reasonably with the thickness of the superadiabatic region (SAR), as it must for consistency in MLT, and its integrated effect may correspond to that of the strong downward plumes which drive convection (Stein and Nordlund), and thus has a physical interpretation even in MLT. If we crudely require the thickness of the SAR to be consistent with the 'geometric factor' used in MLT, there is no longer a free parameter, at least in principle. Use of three-dimensional simulations of both adiabatic convection and stellar atmospheres will allow the determination of the dissipation length and the geometric parameter (i.e., the entropy jump) more realistically, and with no astronomical calibration. A physically realistic treatment of convection in stellar evolution will require substantial additional modifications beyond MLT, including nonlocal effects of kinetic energy flux, entrainment (the most dramatic difference from MLT found by Meakin and Arnett), rotation, and magnetic fields.

  19. High-Resolution Modeling to Assess Tropical Cyclone Activity in Future Climate Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackmann, Gary

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied research is proposed with the following objectives: (i) to determine the most likely level of tropical cyclone intensity and frequency in future climate regimes, (ii) to provide a quantitative measure of uncertainty in these predictions, and (iii) to improve understanding of the linkage between tropical cyclones and the planetary-scale circulation. Current mesoscale weather forecasting models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are capable of simulating the full intensity of tropical cyclones (TC) with realistic structures. However, in order to accurately represent both the primary and secondary circulations in these systems, model simulations must be configured with sufficient resolution to explicitly represent convection (omitting the convective parameterization scheme). Most previous numerical studies of TC activity at seasonal and longer time scales have not utilized such explicit convection (EC) model runs. Here, we propose to employ the moving nest capability of WRF to optimally represent TC activity on a seasonal scale using a downscaling approach. The statistical results of a suite of these high-resolution TC simulations will yield a realistic representation of TC intensity on a seasonal basis, while at the same time allowing analysis of the feedback that TCs exert on the larger-scale climate system. Experiments will be driven with analyzed lateral boundary conditions for several recent Atlantic seasons, spanning a range of activity levels and TC track patterns. Results of the ensemble of WRF simulations will then be compared to analyzed TC data in order to determine the extent to which this modeling setup can reproduce recent levels of TC activity. Next, the boundary conditions (sea-surface temperature, tropopause height, and thermal/moisture profiles) from the recent seasons will be altered in a manner consistent with various future GCM/RCM scenarios, but that preserves the large-scale shear and incipient disturbance activity. This will allow (i) a direct comparison of future TC activity that could be expected for an active or inactive season in an altered climate regime, and (ii) a measure of the level of uncertainty and variability in TC activity resulting from different carbon emission scenarios.

  20. Local helioseismology and correlation tracking analysis of surface structures in realistic simulations of solar convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dali Georgobiani; Junwei Zhao; Alexander Kosovichev; David Benson; Robert F. Stein; Åke Nordlund

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply time-distance helioseismology, local correlation tracking and Fourier spatial-temporal filtering methods to realistic supergranule scale simulations of solar convection and compare the results with high-resolution observations from the SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI). Our objective is to investigate the surface and sub-surface convective structures and test helioseismic measurements. The size and grid of the computational domain are sufficient to resolve various convective scales from granulation to supergranulation. The spatial velocity spectrum is approximately a power law for scales larger than granules, with a continuous decrease in velocity amplitude with increasing size. Aside from granulation no special scales exist, although a small enhancement in power at supergranulation scales can be seen. We calculate the time-distance diagram for f- and p-modes and show that it is consistent with the SOHO/MDI observations. From the simulation data we calculate travel time maps for surface gravity waves (f-mode). We also apply correlation tracking to the simulated vertical velocity in the photosphere to calculate the corresponding horizontal flows. We compare both of these to the actual large-scale (filtered) simulation velocities. All three methods reveal similar large scale convective patterns and provide an initial test of time-distance methods.

  1. Final Report on Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Wu, G. J. Zhang

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations. • The project resulted in nine peer-reviewed publications and numerous scientific presentations that directly address the CCPP’s scientific objective of improving climate models. • We developed a package of improved convection parameterization that includes improved closure, trigger condition for convection, and comprehensive treatment of convective momentum transport. • We implemented the new convection parameterization package into several versions of the NCAR models (both coupled and uncoupled). This has led to 1) Improved simulation of seasonal migration of ITCZ; 2) Improved shortwave cloud radiative forcing response to El Niño in CAM3; 3) Improved MJO simulation in both uncoupled and coupled model; and 4) Improved simulation of ENSO in coupled model. • Using the dynamic core of CCM3, we isolated the dynamic effects of convective momentum transport. • We implemented mosaic treatment of subgrid-scale cloud-radiation interaction in CCM3.

  2. Scaling of convective velocity in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya M. Yamada; Hiroaki Katsuragi

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the velocity scaling of granular convection which is a possible mechanism of the regolith migration on the surface of small asteroids. In order to evaluate the contribution of granular convection to the regolith migration, the velocity of granular convection under the microgravity condition has to be revealed. Although it is hard to control the gravitational acceleration in laboratory experiments, scaling relations involving the gravitational effect can be evaluated by systematic experiments. Therefore, we perform such a systematic experiment of the vibration-induced granular convection. From the experimental data, a scaling form for the granular convective velocity is obtained. The obtained scaling form implies that the granular convective velocity can be decomposed into two characteristic velocity components: vibrational and gravitational velocities. In addition, the system size dependence is also scaled. According to the scaling form, the granular convective velocity $v$ depends on the gravitational acceleration $g$ as $v \\propto g^{0.97}$ when the normalized vibrational acceleration is fixed.

  3. The Generation of a Mesoscale Convective System from Mountain Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Crook, N. Andrew

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Heights are contoured with solid lines every 60 gpm and absolute vorticity (31025) is analyzed in dashed lines every 5 s21. FIG. 2. Skew T-log p diagram for Denver sounding at 1200 UTC 21 Jun 1993. Full wind barb is 5 m s21. FIG. 3. 500-mb observed... relative humidity and winds for 1200 UTC 21 Jun 1993 over innermost grid region shown in Fig. 5. Relative humidity is contoured every 10%, with full wind barb representing 5 m s21. Denver County is the smallest county near the center of the map. This work...

  4. Cloud to ground lightning in tropical cyclone: a study of 34 West Atlantic tropical cyclones from 1986-1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coyne, John Michael

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricane Tropical Storm Hurricane Hurricane Andrew Charley Arlene Floyd Alberto Chris Keith Allison Chantal Hugo Jerry Marco Ana Bob Fabian ?8 Andrew Danielle Earl Arlene Emily Alberto Beryl Gordon Allison Dean Erin Jerry Opal... Tropical Storm Hurricane Tropical Storm Hurricane Tropical Storm Hurricane Humcane Tropical Storm Hurricane Andrew Charley Arlene Floyd Alberto Chris Keith Allison Chantal Hugo Jerry Marco Ana Bob Fabian ?8 Andrew Danielle Earl...

  5. Midlevel ventilation's constraint on tropical cyclone intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian Hong-An

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Midlevel ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hypothesized mechanism by which environmental vertical wind shear can constrain a TC's intensity. An idealized ...

  6. Tropical cyclone-ocea~ interactions Isaac Ginis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Hurricane Andrew in 1992 exceeded 60 with nearly $30 billion damage. Tropical cyclone modeling efforts over of hurricane track predictions over the last 30 years, in contrast there has been no perceptible improvement

  7. The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason Allen

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    cells and vortices are the respective source of PV production and building blocks for the meso-?-scale vortices. Finally, this thesis discusses issues related to the multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclone formation. For instance, the tracking...

  8. Elements of tropical Pacific decadal variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuckar, Neven-Stjepan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the period from 1965 to 1999. Model results show Pacific basin decadal changes, including the prominent 1976-77 climate shift, in agreement with previous research. The reanalysis indicates an evolution intrinsic to the tropical Pacific which propagates...

  9. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  10. Urban and rural site regional fossil fuel CO2 observations from Hungary using multi elevation sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the minimum saturation mixing ratio (SMRmin) along the back trajectories associated with the observed air massAccess Solid Earth OpenAccess The Cryosphere OpenAccess Cold trap dehydration in the Tropical Tropopause Layer is evident from the data in isen- tropic scatter plots between the sonde-observed mixing ratio (OMR

  11. Stability of sunspots to convective motions. I. Adiabatic instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno-Insertis, F.; Spruit, H.C. (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, La Laguna (Spain); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching (Germany, F.R.))

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For determining the adiabatic stability of a uniform vertical field in an arbitrary stratification it is sufficient to consider the limit of infinitesimal horizontal wavelength. It is shown how the behavior of the instability can be estimated qualitatively from the dependence of the equipartition field strength on depth. Modes are calculated numerically for analytic stratification models and for a detailed sunspot stratification, including the effects of partial ionization. It is concluded that for the observed field strengths of umbrae the stratification is indeed unstable, with a growth time of about 18 minutes. The unstable eigenfunctions have a maximum at about 2300 km below the surface of the umbra and are about 3900 km deep. Deeper layers may also be unstable depending on unknown details of the stratification. A connection between fluting instability and convective instability is noted. 37 refs.

  12. Validation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder temperature and moisture profiles over tropical oceans and their impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    ] Tropical cyclones are one of the costliest and deadliest natural disasters in the United States and other the potential for economic damage and deaths. However, due to the lack of the conventional observations over/I satellite rainfall rates results in improvements in hurricane track forecasts in the GEOS global model [Hou

  13. Aquatic Botany 76 (2003) 299315 Phosphorus uptake kinetics of a dominant tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch-Rose, Marguerite

    Laboratory, Biological Sciences Department, Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL; Morse et al., 1987; Fourqurean et al., 1993; Jensen et al., 1998; Koch et al., 2001), with some notable in the observed P-limited growth of some tropical seagrass species (Short et al., 1985; Short, 1987; Powell et al

  14. Convective Dynamo Simulation with a Grand Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustson, Kyle; Miesch, Mark; Toomre, Juri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global-scale dynamo action achieved in a simulation of a Sun-like star rotating at thrice the solar rate is assessed. The 3-D MHD Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code, augmented with a viscosity minimization scheme, is employed to capture convection and dynamo processes in this G-type star. The simulation is carried out in a spherical shell that encompasses 3.8 density scale heights of the solar convection zone. It is found that dynamo action with a high degree of time variation occurs, with many periodic polarity reversals occurring roughly every 6.2 years. The magnetic energy also rises and falls with a regular period. The magnetic energy cycles arise from a Lorentz-force feedback on the differential rotation, whereas the processes leading to polarity reversals are more complex, appearing to arise from the interaction of convection with the mean toroidal fields. Moreover, an equatorial migration of toroidal field is found, which is linked to the changing differential rotation, and potentially to a no...

  15. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  16. The Ratio of Helium- to Hydrogen-Atmosphere White Dwarfs: Direct Evidence for Convective Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. -E. Tremblay; P. Bergeron

    2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the ratio of helium- to hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarf stars as a function of effective temperature from a model atmosphere analysis of the infrared photometric data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey combined with available visual magnitudes. Our study surpasses any previous analysis of this kind both in terms of the accuracy of the Teff determinations as well as the size of the sample. We observe that the ratio of helium- to hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs increases gradually from a constant value of ~0.25 between Teff = 15,000 K and 10,000 K to a value twice as large in the range 10,000 > Teff > 8000 K, suggesting that convective mixing, which occurs when the bottom of the hydrogen convection zone reaches the underlying convective helium envelope, is responsible for this gradual transition. The comparison of our results with an approximate model used to describe the outcome of this convective mixing process implies hydrogen mass layers in the range log M_H/M_tot = -10 to -8 for about 15% of the DA stars that survived the DA to DB transition near Teff ~ 30,000 K, the remainder having presumably more massive layers above log M_H/M_tot ~ -6.

  17. Dynamo Action in the Solar Convection Zone and Tachocline: Pumping and Organization of Toroidal Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Browning; Mark S. Miesch; Allan Sacha Brun; Juri Toomre

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results from three-dimensional spherical shell simulations of magnetic dynamo action realized by turbulent convection penetrating downward into a tachocline of rotational shear. This permits us to assess several dynamical elements believed to be crucial to the operation of the solar global dynamo, variously involving differential rotation resulting from convection, magnetic pumping, and amplification of fields by stretching within the tachocline. The simulations reveal that strong axisymmetric toroidal magnetic fields (about 3000 G in strength) are realized within the lower stable layer, unlike in the convection zone where fluctuating fields are predominant. The toroidal fields in the stable layer possess a striking persistent antisymmetric parity, with fields in the northern hemisphere largely of opposite polarity to those in the southern hemisphere. The associated mean poloidal magnetic fields there have a clear dipolar geometry, but we have not yet observed any distinctive reversals or latitudinal propagation. The presence of these deep magnetic fields appears to stabilize the sense of mean fields produced by vigorous dynamo action in the bulk of the convection zone.

  18. JamesCookUniversity (JCU) es la principal universidad australiana en la zona tropical.JCU ofrece excelencia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    selva tropical, calentamiento global, turismo, medicina tropical y cuidado de la salud pública. JCU es

  19. Noise-Sustained Convective Instability in a Magnetized Taylor-Couette Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Liu

    2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  20. The Mid-Latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen,W.; Jensen,M.; Genio, A. D.; Giangrande, S.; Heymsfield, A.; Heymsfield, G.; Hou, A.; Kollias, P.; Orr, B.; Rutledge, S.; Schwaller, M.; Zipser, E.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April-May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radition Measurement Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation program. The Intensive Observation Period leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall observations over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective processes tangible to the convective parameterization problem are targeted such as, pre-convective environment and convective initiation, updraft / downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, influence on the environment and radiation and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing. MC3E will use a new multi-scale observing strategy with the participation of a network of distributed sensors (both passive and active). The approach is to document in 3-D not only the full spectrum of precipitation rates, but also clouds, winds and moisture in an attempt to provide a holistic view of convective clouds and their feedback with the environment. A goal is to measure cloud and precipitation transitions and environmental quantities that are important for satellite retrieval algorithms, convective parameterization in large-scale models and cloud-resolving model simulations. This will be accomplished through the deployment of several different elements that complement the existing (and soon to become available) ARM facilities: a network of radiosonde stations, NASA scanning multi-frequency/parameter radar systems at three different frequencies (Ka/Ku/S), high-altitude remote sensing and in situ aircraft, wind profilers and a network of surface disdrometers. In addition to these special MC3E instruments, there will be important new instrumentation deployed by DOE at the ARM site including: 3 networked scanning X-band radar systems, a C-band scanning radar, a dual wavelength (Ka/W) scanning cloud radar, a Doppler lidar and upgraded vertically pointing millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) and micropulse lidar (MPL).To fully describe the properties of precipitating cloud systems, both in situ and remote sensing airborne observations are necessary. The NASA GPM-funded University of North Dakota (UND) Citation will provide in situ observations of precipitation-sized particles, ice freezing nuclei and aerosol concentrations. As a complement to the UND Citation's in situ observations, the NASA ER-2 will provide a high altitude satellite simulator platform that carrying a Ka/Ku band radar and passive microwave radiometers (10-183 GHZ).

