National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tropical atmosphere ocean

  1. Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Internal variability of the tropical Pacific ocean M. Jochum Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary model of the tropical Pacific ocean is analyzed to quantify the interannual variability caused by internal variability of ocean dynamics. It is found that along the Pacific cold tongue internal variability

  2. The tropical cyclone-induced flux of carbon between the ocean and the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, Neil L

    2012-01-01

    Tropical cyclones are known to cause phytoplankton blooms in regions of the ocean that would otherwise support very little life; it is also known that these storms entrain carbon-rich deep water, which can cause ...

  3. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  4. Validation of Atmospheric Infrared Sounder temperature and moisture profiles over tropical oceans and their impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Zhaoxia

    ] Tropical cyclones are one of the costliest and deadliest natural disasters in the United States and other the potential for economic damage and deaths. However, due to the lack of the conventional observations over/I satellite rainfall rates results in improvements in hurricane track forecasts in the GEOS global model [Hou

  5. Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

  6. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  7. Bromocarbons in the tropical coastal and open ocean atmosphere during the 2009 Prime Expedition Scientific Cruise (PESC-09)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohd Nadzir, M. S.; Phang, S. M.; Abas, M. R.; Abdul Rahman, N.; Abu Samah, A.; Sturges, W. T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G. P.; Leedham, E. C.; Pyle, J. A.; Harris, N. R. P.; Robinson, A. D.; Ashfold, M. J.; Mead, M. I.; Latif, M. T.; Khan, M. F.; Amiruddin, A. M.; Banan, N.; Hanafiah, M. M.

    2014-08-14

    Cl). Biogenic emissions from the oceans have been identified as one of the main natu- ral sources where organisms such as macroalgae (seaweeds) and microalgae (phytoplankton) can release large quanti- ties of halocarbon gases into the atmosphere (Sturges et al... seaweed biomass, with cultivated Kappaphycus and Eucheuma at Semporna, and Sargassum and other brown algae at Kunak. Samples 17 and 21 had slightly elevated levels of C2Cl4, suggesting a possible influence from local anthropogenic sources. Pyle et al...

  8. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  9. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  10. Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intermediate Zonal Jets in the Tropical Pacific Ocean Observed by Argo Floats* SOPHIE CRAVATTE´veloppement, LEGOS, Toulouse, France WILLIAM S. KESSLER National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Pacific Argo float data in the tropical Pacific Ocean during January 2003­August 2011 are analyzed to obtain

  11. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  12. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    mesoscale oceanic features are current coarse resolutionmesoscale r current variability associated with oceanic ringthe TIW- currents. These mesoscale oceanic and atmospheric

  13. Passive microwave observations of mesoscale convective systems over the tropical Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Gary Rae

    1994-01-01

    the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) aboard the NASA ER2 during the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere Coupled-Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE). The AMPR measures linearly polarized radiation at 10.7, 19.35, 37. 1, and 85...

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF CLOUDS IN TITAN'S TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Caitlin A.; Penteado, Paulo; Rodriguez, Sebastien; Baines, Kevin H.; Buratti, Bonnie; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, Roger; Nicholson, Phil; Jaumann, Ralf

    2009-09-10

    Images of Titan's clouds, possible over the past 10 years, indicate primarily discrete convective methane clouds near the south and north poles and an immense stratiform cloud, likely composed of ethane, around the north pole. Here we present spectral images from Cassini's Visual Mapping Infrared Spectrometer that reveal the increasing presence of clouds in Titan's tropical atmosphere. Radiative transfer analyses indicate similarities between summer polar and tropical methane clouds. Like their southern counterparts, tropical clouds consist of particles exceeding 5 {mu}m. They display discrete structures suggestive of convective cumuli. They prevail at a specific latitude band between 8 deg. - 20 deg. S, indicative of a circulation origin and the beginning of a circulation turnover. Yet, unlike the high latitude clouds that often reach 45 km altitude, these discrete tropical clouds, so far, remain capped to altitudes below 26 km. Such low convective clouds are consistent with the highly stable atmospheric conditions measured at the Huygens landing site. Their characteristics suggest that Titan's tropical atmosphere has a dry climate unlike the south polar atmosphere, and despite the numerous washes that carve the tropical landscape.

  15. Explorations of AtmosphereOceanIce Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy Transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    ) data. 1. Introduction The transport of energy from the tropics toward the poles is a key aspect with ``energy transport'', although it should be remem- Explorations of Atmosphere­Ocean­Ice Climates on an Aquaplanet and Their Meridional Energy

  16. CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CURRENT SKIPJACK OCEANOGRAPHY CRUISES IN EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN F. Williams A series of skipjack oceanography cruises is planned for two offshore areas in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean October 23 and arrived in Honolulu November 29; and the David Starr Jordan (Fishery-Oceanography C en t e

  17. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  18. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  19. Tropical Pacific nutrient dynamics in the modern and pleistocene ocean : insights from the nitrogen isotope system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafter, Patrick Anthony

    2009-01-01

    eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past 3 M.Y. ,in the western tropical Pacific Ocean in the Holocene epoch,eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean, Mar. Chem. , 3, 271–

  20. Rethinking Tropical Ocean Response to Global Warming: The Enhanced Equatorial Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    of tropical Pacific SST to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration is reexamined with a new focus in Fig. 1, which shows the SST trends in response to a 1% transient CO2 in- crease in 14 fully coupled.gov/ipcc/about_ipcc.php), and 1 as an in-house Fast Ocean­Atmosphere Model (FOAM; Jacob 1997). If we define the El Niño

  1. Tropical Ocean Climate Study (TOCS) and Japan-United States Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) on the R/V KAIYO, 25 Jan to 2 March 1997, to the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean BNL component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1997-04-11

    The Japanese U.S. Tropical Ocean Study (JUSTOS) cruise on the R/V KAIYO in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean was a collaborative effort with participants from the Japanese Marine Science and Technology Center (JAMSTEC), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and Brookhaven National Laboratory BNL. This report is a summary of the instruments, measurements, and initial analysis of the BNL portion of the cruise only. It includes a brief description of the instrument system, calibration procedures, problems and resolutions, data collection, processing and data file descriptions. This is a working document, which is meant to provide both a good description of the work and as much information as possible in one place for future analysis.

  2. An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    An optimizing reduced order FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luoa) for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model. Ensembles of data are compiled from transient solutions computed from the discrete equation system derived by FDS for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity

  3. Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy mean flow decomposition and eddy diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2] Eddy diffusivity of the surface velocity field in the tropical Pacific Ocean was estimated using diffusivity estimates in the tropical Pacific Ocean: 2. Results, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C10), 3154, doi:10

  4. Climate Science: Tropical Expansion by Ocean Swing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    The tropical belt has become wider over the past decades, but climate models fall short of capturing the full rate of the expansion. The latest analysis of the climate simulations suggests that a long-term swing of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation is the main missing cause.

  5. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

  6. How ocean color can steer Pacific tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Because ocean color alters the absorption of sunlight, it can produce changes in sea surface temperatures with further impacts on atmospheric circulation. These changes can project onto fields previously recognized to alter ...

  7. On the role of wind driven ocean dynamics in tropical Atlantic variability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Meyre Pereira

    2006-08-16

    The response of the tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind stress forcing on seasonal and interannual time scales is examined using an ocean data assimilation product from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and an ocean general circulation...

  8. Alkyl nitrate (C 1 -C 3 ) depth profiles in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, E. E; Yvon-Lewis, S. A; Saltzman, E. S

    2007-01-01

    Experiment (WOCE), vol. 2, Pacific Ocean DRAFT, edited by M.over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during SAGA 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics A

  9. Exploring the Deep... Ocean-Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    and the transfer of energy among these systems. Global energy balance The Sun is the primary source of energy), and biosphere (living organisms) that are driven by solar energy. The ocean and the atmosphere have the greatest on the others. To fully understand the dynamics of our climate, we must examine the global energy balance

  10. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  11. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    Isolating Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere in the KuroshioSST coupler . . . . Chapter 3 Mesoscale Ocean-Atmosphere4.2 Impact of Mesoscale SST on Precipitation Chapter 4 vi

  12. U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Coastal Data Area Network) Project Description: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA consists of four separate components, an administrative local area network (LAN) component; a public access

  13. Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluffi, Paolo

    Reduced Order Modeling of the Upper Tropical Pacific Ocean Model Using Proper Orthogonal of a large-scale upper ocean circulation in the tropic Pacific domain. We construct different POD models-scale seasonal variability of the tropic Pacific obtained by the original model is well captured by a low

  14. Towards Direct Simulation of Future Tropical Cyclone Statistics in a High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wehner, Michael F.; Bala, G.; Duffy, Phillip; Mirin, Arthur A.; Romano, Raquel

    2010-01-01

    We present a set of high-resolution global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations focusing on the model's ability to represent tropical storms and their statistics. We find that the model produces storms of hurricane strength with realistic dynamical features. We also find that tropical storm statistics are reasonable, both globally and in the north Atlantic, when compared to recent observations. The sensitivity of simulated tropical storm statistics to increases in sea surface temperature (SST) is also investigated, revealing that a credible late 21st century SST increase produced increases in simulated tropical storm numbers and intensities in all ocean basins. Whilemore »this paper supports previous high-resolution model and theoretical findings that the frequency of very intense storms will increase in a warmer climate, it differs notably from previous medium and high-resolution model studies that show a global reduction in total tropical storm frequency. However, we are quick to point out that this particular model finding remains speculative due to a lack of radiative forcing changes in our time-slice experiments as well as a focus on the Northern hemisphere tropical storm seasons.« less