  1. Noise-sustained convective instability in a magnetized Taylor-Couette flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The helical magnetorotational instability of the magnetized Taylor-Couette flow is studied numerically in a finite cylinder. A distant upstream insulating boundary is shown to stabilize the convective instability entirely while reducing the growth rate of the absolute instability. The reduction is less severe with larger height. After modeling the boundary conditions properly, the wave patterns observed in the experiment turn out to be a noise-sustained convective instability. After the source of the noise resulted from unstable Ekman and Stewartson layers is switched off, a slowly-decaying inertial oscillation is observed in the simulation. We reach the conclusion that the experiments completed to date have not yet reached the regime of absolute instability.

  2. Seasonal shift in the foraging niche of a tropical avian resident: resource competition at work?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jedlicka, J A; Greenberg, R; Perfecto, I; Philpottt, S M; Dietsch, T V

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and migrant birds in Campeche, Mexico. Tropical Ecology 22:a dry tropical forest in Campeche, Mexico and found that

  3. Characterization of melting level clouds over the tropical western pacific warm pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M.; Johnson, K.; Billings, J.; Troyan, D.; Long, C.; Comstock, J.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cursory examination of historical ARSCL data indicates a common cloud feature in the tropics are thin detrainment shelves (Attendant Shelf Clouds, or ASCs) near the melting level (see figure for example). We use the ARSCL product to identify ASCs by defining them as cloud layers with bases above 4 km, a corresponding top below 6 km, and a thickness of less than 1 km. In order to prevent biases in determination of the diurnal cycle of cloud occurrence, we require that both the MMCR and MPL are operating well. In this study we use a total of 55 months of data collected over 14 years of deployments at the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin ARM sites in the Tropical Western Pacific to define the frequency of occurrence (~ 14% of the time) and diurnal cycle of these clouds, along with the atmospheric thermodynamic profile. We further investigate the horizontal extent, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud particle phase through a series of “golden cases” where there is a general absence of additional cloud types in the column and nearby deep convection. These cases indicate that the clouds can cover horizontal areas on the order of a GCM gridbox, have significant (but not always) cloud radiative forcing, and may be composed of liquid or ice water.

  4. Air convection noise of pencil-beam interferometer for long trace profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Convection Noise of Pencil-beam Interferometer for Longwe investigate the effect of air convection on laser-beamshown that the NPD spectra due to air convection have a very

  5. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  6. The Relation Between Dry Vortex Merger and Tropical Cyclone Genesis over the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chin

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong, convective African tropical disturbance has a greater chance to develop into a Tropical 23 Depression (TD) if it merges with a shallow, dry vortex (D-vortex) from the north of the African 24 easterly jet (AEJ) after leaving the western coast. Using 11-year reanalysis data we found that the 25 western tip of a vortex strip at northwestern Africa can serve as dry vortices for the D-vortex 26 merger if it shifts southward. Another source of D-vortices is the westward propagating lows 27 along the southern edge of the Saharan air. The D-vortex merger process occurred for 63.5% of 28 tropical cyclones (TCs) or developing systems over the main development region of the Atlantic 29 Ocean, while it occurred for 54% of non-developing systems. TC genesis could be largely 30 controlled by the large-scale environment, but the differences in characteristics of vortices 31 associated with the D-vortex merger between developing and non-developing systems could 32 potentially help determine their destinies; in general, developing systems were dominated by a 33 more intense and moist south vortex, while non-developing systems were dominated by a north 34 vortex which was more intense, drier, and larger in size. Analysis also shows that 74% of intense 35 developing systems were involved with the D-vortex merger process. More attention needs to be 36 paid to the D-vortex merger and the characteristics of those vortices as they can play significant 37 roles or have a strong indication in Atlantic TC genesis.

  7. About convective heat transfer in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashkevich, R.I. [Kamchatsky Complex Department of NIPIgeotherm Institute, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The interphase fluid-rock heat exchange in convective beat transfer in geothermal systems is investigated Nonlinear model of interphase heat exchange is suggested. Calculation for one dimension case and comparison with known Anzelius-Schumann solution is presented Generalized type block heat transfer model is formulated. The model is adequate for case of geothermal systems and reservoir when a rock block size is comparable with filtration path length. Criterion equations for nonstationary coefficients of interphase heat exchange we presented these equations were obtained in laboratory experiments with diorites.

  8. Improving Convective Parameterization Using ARM Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenITLaboratory inImproving Convective

  9. Evaluating the Representation and Impact of Convective Processes in the NCAR’s Community Climate System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoqing Wu

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection and clouds affect atmospheric temperature, moisture and wind fields through the heat of condensation and evaporation and through redistributions of heat, moisture and momentum. Individual clouds have a spatial scale of less than 10 km, much smaller than the grid size of several hundred kilometers used in climate models. Therefore the effects of clouds must be approximated in terms of variables that the model can resolve. Deriving such formulations for convection and clouds has been a major challenge for the climate modeling community due to the lack of observations of cloud and microphysical properties. The objective of our DOE CCPP project is to evaluate and improve the representation of convection schemes developed by PIs in the NCAR (National Center for Atmospheric Research) Community Climate System Model (CCSM) and study its impact on global climate simulations.

  10. Hurricane Earl, September 1, 2010/NOAA Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Yuguang "Michael"

    Hurricane Earl, September 1, 2010/NOAA Tropical Cyclones A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT, 6 of which became hurricanes East Pacific Ocean: 15 tropical storms, 8 of which became hurricanes Central Pacific Ocean: 4 tropical storms, 2 of which became hurricanes Over a typical 2-year period, the U

  11. Species Loss and Aboveground Carbon Storage in a Tropical Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunker, Daniel E.

    of tropical tree species on carbon storage by simulating 18 possible extinction scenarios within a well-studied 50-hectare tropical forest plot in Panama, which contains 227 tree species. Among extinction as well as the size and longevity of tropical trees. Instead, we simulated species extinctions

  12. LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL TERMS & CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE TERMS & CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS October 2003 #12 in accordance with these Terms and Conditions; · "School" shall mean the London School of Hygiene & Tropical of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine · "School Purchasing Officer" shall mean the Postholder, Mr Keith Flanders

  13. Malaria Centre London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    Malaria Centre London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK October 2014 MalariaCentreReport2012-14LondonSchoolofHygiene&TropicalMedicine #12;#12;Contents Director;2 Director's message London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Despite being preventable and treatable

  14. Investigating Tropical Deforestation Using Two-Stage Spatially Misaligned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Investigating Tropical Deforestation Using Two-Stage Spatially Misaligned Regression Models Deepak Deforestation in the tropics has been a major concern in conservationscience for more than 20 years. Estimates of tropical deforestation over the past few decades have shown an alarming accelerationin forest lost. Concern

  15. ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    ONGOING RESEARCH PROJECTS Model of tropical forest structure and dynamics There is a need canopy structure and partitions dynamic rates for a tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI structure and partitions dynamic rates in a tropical forest. In Review. Journal of Ecology. #12;PPA model

  16. Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holdener, Dain Steffen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF THE THESIS Convective Heating Analysis of an IFE Targetto reduce the convective heating to the LEH windows and fuelpoint for more forceful heating simulations, placing less

  17. A numerical simulation of slantwise convection: its structure and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overpeck, Scott Allen

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    convection), and could be a possible explanation for frontal rainbands. This study uses the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) as a diagnostic tool to simulate a slantwise convective case from the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE, Dirks et al...

  18. MPO 663 -Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    MPO 663 - Convective and Mesoscale Meteorology Brian Mapes, Spring 2008 I intend for students and mesoscale phenomena. 2. Working understanding of several of these tools, cultivated via homework, including. A sense of how convective and mesoscale phenomena fit into larger scales, gained via short current

  19. UNCORRECTED Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlbrodt, Till

    UNCORRECTED PROOF Grid geometry effects on convection in ocean climate models: a conceptual study is the 12 improvement of convection parameterization schemes, but the question of grid geometry also plays to an at- 14 mosphere model. Such ocean climate models have mostly structured, coarsely resolved grids. 15

  20. FLUCTUATIONS NEAR THE CONVECTIVE INSTABILITY IN A CHOLESTERIC LIQUID CRYSTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . For sufficiently strong heating, it is pos- sible for the buoyancy force to overcome the vis- cous shear forces convective pour une certaine valeur critique. A cause du couplage de modes induit par la force extérieure, la, drives the system into convective instability. It is found that, because of the mode coupling induced

  1. Drainage induced convection rolls in foams (revised version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Simon

    , where soap solution is added to the foam at constant flow rate, the irregular motion in the beer glass results for convection in quasi two-dimensional foams (monolayers of bubbles between two glass platesDrainage induced convection rolls in foams (revised version) S. Hutzler, S.J. Cox*, E. Janiaud

  2. Carbon dioxide measurements in tropical east African biomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnell, R.C.; Odh, S.A.; Njau, L.N.

    1981-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    From January 1977 through May 1978 atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations were measured hourly and/or continuously at bimonthly intervals over periods varying from 5 to 8 days at 10 different locations in Kenya, East Africa. During each of these periods, at least two, and in some cases five, vertical profile measurements of CO/sub 2/ concentrations were conducted above different biomes. A large diurnal CO/sub 2/ periodicity was observed over land, with daytime drawdowns to 322 ppm and nighttime buildups to more than 400 ppm observed in savannah regions. In and around tropical rain forests, drawdowns to 310 ppm and buildups to more than 400 ppm were regularly observed. On the higher reaches of Mount Kenya, the diurnal CO/sub 2/ cycle was considerably reduced in amplitude, with variations in the range of 2-6 ppm throughout the 16-month study period. On sunny days, the drawdown of CO/sub 2/ was measurable to heights of at least 4000 m above ground level. Other CO/sub 2/ measurements in air over the Indian Ocean (to distances of up to 450 km upwind of the coast) produced fairly consistent concentrations of about 328.5 ppm which did not fluctuate diurnally. The weekly mean CO/sub 2/ concentrations over Kenya appear to have a bimodal structure, with minima occurring in July and January. On the basis of the data collected during the study it appears likely that regular observations at a high-altitude station on Mount Kenya, either with flask sampling or continuous analyzer measurements, are likely to yield data useful for estimates of CO/sub 2/ concentration backgrounds and trends. Also, there is strong evidence that Mount Kenya would be a good location to measure large-scale interhemispheric CO/sub 2/ exchanges and provide a unique base from which to study the effects of the tropical biome on biogeochemical phenomena. 20 references, 12 figures, 2 tables.

  3. MalariaCentreReport2010-11LondonSchoolofHygiene&TropicalMedicine London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    MalariaCentreReport2010-11LondonSchoolofHygiene&TropicalMedicine London School of Hygiene Dessens; DTM&H students in laboratory 24 February 2011. Copyright London School of Hygiene & Tropical Publications 114 Members 130 Abbreviations 134 #12;2Director's Message London School of Hygiene & Tropical

  4. Two-dimensional segmentation of small convective patterns in radiation hydrodynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lemmerer, B; Hanslmeier, A; Veronig, A; Thonhofer, S; Grimm-Strele, H; Kariyappa, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from high-resolution solar granulation observations indicate the existence of a population of small granular cells that are smaller than 600 km in diameter. These small convective cells strongly contribute to the total area of granules and are located in the intergranular lanes, where they form clusters and chains. We study high-resolution radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the upper convection zone and photosphere to detect small granular cells, define their spatial alignment, and analyze their physical properties. We developed an automated image-segmentation algorithm specifically adapted to high-resolution simulations to identify granules. The resulting segmentation masks were applied to physical quantities, such as intensity and vertical velocity profiles, provided by the simulation. A new clustering algorithm was developed to study the alignment of small granular cells. This study shows that small granules make a distinct contribution to the total area of granules and form clusters of ...

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  6. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  7. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  8. Oceanic Origins of Southwest Tropical Atlantic Biases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhao

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic General Circulation Model POP Parallel Ocean Program ROMS Regional Ocean Modeling System SEC South Equatorial Current SECC South Equatorial Counter Current SETA Southeast Tropical Atlantic SEUC South Equatorial UnderCurrent SLP Sea Level... SST bias ................................................................................... 5 1.3.2 SST bias in SETA ...................................................................................... 8 1.4 Objectives and Approach...

  9. 6, 1064910672, 2006 Extinction in tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Stephens et al., 1990). The radiative influence of a given cirrus cloud depends mostly on the delicate balance between its albedo effect and its greenhouse effect. The dominant effect is globally unknownACPD 6, 10649­10672, 2006 Extinction in tropical ice clouds from lidar, Nephelometer V. Noel et al

  10. The development of convective instability in relation to convective activity and synoptic systems in AVE IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, James Gregory

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    700 mb 500 mb 300 mb 100 mb 1. 8 2 54 3. 1' 6. 2 3. 8 5 64 7 5 15. 0 RMS Direction Error RNS ~Seed Error -1 -1 0. 5ms l. oms -1 -1 0. 8 m s 2. 0 m s -1 -1 10ms 3. 8ms -1 -1 2. 0 m s 5. 7 m s The rawinsonde data were supplemented by hourly... of Co ttee) 4' (Member) N. I (Member) (Head of Department) August 1979 ABSTRACT Tha Development of Convective Instability in Relation to ConVectiVe Activity and Synoptic Systems in AVE 1V, (August 1979$ James Gregory Davis, B. S. , Texas A&M...

  11. Convective effects in a regulatory and proposed fire model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wix, S.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hohnstreiter, G.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Transportation System Development Dept.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation is the dominant mode of heat transfer in large fires. However, convection can be as much as 10 to 20 percent of the total heat transfer to an object in a large fire. The current radioactive material transportation packaging regulations include convection as a mode of heat transfer in the accident condition scenario. The current International Atomic Energy Agency Safety Series 6 packaging regulation states ``the convection coefficient shall be that value which the designer can justify if the package were exposed to the specified fire``. The current Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10CFR71) packaging regulation states ``when significant, convection heat input must be included on the basis of still, ambient air at 800{degrees}C (1475{degrees}F)``. Two questions that can arise in an analysts mind from an examination of the packaging regulations is whether convection is significant and whether convection should be included in the design analysis of a radioactive materials transportation container. The objective of this study is to examine the convective effects on an actual radioactive materials transportation package using a regulatory and a proposed thermal boundary condition.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Modeling of Natural Convection for a Cryogenic Prototype of a Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colonius, Tim

    in Sutherland's law D = diameter g = gravitation acceleration h = convection coefficient k = thermal

  13. Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure Keywords: Supercritical pressure Aviation kerosene Convective heat transfer Numerical study a b s t r a c convective in kerosene pipe flow is complicated. Here the convective heat transfer characteristics of China

  14. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 044105 (2013) Onset of buoyancy-driven convection in Cartesian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the onset of buoyancy-driven convection relevant to subsurface carbon dioxide sequestration in confined

  15. Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

  16. ADVANCED TROPICAL METEOROLOGY: METR 5453.001 T R 11:30-12:45, NWC 5820

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    and their limitations. - Why study the tropics separately? Examples of major tropical circulations on weather. - Easterly waves. 5. Tropical Cyclones What are they? How do they differ from extratropical cyclones cyclones: operations and research. - Predictability aspects of tropical cyclones. - Tropical cyclones

  17. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, H-Y; Mechoso, CR; Xue, Y; Xiao, H; Neelin, JD; Ji, X

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the remote response to the convective heating in Africa, weand remote regions. The convective heating anomalies

  18. Solar dynamo models with alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local 3D convection calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Käpylä; M. J. Korpi; I. Tuominen

    2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) Results from kinematic solar dynamo models employing alpha-effect and turbulent pumping from local convection calculations are presented. We estimate the magnitude of these effects to be around 2-3 m/s. The rotation profile of the Sun as obtained from helioseismology is applied. We obtain an estimate of the ratio of the two induction effects, C_alpha/C_Omega \\approx 10^-3, which we keep fixed in all models. We also include a one-cell meridional circulation pattern having a magnitude of 10-20 m/s near the surface and 1-2 m/s at the bottom of the convection zone. The model essentially represents a distributed turbulent dynamo, as the alpha-effect is nonzero throughout the convection zone, although it concentrates near the bottom of the convection zone obtaining a maximum around 30 degrees of latitude. Turbulent pumping of the mean fields is predominantly down- and equatorward. We find that, when all these effects are included in the model, it is possible to correctly reproduce many features of the solar activity cycle, namely the correct equatorward migration at low latitudes and the polar branch at high latitudes, and the observed negative sign of B_r B_phi. Although the activity clearly shifts towards the equator in comparison to previous models due to the combined action of the alpha-effect peaking at midlatitudes, meridional circulation and latitudinal pumping, most of the activity still occurs at too high latitudes (between 5-60 degrees). Other problems include the relatively narrow parameter space within which the preferred solution is dipolar (A0), and the somewhat too short cycle lengths of the solar-type solutions. The role of the surface shear layer is found to be important only in the case where the alpha-effect has an appreciable magnitude near the surface.

  19. VARIATION OF STELLAR ENVELOPE CONVECTION AND OVERSHOOT WITH METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine how metallicity affects convection and overshoot in the superadiabatic layer of main sequence stars. We present results from a grid of three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations with four metallicities (Z = 0.040, 0.020, 0.010, 0.001), and spanning a range in effective temperature (4950 < T{sub eff} < 6230). We show that changing the metallicity alters properties of the convective gas dynamics, and the structure of the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere. Our grid of simulations shows that the amount of superadiabaticity, which tracks the transition from efficient to inefficient convection, is sensitive to changes in metallicity. We find that increasing the metallicity forces the location of the transition region to lower densities and pressures, and results in larger mean and turbulent velocities throughout the superadiabatic region. We also quantify the degree of convective overshoot in the atmosphere, and show that it increases with metallicity as well.

  20. Theory for induced convection experiments in the tokamak edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theory for induced convection experiments in the tokamak edge P. Helander1 , D.D. Ryutov2 , and R National Laboratory, Livermore, USA By biasing alternate divertor plates in a tokamak, one can create

  1. atmospheric convective boundary: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    convective conditions is found to be primarily due to variations in mixed layer wind speed. Low-level winds thus play the major role in regulating the ability of thermals to...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, experiments with a passive solar building with Trombe wall in the north cold climate are carried out and discussed, and the natural convection heat transfer process has been investigated. The relativity of the factors affecting indoor...

  3. Identification of Robust Terminal-Area Routes in Convective Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System, especially during summer. Traffic flow management algorithms require reliable forecasts of route blockage ...

  4. Effects of aerosols on deep convective cumulus clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jiwen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work investigates the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds and the associated radiative forcing in the Houston area. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) coupled with a spectral-bin microphysics is employed...

  5. Identification of Robust Routes using Convective Weather Forcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalek, Diana

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS), especially during summer months when travel demand is high. This has been the motivation for Air ...

  6. Survey and evaluation of techniques to augment convective heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a survey and evaluation of the numerous techniques which have been shown to augment convective heat transfer. These techniques are: surface promoters, including roughness and treatment; displaced ...

  7. Interaction between surface and atmosphere in a convective boundary layer /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garai, Anirban

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cold fluid constitute most of the heat transport andevent cold air descends to the ground, heat transport fromcold air during sweep events. The convective boundary layer has a great influence on moisture transport,

  8. Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

  9. NATURAL CONVECTION IN PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDINGS: EXPERIMENTS, ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Bauman, F.; Kammerud, R.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer programs have been developed to numerically simulate natural convection in two- and three-dimensional room geometries. The programs have been validated using published data from the literature, results from a full-scale experiment performed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and results from a small-scale experiment performed at LBL. One of the computer programs has been used to study the influence of natural convection on the thermal performance of a single zone in a direct-gain passive solar building. It is found that the convective heat transfer coefficients between the air and the enclosure surfaces can be substantially different from the values assumed in the standard building energy analysis methods, and can exhibit significant variations across a given surface. This study implies that the building heating loads calculated by standard building energy analysis methods may have substantial errors as a result of their use of common assumptions regarding the convection processes which occur in an enclosure.

  10. Radiative sensitivities of tropical anvils to small ice crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles S.; Kiehl, J. T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jr. , Water budget of mesoscale convective system in theJr. , The contribution of mesoscale motions to the mass andpresence of a gentle mesoscale vertical updraft to supply

  11. Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, AND ROBERT WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    Dynamic Effects on the Tropical Cloud Radiative Forcing and Radiation Budget JIAN YUAN, DENNIS L to isolate the effect of large-scale dynamics on the observed radiation budget and cloud properties the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) show that the net radiative effect of clouds on the earth

  12. Vertical convection in neutrino-dominated accretion flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Tong; Kawanaka, Norita; Li, Ang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the effects of the vertical convection on the structure and luminosity of the neutrino-dominated accretion flow (NDAF) around a stellar-mass black hole in spherical coordinates. We found that the convective energy transfer can suppress the radial advection in the NDAF, and that the density, temperature and opening angle are slightly changed. As a result, the neutrino luminosity and annihilation luminosity are increased, which is conducive to achieve the energy requirement of gamma-ray bursts.

  13. Possible solar cycle variations in the convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2000-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) that covers the period from 1995 to 1998 we study the change in frequencies of solar oscillations with solar activity. From these frequencies we attempt to determine any possible variation in solar structure with solar activity. We do not find any evidence of a change in the convection zone depth or extent of overshoot below the convection zone during the solar cycle.

  14. Thermal effects of Kohout convection in the Bahamas and Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kohout convection is a low-temperature groundwater thermal convection process in carbonate platform margins. It was first conceived of and postulated to occur in the subsurface of Florida by Francis Kohout in the 1960's. The flow is driven by buoyancy arising from subsurface differences in salinity and in temperature. Cold, dense seawater surrounding a platform at depth migrates inward, displacing warmer pore waters at the same elevation. This inflowing density current is in turn warmed within the platform and is buoyed upward to discharge on the platform shelf or margin resulting in a giant convective half-cell. In isolated platforms, such as the Bahamas, temperature differences alone drive Kohout convection. In Florida, the regional meteoric flow of the Floridan Aquifer mixes by dispersion with the convecting seawater resulting in an enhanced flow rate. Approximate analytical and numerical solutions of the governing differential equations allow the interactions of the flow and temperature fields to be determined. Permeability characteristics and platform margin geometry are the principal controls of the thermal structure and groundwater flow pattern in isolated platforms. In Florida, regional flow strength is also a control. High horizontal permeabilities (100 md to 1 darcy and higher) and tall, steep margins (1 km height, 30/sup 0/ slope) allow Kohout convection to penetrate 30 to 50 km inland causing substantial cooling. It may thus be a control of thermal evolution of the Florida-Bahamas Basin as well as parts of other sedimentary basins.

  15. Evolution of vertical drafts and cloud-to-ground lightning within the convective region of a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saul, Scott Henry

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolution of the area-averaged vertical velocity within the objectively defined convective region of the 4 June 1985 PRE-STORM (Preliminary Regional Experiment for Stormscale Operational and Research Meteorology-Central Phase) mesoscale...

  16. Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary · Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

  17. Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potvin, Catherine

    Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama S E B) to estimate the carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation; and (3 show the potential for considerable carbon sequestration of tropical afforestation and highlight

  18. GCM simulation of the tropical mixing barriers in the lower stratosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yongyun

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-resolution SKYHI general circulation model is used to simulate tropical mixing behavior and to investigate mixing barriers in the tropical lower stratosphere. Results show that during the solstitial seasons a tropical weak-mixing zone...

  19. australian tropical savannas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results in warmer and drier climate of tropical savannas increases temperatures and wind speeds and decreases precipitation and relative humidity Jackson, Robert B. 2...

  20. Energy saving strategies with personalized ventilation in tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Melikov, Arsen; Chandra Sekhar, Chandra Sekhar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a personalized ventilation system in the tropics, in:edged-mounted task ventilation system, Indoor Air, Vol. 14 (a chair-based personalized ventilation system, Building and

  1. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClarenceStraitTidalEnergyProject,TenaxEnergyTropicalTidalTestCentre,&o...

  2. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox,...

  3. "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Road Princeton, NJ 08540-6649 "A New Paradigm for Secondary Eyewall Formation in Tropical Cyclones", Chun-Chieh Wu (National Taiwan University) Contact Information Website: Website...

  4. TROPICAL DEFORESTATION MODELLING: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT PREDICTIVE APPROACHES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TROPICAL DEFORESTATION MODELLING: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF DIFFERENT PREDICTIVE APPROACHES-time discretisation; Remote Sensing; Neural Networks; Markov Chains; MCE; Dinamica; Risk management; Deforestation

  5. Direct numerical simulations of convective heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pointel, G.; Acharya, S.; Sharma, C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the development of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) code for solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation using higher order finite difference schemes. The time dependent Navier Stokes equation has been discretized using semi-implicit second order time splitting scheme, which requires the solution of pressure Poisson equation. For this purpose a Galerkin Fourier transform in the spanwise direction and a matrix diagonalization technique is used. The convection terms are formulated in non-conservative form on a collocated grid. A fifth order upwind biased scheme is used for this purpose. Diffusion terms are differenced using a sixth order central difference scheme. The algorithm is implemented on the MasPar MP-1, a Single Instruction Multiple Data computer where efficient data parallelization is used to get DNS results. The code has been used to get results for smooth channel flow at Re{sub {tau}} = 180. Results are now being obtained for the energy equation and for flow in a periodic ribbed channel.

  6. Dynamic Transitions of Surface Tension Driven Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henk Dijkstra; Taylan Sengul; Shouhong Wang

    2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the well-posedness and dynamic transitions of the surface tension driven convection in a three-dimensional (3D) rectangular box with non-deformable upper surface and with free-slip boundary conditions. It is shown that as the Marangoni number crosses the critical threshold, the system always undergoes a dynamic transition. In particular, two different scenarios are studied. In the first scenario, a single mode losing its stability at the critical parameter gives rise to either a Type-I (continuous) or a Type-II (jump) transition. The type of transitions is dictated by the sign of a computable non-dimensional parameter, and the numerical computation of this parameter suggests that a Type-I transition is favorable. The second scenario deals with the case where the geometry of the domain allows two critical modes which possibly characterize a hexagonal pattern. In this case we show that the transition can only be either a Type-II or a Type-III (mixed) transition depending on another computable non-dimensional parameter. We only encountered Type-III transition in our numerical calculations. The second part of the paper deals with the well-posedness and existence of global attractors for the problem.

  7. Atmospheric structure and variability in areas of convective storms determined from 3-h rawinsonde data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Gregory Sims

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (1974) indicates RMS vector errors in wind speed for the AVE II data as follows: Level Elevation An le 700 mb 500 mb 300 Htb 40' 0. 5 m s 0. 8 m s " 1. 0ms 10' -1 2. 5ms -1 4. 5 ms 7. 8 m s 'ihese RNS errors agree closely with those.... , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James R. Scoggins The structure and variability of the atmosphere in areas of radar- observed convection is established by using the unique 3-h rawinsonde and surface data from NASA's second...

  8. COMPARISON OF ELM PULSE PROPAGATION IN THE DIII-D SOL AND DIVERTORS WITH AN ION CONVECTION MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FENSTERMACHER,ME; PORTER,GD; LEONARD,AW; BROOKS,NH; BOEDO,JA; COLCHIN,RJ; GRAY,DS; GROEBNER,RJ; GROTH,M; HOGAN,JT; HOLLMANN,EM; LASNIER,CJ; OSBORNE,TH; PETRIE,TW; RUDAKOV,DL; SNYDER,PB; TAKAHASHI,H; WATKINS,JG; ZENG,L; DIII-D TEAM

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 Results from dedicated ELM experiments, performed in DIII-D with fast diagnostics to measure the evolution of Type-I ELM effects in the SOL and divertor, are compared with a simple ion convection model and with initial time-dependent UEDGE simulations. Delays between ELM effects observed in the inner versus the outer divertor regions in the experiments scale, as a function of density, with the difference in ion convection time along field lines from the outer midplane to the divertor targets. The ELM perturbation was modeled as an instantaneous radially uniform increase of diffusion coefficients from the top of the pedestal to the outer SOL. The perturbation was confined to a low field side poloidal zone {+-} 40{sup o} from the outer midplane. The delays in the simulations are similar to those observed in the experiments.

  9. The Role of Subsurface Flows in Solar Surface Convection: Modeling the Spectrum of Supergranular and Larger Scale Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lord, J W; Rast, M P; Rempel, M; Roudier, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the solar horizontal velocity power spectrum at scales larger than granulation using a two-component approximation to the mass continuity equation. The model takes four times the density scale height as the integral (driving) scale of the vertical motions at each depth. Scales larger than this decay with height from the deeper layers. Those smaller are assumed to follow a Kolomogorov turbulent cascade, with the total power in the vertical convective motions matching that required to transport the solar luminosity in a mixing length formulation. These model components are validated using large scale radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We reach two primary conclusions: 1. The model predicts significantly more power at low wavenumbers than is observed in the solar photospheric horizontal velocity spectrum. 2. Ionization plays a minor role in shaping the observed solar velocity spectrum by reducing convective amplitudes in the regions of partial helium ionization. The excess low wavenumber power is also ...

  10. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–eastern tropical South Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 16, 277–and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean, Global Biogeochem.

  11. A Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulent Compressible Convection: Differential Rotation in the Solar Convection Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. Robinson; Kwing L. Chan

    2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of two simulations of the convection zone, obtained by solving the full hydrodynamic equations in a section of a spherical shell. The first simulation has cylindrical rotation contours (parallel to the rotation axis) and a strong meridional circulation, which traverses the entire depth. The second simulation has isorotation contours about mid-way between cylinders and cones, and a weak meridional circulation, concentrated in the uppermost part of the shell. We show that the solar differential rotation is directly related to a latitudinal entropy gradient, which pervades into the deep layers of the convection zone. We also offer an explanation of the angular velocity shear found at low latitudes near the top. A non-zero correlation between radial and zonal velocity fluctuations produces a significant Reynolds stress in that region. This constitutes a net transport of angular momentum inwards, which causes a slight modification of the overall structure of the differential rotation near the top. In essence, the {\\it thermodynamics controls the dynamics through the Taylor-Proudman momentum balance}. The Reynolds stresses only become significant in the surface layers, where they generate a weak meridional circulation and an angular velocity `bump'.