  15. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assessing the tropical ocean current system partly responsible for the fresh water budget. AOML will alsoAOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Administra- tor of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmo- spheric Research in January and began his new duties

  16. Proper orthogonal decomposition approach and error estimation of mixed finite element methods for the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navon, Michael

    for the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model Zhendong Luo a , Jiang Zhu b , Ruiwen Wang b , I.M. Navon c Available online 8 May 2007 Abstract In this paper, the tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model and the insufficient knowledge of air­sea exchange processes. The tropical Pacific Ocean reduced gravity model

  17. The impact of atmospheric aerosols on trace metal chemistry in open ocean surface seawater 3. Lead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maring, H.B.; Duce, R.A. )

    1990-04-15

    Atmospheric aerosols collected at Enewetak Atoll in the tropical North Pacific were exposed to seawater in laboratory experiments to assess the impact of atmospheric aerosols on lead chemistry in surface seawater. The net atmospheric flux of soluble lead to the ocean is between 16 and 32 pmol cm{sup {minus}2}/yr at Enewetak. The stable lead isotopic composition of soluble aerosol lead indicates that it is of anthropogenic origin. Anthropogenic aerosol lead from Central and North America appears to be less soluble and/or to dissolve less rapidly than that from Asia. Dissolved organic matter and possibly lower pH appear to increase the nonaluminosilicate aerosol lead solubility and/or dissolution rate. The isotopic composition of lead in air, seawater and dry deposition suggests that after deposition in the ocean, nonaluminosilicate particulate lead can be reinjected into the atmosphere during sea salt aerosol production.

  18. Lecture(s) 9 Slides from atmosphere-ocean lectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the required energy poleward. the atmosphere is a heat engine, with Hadley convection cells driven moisture: both the `sensible' and `latent' heat fuels the vigorous overturning of the cloud visible albedo and ice can insulate the ocean from the atmosphere above. When the ocean surface freezes

  19. Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Intercomparison of oceanic and atmospheric forced and coupled mesoscale simulations Part I: Surface Abstract. A mesoscale non-hydrostatic atmospheric model has been coupled with a mesoscale oceanic model current. In order to analyze the eect of mesoscale coupling, three simulations are compared: the ®rst one

  20. The Response of Quasigeostrophic Oceanic Vortices to Tropical Cyclone Forcing BENJAMIN JAIMES AND LYNN K. SHAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    . Idealized oceanic currents and wind fields derived from observational data acquired during Hurricane Katrina of wind-driven acceleration of oceanic mixed layer (OML) currents rather than a function of the windThe Response of Quasigeostrophic Oceanic Vortices to Tropical Cyclone Forcing BENJAMIN JAIMES

  1. The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    The depth of the tropical Pacific Ocean's warm surface layer shrank during the last three decades Pacific Ocean, off an island in Palau. They analysed the ratio of nitrogen and carbon isotopes.1029/2010GL044867 (2010) OceanOgraphy Cold water rising in the Pacific DrUg DeVeLOpMenT Worm surgery on a chip

  2. 12.003 Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans, Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    The laws of classical mechanics and thermodynamics are used to explore how the properties of fluids on a rotating Earth manifest themselves in, and help shape, the global patterns of atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and ...

  3. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency: Proceedings Series. IAEA. 2005. Worldwide marine Radionuclides in the Marine Environment: A Selected Bibliography Compiled and edited by: Chris Belter: NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and National Marine Fisheries Service, have prepared

  4. Impact of Tropical Cyclones on the Heat Budget of the South Pacific Ocean S. JULLIEN,* C. E. MENKES,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of Tropical Cyclones on the Heat Budget of the South Pacific Ocean S. JULLIEN,* C. E. MENKES cyclones (TCs) in the South Pacific convergence zone through a complete ocean heat budget. The TC impact, in final form 4 May 2012) ABSTRACT The present study investigates the integrated ocean response to tropical

  5. Effects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    suggests that effects of TC can penetrate deeper into the ocean. This deep effect may result from the nearEffects of tropical cyclones on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China the influence of tropical cyclones (TCs) on large-scale circulation and ocean heat transport in the South China

  6. Data assimilation for the coupled ocean-atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    is vacillating between a normal year (lasts from ~3-8 years) and an El Nino (lasts about a 1 year) #12;Time atmosphere slow ocean fast extratropical atmosphere t=0.01 We do OSSEs with this simple coupled model "El

  7. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  8. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

  9. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: With application toand R. L. Smith, 1995: Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf ofwind stress maximum and CCS SST front located roughly 200 km further offshore

  10. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  11. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  12. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  13. Air-sea interaction at contrasting sites in the Eastern Tropical Pacific : mesoscale variability and atmospheric convection at 10°N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrar, J. Thomas (John Thomas), 1976-

    2007-01-01

    The role of ocean dynamics in driving air-sea interaction is examined at two contrasting sites on 125°W in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean using data from the Pan American Climate Study (PACS) field program. Analysis ...

  14. NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION FISCAL YEAR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION BUDGET ESTIMATES FISCAL YEAR 2014 CONGRESSIONAL SUBMISSION PRIVILEGED The information contained herein must not be disclosed outside the Agency until made public by the President or by the Congress. #12; #12;i Budget Estimates, Fiscal Year 2014 Congressional

  15. NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION FISCAL YEAR 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION BUDGET ESTIMATES FISCAL YEAR 2014 CONGRESSIONAL SUBMISSION PRIVILEGED The information contained herein must not be disclosed outside the Agency until made public by the President or by the Congress. #12;#12;i Budget Estimates, Fiscal Year 2014 Congressional

  16. NOAA Central Library July 2012 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Central Library July 2012 1 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce National Undersea Research Program Bibliography: Preliminary Statistics Compiled by Chris Belter, NOAA Central Library July 2012 #12;NOAA Central Library July 2012 2 Introduction This report presents

  17. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  18. DEPARTMENT OF EARTH, OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE STRATEGIC PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEPARTMENT OF EARTH, OCEAN AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE STRATEGIC PLAN Preamble The new Department. This strategic plan shows how the strength of EOAS will be enhanced by combining the proficiencies of its the University's strategic goals. The Department will continue with the University to offer the public beyond

  19. Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 United States decisions regarding our resources and economic well-being. NOAA Research's FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 Strategic Plan is guided by the vision and goals expressed in the agency's Strategic Plan. We support a broad range

  20. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Sea Turtle Strandings an the Deepwater Oil Spill Commerce d Sea turtle stranding responders, working under, are responding to dead and live sea turtle strandings and offshore teams are searching for and rescuing oiled sea

  1. NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL GEOPHYSICAL DATA CENTER NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT Graig McHendrie Stuart M. Smith National Geophysical Data Center Boulder, Colorado September 1977 countries participated in a workshop at the National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) in Boulder, Colorado

  2. CollegeofEarth,Ocean, andAtmosphericSciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    CollegeofEarth,Ocean, andAtmosphericSciences New Undergraduate STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012-2013 Name Options: Applied Ecology and Resource Management (E-Campus only) 169 Aquatic Biology 501 Environmental Chemistry for Environmental Sciences 490 Environmental Conservation & Sustainability 577 Environmental

  3. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau Hurricane Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau Hurricane Series ERRATA Beltsville, MD 20704-1387 November 6,2007 #12;YRKLXMINARY RET'OHT ON HURRICANE CLEO AUGUST 1.4-~9,1958 The existence af Hurricane "Cleo" i n the Atlantic som 900 milee e a ~ tof the Antflles (near 1 4 . 6 ~ ,47

  4. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau Hurricane Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau Hurricane Series ERRATA Beltsville, MD 20704-1387 November 6,2007 #12;FRELLMINARY REPORT ON HURRICANE HANNAH SEPJCEMBEIi 28-OCTOBER 6, 1959 !Phe Weather Bureau Hurricane Warning Center at M i d issued the f i r a t advisory on Hurricane

  5. Impact of tropical cyclones on the ocean heat budget in the Bay of Bengal during 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    ­November in 1999 on the Bay of Bengal (BoB) heat budget are examined using the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model estimates using previously published methods based on surface observations. The relatively weak heat pumping pumping (DOHP) by tropical cyclones (TCs), which mea- sures the amount of heat that is pumped down from

  6. Localization of Deep Water Formation: Role of Atmospheric Moisture Transport and Geometrical Constraints on Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    A series of coupled atmosphere–ocean–ice aquaplanet experiments is described in which topological constraints on ocean circulation are introduced to study the role of ocean circulation on the mean climate of the coupled ...

  7. Oceanography | Vol.24, No.3114 OCEAN WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    out ows via these pathways return freshwaters to the North Atlantic that were evaporated from tropical oceans, transported by the atmosphere, and delivered to the Arctic Ocean via precipi- tation, terrestrial

  8. A joint atmosphere-ocean inversion for surface fluxes of carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Sara E. Mikaloff

    A joint atmosphere-ocean inversion for surface fluxes of carbon dioxide: 2. Regional results Andrew atmospheric CO2 gradients and transport simulations are combined with observations of ocean interior carbon (2007), A joint atmosphere-ocean inversion for surface fluxes of carbon dioxide: 2. Regional results

  9. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

  10. TROPICAL ATMOSPHERE-OCEAN (TAO) PROGRAM FINAL CRUISE REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Tubes Downloaded: All sensors downloaded successfully except T125, dead battery. General Comments: None Site Sensor battery Buoy Site: 8N 170W Refresh Mooring Depth: 5535 m Mooring Operation: Deployment Mooring ID#: DM038A: Dive op to replace T25 aborted due to unsafe sea conditions. Site Sensor Failures Date Data Flagged Why

  11. Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by the responses of surface winds to SST bias and the thermocline structure to surface wind curls. We also showed that the warming biases in surface solar radiation and latent...

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring Single Column Model IOP(PROBE)

  13. Saharan dust as a causal factor of hemispheric asymmetry in aerosols and cloud cover over the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Da Sliva, Arlindo; Starobinets, Boris; Long, Charles N.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Alpert, Pinhas

    2015-07-09

    Meridional distribution of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) over the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30°N – 30°S) was analyzed to assess seasonal variations of meridional AOT asymmetry. Ten-year MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero) data (July 2002 – June 2012) confirms that the Sahara desert emits a significant amount of dust into the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean. Only over the Atlantic Ocean did MERRAero show that desert dust dominates other aerosol species and is responsible for meridional aerosol asymmetry between the tropical North and South Atlantic. Over the 10-year period under consideration, both MISR measurements and MERRAero data showed a pronounced meridional AOTmore »asymmetry. The meridional AOT asymmetry, characterized by the hemispheric ratio (RAOT) of AOT averaged separately over the North and over the South Atlantic, was about 1.7. Seasonally, meridional AOT asymmetry over the Atlantic was the most pronounced between March and July, when dust presence is maximal (RAOT ranged from 2 to 2.4). There was no noticeable meridional aerosol asymmetry in total AOT from September to October. During this period the contribution of carbonaceous aerosols to total AOT in the South Atlantic was comparable to the contribution of dust aerosols to total AOT in the North Atlantic. During the same 10-year period, MODIS cloud fraction (CF) data showed that there was no noticeable asymmetry in meridional CF distribution in different seasons (the hemispheric ratio of CF ranged from 1.0 to 1.2). MODIS CF data illustrated significant cloud cover (CF of 0.7 – 0.9) with limited precipitation ability along the Saharan Air Layer.« less

  14. A Coupled AtmosphereOcean Radiative Transfer System Using the Analytic Four-Stream Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    of the ocean. Shortwave radiation from the sun contributes most of the heat fluxes that penetrate the airA Coupled Atmosphere­Ocean Radiative Transfer System Using the Analytic Four-Stream Approximation WEI-LIANG LEE AND K. N. LIOU Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of California

  15. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    science, for analyzing current and anticipated uses of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes areas. Coastal) #12;4 Ocean Uses Assessments ­ Maps and analyzes current and likely future ocean uses by kindsNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAAStrategic

  16. JETS: intense circulations in atmospheres and ocean OC569c Spring 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 JETS: intense circulations in atmospheres and ocean OC569c Spring 2008 Room 211 Ocean Teaching.ocean.washington.edu/research/gfd Outline a look at the extratropical jet stream with synoptic data: transport, energy, vertical structure or veering with height) the Hadley cell and its limited size oceanic jets and boundary currents Why

  17. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    productive oceanic eastern boundary current, providing anCurrent System and the Kuroshio Extension uses OFES products for their oceanic

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Manacapuru, Brazil for the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON) Field Campaign

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Amazon rain forest in Brazil is the largest broadleaf forest in the world, covering 7 million square kilometers of the Amazon Basin in South America. It represents over half of the planet’s remaining rain forests, and comprises the most biodiverse tract of tropical rain forest on the planet. Due to the sheer size of the Amazon rain forest, the area has a strong impact on the climate in the Southern Hemisphere. To understand the intricacies of the natural state of the Amazon rain forest, the Green Ocean Amazon, or GOAMAZON, field campaign is a two-year scientific collaboration among U.S. and Brazilian research organizations. They are conducting a variety of different experiments with dozens of measurement tools, using both ground and aerial instrumentation, including the ARM Aerial Facility's G-1 aircraft. For more information on the holistic view of the campaign, see the Department of Energy’s GOAMAZON website. As a critical component of GOAMAZON, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) will obtain measurements near Manacapuru, south of Manaus, Brazil, from January to December 2014. The city of Manaus, with a population of 3 million, uses high-sulfur oil as their primary source of electricity. The AMF site is situated to measure the atmospheric extremes of a pristine atmosphere and the nearby cities’ pollution plume, as it regularly intersects with the site. Along with other instrument systems located at the Manacapuru site, this deployment will enable scientists to study how aerosol and cloud life cycles are influenced by pollutant outflow from a tropical megacity.

  19. Long-Term Operation Of Ground-Based Atmospheric Sensing Systems In The Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark; Jones, Larry J.; Porch, W. M.; Apple, Monty L.; Widener, Kevin B.

    2004-10-14

    Three semi-autonomous atmospheric sensing systems were installed in the tropical western Pacific region. The first of these Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Stations (ARCS) began operation in 1996. Each ARCS is configured as a system-of-systems since it comprises an ensemble of independent instrument systems. The ARCS collect, process, and transmit large volumes of cloud, solar and thermal radiation, and meteorological data to support climate studies and climate-modeling improvements as part of the U.S Department of Energy’s Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Data from these tropical ARCS stations have been used for satellite ground-truth data comparisons and validations, including comparisons for MTI and AQUA satellite data. Our experiences with these systems in the tropics led to modifications in their design. An ongoing international logistics effort is required to keep gigabytes per day of quality-assured data flowing to the ARM program’s archives. Design criteria, performance, communications methods, and the day-to-day logistics required to support long-term operations of ground-based remote atmospheric sensing systems are discussed. End-to-end data flow from the ARCS systems to the ARM Program archives is discussed.

  20. A joint atmosphere-ocean inversion for surface fluxes of carbon dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Sara E. Mikaloff

    interprets in situ observations of carbon dioxide concentration in the ocean and atmosphere with transportA joint atmosphere-ocean inversion for surface fluxes of carbon dioxide: 1. Methods and global March 2007. [1] We have constructed an inverse estimate of surface fluxes of carbon dioxide using both

  1. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  2. Using Satellite Ocean Color Data to Derive an Empirical Model for the Penetration Depth of Solar Radiation (Hp) in the Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    the climate through the penetration depth of solar radiation in the upper ocean (Hp), a primary parameter on penetrative solar radiation in the tropical Pacific, demonstrating the dynamical implication of remotely in which incident solar radiation is absorbed in the mixed layer and the verti- cal penetration down

  3. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau Hurricane Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUREAU SAN JUAN SAN JUAN WATHER BUltEAU TROPICAL STORM ADVISORY NUMBER 1 FIFI 6 PM AST SEPTEMBER 5 1958

  4. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

    2011-01-21

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

  5. Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 45 (2008) 274319 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    will be assessed. The atmospheric response is known to create small-scale wind stress curl and diver- gence and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 COAS Admin. Building, Corvallis, OR 97331-5503, USA e of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, UCLA, 7127 Math Sciences Building, 405 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095

  6. The Relation Between Dry Vortex Merger and Tropical Cyclone Genesis over the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chin

    2014-10-27

    A strong, convective African tropical disturbance has a greater chance to develop into a Tropical 23 Depression (TD) if it merges with a shallow, dry vortex (D-vortex) from the north of the African 24 easterly jet (AEJ) after leaving the western coast. Using 11-year reanalysis data we found that the 25 western tip of a vortex strip at northwestern Africa can serve as dry vortices for the D-vortex 26 merger if it shifts southward. Another source of D-vortices is the westward propagating lows 27 along the southern edge of the Saharan air. The D-vortex merger process occurred for 63.5% of 28 tropical cyclones (TCs) or developing systems over the main development region of the Atlantic 29 Ocean, while it occurred for 54% of non-developing systems. TC genesis could be largely 30 controlled by the large-scale environment, but the differences in characteristics of vortices 31 associated with the D-vortex merger between developing and non-developing systems could 32 potentially help determine their destinies; in general, developing systems were dominated by a 33 more intense and moist south vortex, while non-developing systems were dominated by a north 34 vortex which was more intense, drier, and larger in size. Analysis also shows that 74% of intense 35 developing systems were involved with the D-vortex merger process. More attention needs to be 36 paid to the D-vortex merger and the characteristics of those vortices as they can play significant 37 roles or have a strong indication in Atlantic TC genesis.

  7. On the meridional heat transport and its partition between the atmosphere and oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enderton, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis I study the meridional heat transport of the climate system and its partition between the atmosphere and oceans using models and data. I focus on three primary questions: (1) What is the total heat transport ...