  12. Influence of the tropical Atlantic versus the tropical Pacific on Caribbean rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Taylor Department of Physics, University of the West Indies, Mona, Jamaica David B. Enfield Physical); KEYWORDS: Caribbean, rainfall, El Nin~o, tropical Atlantic, warm pool, model Citation: Taylor, M. A., D. B the two equatorial oceanic basins. Oppositely signed SST anomalies in the NINO3 region and the central

  13. Chapter Number1 Biomass Prediction in Tropical Forests:2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chapter Number1 Biomass Prediction in Tropical Forests:2 The Canopy Grain Approach3 Christophe France9 1. Introduction10 The challenging task of biomass prediction in dense and heterogeneous tropical different forest structures may indeed present similar above ground biomass (AGB) values.13 This is probably

  14. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Andrew-Category 4· Category 4 Hurricane - Winds 131-155 mph. Wall failures in homes and complete roofHurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known

  15. The Maslov dequantization, idempotent and tropical mathematics: A brief introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Litvinov

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a brief introduction to idempotent and tropical mathematics. Tropical mathematics can be treated as a result of the so-called Maslov dequantization of the traditional mathematics over numerical fields as the Planck constant $\\hbar$ tends to zero taking imaginary values.

  16. Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers David L. Carr are significantly associated at the global and regional scales, evidence for population links to deforestation of thought on population­environment theories relevant to deforestation in tropical agricultural frontiers

  17. Carbon accumulation of tropical peatlands over millennia: a modeling approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the global carbon cycle by storing about 40­90 Gt C in peat. Over the past several decades, tropical with lowering the water table and peat burning, releasing large amounts of carbon stored in peat the Holocene Peat Model (HPM), which has been successfully applied to northern temperate peatlands. Tropical

  18. The iron nutrition of tropical foliage plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Harvey Joe

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    extraction of Fe from fresh leaves proved to be a good indicator of the Fe status of plants. It consistently gave higher correlations with chlorophyll concentration than other methods tested. Conversely, total Fe analysis on dried leaves did not always... resolve the correct Fe status of the plant. The studies also suggested that P and the ratio of P/0. 1 N HC1-Fe may be important parameters in the diagnosis of Fe status. In a screening of 11 tropical foliage plants, Ficus benj ami ha and Nephroiepi...

  19. UPDATE: Tropical Storm Isaac | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries | Department ofDepartmentChinaUPDATE: Tropical

  20. ARM - Lesson Plans: Tropical Western Pacific

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPastSurfaceTheTropical

  1. Analysis of 11 june 2003 mesoscale convective vortex genesis using weather surveillance radar ??88 doppler (wsr-88d) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Amber Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs), which typically form within the stratiform rain of some mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), may persist for days, often regenerating convection daily. Long-lived MCVs can produce as much precipitation as a...

  2. Analysis of 11 june 2003 mesoscale convective vortex genesis using weather surveillance radar ??88 doppler (wsr-88d)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Amber Elizabeth

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs), which typically form within the stratiform rain of some mesoscale convective systems (MCSs), may persist for days, often regenerating convection daily. Long-lived MCVs can produce as much precipitation as a...

  3. Efficient small-scale dynamo in solar convection zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotta, H; Yokoyama, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate small-scale dynamo action in the solar convection zone through a series of high resolution MHD simulations in a local Cartesian domain with 1$R_\\odot$ (solar radius) of horizontal extent and a radial extent from 0.715 to 0.96$R_\\odot$. The dependence of the solution on resolution and diffusivity is studied. For a grid spacing of less than 350 km, the root mean square magnetic field strength near the base of the convection zone reaches 95% of the equipartition field strength (i.e. magnetic and kinetic energy are comparable). For these solutions the Lorentz force feedback on the convection velocity is found to be significant. The velocity near the base of the convection zone is reduced to 50% of the hydrodynamic one. In spite of a significant decrease of the convection velocity, the reduction in the enthalpy flux is relatively small, since the magnetic field also suppresses the horizontal mixing of the entropy between up- and downflow regions. This effect increases the amplitude of the entropy pe...

  4. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  5. Eects of thermo-chemical mantle convection on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    E¡ects of thermo-chemical mantle convection on the thermal evolution of the Earth's core Takashi in the core with a fully dynamic thermo-chemical mantle convection model is developed to investigate

  6. Hydration of the lower stratosphere by ice crystal geysers over land convective systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaykin, S.

    The possible impact of deep convective overshooting over land has been explored by six simultaneous soundings of water vapour, particles and ozone in the lower stratosphere next to Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) during ...

  7. Forced-convection surface-boiling heat transfer and burnout in tubes of small diameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic heat-transfer apparatus was designed and constructed for the study of forced-convection boiling in small channels. The various regions of forced-convection surface boiling were studied experimentally and analytically. ...

  8. The influence of convective activity on the vorticity budget 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Tamara L

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Continued. ~E' i~ QE I ~ tt Jtm a tt NE v~ l / tmt ta' NE ~~f IIIY G NE~~ NE a/+ NE NE NE NE 1st NE Fig. 13. Radar summary for 1435 GNT 10 Apri. l 1979. NE I l. c I E j~7 ~ NE NE MP- Qo+ Fig. 14. Radar summary for 2235 GMT 10 April 1979... experiment. 15 3 Average values of terms in the vorticity equation for a convective (Area 1) and a nonconvective (Area 2) area during AVE VII. Units of 10 s 145 4 Average values of terms in the vorticity equation for a convective (Area 1) and a...

  9. On the Wavelength of the Rossby Waves Radiated by Tropical Cyclones KYLE D. KROUSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    of tropical cyclones; the theory then predicts the zonal separation distance of such tropical cyclone pairsOn the Wavelength of the Rossby Waves Radiated by Tropical Cyclones KYLE D. KROUSE Department cyclone (TC). In some cases, such disturbances undergo tropical cyclogenesis, resulting in a pair

  10. Submitted to Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics Shear and Mixing in Oscillatory Doubly Di usive Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    convection are found in the Earth's oceans, most notably, below the polar ice caps. There melting ice

  11. Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yue

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates three topics concerning high clouds: 1) convectively coupled equatorial wave (CCEW) signals derived from cloud top temperature (CTT) and cirrus optical thickness retrieved from satellite observations; 2) investigation...

  12. Life Cycle of a Mesoscale Circular Gust Front Observed by a C-Band Doppler Radar in West Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lothon, Marie

    On 10 July 2006, during the Special Observation Period (SOP) of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) campaign, a small convective system initiated over Niamey and propagated westward in the vicinity of ...

  13. The ionospheric signature of transient dayside reconnection and the associated pulsed convection return ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of convection. Key words. Ionosphere (plasma convection) á Magne- tospheric physics (magnetopause, cusp, 1996, and references therein) and the excitation of dayside convection is the focus of the present of magnetosheath plasma into the magneto- sphere, and the ionospheric plasma ¯ow at the footprint of the cusp

  14. Practical and Intrinsic Predictability of Severe and Convective Weather at the Mesoscales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practical and Intrinsic Predictability of Severe and Convective Weather at the Mesoscales at the mesoscales using convection-permitting ensemble simulations of a squall line and bow echo event during the Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) Experiment (BAMEX) on 9­10 June 2003. Although most

  15. weber, evans, moser, and newell Air Traffic Management Decision Support During Convective Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    · weber, evans, moser, and newell Air Traffic Management Decision Support During Convective WeatherTraffic Management Decision Support During Convective Weather Mark E. Weber, James E. Evans, William R. Moser algorithm. #12;· weber, evans, moser, and newell Air Traffic Management Decision Support During Convective

  16. Charge rearrangement by sprites over a north Texas mesoscale convective system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    Charge rearrangement by sprites over a north Texas mesoscale convective system William W. Hager,1 is analyzed for a mesoscale convective system (MCS) situated in north Texas and east New Mexico on 15 July. Lapierre (2012), Charge rearrangement by sprites over a north Texas mesoscale convective system, J. Geophys

  17. Patterns of Precipitation and Mesolow Evolution in Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    Patterns of Precipitation and Mesolow Evolution in Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices ERIC P manifestations of mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs) that traversed Oklahoma during the periods May­August 2002 Profiler Network data. Forty-five MCVs that developed from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) have been

  18. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

  19. NATURAL CONVECTION OF SUBCOOLED LIQUID NITROGEN IN A VERTICAL CAVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Ho-Myung

    temperature superconductor) power devices, such as HTS transformers, fault current limiters, and terminals power transformer cooled by natural convection of subcooled liquid nitrogen. A liquid nitrogen bath of subcooled liquid nitrogen system for an HTS transformer, operating at around 65 K. This system consists

  20. Sparse grid collocation schemes for stochastic natural convection problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    stochastic methods and Monte-Carlo based sam- pling methods are two approaches that have been used to analyzeSparse grid collocation schemes for stochastic natural convection problems Baskar on the Smolyak algorithm offers a viable alternate method for solving high-dimensional stochastic partial

  1. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  2. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, Bruce A. (825 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Siminovitch, Michael (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  3. EFFECTS OF SURFACE DEPRESSION AND CONVECTION IN GTA WELDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    EFFECTS OF SURFACE DEPRESSION AND CONVECTION IN GTA WELDING M.L. Lin, T.W. Eagar Materials of the weld pool which are changed by these fact ors . It is shown that, at current s in excess of 300 amperes in a different heat distribution on the weld pool surface . ALTHOUGH THE GAS tungsten arc (GTA) welding process

  4. Estimation of Convection Loss from Paraboloidal Dish Cavity Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In general, cavity receivers employed in the sun-tracking paraboloidal dish concentrator are subjected the numerical investigation of natural and combined convection loss from cavity receivers employed in solar is a significant source of energy loss from thermal receivers used with dish solar concentrators. This paper

  5. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  6. The CHUVA Project how does convection vary across the Brazil?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    1 The CHUVA Project ­ how does convection vary across the Brazil? Luiz A. T. Machado1 , Maria A. F de Previsão de Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC), Brazil. 2. Universidade de São Paulo. Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas, Brazil. 3. Departamento de Ciências e Tecnologia Espacial

  7. Symmetrybreaking instabilities of convection By A.M. Rucklidge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rucklidge, Alastair

    fluid layer is often modelled by considering a finite box with periodic boundary conditions in the two­dimensional convection in a plane layer of unit depth with periodic boundary conditions with equal wave numbers k oscillatory solutions are cre­ ated in a Hopf bifurcation. One of the three oscillations, alternating

  8. 'Butterfly effect' in porous Bénard convection heated from below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siri, Z.; Liew, K. Y. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ibrahim, R. I. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia, 71800 Bandar Baru Nilai, Negeri Sembilan Darul Khusus (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition from steady to chaos for the onset of Bénard convection in porous medium was analyzed. The governing equation is reduced to ordinary differential equation and solved using built in MATLAB ODE45. The transition from steady to chaos take over from a limit cycle followed by homoclinic explosion.

  9. Preparation, Biodistribution and Neurotoxicity of Liposomal Cisplatin following Convection Enhanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Preparation, Biodistribution and Neurotoxicity of Liposomal Cisplatin following Convection Enhanced delivery (CED) to F98 glioma bearing rats. Neurotoxicologic studies were carried out in non-tumor bearing. Unexpectedly, LipoplatinTM was highly neurotoxic when given i.c. by CED and resulted in death immediately

  10. Stellar Surface Convection, Line Asymmetries, and Wavelength Shifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Box 43, SE­22100 Lund, Sweden Abstract. Wavelength positions of photospheric absorption lines may the sinking and cooler (darker) gas. For the Sun, the effect is around 300 m s \\Gamma1 , expected to increase), and intergranular lanes with local redshifts (sinking motion), as naturally expected in convective energy transfer

  11. Predicting flow reversals in chaotic natural convection using data assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Chris

    . The thermosyphon, a type of natural convection loop or non-mechanical heat pump, can be likened to a toy model of climate. Thermosyphons are used in solar water heaters (Belessiotis and Mathiou- lakis, 2002), cooling) and other industrial applications. In these heat pumps, buoyant forces move fluid through a closed loop

  12. Nonequilibrium pattern formation and spatiotemporal chaos in fluid convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cross

    2006-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report for grant number DE-FG03-98ER14891 summarizes the application of the unique simulation capabilities developed under DOE support to investigations of important issues in pattern formation and spatiotemporal chaos in Rayleigh-Benard convection, particularly emphasizing quantitative contact with the active experimental programs.

  13. OSCILLATORY FLOW FORCED CONVECTION IN MICRO HEAT SPREADERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskok, Ali

    transfer devices, micro heat pipes, based on capillary pumping of a multiphase ¯uid in microchannels, have-phase forced convection heat transfer and ¯ow characteristics of water in microchannels, both in the laminar) concept for ef cient transport of large, concentrated heat loads is introduced. The MHS is a single

  14. Observations of Stratocumulus Clouds and Their Effect on the Eastern Pacific Surface Heat Budget along 20°S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Szoeke, Simon P.; Yuter, Sandra E.; Mechem, David B.; Fairall, Chris W.; Burleyson, Casey D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Widespread stratocumulus clouds were observed on nine transects from seven research cruises to the southeastern tropical Pacific Ocean along 20°S, 75°–85°W in October–November of 2001–08. The nine transects sample a unique ...

  15. Holocene Paleohydrology of the tropical andes from lake records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, M. B., LLNL

    1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Two century-scale time series in northern Bolivia constrain the ages of abrupt changes in the physical, geochemical, and biological characteristics of sediments obtained from lakes that formed during deglaciation from the late Pleistocene glacial maximum. The watersheds of Laguna Viscachani (16{degrees}12`S, 68{degrees}07`W, 3780m) and Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota (16{degrees}13`S, 68{degrees}21`W, 4300m), located on the eastern and western slopes of the Cordillera Real, respectively, contain small cirque glaciers. A high-resolution chronology of the lake sediments is provided by 23 AMS {sup 14}C dates of discrete macro-fossils. Late Pleistocene glaciers retreated rapidly, exposing the lake basins between 10,700 and 9700 {sup 14}C yr B.P. The sedimentary facies suggest that after 8900 {sup 14}C B.P. glaciers were absent from the watersheds and remained so during the middle Holocene. An increase in the precipitation-evaporation balance is indicated above unconformities dated to about 2300 {sup 14}C yr B.P. in both Lago Taypi Chaka Kkota and Laguna Viscachani. An abrupt increase in sediment accumulation rated after 1400 {sup 14}C yr B.P. signals the onset of Neoglaciation. A possible link exists between the observed millennial-scale shifts in the regional precipitation- evaporation balance and seasonal shifts in tropical insolation.