  8. Atmospheric forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 2001 upwelling season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    by nonlinear internal ocean tides. The diurnal cycle of wind stress was similar for both southwardAtmospheric forcing of the Oregon coastal ocean during the 2001 upwelling season J. M. Bane,1 M. D. Southward wind stresses of 0.05À0.1 N mÀ2 occurred roughly 75% of the time, with a sustained period

  9. Effect of ocean mesoscale variability on the mean state of tropical Atlantic climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, H; Jochum, M; Murtugudde, R; Miller, A J

    2006-01-01

    Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean State ofthe effect of oceanic mesoscale features on the mean climatemodel, resolving oceanic mesoscale variability leads to a

  10. EPS 22 The Fluid Earth: Oceans, Atmosphere, Climate & Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    . Students are requested not to use laptops or cell phones during class. Textbook: The Atmospheric Balance 02 Feb Atmospheric radiation. Demonstration: Invisibility at 1800 K. Spectra and Planck's Nobel

  11. Shipboard Atmospheric O2 Measurements in the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    outgassing on the atmospheric gradients at this latitude and time of year. This CO2 outgassing is in contrast

  12. Impact of anthropogenic atmospheric nitrogen and sulfur deposition on ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    3 and H2SO4) and bases (NH3) alter surface seawater alkalinity, pH, and inorganic carbon storage. We and alkaline in the tropics because of am- monia inputs. However, because most of the excess ammonia Tmol/yr), ammonia (NH3, 4 Tmol/yr), and sulfur dioxide (SO2, 2 Tmol/yr) to the atmosphere (1). Globally

  13. Ocean-atmosphere partitioning of anthropogenic carbon dioxide on centennial timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    Ocean-atmosphere partitioning of anthropogenic carbon dioxide on centennial timescales Philip-atmosphere partitioning of anthropogenic carbon dioxide on centennial timescales is presented. The partial pressure carbon dioxide on centennial timescales, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 21, GB1014, doi:10.1029/2006GB002810

  14. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY College of Earth, Ocean, & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    and River Dominated Margins", Santiago de Compostela, Spain, June 19-24, 2005. · 2009 Coastal and Estuarine Research Federation Meeting, "Significance of River-Ocean Coherence for Fluxes and Fate of Terrestrial

  15. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01

    and C. D. Winant (1995), Buoy observations of the atmosphereQuikSCAT/SeaWinds using ocean buoy data, J. Atmos. Oceanicfield evaluation of NDBC moored buoy winds, J. Atmos. Ocean.

  16. Response of photosynthesis to ocean acidification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, KRM; Morris, JJ; Morris, JJ; Morel, FMM; Kranz, SA

    2015-01-01

    sub- tropical North Pacific Ocean. Aquatic Microbial Ecologytropical Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and contributes sub-

  17. Ship Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C. W. FAIRALL, AND SERGIO PEZOA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    of upwelling, surface fluxes, and transport, which in turn depend on the wind and solar forcing at the ocean surface. Southeasterly winds blow parallel to the coast in the Southern Hemisphere, causing offshore EkmanShip Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C

  18. Atmosphere and Ocean: Water (drought topic begins at slide 26)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water: the `vapor pressure' exerted by H2O molecules increases exponenEally with temperature ( it boils when that vapor pressure equals the ambient pressure: Humans & Nature 23 May 2012 GFD Lab: www.ocean.washington.edu/research/gfd #12;water vapor

  19. NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION FISCAL YEAR 2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Submission Table of Contents Exhibit No. Page No. Summary Materials 1 Table of Contents i 2 Organization Chart vii 3 Executive Summary viii 10 Program and Performance: Direct Obligations Exhibit 10 ­ 1 32;Ocean and Coastal Management and Services 12-15 Justification of Program and Changes NOS ­ 29 NOS

  20. Surface and free tropospheric sources of methanesulfonic acid over the tropical Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuzhong; Wang, Yuhang; Gray, Burton A.; Gu, Dasa; Mauldin, L.; Cantrell, Chris; Bandy, Alan R.

    2014-07-28

    The production of sulfate aerosols through marine sulfur chemistry is critical to the climate system. However, not all sulfur compounds have been studied in detail. One such compound is methanesulfonic acid (MSA). In this study, we use a one-dimensional chemical transport model to analyze observed vertical profiles of gas-phase MSA during the Pacific Atmospheric Sulfur Experiment (PASE). The observed sharp decrease in MSA from the surface to 600m implies a surface source of 4.0×107 molecules/cm2/s. Evidence suggests that this source is photolytically enhanced. We also find that the observed large increase of MSA from the boundary layer into the lower free troposphere (1000-2000m) results mainly from the degassing of MSA from dehydrated aerosols. We estimate a source of 1.2×107 molecules/cm2/s through this pathway. This source of soluble MSA potentially provides an important precursor for new particle formation in the free troposphere over tropics, affecting the climate system through aerosol-cloud interactions.

  1. Curriculum Vitae Program of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Mechanics and Turbulence !Multi-Scale Numerical Modeling !Hydrometeorology and Micrometeorology !Land-Atmosphere Interaction EDUCATION & EMPLOYMENT 2005-2009: B.E., Department of Hydraulic Engineering, Tsinghua University, China 2009-2013: Ph.D., Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (with a certificate from

  2. NOAA Central Library Draft November 2012 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Central Library Draft November 2012 1 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US by Chris Belter, Sarah Davis, Jan Thomas, and Christie Wiley: NOAA Central and Regional Libraries Analysis by Chris Belter: NOAA Central Library November 2012 #12;NOAA Central Library Draft November 2012 2 About

  3. The contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The formation of Subtropical Mode Water (STMW) in the western North Atlantic has been attributed to both are the subject of a study, the CLIvar MOde Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE), which includes a large fieldThe contributions of atmosphere and ocean to North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water volume anomalies

  4. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse What to Expect in South Florida from the Deepwater Horizon/ BP Oil Spill Has Oil from the Deepwater Horizon/BP Oil Spill Reached South Florida Yet? There have been no confirmed observations of oil from

  5. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Oil Spill Dispersant Application and Monitoring Once oil has spilled, responders use a variety oil spill countermeasures to reduce the adverse effects of spilled oil on the environment. Dispersants

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Guide to Distinguishing Oil From Algal Blooms When observed from a boat or aircraft, many kinds of natural phenomena can be mistaken for oil on the water surface. Kelp beds, accumulations of jellyfish

  7. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Sea Turtle Strandings and the Deepwater Oil Spill Credit: University of California, Davis Sea turtle and are rescuing some heavily oiled sea turtles from the spill area. All the living turtles captured

  8. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Using Boom in Response to Oil Spills Boom is a common type of oil spill response equipment. It is used to protect shorelines or sensitive locations by acting as a barrier to oil, and to corral oil on the water

  9. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Hurricanes and the Oil Spill What will happen to a hurricane that runs through this oil slick? · Most impact on the hurricane would be minimal. · The oil is not expected to appreciably affect either

  10. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Effects of Oil on Marine Mammals and Sea Turtles Oil is a mixture of chemicals, all of which may have of the chemicals and methods used to clean up oil spills may also have effects on marine animals. Toxicity

  11. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Oil Spills and Coral Reefs Healthy coral reefs are among the most biologically diverse on a reef. Coral reefs are sometimes called rainforests of the seas. Impacts of oil spills to coral reefs

  12. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce NOAA'sOilSpillResponse Surface Washing Agents Surface washing agents are liquid products designed to make it easier to remove oil from surfaces and structures that have been oiled so that they don't become "secondary sources

  13. Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earth MattErsNewsletter of UBC Earth, Ocean and atmospheric sciences Vol. 1 2014 8 News Transforming undergraduate education, reopening of the Pacific Museum of Earth, and more 18 New Faculty Three on their latest investigations #12;PhotobyKirstenHodge ii EarthMatters 2014 iii Contents iii From the Editor iv

  14. Z .Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 28 1998 93105 Fluid transport by dipolar vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flór, Jan-Bert

    Z .Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 28 1998 93­105 Fluid transport by dipolar vortices I. Eames a forward, where C s1 for a Lamb's dipole. The results areM M applied to examine fluid transport by dipolar potential vorticity. q 1998 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Fluid transport; Dipoles

  15. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, centered on Earth System Modeling and OAR's role develop and/or can use accurate and timely predictions of the Earth system that come from modeling. The 18

  16. Tropical forest responses to increasing atmospheric CO2: current knowledge and opportunities for future research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    their representation in Earth system models. Tropical forests play a significant role in the global carbon cycle

  17. The effect of subsurface temperature variability on the predictability of SST in the tropical Atlantic Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Susan Carr

    1999-01-01

    The role of thermocouple variability and its effects on tropical Atlantic SST is investigated through the generation of SST predictions using a linear inverse modeling technique developed by Penland (1989). In order to ...

  18. Evidence for a winter sink of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide in the northeast Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulshoefer, V.S.; Uher, G.; Andreae, M.O. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    Atmospheric and dissolved carbonyl sulfide (COS) concentrations were measured on 473 samples during three cruises into the northeast Atlantic Ocean. The cruises took place in April/May 1992, January 1994, and September 1994, covering three seasons. In January 1994, persistent undersaturation of COS in seawater with respect to the atmosphere was observed. This is the first data set to show a strong and persistent undersaturation with the mean saturation ratio (SR) being 46% and the standard deviation 13%. In April 1992. the seawater was slightly supersaturated, with a SR of 126{plus_minus}58%. Only in September 1994, strong supersaturation of 214{plus_minus}86% was observed. The measured air concentrations were relatively uniform, averaging 410{plus_minus}67 pptv in January 1994, 466{plus_minus}42 pptv in April 1992, and 396{plus_minus}18 pptv in September 1994. Sea-to-air fluxes of COS were estimated using three different exchange models. We obtained moderate to low COS emissions in September (19 to 33 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) and April/May (5 to 10 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), in contrast to a significant flux from the atmosphere into the ocean in January (-76 to -31 nmol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}). The strong seasonal variation of COS emissions with the possibility of reversed fluxes into the ocean during winter must be considered in future oceanic source estimates. The possible effect of an open ocean winter sink on global marine emissions of COS could be a reduction by some 10-15%. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Radiative transfer in the earth's atmosphere-ocean system using Monte Carlo techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Paul Andrew

    1987-01-01

    TRANSFER PROBLEM MONTE CARLO METHOD Assumptions of the Model Photon Pathlength Emulation Techniques Sampling Scattering Functions: Angles and Probabilities Emulation of an Interface Computing the Radiance by Statistical Estimation Determination... radiance values in both the atmosphere and the ocean from the scattering functions and other input data, with a Monte Carlo computer code. The polarization ot the radiation was taken into account by Kattawar et al. s in their computation...

  20. The Role of the Tropics in Abrupt Climate Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey

    2013-12-07

    Topics addressed include: abrupt climate changes and ocean circulation in the tropics; what controls the ocean thermal structure in the tropics; a permanent El Niño in paleoclimates; the energetics of the tropical ocean.

  1. A Comparison of Atmospheric Reanalysis Surface Products over the Ocean and Implications for Uncertainties in Air–Sea Boundary Forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.

    This paper investigates the uncertainties related to atmospheric fields from reanalysis products used in forcing ocean models. Four reanalysis products, namely from 1) the interim ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), 2) version ...

  2. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, P. E.; Doney, S. C.; Lindsay, Keith; Moore, J. K.; Mahowald, N. M.; Randerson, J. T.; Fung, I.; Lamarque, J. F.; Feddema, Johannes J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. Inclusion of fundamental ecological interactions between carbon and nitrogen cycles in the land component of an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM) leads to decreased carbon uptake associated ...

  3. Diurnal cycle of liquid water path over the subtropical and tropical oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager) satellite microwave radiometer data. Diurnal, consistent with a diurnal cycle driven largely by cloud solar absorption. In deep convective regions [1995] examined a two-point sampling of the LWP diurnal cycle of using the special sensor microwave

  4. Diurnal cycle of liquid water path over the subtropical and tropical oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager) satellite microwave radiometer data. Diurnal, consistent with a diurnal cycle driven largely by cloud solar absorption. In deep convective regions], using a 17 day period of near-continuous ground based microwave radio- meter data around the time

  5. Thermal evolution of an early magma ocean in interaction with the atmosphere: conditions for the condensation of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandeis, Geneviève

    for the condensation of a water ocean T. Lebrun1 , H. Massol1 , E. Chassefière1 , A. Davaille2 , E. Marcq3 , P. Sarda1-planet distance. Our results suggest that a steam atmosphere delays the end of the magma ocean phase by typically 1 Myr. Water vapor condenses to an ocean after 0.1 Myr, 1.5 Myr and 10 Myr for, respectively, Mars

  6. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 15 FEBRUARY 2009 DOI: 10.1038/NGEO439 Rapid oceanic and atmospheric changes during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    are indicative of rapid alternations between glacial growth and melting during the later Younger Dryas. Meanwhile and the melting of glaciers. Subsequent input of this fresh meltwater into the ocean spurred the formation of sea the last glacial period12,13 . The roles of the ocean and the atmosphere in triggering the climate shifts

  7. Centennial-scale elemental and isotopic variability in the tropical and subtropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuer, Matthew K. (Matthew Kindt), 1972-

    2002-01-01

    The marine geochemistry of the North Atlantic Ocean varies on decadal to centennial time scales, a consequence of natural and anthropogenic forcing. Surface corals provide a useful geochemical archive to quantify past mixed ...

  8. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of methane in distilled water and seawater, J. Chem. Eng.Paci?c (ETP) Ocean • Water column MO x strongly mitigatesD. M. Lavoie (1983), Upper water column methane geochemistry

  9. Comparison of reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Céline; Verron, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of two reduced-order, sequential and variational data assimilation methods: the SEEK filter and the R-4D-Var. A hybridization of the two, combining the variational framework and the sequential evolution of covariance matrices, is also preliminarily investigated and assessed in the same experimental conditions. The comparison is performed using the twin-experiment approach on a model of the Tropical Pacific domain. The assimilated data are simulated temperature profiles at the locations of the TAO/TRITON array moorings. It is shown that, in a quasi-linear regime, both methods produce similarly good results. However the hybrid approach provides slightly better results and thus appears as potentially fruitful. In a more non-linear regime, when Tropical Instability Waves develop, the global nature of the variational approach helps control model dynamics better than the sequential approach of the SEEK filter. This aspect is probably enhanced by the context of the experiments in tha...

  10. )OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - glades. They also monitor ocean currents, studying changes that may affect rainfall or climate. AOML)OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). AOML car- ries out world-class research

  11. GFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geography of potential vorticity -lateral circulation: wind-driven ocean gyres and boundary currents -circumpolar ocean currents and the atmospheric westerly winds: stationary Rossby waves with mountains; waveGFD-2 Spring 2004 Syllabus Text: a nearly complete set of text handouts, plus A.E.Gill, Atmosphere-Ocean

  12. Evidence for multiple magma ocean outgassing and atmospheric loss episodes from mantle noble gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    The energy associated with giant impacts is large enough to generate global magma oceans during Earth's accretion. However, geochemical evidence requiring a terrestrial magma ocean is scarce. Here we present evidence for at least two separate magma ocean outgassing episodes on Earth based on the ratio of primordial 3He to 22Ne in the present-day mantle. We demonstrate that the depleted mantle 3He/22Ne ratio is at least 10 while a more primitive mantle reservoir has a 3He/22Ne ratio of 2.3 to 3. The 3He/22Ne ratios of the mantle reservoirs are higher than possible sources of terrestrial volatiles, including the solar nebula ratio of 1.5. Therefore, a planetary process must have raised the mantle's 3He/22Ne ratio. We show that long-term plate tectonic cycling is incapable of raising the mantle 3He/22Ne ratio and may even lower it. However, ingassing of a gravitationally accreted nebular atmosphere into a magma ocean on the proto-Earth explains the 3He/22Ne and 20Ne/22Ne ratios of the primitive mantle reservoir....

  13. Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather in order to improve the Nation's ability to protect human and ecosystem health. What We Do ARL conducts research and development in the fields of atmospheric dispersion, air quality, climate change, and boundary

  14. Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Profile Program) data base are searched to depict the detail UOTS structure. Sea surface height anom- aly are available. The cyclone track and intensity data is from the Unisys Weather (http://weather to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

  15. Tropical CycloneInduced Upper-Ocean Mixing and Climate: Application to Equable Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    ), and above-freezing temperatures at polar latitudes were common through a significant fraction are principally responsible for transport- ing enthalpy poleward in the present climate, itself varies (CO2; Barron and Washington 1985), strong ocean heat transport (Barron 1983; Emanuel 2002; Korty 2005

  16. Mixed-phase clouds, thin cirrus clouds, and OLR over the tropics: observations, retrievals, and radiative impacts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joonsuk

    2009-06-02

    The tropics is a very important region in terms of earth’s radiation budget because the net radiative heating is largest in the tropics and that surplus energy is redistributed by the circulations of oceans and atmospheres. Moreover, a large number...

  17. A Three-Dimensional Ocean-Seaice-Carbon Cycle Model and its Coupling to a Two-Dimensional Atmospheric Model: Uses in Climate Change Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutkiewicz, Stephanie.

    We describe the coupling of a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, with explicit thermodynamic seaice and ocean carbon cycle representations, to a two-dimensional atmospheric/land model. This coupled system has been ...

  18. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Morton, DC

    2015-01-01

    19), 7888–7892. CHEN ET AL. HURRICANES AND AMAZON FIRES AREand G. C. Hurtt (2007), Hurricane Katrina’s carbon footprintThe 2013 Atlantic basin hurricane season: Blip or ?ip? ,

  19. Effect of Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Changes on Tropical Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xiuquan

    2010-01-14

    by the surface cooling of the North Atlantic and the North Pacific in response to a weakened AMOC, is a leading physical mechanism that dictates the behavior of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) response to AMOC changes. However, depending on its origin...

  20. Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)Curves (Journal Article)Connect

  1. Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(Journal Article)Curves (Journal Article)Connectprediction

  2. Increasing carbon storage in intact African tropical forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    to predictions of future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide1,2 . The role of tropical forests is critical dioxide concentrations, may be the cause of the increase in carbon stocks13 , as some theory14 and models2 with estimates of fossil fuel emissions, ocean carbon fluxes and carbon released from land-use change, indicate

  3. Impacts of Pacific and Indian Ocean Coupling on Wintertime Tropical Intraseasonal Oscillation: A Basin-Coupling CGCM Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weng, Shu-Ping; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2010-01-01

    the central Indian and Pacific oceans. We notice from FigureIP) Run, (c) the Pacific Ocean (PO) Run, and (d) the Indiantropical Indian and Pacific Oceans. Journal of Climate 10:

  4. Role of the oceans in the atmospheric cycle of carbonyl sulfide. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is both the dominant sulfur gas in the remote troposphere and, along with volcanoes, a major source of sulfur for the stratospheric sulfate layer. Prior to this work the ocean was regarded as a major sink for atmospheric OCS. The purpose of this study has been to assess the magnitude of the global air-sea flux of OCS. The author designed an analytical system which was centered around a Varian-3700 gas chromatograph with a flame-photometric detector. To increase the sensitivity of the detector, the hydrogen gas for the flame was doped with sulfur hexafloride. Air samples were concentrated in a liquid nitrogen cooled freeze-out loop, then injected into the gas chromatograph. Water samples purged with sulfur-free zero-air which was analyzed similarly. The author also built a permeation tube system for chemical standardization. This equipment was taken on two oceanographic cruises on the Pacific Ocean on board the NOAA ship DISCOVERER, one in the spring of 1983 and a second in the spring of 1984. Both of these cruises included measurements of air and sea-water concentrations of OCS.