  16. Transport of Magnetic Fields in Convective, Accreting Supernova Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Thompson; Norman Murray

    2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the amplification and transport of a magnetic field in the collapsed core of a massive star, including both the region between the neutrinosphere and the shock, and the central, opaque core. An analytical argument explains why rapid convective overturns persist within a newly formed neutron star for roughly 10 seconds ($> 10^3$ overturns), consistent with recent numerical models. A dynamical balance between turbulent and magnetic stresses within this convective layer corresponds to flux densities in excess of $10^{15}$G. Material accreting onto the core is heated by neutrinos and also becomes strongly convective. We compare the expected magnetic stresses in this convective `gain layer' with those deep inside the neutron core. Buoyant motions of magnetized fluid are greatly aided by the intense neutrino flux. We calculate the transport rate through a medium containing free neutrons protons, and electrons, in the limiting cases of degenerate or non-degenerate nucleons. Fields stronger than $\\sim 10^{13}$ G are able to rise through the outer degenerate layers of the neutron core during the last stages of Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling (up to 10 seconds post-collapse), even though these layers have become stable to convection. We also find the equilibrium shape of a thin magnetic flux rope in the dense hydrostatic atmosphere of the neutron star, along with the critical separation of the footpoints above which the rope undergoes unlimited expansion against gravity. The implications of these results for pulsar magnetism are summarized, and applied to the case of late fallback over the first 1,000-10,000 s of the life of a neutron star

  17. Classical confinement and outward convection of impurity ions in the MST RFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Craig, D. [Physics Department, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impurity ion dynamics measured with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution reveal classical ion transport in the reversed-field pinch. The boron, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum impurity ion density profiles are obtained in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using a fast, active charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy diagnostic. Measurements are made during improved-confinement plasmas obtained using inductive control of tearing instability to mitigate stochastic transport. At the onset of the transition to improved confinement, the impurity ion density profile becomes hollow, with a slow decay in the core region concurrent with an increase in the outer region, implying an outward convection of impurities. Impurity transport from Coulomb collisions in the reversed-field pinch is classical for all collisionality regimes, and analysis shows that the observed hollow profile and outward convection can be explained by the classical temperature screening mechanism. The profile agrees well with classical expectations. Experiments performed with impurity pellet injection provide further evidence for classical impurity ion confinement.

  18. OBSERVATIONS ON THE WEB AND BEHAVIOR OF WENDILGARDA SPIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    OBSERVATIONS ON THE WEB AND BEHAVIOR OF WENDILGARDA SPIDERS (ARANEAE: THERIDIOSOMATIDAE that theridiosomatids spin modified orb-webs, but only the web of the holarctic Theridiosoma gemmosum (C. L. Koch) has the unusual webs ofsome tropical theridio- somatid spiders that the senior author later identified

  19. annual tropical cyclone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEASONAL AND MONTHLY FORECASTS Geosciences Websites Summary: 10 12.25 8 5.75 Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) (96.2) 130 170 170 150 148 100 68 Net Tropical't press us too hard on...

  20. WMO/CAS/WWW SIXTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP on TROPICAL CYCLONES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    to Human and Economic Losses Rapporteur: Roger A. Pielke, Jr. Center for Science and Technology Policy.2.3 Tropical cyclone case studies a) India b) Australia c) United States 5.2.4 Differing views of the role

  1. ambiente tropical um: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract. We show that the tropicalization of an irreducible May 18, 2012. 1089 12;1090 DUSTIN CARTWRIGHT AND SAM PAYNE real closed fields with convex valuation Payne, Sam 460...

  2. Surface Fluxes and Tropical Intraseasonal Variability: a Reassessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    and Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA 2 Department whose essential features -- its existence, energetics, spatial and temporal scales -- remain so be fundamental similarities in their energetics. General circulation models (GCMs) simulate tropical

  3. The Political Economy of Deforestation in the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgess, Robin

    Tropical deforestation accounts for almost one-fifth of greenhouse gas emissions and threatens the world’s most diverse ecosystems. Much of this deforestation is driven by illegal logging. We use novel satellite data that ...

  4. Commercial Building HVAC Energy Usage in Semi-Tropical Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worbs, H. E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of heating and cooling equipment in semi-tropical climates presents some design considerations and limitations not so prevalent in temperate climates. In some cases, the heating season may be non-existent for all practical purposes...

  5. american tropical cyclone: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 Cross-equatorial influences of a South American cold surge on the development of two eastern North Pacific tropical cyclones Texas A&M...

  6. The NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a dramatic effect on the overall amount of radiation and heat the Earth's atmosphere contains. These systems Rica in the Gulf of Panama are remarkably intense for tropical maritime systems due to a number

  7. african tropical forests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cory C. Cleveland1,4, and Alan R in tropical rain forests may be among the highest on earth. However, data supporting this contention are rare Cleveland, Cory 116 THE WEST...

  8. african tropical forest: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cory C. Cleveland1,4, and Alan R in tropical rain forests may be among the highest on earth. However, data supporting this contention are rare Cleveland, Cory 116 THE WEST...

  9. MODELING THE DYNAMICAL COUPLING OF SOLAR CONVECTION WITH THE RADIATIVE INTERIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miesch, Mark S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Toomre, Juri [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global dynamics of a rotating star like the Sun involves the coupling of a highly turbulent convective envelope overlying a seemingly benign radiative interior. We use the anelastic spherical harmonic code to develop a new class of three-dimensional models that nonlinearly couple the convective envelope to a deep stable radiative interior. The numerical simulation assumes a realistic solar stratification from r = 0.07 up to 0.97R (with R the solar radius), thus encompassing part of the nuclear core up through most of the convection zone. We find that a tachocline naturally establishes itself between the differentially rotating convective envelope and the solid body rotation of the interior, with a slow spreading that is here diffusively controlled. The rapid angular momentum redistribution in the convective envelope leads to a fast equator and slow poles, with a conical differential rotation achieved at mid-latitudes, much as has been deduced by helioseismology. The convective motions are able to overshoot downward about 0.04R into the radiative interior. However, the convective meridional circulation there is confined to a smaller penetration depth and is directed mostly equatorward at the base of the convection zone. Thermal wind balance is established in the lower convection zone and tachocline but departures are evident in the upper convection zone. Internal gravity waves are excited by the convective overshooting, yielding a complex wave field throughout the radiative interior.

  10. Using cloud resolving model simulations of deep convection to inform cloud parameterizations in large-scale models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Xu, Kuan-man

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive framework to self-consistently predict the horizontal inhomogeneity in radiation and microphysics because the probability distribution function (PDF) of total water contained in the scheme can be used to calculate these non-linear effects. Statistical cloud schemes were originally developed for boundary layer studies so extending them to a global model with many different environments is not straightforward. For example, deep convection creates abundant cloudiness and yet little is known about how deep convection alters the PDF of total water or how to parameterize these impacts. These issues are explored with data from a 29 day simulation by a cloud resolving model (CRM) of the July 1997 ARM Intensive Observing Period at the Southern Great Plains site. The simulation is used to answer two questions: (a) how well can the beta distribution represent the PDFs of total water relative to saturation resolved by the CRM? (b) how can the effects of convection on the PDF be parameterized? In addition to answering these questions, additional sections more fully describe the proposed statistical cloud scheme and the CRM simulation and analysis methods.

  11. Response of tropical sea surface temperature, precipitation, and tropical cyclone-related variables to changes in global and local forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobel, Adam

    A single-column model is used to estimate the equilibrium response of sea surface temperature (SST), precipitation, and several variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) activity to changes in both local and global forcing. ...

  12. The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator for Ag Contamination in Tropical Coastal Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Tropical Brown Alga Lobophora variegata (Lamouroux) Womersley: A Prospective Bioindicator determined in the brown alga Lobophora variegata, using radiotracer techniques. Results indicate that this widely distributed alga could be a useful bioindicator species for surveying silver contamination

  13. Simulating the connections of ENSO and the rainfall regime of East Africa and the upper Blue Nile region using a climate model of the Tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaroug, M. A. H.

    We simulate the observed statistical relationship between ENSO and the rainfall regime of the upper Blue Nile using the tropical-band version of the regional climate model RegCM4 (or Reg-TB). An ensemble of nine simulations ...

  14. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 23, PAGES 3857-3860, DECEMBER 1, 2000 Climatology of Intrusions into the Tropical Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    winds, observed over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans during northern fall to spring, are important westerlies over the Pa- cific and Atlantic Oceans. These "westerly ducts" are im- portant for extratropical]. Because of their penetration deep into the tropics, intru- sion events can potentially have a large impact

  15. An Observational Summary of Convective Storm-generated Winds NOAA/NESDIS/STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    ), GOES sounding profile over Patuxent River, MD at 2100 UTC (top right), GOES imager product at 2232 UTC River Buoy near Dahlgren, Virginia (left) compared to a hypothetical microburst wind speed trace (right

  16. Using observations of deep convective systems to constrain atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    column absorption of solar radiation (Acol) is a fundamental part of the Earth's energy cycle.e., the Acol values at both regions converge to the same value ($0.27 of the total incoming solar radiation to constrain atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation in the optically thick limit, J. Geophys. Res

  17. A study of convective precipitation as revealed by radar observation, Texas 1958-59

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Robert Alfred

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be difficult to overesthnate the economy of time and the increase in accuracy af data reduction resulting from its use, All of the computed data were printed out on a continuous form which facili- meed further analysis by hand methods. C. Anal ~ Mad... after first formation. 1. First Echo Anal sis. The classic theory of precipitation furma- tion, first advanced by V. 'egsner (34) and later promoted by Bergeron (5), hyp?besixed the necessity of ice crystals for the initiation of precipitation...

  18. Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfiresImpurity Transport,12, 20103,University1_3355 Revisionand

  19. Helioseismic Holography of Simulated Solar Convection and Prospects for the Detection of Small-Scale Subsurface Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Braun; A. C. Birch; D. Benson; R. F. Stein; Å. Nordlund

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform helioseismic holography on realistic solar convection simulations and compare the observed travel-time perturbations with the expected travel times from the horizontal flows in the simulations computed from forward models under the assumption of the Born approximation. We demonstrate reasonable agreement between the observed and model travel times which reinforces the validity of helioseismic holography in the detection of subsurface horizontal flows. From the variation of the signal-to-noise ratio with depth, we conclude that the helioseismic detection of individual flow structures with spatial scales of supergranulation or smaller is not possible for depths below about 5 Mm below the surface over time scales less than a day. Approximately half of the observed signal originates within the first 2 Mm below the surface. A consequence of this is a rapid decrease (and reversal in some cases) of the travel-time perturbations with depth due to the contribution to the measurements of oppositely directed surface flows in neighboring convective cells. This confirms an earlier interpretation of similar effects reported from observations.

  20. COMPARING THE EFFECT OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER SCHEMES ON CONVECTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, Joel D.; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the effect of different radiative transfer schemes on the properties of three-dimensional (3D) simulations of near-surface stellar convection in the superadiabatic layer, where energy transport transitions from fully convective to fully radiative. We employ two radiative transfer schemes that fundamentally differ in the way they cover the 3D domain. The first solver approximates domain coverage with moments, while the second solver samples the 3D domain with ray integrations. By comparing simulations that differ only in their respective radiative transfer methods, we are able to isolate the effect that radiative efficiency has on the structure of the superadiabatic layer. We find the simulations to be in good general agreement, but they show distinct differences in the thermal structure in the superadiabatic layer and atmosphere.

  1. Convection in multiphase flows using Lattice Boltzmann methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; P. Perlekar; M. Sbragaglia; F. Toschi

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high resolution numerical simulations of convection in multiphase flows (boiling) using a novel algorithm based on a Lattice Boltzmann method. We first validate the thermodynamical and kinematical properties of the algorithm. Then, we perform a series of 3d numerical simulations at changing the mean properties in the phase diagram and compare convection with and without phase coexistence at $Ra \\sim 10^7$. We show that in presence of nucleating bubbles non-Oberbeck Boussinesq effects develops, mean temperature profile becomes asymmetric, heat-transfer and heat-transfer fluctuations are enhanced. We also show that small-scale properties of velocity and temperature fields are strongly affected by the presence of buoyant bubble leading to high non-Gaussian profiles in the bulk.

  2. Dissipation Efficiency in Turbulent Convective Zones in Low Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaloyan Penev; Dimitar Sasselov; Frank Robinson; Pierre Demarque

    2009-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the analysis of Penev et al. (2007) to calculate effective viscosities for the surface convective zones of three main sequence stars of 0.775Msun, 0.85Msun and the present day Sun. In addition we also pay careful attention to all normalization factors and assumptions in order to derive actual numerical prescriptions for the effective viscosity as a function of the period and direction of the external shear. Our results are applicable for periods that are too long to correspond to eddies that fall within the inertial subrange of Kolmogorov scaling, but no larger than the convective turnover time, when the assumptions of the calculation break down. We find linear scaling of effective viscosity with period and magnitudes at least three times larger than the Zahn (1966, 1989) prescription.

  3. The Critical Rayleigh Number in Horizontal Convection for $\\Pran=1$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, L; Sun, De-Jun; Sun, Liang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the numerical simulations of the horizontal convection within a rectangle cavity tank at high Rayleigh numbers. The physical solution of horizontal convection depends the space resolution of the meshes. The mesh number $N$ is proportion to $Ra^{1/3}$. The unstable numerical solutions are obtained as $Npower law also implies that the space resolution is dominated by the viscosity and heat diffusion. It implies that the special resolution is dominated by viscosity and thermal diffusivity but the length of the tank. Moreover, there is a Hopf bifurcation from steady solutions to unsteady solutions and the critical Rayleigh number $Ra_c$ is obtained as $5.53\\times 10^8

  4. Influence of geometry on natural convection in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Winn, C.B.; Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strong free convection airflows occur within passive solar buildings resulting from elevated temperatures of surfaces irradiated by solar energy compared with the cooler surfaces not receiving radiation. The geometry of a building has a large influence on the directions and magnitudes of natural airflows, and thus heat transfer between zones. This investigation has utilized a variety of reduced-scale building configurations to study the effects of geometry on natural convection heat transfer. Similarity between the reduced-scale model and a full-scale passive solar building is achieved by having similar geometries and by replacing air with Freon-12 gas as the model's working fluid. Filling the model with Freon-12 gas results in similarity in Prandtl numbers and Rayleigh numbers based on temperature differences in the range from 10/sup 9/ to 10/sup 11/. Results from four geometries are described with an emphasis placed on the effects of heat loss on zone temperature stratification shifts.

  5. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Shinn, Michelle [Free Electron Laser Group, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Schaaf, Peter [Institut fuer Werkstofftechnik, FG Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik, TU Ilmenau, Postfach 10 05 65, 98684 Ilmenau (Germany)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  6. Evolution of moisture convergence in a mesoscale convective complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bercherer, John Phillip

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Keuneth C. Brundidge Two separate Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) were investigated to determine if a characteristic surface moisture convergence (MC) signature existed on the mesoscale during their lifecycle. The first storm (Case 1... convergence, a bandpass filtering technique was utilized. It was found that MC could identify the general area of initial thunderstorm activity 2 h prior to its development for both cases. During the initial development stage of Case 1, advection...

  7. First results from hydrodynamic simulations of convective-reactive proton-C12 combustion in the He-shell flash of Sakurai's object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herwig, Falk; Lin, Pei-Hung; Knox, Mike; Fryer, Chris

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing of proton-rich material into C12-rich He-shell flash convection induces exotic n-capture nucleosynthtesis and is encountered in the late phases of the evolution of different types of stars. Examples include the first generations of low- and intermediate mass and massive stars that formed in the early universe. The He-shell flash convection during the post-AGB evolution provides a solar-like metallicity example of a H-ingestion event that can validate multi-physics simulations. Previously we have demonstrated that light curve and abundance observations of post-AGB star Sakurai's object can only be reproduced by stellar evolution simulations if mixing-length theory mixing properties are modified. Our initial 3D simulations of the entrainment and burning of protons into the He-shell flash convection zone confirm some properties of stellar evolution models and identify aspects that are not correctly described in 1D models. 3D and 1D simulations aggree in that a H-burning driven convection zone emerges ...