  5. Role of the oceans in the atmospheric cycle of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) is both the dominant sulfur gas in the remote troposphere and, along with volcanoes, a major source of sulfur for the stratospheric sulfate layer. Prior to this work the ocean was regarded as a major sink for atmospheric OCS. The purpose of this study has been to assess the magnitude of the global air-sea flux of OCS. The author designed an analytical system which was centered around a Varian-3700 gas chromatograph with a flame-photometric detector. To increase the sensitivity of the detector, the hydrogen gas for the flame was doped with sulfur hexafluoride. Air samples were concentrated in a liquid nitrogen cooled freeze-out loop, then injected into the gas chromatograph. Water samples purged with sulfur-free zero-air which was analyzed similarly. He also built a permeation tube system for chemical standardization. This equipment was taken on two oceanographic cruises on the Pacific Ocean, one in the spring of 1983 and a second in the spring of 1983. Both of these cruises included measurements of air and seawater concentrations of OCS from the equator to the Aleutian Islands. The Henry's law constant of solubility for OCS was measured in the laboratory for filtered and boiled seawater at three temperatures.

  6. Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard J. Diamond, U.S. GCOS Program Manager, National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Tel : +1 System Program Manager Director, World Data Center for Meteorology Formal NOAA Lead on U.S. climate bi

  7. Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences in the bottom bound- ary layer. In the nonlinear internal waves that were observed, the kinetic energy. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear

  8. Convective Entrainment and Large-Scale Organization of Tropical Precipitation: Sensitivity of the CNRM-CM5 Hierarchy of Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convective Entrainment and Large-Scale Organization of Tropical Precipitation: Sensitivity explore this sensitivity, the authors focus in this study on the influence of lateral entrainment to the entrainment parameter were performed in a hierarchy of models (coupled ocean­ atmosphere GCM, atmospheric GCM

  9. Prospects for Simulating Macromolecular Surfactant Chemistry at the Ocean-Atmosphere Boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, S.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Deal, C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Long, M.; Ogunro, O.; Russell, Lynn M.; Wingenter, O.

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic lipids and polymers are surveyed for their ability to adsorb at the water-air interfaces associated with bubbles, marine microlayers and particles in the overlying boundary layer. Representative ocean biogeochemical regimes are defined in order to estimate local concentrations for the major macromolecular classes. Surfactant equilibria and maximum excess are then derived based on a network of model compounds. Relative local coverage and upward mass transport follow directly, and specific chemical structures can be placed into regional rank order. Lipids and denatured protein-like polymers dominate at the selected locations. The assigned monolayer phase states are variable, whether assessed along bubbles or at the atmospheric spray droplet perimeter. Since oceanic film compositions prove to be irregular, effects on gas and organic transfer are expected to exhibit geographic dependence as well. Moreover, the core arguments extend across the sea-air interface into aerosol-cloud systems. Fundamental nascent chemical properties including mass to carbon ratio and density depend strongly on the geochemical state of source waters. High surface pressures may suppress the Kelvin effect, and marine organic hygroscopicities are almost entirely unconstrained. While bubble adsorption provides a well-known means for transporting lipidic or proteinaceous material into sea spray, the same cannot be said of polysaccharides. Carbohydrates tend to be strongly hydrophilic so that their excess carbon mass is low despite stacked polymeric geometries. Since sugars are abundant in the marine aerosol, gel-based mechanisms may be required to achieve uplift. Uncertainties in the surfactant logic distill to a global scale dearth of information regarding two dimensional kinetics and equilibria. Nonetheless simulations are recommended, to initiate the process of systems level quantification.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Site.

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is one of the four fixed sites. It consists of three climate research facilities; the Manus facility on Los Negros Island in Manus, Papua New Guinea (established in 1996); the Nauru facility on Nauru Island, Republic of Nauru (1998); and the Darwin facility in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia (2002). The operations are supported by government agencies in each host country. Covering the area roughly between 10 degrees N and 10 degrees S of the equator and from 130 degrees E to 167 degrees E, the TWP locale includes a region that plays a large role in the interannual variability observed in the global climate system. More than 250,000 TWP data sets from 1996 to the present reside in the ARM Archive. Begin at the TWP information page for links or access data directly from the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. Geography 102, Spring 2007 Tropical Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Office: Bunche Hall 1176 Phone: 206-4590/825-1071, email:raphael@geog.ucla.edu Office Hours: M/W 10:30p the development of Tropical Cli- mates - the laws that govern the movement of air; solar radiation in the Tropics in the Tropics - the Hadley Cells, the Trade Winds, the InterTropical Convergence Zone, the Tropical ocean

  12. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    collabora- tion between Brazil, France, and the United States to better understand the ocean masses (e.g., the United (continued on page 2) Zachary Barton of AOML and Jonathan Shannahoff, the chief.aoml.noaa.gov/keynotes/ States and Brazil) and for the formation of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic. The suite

  13. Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverthorne, Katherine E

    2010-01-01

    Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

  14. NOAA | Valuing Coastal and Ocean Ecosystems U.S. Department of Commerce | National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , wetlands, sea grasses, coral reefs, and mangroves. Despite localized successes, habitat trends continue% of coral reefs are already seriously damaged by local sources such as overfishing, destructive fishing and endangered species, human health and well-being. How valuable are healthy coastal and ocean ecosystems? Our

  15. The 1996 U.S. Purse Seine Fishery for Tropical Tunas in the Central-Western Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for tropical tu nas (yellowfin, Thunnus albacares; skipjack, Katsuwonus pelamis; and big eye, T. obesus, and skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, and continued a de clining trend that started in 1995. Catch rates also

  16. ,u.s. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Water Shrimp, Macrobrachium, in the Lower St. Paul River, Liberia, 1952-53 By GEORGE C. MILLER Contribution No River, liberia, 1952-53 By GEORGE C. MILLER, Zoologist' National Marine Fisheries Service Tropical

  17. A tropical influence on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S.

    1997-05-15

    A potential influence of tropical sea surface temperature on the global climate response to a doubling of the CO{sub 2} concentration is tested using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The warming is significantly reduced when sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue region between latitudes 2.25{degrees}N and 2.25{degrees}S are held at the control simulation values. Warming of the global mean temperature outside of the cold tongue region is reduced from 2.4{degrees}C in the unconstrained case to 1.9{degrees}C when the sea surface temperature constraint is applied. The decrease in the warming results from a positive net heat flux into the ocean cold tongue region and implicit heat storage in the subsurface ocean, induced by horizontal atmospheric heat fluxes. The reduced surface temperature warming outside of the cold tongue region is due to reduction in the downward longwave radiative flux at the surface, caused in turn by reduced atmospheric temperature and moisture. The global mean surface temperature responds to the heat storage in the ocean as if the global mean radiative forcing due to the doubled CO{sub 2} (approximately 4 W m{sup {minus}2}) was reduced by the value of the global mean heat flux into the ocean. This mechanism also provides a possible explanation for the observed high correlation on interannual timescales between the global mean tropospheric temperature and sea surface temperature in the eastern tropical Pacific. The results emphasize the importance of correctly modeling the dynamical processes in the ocean and atmosphere that help determine the sea surface temperature in the equatorial eastern Pacific, in addition to the thermodynamical processes, in projecting global warming. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Adjusting to policy expectations in climate change modeling : an interdiciplinary study of flux adjustments in coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, Simon.; Risbey, James; Stone, Peter H.; Wynne, Brian

    This paper surveys and interprets the attitudes of scientists to the use of flux adjustments in climate projections with coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Models. The survey is based largely on the responses of ...

  19. Revised for Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology Dec. 18, 2001 DO NOT QUOTE OR CIRCULATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI *Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA #12 studies of atmospheric pollution, atmospheric chemistry, aerosol radiative effects on climate, visibility etc. Hence in-situ measurements in minimally disturbed air are desirable for many applications

  20. A multi-resolution ensemble study of a tropical urban environment and its interactions with the background regional atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xian-Xiang

    This study employed the Weather Research and Forecasting model with a single-layer urban canopy model to investigate the urban environment of a tropical city, Singapore. The coupled model was evaluated against available ...

  1. The atmospheric ocean: eddies and jets in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    of heat, carbon dioxide, chemicals, biology and other tracers. Despite its essential role in the climate in obtaining observations from the remote Southern Ocean has, in part, hindered progress in describing

  2. Exploring the Texture of Ocean-Atmosphere Redox Evolution on the Early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhard, Christopher Thomas

    2012-01-01

    northeastern Baltic Shield. Earth Sci Rev 36:205- 241. B81.Earth.DC, Claire MW (2005) How Earth’s atmosphere evolved to an

  3. Oceanic sources, sinks, and transport of atmospheric CO2 Nicolas Gruber,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortunat, Joos

    of generally less than 0.1 Pg C aÀ1 . This distribution is characterized by outgassing in the tropics, uptake cancellation between a substantial outgassing of natural CO2 and a strong uptake of anthropogenic CO2 of an outgassing flux of river-derived carbon of $+0.5 Pg C aÀ1 , and an uptake flux of anthropogenic carbon of À2

  4. Nitrogen deposition in tropical forests from savanna and deforestation fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Van Der Werf, GR; Morton, DC; Mu, M; Kasibhatla, PS

    2010-01-01

    15, Atkinson R (2000) Atmospheric chemistry of VOCs and NOx.tropics – impact on atmospheric chemistry and biogeochemicalimpact of fires on atmospheric chemistry. N r can be emitted

  5. The Role of the Ocean in the Atmospheric Budgets of Methyl Bromide, Methyl Chloride and Methane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Lei

    2012-10-19

    , which was 700 (490 to 920) Gg yr^-1 and -370 (-440 to -280) Gg yr^-1, respectively. The ocean accounts for 10 - 19 % in the global CH3Cl emission and 6 - 9 % in its global sinks. Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas, which has a warming potential...

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration U.S. Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and will change living conditions for plants and animals, including people. At the same time, the world will see systems -- is shrinking. Arctic sea ice reflects solar energy away from the Earth and acts as a natural stream flow. And as more and more water reaches the ocean, it is increasing sea level at a faster rate

  7. On a revised ocean-atmosphere physical coupling interface and about technical coupling software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the introduction of two new modules: the Surface Layer Turbulence (SLT) and the ocean surface (OS) modules to recreate subgrid variability when going from low to high resolution grids, incoherent coast- lines across which the conservation of energy, mass and momentum can be ensured; · identify which process needs

  8. Ice at the Interface: Atmosphere-Ice-Ocean Boundary Layer Processes and Their Role in Polar Change---Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunke, Elizabeth C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    The atmosphere-ocean boundary layer in which sea ice resides includes many complex processes that require a more realistic treatment in GCMs, particularly as models move toward full earth system descriptions. The primary purpose of the workshop was to define and discuss such coupled processes from observational and modeling points of view, including insight from both the Arctic and Antarctic systems. The workshop met each of its overarching goals, including fostering collaboration among experimentalists, theorists and modelers, proposing modeling strategies, and ascertaining data availability and needs. Several scientific themes emerged from the workshop, such as the importance of episodic or extreme events, precipitation, stratification above and below the ice, and the marginal ice zone, whose seasonal Arctic migrations now traverse more territory than in the past.

  9. Parametric Excitation of Internal Gravity Waves in Ocean and Atmosphere as Precursors of Strong Earthquakes and Tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chefranov, Sergey G

    2013-01-01

    The condition of internal gravity waves (IGW) parametric excitation in the rotating fluid layer heated from above, with the layer vibration along the vertical axis or with periodic modulation in time of the vertical temperature distribution, is obtained. We show the dual role of the molecular dissipative effects that may lead not only to the wave oscillations damping, but also to emergence of hydrodynamic dissipative instability (DI) in some frequency band of IGW. This DI also may take place for the localized in horizontal plane tornado-like disturbances, horizontal scale of which does not exceed the character vertical scale for the fluid layer of the finite depth. Investigated parametric resonance mechanism of IGW generation in ocean and atmosphere during and before earthquakes allows monitoring of such waves (with double period with respect to the period of vibration or temperature gradient modulation) as precursors of these devastating phenomena.

  10. The relationship between atmospheric convective radiative effect and net1 energy transport in the tropical warm pool2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    of the atmospheric cloud radiative effect in determining the magnitude of hor- izontal export of energy, they increase the re- quirement for the atmosphere to export energy from convective regions. Over the warmest that the increased energy export is supplied by the radiative heating from convection. The net cloud radiative effect

  11. The effect of variable atmospheric forcing on oceanic subduction of a passive tracer in a numerical model: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horsfall, F.; Bleck, R.; Hanson, H.P.

    1997-11-01

    This study addresses the issue of the ocean`s response to the changing climate. The objectives is to determine the effect of variable atmospheric forcing on the ocean on decadal time scales, specifically on the subduction of a passive tracer. In the context of the model used in this study, this tracer is {open_quotes}tagged{close_quotes} water that is subducted into the thermocline and into the deep ocean. The model used in this study is the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model which has a realistic Atlantic domain from 20{degrees}S to 60{degrees}N. There are twelve model layers, the first (top) layer being the thermodynamically active mixed layer and the lower eleven layers all having constant potential density ({sigma}{sub {theta}}). The atmospheric forcing changes vary latitudinally, allowing for a maximum increase in wind at midlatitudes and a maximum increase in temperature at the poles. In these experiments, it was found that wind speed and temperature effects dominate in bringing about changes in mixed-layer depth and in tracer penetration at high latitudes, with wind speed effects having the greater weight. It is apparent from the results that the weakening of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation is dependent on the atmospheric changes in air temperature and in the wind field. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  12. The Antarctic Circumpolar Productivity Belt Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Productivity Belt T. Ito Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere in the Southern Ocean using a coupled, physical-biogeochemical-ecological model. The model captures a belt of enhanced export production, figuratively termed as the Antarctic Circumpolar Productivity Belt. As observed

  13. U.S. Department of Commerce I National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration I National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Protected Resources and the Marine Mammal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Department of Commerce I National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration I National Marine Fisheries Service Office of Protected Resources and the Marine Mammal Protection Act The Marine Mammal that significant declines in some species of marine mammals were caused by human activities. The Act established

  14. Intermediate-depth circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans measured by autonomous floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Russ E

    2005-01-01

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomousthe tropical and South Pacific Ocean and 228 were deployed

  15. Estimating tropical cyclone precipitation risk in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Laiyin

    This paper uses a new rainfall algorithm to simulate the long-term tropical cyclone precipitation (TCP) climatology in Texas based on synthetic tropical cyclones generated from National Center for Atmospheric Research/National ...

  16. Geography 102, Spring 2008 Tropical Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall 1176 Phone: 206-4590/825-1071, email:raphael@geog.ucla.edu Office Hours: M/W 10:00a.m-11:00a Cli- mates - the laws that govern the movement of air; solar radiation in the Tropics; temperature - the Hadley Cells, the Trade Winds, the InterTropical Convergence Zone, the Tropical ocean circulation

  17. Tropical Western Pacific site science mission plan. Semiannual project report, January--June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, T.; Mather, J.; Clements, W.; Barnes, F.

    1998-11-01

    The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was created in 1989 as part of the US Global Change Research Program to improve the treatment of atmospheric radiative and cloud processes in computer models used to predict climate change. The overall goal of the ARM program is to develop and test parameterizations of important atmospheric processes, particularly cloud and radiative processes, for use in atmospheric models. This goal is being achieved through a combination of field measurements and modeling studies. Three primary locales were chosen for extensive field measurement facilities. These are the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the United States, the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSA/AAO). This Site Science Mission Plan [RPT(TWP)-010.000] describes the ARM program in the Tropical Western Pacific locale.

  18. Hurricane Isaac, August 28, 2012/NOAA Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Isaac, August 28, 2012/NOAA Tropical Cyclones A PREPAREDNESS GUIDE U.S. DEPARTMENT, 6 of which became hurricanes East Pacific Ocean: 15 tropical storms, 8 of which became hurricanes Central Pacific Ocean: 4 tropical storms, 2 of which became hurricanes Over a typical 2-year period, the U

  19. Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics* KAZUYOSHI KIKUCHI AND BIN WANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bin

    Diurnal Precipitation Regimes in the Global Tropics* KAZUYOSHI KIKUCHI AND BIN WANG Department tropical precipitation are documented by using two complementary Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, and phase propagation characteristics of the diurnal precipitation. The oceanic regime is characterized

  20. Impacts of the Indian Ocean on the ENSO cycle Jin-Yi Yu, Carlos R. Mechoso, James C. McWilliams, and Akio Arakawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Jin-Yi

    , the ocean model domain includes only the tropical Pacific Ocean (the Pacific Run). In the other experiment, the ocean model domain includes both the Indian and tropical Pacific Oceans (the Indo-Pacific Run Oceans tends to be more realistic than that including the tropical Pacific Ocean only. In particular

  1. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review J. Timothy Pennington a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, J. Timothy

    , Peru Abstract The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km2 of ocean between 23.5°N phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific Pacific. Seasonal cycles are weak over much of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, although several

  2. Although tropical cyclones are still not fully understood, Professor Nick Shay was responsible for uncovering the role of the deep ocean on their possible intensification. Here, he

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    of circulation and available upper ocean heat. The HF radar provides a means of mapping surface currents, winds and waves over the coastal ocean to as far as 200 km offshore. These measurements are useful to improve for uncovering the role of the deep ocean on their possible intensification. Here, he explains how his current

  3. Carbon-nitrogen interactions regulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks: results from an atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    2009 P. E. Thornton et al. : Carbon-nitrogen interactionsregulate climate-carbon cycle feedbacks Monfray, P. ,T. H. : A global ocean carbon climatology: Results from

  4. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  5. Increase in the Intensity of Postmonsoon Bay of Bengal Tropical Cyclones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.

    2014-05-28

    The post-monsoon (October-November) tropical cyclone (TC) season in the Bay of Bengal has spawned many of the deadliest storms in recorded history. Here it is shown that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs, and the contribution of major TCs to total TC power, increased during 1981-2010. It is found that changes in environmental parameters are responsible for the observed increases in TC intensity. Increases in sea surface temperature and upper ocean heat content made the ocean more conducive to TC development, while enhanced convective instability made the atmosphere more favorable for the growth of TCs. The largest changes in the atmosphere and ocean occurred in the eastern Bay of Bengal, where nearly all major TCs form. These changes are part of positive linear trends, suggesting that the intensity of post-monsoon Bay of Bengal TCs may continue to increase in the future.

  6. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  7. Ocean Circulation Lynne D Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    to the topography, with low pressure in the center. Ocean currents transport heat from the tropics to the poles have gone to sea. As knowledge about ocean currents and capabilities to observe it below the surfaceOcean Circulation Lynne D Talley Volume 1, The Earth system: physical and chemical dimensions

  8. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  9. M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR Expected Spring, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    EDUCATION M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean. Dilles Relevant Courses Interpretation of Geologic Maps Igneous Petrology Tectonic Geomorphology B.S. Geology, University of Idaho College of Science, Moscow, ID; GPA: 3

  10. Coupling of a regional atmospheric model (RegCM3) and a regional oceanic model (FVCOM) over the maritime continent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Jun

    Climatological high resolution coupled climate model simulations for the maritime continent have been carried out using the regional climate model (RegCM) version 3 and the finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) ...