  8. Survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli in petroleum-contaminated tropical marine waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santo Domingo, J.W.; Fuentes, F.A.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Microbial Ecology Lab.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The in situ survival and activity of Streptococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli were studied using membrane diffusion chambers in tropical marine waters receiving oil refinery effluents. Protein synthesis, DNA synthesis, respiration or fermentation, INT reduced per cell, and ATP per cell were used to measure physiological activity. Cell densities decreased significantly over time at both sites for both S. faecalis and E. coli; however, no significant differences in survival pattern were observed between S. faecalis and E.coli. Differences in protein synthesis between the two were only observed at a study site which was not heavily oiled. Although fecal streptococci have been suggested as a better indicator of fecal contamination than fecal coliforms in marine waters, in this study both E. coli and S. faecalis survived and remained physiologically active for extended periods of time. These results suggest that the fecal streptococci group is not a better indicator of fecal contamination in tropical marine waters than the fecal coliform group, especially when that environment is high in long-chained hydrocarbons.

  9. SOUND-SPEED INVERSION OF THE SUN USING A NONLOCAL STATISTICAL CONVECTION THEORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Chunguang; Deng Licai [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Xiong Darun [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen, E-mail: cgzhang@nao.cas.cn [Stellar Astrophysics Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Helioseismic inversions reveal a major discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and the standard solar model just below the base of the solar convection zone. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is caused by the inherent shortcomings of the local mixing-length theory adopted in the standard solar model. Using a self-consistent nonlocal convection theory, we construct an envelope model of the Sun for sound-speed inversion. Our solar model has a very smooth transition from the convective envelope to the radiative interior, and the convective energy flux changes sign crossing the boundaries of the convection zone. It shows evident improvement over the standard solar model, with a significant reduction in the discrepancy in sound speed between the Sun and local convection models.

  10. Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, Kristina Ariel

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

  11. Vertical flux, ecology and dissolution of radiolaria in tropical oceans : implications for the silica cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Kozo

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiolarians which settle through the oceanic water column were recovered from three stations (western Tropical Atlantic-Station E, central Tropical Pacific-P1 and Panama Basin-PB) using PARFLUX sediment traps in moored ...

  12. The Role of Mineralogy in Organic Matter Stabilization in Tropical Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Role of Mineralogy in Organic Matter Stabilization in Tropical Soils Wipawan Thaymuang,1 Irb) and mineralogy. This study investigated the mineral properties and OM stabilization in 12 surface tropical soil

  13. Sensitivity of Tropical Cyclone Intensity to Ventilation in an Axisymmetric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    The sensitivity of tropical cyclone intensity to ventilation of cooler, drier air into the inner core is examined using an axisymmetric tropical cyclone model with parameterized ventilation. Sufficiently strong ventilation ...

  14. Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leal, Manuel S.

    Geographic variation in vulnerability to climate warming in a tropical Caribbean lizard Alex R temperatures (Tb) of the tropical Caribbean lizard Anolis cristatellus at nine sites representing two habitat

  15. LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    1 LONDON SCHOOL OF HYGIENE & TROPICAL MEDICINE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT 2000 REQUEST help. NB. The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has the right to ask for clarification

  16. London School of Hygiene & Tropical The School is a world-leading centre for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maizels, Rick

    London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine The School is a world-leading centre for research information Registry London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Keppel Street London WC1E 7HT UNITED KINGDOM

  17. How might a statistical cloud scheme be coupled to a mass-flux convection scheme?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Stephen A.; Pincus, Robert; Hannay, Cecile; Xu, Kuan-man

    2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The coupling of statistical cloud schemes with mass-flux convection schemes is addressed. Source terms representing the impact of convection are derived within the framework of prognostic equations for the width and asymmetry of the probability distribution function of total water mixing ratio. The accuracy of these source terms is quantified by examining output from a cloud resolving model simulation of deep convection. Practical suggestions for inclusion of these source terms in large-scale models are offered.

  18. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  19. Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    their representation in Earth system models. Tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle

  20. Tropical Forestry Researchat the USDA Forest Service's Instituteof Pacific Islands Forestry1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Tropical Forestry Researchat the USDA Forest Service's Instituteof Pacific Islands Forestry1 C greater emphasis on tropical forestry management and research was provided by the International Forestry Islands Forestry in Hawaii, the Institute of Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico, and the U S . Forest

  1. Developing versus Nondeveloping Disturbances for Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part I: North Atlantic*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Developing versus Nondeveloping Disturbances for Tropical Cyclone Formation. Part I: North Atlantic the characteristic differences of tropical disturbances that eventually develop into tropical cyclones (TCs) versus for TC genesis in the North Atlantic. When the east and west (separated by 408W) Atlantic are examined

  2. Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity BRIAN TANG AND KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    Midlevel Ventilation's Constraint on Tropical Cyclone Intensity BRIAN TANG AND KERRY EMANUEL ventilation, or the flux of low-entropy air into the inner core of a tropical cyclone (TC), is a hy to assess how ventilation affects tropical cyclone intensity via two possible pathways: the first through

  3. Regional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    in the tropical eastern Pacific and western Indian Ocean than in the tropical western Pacific and eastern IndianRegional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening* HIROKI TOKINAGA, SHANG-PING XIE, AND AXEL TIMMERMANN International Pacific Research Center, SOEST

  4. An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

  5. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review J. Timothy Pennington a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, J. Timothy

    , Peru Abstract The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km2 of ocean between 23.5°N phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific Pacific. Seasonal cycles are weak over much of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, although several

  6. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  7. Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2] Eddy diffusivity of the surface velocity field in the tropical Pacific Ocean was estimated using diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2. Results, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10), 3154, doi:10

  8. Interhemispheric Teleconnections from Tropical Heat Sources in Intermediate and Simple Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the prescribed tropical heating in both intensity and geographical extent and by inducing remote precipitation anomalies by interaction with the basic state. 1. Introduction Tropical heat sources can remotely influenceInterhemispheric Teleconnections from Tropical Heat Sources in Intermediate and Simple Models XUAN

  9. A Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    the local and remote stationary responses of the atmosphere to tropical heating anomalies is describedA Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies and forced with a localized heating for illustration. In the tropics, the baroclinic responses are familiar

  10. Regional feedbacks among fire, climate, and tropical deforestation William A. Hoffmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Regional feedbacks among fire, climate, and tropical deforestation William A. Hoffmann1 December 2003. [1] Numerous studies with general circulation models suggest that tropical deforestation can to estimate the effect of tropical deforestation on fire risk through the McArthur forest fire danger index

  11. Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location MinHo Kwon,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location Tim Li,1 MinHo Kwon,1,3 Ming Zhao,3 Jong) is used to investigate the change of tropical cyclone frequency in the North Pacific under global warming, and W. Yu (2010), Global warming shifts Pacific tropical cyclone location, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L

  12. Interactions between the tropical ISO and midlatitude low-frequency flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Interactions between the tropical ISO and midlatitude low-frequency flow Lin-Lin Pan Æ Tim Li Abstract In this study, we investigate the interaction between the tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation (ISO study the role of the syn- optic eddy feedback in the midlatitude response to the tropical ISO forcing

  13. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 365, 276286 (2006) doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2005.09710.x The radial distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar convective zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moss, David

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution of magnetic helicity in the solar convective zone: observations and dynamo theory H. Zhang,1 D Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012, China 2Department of Physics, Moscow State on current helicity in solar active regions with solar dynamo models. In addition to our previous results

  14. Natural convection in high heat flux tanks at the Hanford Waste Site / [by] Mark van der Helm and Mujid S. Kazimi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van der Helm, Mark Johan, 1972-

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was carried out on the potential for natural convection and the effect of natural convection in a High Heat Flux Tank, Tank 241-C-106, at the Hanford Reservation. To determine the existence of natural convection, ...

  15. Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

  16. Redistribution of trace chemical species by a small convective cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stith, J.L.; Alkezweeny, A.J.; Pleim, J.E.; Ching, J.K.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a new experiment with a SF6 tracer to determine the mixing history of a small region of cloud-base air. In situ measurements of the SF6 are made to follow the region and simultaneous measurements of natural trace gases are used to determine the dilution of the tagged region as it is affected by the cloud. After describing the experimental method, the results from an experiment with a small cumulus, which was ideally suited for the experiment, are explained. The goal of the paper is to better understand how convective clouds redistribute trace constituents (e.g. moisture, trace gases) in the vertical.

  17. SRS reactor control rod cooling without normal forced convection cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.C. (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Easterling, T.C. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an analytical study of the coolability of the control rods in the Savannah River site (SRS) K production reactor under conditions of loss of normal forced convection cooling. The study was performed as part of the overall safety analysis of the reactor supporting its restart. The analysis addresses the buoyancy-driven boiling flow over the control rods that occurs when forced cooling is lost. The objective of the study was to demonstrate that the control rods will remain cooled (i.e., no melting) at powers representative of those anticipated for restart of the reactor.

  18. A numerical study of convection with an ambient wind field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottrell, Kit Garfield

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equations in ehe same order as in (8. 16)-(8. 19). ? TEB = TEB1 + TEB2 at ? TEC = TEC1 + TEC2 a at ? NEB = MEB1 + NEB2 a ae ? NEC = MEC1 + NEC2 + MEC3 + HECT a at TEB and TEC are the thermal energies for the basic and con- vective flows, respectively...; likewise, MZB and MEC are the mechanical energies for the basic and convective flows. The evaluation of ehese terms at each time step represents the total amount of energy presene in these forms. TEB1 represents a thermal energy transformation...

  19. Gradients of meteorological parameters in convective and nonconvective areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCown, Milton Samuel

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . SYNOPTIC CONDITIONS 4. STRATIFICATION OF DATA 5. COMPUTATIONAL PROCEDURES 21 25 a. Gridding of rawinsonde data 25 b. Gradients 26 5'' lp t* 27 RESULTS 29 a. Gradients 29 1) Convective areas 29 2) Nonconvective areas 31 3) Combined areas 33 vi... air turbulence. By using airplane data from over the western United States, Scoggins (1975) has shown that CAT at 300 mb occurred 71% of the time when the magnitude of the vector horizontal wind shear -5 -1 exceeded 4. 5 x 10 sec . The horizontal...

  20. Convection feedbacks in a super-parameterization GCM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControlling Graphene's ElectronicnewConvection

  1. Possible linkages between Saharan dust and tropical cyclone rain band invigoration in the eastern Atlantic during NAMMA-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    for tropical cyclogenesis, it also provides an infusion of cloud condensation and ice nuclei which can

  2. Temporal Changes in a Tropical Nekton Assemblage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temporal Changes in a Tropical Nekton Assemblage and Performance of a Prawn Selective Gear TING and weights of 39 trials conductedfor a selective prawning gear whose performance in bycatch reduc tionI., 1975; Rob erts, 1978; Allen and Coates, 1990), but is extremely rich in the marine coun terpart

  3. Environmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    - son 1974; Webster et al. 2005), and the Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) index (Bell et al. 2000, the PDI is also accumulated over each year. Annually accumulated integral metrics such as ACE and PDI showEnvironmental Factors Affecting Tropical Cyclone Power Dissipation KERRY EMANUEL Program

  4. Low beta diversity of herbivorous insects in tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basset, Yves

    LETTERS Low beta diversity of herbivorous insects in tropical forests Vojtech Novotny1 , Scott E) and fruit (fruitflies, Diptera) found a low rate of change in species composition (beta diversity) across 75 of kilo- metres. Low beta diversity was also documented in groups with differing host specificity

  5. Variable Responses of Lowland Tropical Forest Nutrient Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Variable Responses of Lowland Tropical Forest Nutrient Status to to play a key role in nutrient retention. We discuss our findings in the context of possible impacts Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 387 #12;growth not only alters forests' nutrient demands but also

  6. Detection of iodine monoxide in the tropical free troposphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    19, 2012) Atmospheric iodine monoxide (IO) is a radical that catalytically destroys heat trapping in the remote tropical marine boundary layer (MBL) (2­4). IO further affects the oxidative capacity iodine species over the remote ocean remain poorly understood (11, 14) but are currently thought

  7. TROPICAL MULTIPLICATION MAPS AND THE GIESEKER-PETRI THEOREM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, Sam

    TROPICAL MULTIPLICATION MAPS AND THE GIESEKER-PETRI THEOREM DAVID JENSEN AND SAM PAYNE Abstract. We. Supported in part by NSF grants DMS­1068689 and CAREER DMS­1149054. 1 #12;2 DAVID JENSEN AND SAM PAYNE v1 w1 by the addition or deletion of a bridge are canonically isomorphic, and these isomorphisms respect the images of the

  8. Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree A. Elizabeth Arnold* , Luis Carlos Meji species examined to date harbors endophytic fungi within its asymptomatic aerial tissues, such that endophytes rep- resent a ubiquitous, yet cryptic, component of terrestrial plant communities. Fungal

  9. Global Patterns of Ecological Productivity and Tropical Forest Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    those measurements in addition to climate data to construct a suite of empirical models of NPP productivity (NPP) on a global scale and biomass accumulation across thee tropics. Scientists have been model of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP), and its simplicity and relative accuracy has led

  10. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  11. Tropical mountain cradles of dry forest diversity Christopher W. Dick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    * *Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Panama´; and Department of Ecology radiated at vastly different times, so fo- cus on a single taxon would be mislead- ing. On the side of rain- ple, the dry forest legume clade Leu- caena underwent endemic radiation in southwest Mexico beginning

  12. Transport of carbon monoxide from the tropics to the extratropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November), biomass burning in the southern tropics produces large-scale plumes of CO. These plumes can biomass-burning regions generally rises into the middle and upper troposphere, where it is entrained. For example, it is now clear that the main population areas in the northern hemisphere (North America, Europe

  13. A Statistical Analysis of Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective System Mountain Initiation Location Clusters in the Arkansas-Red River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callen, Elisabeth F.

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are the focus of this analysis since it is the convective weather category which is smallest in number but produces the highest amount of precipitation. Being able to forecast these MCSs ...

  14. THE MAGNETIC CONNECTION BETWEEN THE CONVECTION ZONE AND CORONA IN THE QUIET SUN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbett, Bill

    THE MAGNETIC CONNECTION BETWEEN THE CONVECTION ZONE AND CORONA IN THE QUIET SUN W. P. Abbett Space connection between the convectively unstable layers below the visible surface of the Sun and the overlying application of this numerical model, we present a series of simulations of the quiet Sun in a domain

  15. Linear control and estimation of nonlinear chaotic convection: Harnessing the butterfly effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bewley, Thomas

    Linear control and estimation of nonlinear chaotic convection: Harnessing the butterfly effect/robust control theory to a low-order nonlinear chaotic convection problem. Linear control feedback is found before control is applied. Linear estimator feedback is found to be fully effective only when

  16. Improving Simulations of Convective Systems from TRMM LBA: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    ) experiment in Brazil. These two events epitomized the type of convective systems that formed in two a sheared low-level easterly wind flow. On 23 February 1999, convection developed in weak low-level westerly-scale models. A central objective of the Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study

  17. Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    value energy conversions such as heat engine cycles or chemical process to be carried outModelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove, Canberra AUSTRALIA E-mail: u3370739@anu.edu.au The natural convective flow inside a concentrating solar

  18. Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, John M.

    Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating M. Sankar online 20 December 2010 Keywords: Natural convection Annulus Discrete heating Porous medium Radii ratio to discrete heating. The outer wall is maintained iso- thermally at a lower temperature, while the top

  19. A Climatology of Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices in the Rapid Update Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    A Climatology of Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Vortices in the Rapid Update Cycle ERIC P. JAMES of mesoscale convective vortices (MCVs) occurring in the state of Oklahoma during the late spring and summer, true MCVs represent only about 20% of the mesoscale relative vorticity maxima detected by the algorithm

  20. Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective systems: Charge moment change analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective systems: Charge moment change analysis that were parents of transient luminous events (TLEs; mainly sprites) over two different storms: 9 May (20. A. Rutledge, and D. R. MacGorman (2011), Transient luminous events above two mesoscale convective

  1. THE BASE OF THE CONVECTION ZONE AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE: SEISMIC DETECTION OF THEIR CONNECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Mário João

    495 THE BASE OF THE CONVECTION ZONE AND THE SOLAR MAGNETIC CYCLE: SEISMIC DETECTION Unit, School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London El 4NS of the transition at the bot- tom of the solar convection zone, as determined from the periodic signal

  2. PARAMETERS OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE IN EVOLUTIONARY AND SEISMIC MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARAMETERS OF THE SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE IN EVOLUTIONARY AND SEISMIC MODELS VLADIMIR A. BATURIN Queen Mary & Westfield College, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK AND SERGEY V. AYUKOV Sternberg of the entropy of the adiabatic part of the solar convection zone are compared. Key words: solar physics

  3. Global Gevrey Regularity for the B'enard Convection in Porous Medium with Zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Gevrey Regularity for the B'enard Convection in Porous Medium with Zero Darcy­Prandtl Number for the three­dimensional B'enard convection model in porous medium with zero Darcy­Prandtl number using system for energy conservation, enhancing recovery of oil by thermal methods, assessing risks for nuclear

  4. A Fourier-spectral element algorithm for thermal convection in rotating axisymmetric containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, Alexandre

    A Fourier-spectral element algorithm for thermal convection in rotating axisymmetric containers Abstract We present a Fourier-spectral element approach for modeling thermal convection in a rotating, Spectral Methods for Axisymmetric Domains, Gauthier-Villars, Paris, 1999], a Fourier expansion of the field

  5. Convective heat transfer as a function of wavelength: Implications for the cooling of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convective heat transfer as a function of wavelength: Implications for the cooling of the Earth C, in particular, on its variation with the wavelength of convection. The heat transfer strongly depends in Earth's mantle can significantly reduce the efficiency of heat transfer. The likely variations

  6. EulerianEulerian two-phase numerical simulation of nanofluid laminar forced convection in a microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harting, Jens

    Eulerian­Eulerian two-phase numerical simulation of nanofluid laminar forced convection August 2010 Accepted 5 August 2010 Keywords: Nanofluid Microchannel Two-phase Laminar Heat transfer a b s t r a c t In this paper, laminar forced convection heat transfer of a copper­water nanofluid inside

  7. Dielectrophoretic Rayleigh-Benard convection under microgravity conditions H. N. Yoshikawa,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    conditions. A thermo-electric coupling resulting from the thermal variation of the electric permittivity of the fluid produces the dielectrophoretic (DEP) body force, which can be regarded as thermal buoyancy due of the GL equation are comparable with those for the RB convection. The heat transfer in the DEP convection

  8. Kinetics of the clay roofing tile convection drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S. (Univ. of Osijek (Croatia). Faculty of Food Technology); Skansi, D. (Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology); Sokele, M. (Croatian Post and Telecommunications, Zagreb (Croatia). Telecommunications Center)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of the convection drying process of flat tile has been investigated experimentally in an industrial tunnel dryer. Several velocities of wet tile movement through the dryer were tested to obtain maximum allowable drying rate curve. As there are various models to describe the kinetics of convection drying, finding a model that would fairly well approximate the kinetics of the whole drying process was part of the research. Especially the polynomial and exponential models were tested. It was found that exponential model of the type: B(t) = (a[minus]B[sub e])[center dot]EXP([minus]bt[sup 2])+B[sub e], ([minus]dB(t)/dt) = 2bt(B(t)[minus]B[sub e]) significantly correlates the kinetics of the whole tile drying process. Applying the maximum allowable drying rate curve obtained for flat tile in the first period of drying, a grapho-analytic model for the optimal conducting of the process has been developed.

  9. A Multiscale Dynamo Model Driven by Quasi-geostrophic Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A convection-driven multiscale dynamo model is developed for the plane layer geometry in the limit of low Rossby number. The small-scale fluctuating dynamics are described by a magnetically-modified quasi-geostrophic equation set, and the large-scale mean dynamics are governed by a diagnostic thermal wind balance. The model utilizes three timescales that respectively characterize the convective timescale, the large-scale magnetic diffusion timescale, and the large-scale thermal diffusion timescale. Distinct equations are derived for the cases of order one and low magnetic Prandtl number. It is shown that the low magnetic Prandtl number model is characterized by a magnetic to kinetic energy ratio that is asymptotically large, with ohmic dissipation dominating viscous dissipation on the large-scales. For the order one magnetic Prandtl number model the magnetic and kinetic energies are equipartitioned and both ohmic and viscous dissipation are weak on the large-scales; large-scale ohmic dissipation occurs in thi...

  10. Particle filter based on thermophoretic deposition from natural convection flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasse, A.G.B.M.; Nazaroff, W.W. (Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Gadgil, A.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of particle migration in a natural convection flow between parallel plates and within the annulus of concentric tubes. The flow channel is vertically oriented with one surface maintained at a higher temperature than the other. Particle migration is dominated by advection in the vertical direction and thermophoresis in the horizontal direction. From scale analysis it is demonstrated that particles are completely removed from air flowing through the channel if its length exceeds L[sub c] = (b[sup 4]g/24K[nu][sup 2]), where b is the width of the channel, g is the acceleration of gravity, K is a thermophoretic coefficient of order 0.5, and [nu] is the kinematic viscosity of air. Precise predictions of particle removal efficiency as a function of system parameters are obtained by numerical solution of the governing equations. Based on the model results, it appears feasible to develop a practical filter for removing smoke particles from a smoldering cigarette in an ashtray by using natural convection in combination with thermophoresis. 22 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  15. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF NATURAL CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER OF IONIC LIQUID IN A RECTANGULAR ENCLOSURE HEATED FROM BELOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.; Visser, A.; Bridges, N.

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an experimental study of natural convection heat transfer for an Ionic Liquid. The experiments were performed for 1-butyl-2, 3-dimethylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}]) at a Raleigh number range of 1.26 x 10{sup 7} to 8.3 x 10{sup 7}. In addition to determining the convective heat transfer coefficients, this study also included experimental determination of thermophysical properties of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] such as, density, viscosity, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity. The results show that the density of [C{sub 4}mmim][NTf{sub 2}] varies from 1.437-1.396 g/cm{sup 3} within the temperature range of 10-50 C, the thermal conductivity varies from 0.105-0.116 W/m.K between a temperature of 10 to 60 C, the heat capacity varies from 1.015 J/g.K - 1.760 J/g.K within temperature range of 25-340 C and the viscosity varies from 18cp-243cp within temperature range 10-75 C. The results for density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and viscosity were in close agreement with the values in the literature. Measured dimensionless Nusselt number was observed to be higher for the ionic liquid than that of DI water. This is expected as Nusselt number is the ratio of heat transfer by convection to conduction and the ionic liquid has lower thermal conductivity (approximately 18%) than DI water.

  18. A census of precipitation features in the tropics using TRMM: radar, ice scattering, and lightning observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesbitt, Stephen William

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and two ocean regions during August, September and October 1998, this study used radar retrievals and 85 GHz Polarization Corrected Temperatures (PCTs, which passively measure relative concentrations of precipitation-sized ice particles within a cloud...

  19. Reexamining the Vertical Structure of Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones: Observations and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, David S.

    theory are governed by the dual constraints of thermal wind balance and slantwise moist neutrality- fluences their dynamics in several ways, notably by al- tering the efficiency with which unbalanced heat energy is converted to balanced mean kinetic energy (Hack and Schubert 1986; Nolan et al. 2007

  20. How robust are observed and simulated precipitation responses to tropical ocean warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    moisture and net radiative cooling provide powerful constraints upon future changes in precipitation. While cooling, derived from satellite data, is less coherent. Precipitation trends and relationships by the availability of moisture but by atmospheric energy balance. Enhanced net radiative cooling of the atmosphere

  1. Remote Sensing Observations from MTI Satellites and GMS Over Tropical Island of Nauru

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 c/) ReleaseRemote Access AmesJ.E.M.Remote

  2. Observed Regimes of Mid-Latitude.and Tropical Cirrus Microphysical Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeeding access(SC)Gas and

  3. Charge transfer and in-cloud structure of large-charge-moment positive lightning strokes in a mesoscale convective system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    in a mesoscale convective system Gaopeng Lu,1 Steven A. Cummer,1 Jingbo Li,1 Feng Han,1 Richard J. Blakeslee,2 positive cloud-to-ground (+CG) strokes in a mesoscale convective system. Although no high altitude images of large-charge-moment positive lightning strokes in a mesoscale convective system, Geophys. Res. Lett., 36

  4. Magnetospheric Convection The large-scale flow of rarefied plasma in the Earth's magnetosphere "is quite analogous to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    quite analogous to thermal convection" (Gold, 1959); therefore, the term "convection" is commonly used of geomagnetic field lines in the crossed E and B fields. By analogy with the thermal convection in a non in the magnetosheath: a region between the bow shock and the magnetopause. A similar flow pattern is formed

  5. Accepted by Mon. Weather Rev. December 17, 1998. Convective Precursors and Predictability in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Steven

    in the Tropics are investigated by multivariate analysis of sounding and satellite data from the tropical western because it has been considered more complex and less well-understood than the activation problem, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 916, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (ssherwood@alum.mit.edu) Many

  6. Impact of Resolution on Simulation of Closed Mesoscale Cellular Convection Identified by Dynamically Guided Watershed Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martini, Matus; Gustafson, William I.; Yang, Qing; Xiao, Heng

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Organized mesoscale cellular convection (MCC) is a common feature of marine stratocumulus that forms in response to a balance between mesoscale dynamics and smaller scale processes such as cloud radiative cooling and microphysics. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) and fully coupled cloud-aerosol interactions to simulate marine low clouds during the VOCALS-REx campaign over the southeast Pacific. A suite of experiments with 3- and 9-km grid spacing indicates resolution-dependent behavior. The simulations with finer grid spacing have smaller liquid water paths and cloud fractions, while cloud tops are higher. The observed diurnal cycle is reasonably well simulated. To isolate organized MCC characteristics we develop a new automated method, which uses a variation of the watershed segmentation technique that combines the detection of cloud boundaries with a test for coincident vertical velocity characteristics. This ensures that the detected cloud fields are dynamically consistent for closed MCC, the most common MCC type over the VOCALS-REx region. We demonstrate that the 3-km simulation is able to reproduce the scaling between horizontal cell size and boundary layer height seen in satellite observations. However, the 9-km simulation is unable to resolve smaller circulations corresponding to shallower boundary layers, instead producing invariant MCC horizontal scale for all simulated boundary layers depths. The results imply that climate models with grid spacing of roughly 3 km or smaller may be needed to properly simulate the MCC structure in the marine stratocumulus regions.

  7. TESTING CONVECTIVE-CORE OVERSHOOTING USING PERIOD SPACINGS OF DIPOLE MODES IN RED GIANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montalban, J.; Noels, A.; Dupret, M.-A.; Scuflaire, R. [Institut d'Astrophysique et Geophysique de l'Universite de Liege, Allee du six Aout, 17 B-4000 Liege (Belgium)] [Institut d'Astrophysique et Geophysique de l'Universite de Liege, Allee du six Aout, 17 B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Miglio, A. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Ventura, P. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Rome (Italy)] [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Rome (Italy)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties on central mixing in main-sequence (MS) and core He-burning (He-B) phases affect key predictions of stellar evolution such as late evolutionary phases, chemical enrichment, ages, etc. We propose a test of the extension of extra-mixing in two relevant evolutionary phases based on period spacing ({Delta}P) of solar-like oscillating giants. From stellar models and their corresponding adiabatic frequencies (respectively, computed with ATON and LOSC codes), we provide the first predictions of the observable {Delta}P for stars in the red giant branch and in the red clump (RC). We find (1) a clear correlation between {Delta}P and the mass of the helium core (M{sub He}); the latter in intermediate-mass stars depends on the MS overshooting, and hence it can be used to set constraints on extra-mixing during MS when coupled with chemical composition; and (2) a linear dependence of the average value of the asymptotic period spacing (({Delta}P){sub a}) on the size of the convective core during the He-B phase. A first comparison with the inferred asymptotic period spacing for Kepler RC stars also suggests the need for extra-mixing during this phase, as evinced from other observational facts.

  8. GFDL ARM Project Technical Report: Using ARM Observations to Evaluate Cloud and Convection Parameterizations & Cloud-Convection-Radiation Interactions in the GFDL Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Ramaswamy; L. J. Donner; J-C. Golaz; S. A. Klein

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report briefly summarizes the progress made by ARM postdoctoral fellow, Yanluan Lin, at GFDL during the period from October 2008 to present. Several ARM datasets have been used for GFDL model evaluation, understanding, and improvement. This includes a new ice fall speed parameterization with riming impact and its test in GFDL AM3, evaluation of model cloud and radiation diurnal and seasonal variation using ARM CMBE data, model ice water content evaluation using ARM cirrus data, and coordination of the TWPICE global model intercomparison. The work illustrates the potential and importance of ARM data for GCM evaluation, understanding, and ultimately, improvement of GCM cloud and radiation parameterizations. Future work includes evaluation and improvement of the new dynamicsPDF cloud scheme and aerosol activation in the GFDL model.

  9. Hydrodynamic Simulations with PPMstar. Methods and Convergence Study of Entrainment at the Top Boundary of Shell Convection in Stellar Interiors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, Paul R; Lin, Pei-Hung

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He-shell flash convection in AGB stars of very low metallicity, in post-AGB or pre-white dwarf stars or in accreting white dwarfs may under certain conditions grow and extend into the H-rich layers above. In this case proton-rich material will be advected into the deep C12-rich He-burning layers leading to a regime of H-C12 combustion which may lead to an observable (e.g. Sakurai's object) stellar response in real-time. This is the nucleosynthesis site of the i process. The properties of this violent phase of stellar evolution depend on the interplay of fuel advection, mixing and nuclear energy production associated with dynamic feedback into the fluid flow. We present 3-dimensional, fully compressible gas-dynamics simulations in 4pi geometry of He-shell flash convection with proton-rich fuel entrainment at the upper boundary. We are focusing on the properties of entrainment of material, and establish the quantitative dependence of the entrainment rate on grid resolution. We find that, with our numerical tech...

  10. Wind reversals in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Fontenele Araujo; S. Grossmann; D. Lohse

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of irregular cessation and subsequent reversal of the large-scale circulation in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection is theoretically analysed. The force and thermal balance on a single plume detached from the thermal boundary layer yields a set of coupled nonlinear equations, whose dynamics is related to the Lorenz equations. For Prandtl and Rayleigh numbers in the range $10^{-2} \\leq \\Pr \\leq 10^{3}$ and $10^{7} \\leq \\Ra \\leq 10^{12}$, the model has the following features: (i) chaotic reversals may be exhibited at Ra $\\geq 10^{7}$; (ii) the Reynolds number based on the root mean square velocity scales as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Ra^{[0.41 ... 0.47]}$ (depending on Pr), and as $\\Re_{rms} \\sim \\Pr^{-[0.66 ... 0.76]}$ (depending on Ra); and (iii) the mean reversal frequency follows an effective scaling law $\\omega / (\

  11. Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :0010:0011:0012:0013:0014:00 15:0016:0017:00 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2.0 2.2 2.4 11/21 Solar radiant intensity[kW/m 2 ] Temperature[ ? ] Time Tr Tfu Twi Ta ------- I Fig. 2 Daily variation of Tr, Tfu, Twi , Ta , I and ? f... regarded that Gr~109 -3?Pr ?10 3? is the transition criterion as the natural convection flow from laminar to turbulent [12]. Experimental data from four sunny days (11.20, 11.21, 11.27, 11.28) with normal thermo-circulation (9:00-16:00) is utilized...

  12. Apparatus for production of synthesis gas using convective reforming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karafian, M.; Tsang, I.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a system for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons into a hydrogen-rich gas. It comprises a convective reformer device having indirect heat exchange means for partially reforming a feed mixture of hydrocarbons and steam; a steam reforming furnace having a radiant section, reforming tubes in the radiant section, and means for producing radiant heat for the further reforming of the partially reformed effluent; an auto-thermal reformer for fully reforming the effluent; conduit means for passing the partially reformed effluent; conduit means for passing the effluent; and conduit means for passing the fully reformed effluent to supply the heat of reaction for the partial reformation of the hydrocarbon-steam feed mixture.

  13. TURBULENT CONVECTION IN STELLAR INTERIORS. III. MEAN-FIELD ANALYSIS AND STRATIFICATION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viallet, Maxime [Physics and Astronomy, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Meakin, Casey; Mocak, Miroslav [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Arnett, David [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three-dimensional implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in the envelope of a 5 M{sub Sun} red giant star and in the oxygen-burning shell of a 23 M{sub Sun} supernova progenitor. The numerical models are analyzed in the framework of one-dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The effects of pressure fluctuations are more important in the red giant model, owing to larger stratification of the convective zone. We show how this impacts different terms in the mean-field equations. We clarify the driving sources of kinetic energy, and show that the rate of turbulent dissipation is comparable to the convective luminosity. Although our flows have low Mach numbers and are nearly adiabatic, our analysis is general and can be applied to photospheric convection as well. The robustness of our analysis of turbulent convection is supported by the insensitivity of the mean-field balances to linear mesh resolution. We find robust results for the turbulent convection zone and the stable layers in the oxygen-burning shell model, and robust results everywhere in the red giant model, but the mean fields are not well converged in the narrow boundary regions (which contain steep gradients) in the oxygen-burning shell model. This last result illustrates the importance of unresolved physics at the convective boundary, which governs the mixing there.

  14. LIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    of the Lake-Induced Convection Experiments (Lake-ICE), on December 21, 1997 the University of Wisconsin VolumeLIDAR OBSERVATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF A LAKE MICHIGAN LAND BREEZE FRONT G circulation over Lake Michigan. Backscatter returns revealed a steady offshore flow extending 1.5 to 4 km

  15. Interactions between Cumulus Convection and Its Environment as Revealed by the MC3E Sounding Array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Jensen, Michael P.; Zhang, Yunyan; Giangrande, Scott E.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Minghua

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data collected from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in central Oklahoma. Distinct large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles are presented for cases of weaker and elevated thunderstorms as well as intense squall line and supercell thunderstorm events during the campaign. The elevated cell events were nocturnal convective systems occurring in an environment having low convective available potential energy (CAPE) and a very dry boundary layer. In contrast, deeper convective events happened during themore »morning into early afternoon within an environment associated with large CAPE and a near-saturated boundary layer. As the systems reached maturity, the diagnosed diabatic heating in the latter deep convective cases was much stronger and of greater vertical extent than the former. Both groups showed considerable diabatic cooling in the lower troposphere, associated with the evaporation of precipitation and low-level clouds. The horizontal advection of moisture also played a dominant role in moistening the lower troposphere, particularly for the deeper convective events, wherein the near surface southeasterly flow allows persistent low-level moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico to support convection. The moisture convergence often was present before these systems develop, suggesting a strong correlation between the large-scale moisture convergence and convection. Sensitivity tests indicated that the uncertainty in the surface precipitation and the size of analysis domain mainly affected the magnitude of these analyzed fields rather than their vertical structures.« less

  16. Interactions between Cumulus Convection and Its Environment as Revealed by the MC3E Sounding Array

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xie, Shaocheng [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jensen, Michael P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, Yunyan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Giangrande, Scott E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McCoy, Renata [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhang, Minghua [Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data collected from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) in central Oklahoma. Distinct large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles are presented for cases of weaker and elevated thunderstorms as well as intense squall line and supercell thunderstorm events during the campaign. The elevated cell events were nocturnal convective systems occurring in an environment having low convective available potential energy (CAPE) and a very dry boundary layer. In contrast, deeper convective events happened during the morning into early afternoon within an environment associated with large CAPE and a near-saturated boundary layer. As the systems reached maturity, the diagnosed diabatic heating in the latter deep convective cases was much stronger and of greater vertical extent than the former. Both groups showed considerable diabatic cooling in the lower troposphere, associated with the evaporation of precipitation and low-level clouds. The horizontal advection of moisture also played a dominant role in moistening the lower troposphere, particularly for the deeper convective events, wherein the near surface southeasterly flow allows persistent low-level moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico to support convection. The moisture convergence often was present before these systems develop, suggesting a strong correlation between the large-scale moisture convergence and convection. Sensitivity tests indicated that the uncertainty in the surface precipitation and the size of analysis domain mainly affected the magnitude of these analyzed fields rather than their vertical structures.

  17. Effect of surfactant on evaporative heat transfer coefficients in vertical film forced convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Basit Husain

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and control of temperatures of chemical reactions. . Soi1ing may be considered as a special case of convect1on either free or forced. However, the phenomena of boiling heat transfer are considerably more complex than those of convection without phase...), Leppert and Pitts (4), and Rohsenow The two general situations under which bo111ng occurs are: (a) pool bo1ling and (b) forced convection boiling. When the bulk of the 11quid is at the saturation temperature corresponding to the presssure of the liquid...

  18. Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

  19. Longwave radiative forcing of Saharan dust aerosols estimated from MODIS, MISR, and CERES observations on Terra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, Sundar A.

    observations from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) [Ackerman and Chung, 1992] and the Total's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments onboard the Terra satellite; we present a new technique prevalent in the tropics [Prospero, 1999], dust aerosols are effective in reflecting solar energy back

  20. Validation of QuikSCAT wind vectors by dropwindsonde data from Dropwindsonde Observations for Typhoon Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Sharan

    of winds of hurricane force (32.9 m sÀ1 ) in extratropical cyclones and marine weather over the open oceanValidation of QuikSCAT wind vectors by dropwindsonde data from Dropwindsonde Observations January 2010. [1] The accuracy of 10 m wind vectors derived from the QuikSCAT satellite near tropical

  1. OBSERVATIONS ON DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE HISTORY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OBSERVATIONS ON DISTRIBUTION AND LIFE HISTORY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, IN AUSTRALIAN, Katsuwonus pelamis (Lin- naeus), occurs in tropical and warm temperate waters of all oceans. It supports, however, and both names are now used in Australia. Therefore we now refer to Katsuwonus pelamis

  2. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  3. A high glacier opens a view of the ice age tropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mlot, C.

    1995-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses new information about the ice age tropics as cores from a mountain glacier in the Peruvian Andes are analysed. Chemical markers in the ice of the two cores (160 and 166 meters long), covering 20,000 years, are starting to provide detailed support for understanding the ice age in the tropics. they show that climate in the tropics experience sharp oscillations at the end of the ice ages as it did in more northerly regions. Information about El Ninos and how the tropics respond to global climate changes is forthcoming. Comments on the actual expedition to obtain the ice cores are included.

  4. Effect of the Centrifugal Force on Domain Chaos in Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Becker; J. D. Scheel; M. C. Cross; Guenter Ahlers

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments and simulations from a variety of sample sizes indicated that the centrifugal force significantly affects rotating Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection-patterns. In a large-aspect-ratio sample, we observed a hybrid state consisting of domain chaos close to the sample center, surrounded by an annulus of nearly-stationary nearly-radial rolls populated by occasional defects reminiscent of undulation chaos. Although the Coriolis force is responsible for domain chaos, by comparing experiment and simulation we show that the centrifugal force is responsible for the radial rolls. Furthermore, simulations of the Boussinesq equations for smaller aspect ratios neglecting the centrifugal force yielded a domain precession-frequency $f\\sim\\epsilon^\\mu$ with $\\mu\\simeq1$ as predicted by the amplitude-equation model for domain chaos, but contradicted by previous experiment. Additionally the simulations gave a domain size that was larger than in the experiment. When the centrifugal force was included in the simulation, $\\mu$ and the domain size closely agreed with experiment.

  5. Corrosion of type 316L stainless steel in a mercury thermal convection loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two thermal convection loops fabricated from 316L stainless steel containing mercury (Hg) and Hg with 1000 wppm gallium (Ga), respectively, were operated continuously for about 5000 h. In each case, the maximum loop temperature was constant at about 305 degrees C and the minimum temperature was constant at about 242 degrees C. Coupons in the hot leg of the Hg-loop developed a posous surface layer substantially depleted of nickel and chromium, which resulted in a transformation to ferrite. The coupon exposed at the top of the hot leg in the Hg-loop experienced the maximum degradation, exhibiting a surface layer extending an average of 9-10 mu m after almost 5000 h. Analysis of the corrosion rate data as a function of temperature (position) in the Hg-loop suggests wetting by the mer cury occurred only above about 255 degrees C and that the rate limiting step in the corrosion process above 255 degrees C is solute diffusion through the saturated liquid boundary layer adjacent to the corroding surface. The latter factor suggests that the corrosion of 316L stainless steel in a mercury loop may be velocity dependent. No wetting and no corrosion were observed on the coupons and wall specimens removed from the Hg/Ga loop after 5000 h of operation.

  6. A radiative-convective equilibrium model to study young giant exoplanets by direct imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudino, J -L; Boccaletti, A; Bonnefoy, M; Lagrange, A M; Galicher, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a model for young giant exoplanets (Exoplanet Radiative-convective Equilibrium Model or Exo-REM). Input parameters are planet's surface gravity (g), effective temperature (Teff ) and elemental composition. Under the additional assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, the model predicts the equilibrium temperature profile and mixing ratio profiles of the most important gases. Opacity sources include the H$_2$-He collision-induced absorption and molecular lines from H$_2$O, CO, CH$_4$ (updated with the Exomol linelist), NH$_3$, VO, TiO, Na and K. Absorption by iron and silicate cloud particles is added above the expected condensation levels with a fixed scale height and a given optical depth at some reference wavelength. Scattering was not included at this stage. We applied Exo-REM to photometric and spectral observations of the planet beta Pictoris b obtained in a series of near IR filters. We derived Teff = 1550 $\\pm$ 150 K, log(g) = 3.5 $\\pm$ 1, and a radius R = 1.76 $\\pm$ 0.24 R Jup (2-$\\sigma...

  7. Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea Lynne D. Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    ventilation occurs in only a very few regions, generally in confined patches associated with local cyclonic (Figure 1) to these small groups of deep convection sites and regions withdeep``ventilation

  8. Simulation of Mixed Convection Flow in a Room with a Two-Layer Turbulence Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    ; displacement ventilation; office rooms. Nomenclature Ary local Archimedes number, 2 /UTyg n C Contaminant used to predict the mixed convection by displacement ventilation in an office. The computed results

  9. STUDY OF MHD MIXED CONVECTION IN THE DCLL BLANKET SMOLENTSEV Sergey1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    , and ABDOU Mohamed3 1 University of California, Los Angeles, USA, sergey@fusion.ucla.edu 2 Laboratoire SIMAP, abdou@fusion.ucla.edu Abstract: Magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection associated with a non

  10. Study of formation and convective transport of aerosols using optical diagnostic technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae-Kyun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Part II investigates the characteristics of convective transport behavior of solid particles in virtual impactor (VI). The objective of part I is to establish correlations which offer predictions on atomized particle size of HTFs which are widely...

  11. An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection Eric D, 80307­3000, maloney@ucar.edu #12; 1 Abstract The NCAR CCM3.6 with microphysics of clouds with relaxed

  12. An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    An Intraseasonal Oscillation Composite Lifecycle in the NCAR CCM3.6 with Modified Convection Eric D, 80307-3000, maloney@ucar.edu #12;1 Abstract The NCAR CCM3.6 with microphysics of clouds with relaxed

  13. A visualization comparison of convective flow boiling heat transfer augmentation devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lundy, Brian Franklin

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The qualitative effects of inset-table heat transfer phics. augmentation devices on vertical in-tube convective flow boiling flow regimes, transition mechanisms, and heat transfer are presented in this study. Three twisted tapes with twist ratios...

  14. A climatology of springtime convection systems over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashem, Magda Sami

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Springtime (March 15-June 15) climatology of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) has been established on the basis of satellite imagery and radar reflectivities over the Northwest Gulf of Mexico and adjacent coastal areas during 1985...

  15. TACKLEY ET AL.:THERMO-CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: Philosophy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    TACKLEY ET AL.:THERMO-CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY 1 Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: Philosophy, accomplishments and thermo-chemical structure and evolution Paul J. Tackley Department of Earth

  16. Influence of Induced natural convection on laser propagation : analysis and interferometric visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhakta, Aditya (Aditya S.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis analyzes the influence of a self-induced natural convection flow on the propagation of a high energy laser beam. The two configurations considered are of a vertical laser beam (propagation direction opposite ...

  17. Convective cloud and rainfall processes over the Maritime Continent : simulation and analysis of the diurnal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianotti, Rebecca L. (Rebecca Louise)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime Continent experiences strong moist convection, which produces significant rainfall and drives large fluxes of heat and moisture to the upper troposphere. Despite the importance of these processes to global ...

  18. Convective variability associated with a mesoscale vortex in a midlatitude squall line system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the kinematic structure of the convective line and the mesoscale stortn-relative flow associated with an embedded mesovortex in the trailing stratiform region of the 28 May 1985 squall line system is examined using Doppler...

  19. Thermal perturbations caused by large impacts and consequences for mantle convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watters, W. A.

    We examine the effects of thermal perturbations on a convecting layer of incompressible fluid with uniform viscosity in the limit of infinite Prandtl number, for two upper boundary conditions (free- and no-slip) and heat ...

  20. A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    A Summary of Convective-Core Vertical Velocity Properties Using ARM UHF Wind Profilers in Oklahoma Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois # University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma @ Bureau of Meteorology, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia & Cooperative Institute for Research