  11. Upper ocean model of dissolved atmospheric gases. Final report for the period 1 August 1991--31 May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schudlich, R.; Emerson, S.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes results from three years of funding for a modelling study of processes controlling the distribution of metabolic chemical tracers in surface waters. We determined concentrations of the gases O{sub 2}, Ar, N{sub 2}, and the stable isotope ratio ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) of molecular oxygen in surface waters at Station ALOHA in conjunction with the Global Ocean Flux Study (GOFS) Hawaiian Ocean Time-series project during the years 1989- 90 and 1992-93. Under this contract we have incorporated chemical tracers into an existing ocean mixed-layer model to simulate the physical processes controlling the distribution and seasonal cycle of dissolved gases in the upper ocean. The broad background of concurrent chemical, physical, and biological measurements at Station ALOHA provides enough redundancy of ``ground truth`` to assess the model`s accuracy. Biological oxygen production estimated from modelled chemical tracers agrees with estimates based on measurement of carbon fluxes into the deep ocean and nitrate fluxes into the upper ocean during 1989-90 and 1992-93, verifying for the first time the utility of chemical tracers for determining biological fluxes in the ocean. Our results suggest that in the euphotic zone (the upper 100 m of the ocean), the net biological O{sub 2} production is 1.0-2. 0 moles m{sup -2}yr{sup - 1}. Inert gas (Ar, N{sub 2}) supersaturation levels show that air and bubble injection are important modes of air-sea gas transfer in the Station ALOHA region.

  12. Large-scale fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric and oceanic oxygen levels from the record of U in shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg, Russia g Zavaritskii Institute of Geology and Geochemistry, Urals Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg, Russia h Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

  13. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  14. Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : . Computer models show skill in forecasting tropical Pacific Ocean temperatures one to two years in advance for Pacific Ocean observations that are the foundation of skillful ENSO forecasts: Moored buoys Drifting buoysaaaaaa Facts about ENSO: . Originates in the tropical Pacific . Has a periodicity of 2­7 years

  15. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  16. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryNovember-December2006 Volume10,Number6 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that began devel- oping in August across the tropical Pacific generated crosswinds in the upper atmo- sphere

  17. A technique for using historical analogues to forecast the central pressure of tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific Ocean and south China Sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagoner, Richard Allen

    1973-01-01

    of Terna AA? Un! veroity in pert!el fnlfil!m nt of the reqnirement for the degree of i&STER OP SO(ENCE D e::;:;b& r 1973 He jor Sob jeet. Neteoroicgy A TECHNIQUE FOR USING fIISTORICAL ANALOGUES TO FORECAST THF. CENTRAL PRESSURE 01' TROPICAL CYCLONES... IN THE WESTERN NORTH PACIl'IC OCL'AiV AND SOUTH CHINA SEA A Thesis by ffICHARD Af LEN WAGOiVFR Approve&! as to style and content by: (Chairman oI Coi!miit tee) (Nemb e r ) ( iember) (Member) 1'acorn!ier 1973 ABSTRACT A Technique for Iising Historical...

  18. Is the basinwide warming in the North Atlantic Ocean related to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    to atmospheric carbon dioxide and global warming? Chunzai Wang1 and Shenfu Dong1,2 Received 31 January 2010 is controversial. Some studies argued that the warming is due to global warming in association with the secular sea surface temperature. Here we show that both global warming and AMO variability make a contribution

  19. Photo: Bruno Marty / IRD Observed and expected changes to the tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    simulations 104 3.2 Features of the tropical Pacific Ocean 105 3.2.1 Large-scale currents 105 3.2.2 Ocean.3 Observed and projected changes in the tropical Pacific Ocean 141 3.3.1 Large-scale currents 141 3.3.2 Ocean, dissolved oxygen concentration and pH affect biological activity; and oceanic currents, waves and sea level

  20. Atmospheric rivers as Lagrangian coherent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garaboa, Daniel; Huhn, Florian; Perez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    We show that filamentous Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) over the Northern Atlantic Ocean are closely linked to attracting Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in the large scale wind field. LCSs represent lines of attraction in the evolving flow with a significant impact on all passive tracers. Using Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE), we extract LCSs from a two-dimensional flow derived from water vapor flux of atmospheric reanalysis data and compare them to the three-dimensional LCS obtained from the wind flow. We correlate the typical filamentous water vapor patterns of ARs with LCSs and find that LCSs bound the filaments on the back side. Passive advective transport of water vapor from tropical latitudes is potentially possible.

  1. Unique oceanderived particles serve as a proxy for changes in ocean chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on atmospheric aerosol chemistry, simultaneous realtime measurements were made of atmospheric aerosol size.76). Time series correlations between ocean measurements and atmospheric aerosol chemistry suggest such realtime correlations are shown between ocean chemistry and atmospheric aerosol mixingstate. The reasons

  2. Contribution of ocean, fossil fuel, land biosphere, and biomass burning carbon fluxes to seasonal and interannual variability in atmospheric CO 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Neutral Biosphere (NB) GFED NEP GFED Uncorrected Biomass2 (1) Best case = best ocean + GFED (NEP+best BB) + fossil2) Takahashi ocean + GFED (NEP+best BB) + fossil fuel (3)

  3. TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

  4. Reduction of tropical land region precipitation variability via transpiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jung-Eun

    Tropical rainforests are known to exhibit low intraseasonal precipitation variability compared with oceanic areas with similar mean precipitation in observations and models. In the present study, the potential role of ...

  5. August 24, 2010 11:3 B-936 b936-ch03 Air-Sea Interactions in Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    , in the western parts of the oceanic basins where the ocean state is not at rest, strong currents (e.g., Kuroshio ocean current shears do not necessarily develop as in regions with shallow ocean mixed layers where made in the area of upper ocean responses and air-sea interactions during the passage of tropical

  6. Bomb-test 90Sr in Pacific and Indian Ocean surface water as recorded by banded corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toggweiler, JR; Trumbore, S

    1985-01-01

    the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. 8,Bomb tritium in the Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. 80,of tritium in the Pacific Ocean, J. Phys. Oceanogr. II, 3,

  7. Developing Model Constraints on Northern Extra-Tropical Carbon Cycling Based on measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, Ralph

    2014-12-12

    The objective of this project was to perform CO2 data syntheses and modeling activities to address two central questions: 1) how much has the seasonal cycle in atmospheric CO2 at northern high latitudes changed since the 1960s, and 2) how well do prognostic biospheric models represent these changes. This project also supported the continuation of the Scripps time series of CO2 isotopes and concentration at ten baseline stations distributed globally.

  8. Regional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    in the tropical eastern Pacific and western Indian Ocean than in the tropical western Pacific and eastern IndianRegional Patterns of Tropical Indo-Pacific Climate Change: Evidence of the Walker Circulation Weakening* HIROKI TOKINAGA, SHANG-PING XIE, AND AXEL TIMMERMANN International Pacific Research Center, SOEST

  9. SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS--Scatterometer measurements of ocean vector winds (OVW) are significantly degraded in the presence of the precipitation, especially in tropical cyclones. This paper presents a new ocean hurricane/typhoon wind vector retrieval

  10. Contribution of ocean, fossil fuel, land biosphere, and biomass burning carbon fluxes to seasonal and interannual variability in atmospheric CO 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cementannual variations in fossil fuel emissions, J. Geophys.including land, ocean and fossil fuel surface fluxes, have

  11. Asian summer monsoon precipitation recorded by stalagmite oxygen isotopic composition in the western Loess Plateau during AD1875-2003 and its linkage with ocean-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Indian Ocean monsoon precipitation from a spe- temperature165 ? 178[doi] sent-day precipitation: data and modeling. Jtopic composition of precipitation in Chian. Geochimica ( in

  12. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida ATLANTIC OCEANOGRAPHIC AND METEOROLOGICAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the thermal struc- ture of the upper ocean. SOOP is a global network of commer- cial vessels that aid NOAA are to investigate the variability of the ocean's upper thermal structure at high latitudes (AX01 and AX02 transects storage and the global transport of heat and fresh water, which are crucial for improving climate

  13. Atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulfide, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide using the electron capture sulfur detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.E.; Bates, T.S. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Measurements of atmospheric dimethyl sulfide (DMS), carbonyl sulfide (COS), and carbon disulfide (CS2) were conducted over the Atlantic Ocean on board the NASA Electra aircraft during the Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) project using the electron capture sulfur detector (ECD-S). The system employed cryogenic preconcentration of air samples, gas chromatographic separation, catalytic fluorination, and electron capture detection. Samples collected for DMS analysis were scrubbed of oxidants with NaOH impregnated glass fiber filters to preconcentration. The detection limits (DL) of the system for COS, DMS, and CS2 were 5, 5, and 2 ppt, respectively. COS concentrations ranged from 404 to 603 ppt with a mean of 489 ppt for measurements over the North Atlantic Ocean (31 deg N to 41 deg N), and from 395 to 437 ppt with a mean of 419 ppt for measurements over the Tropical Atlantic Ocean (11 deg S to 2 deg N). DMS concentrations in the lower marine boundary layer, below 600-m altitude, ranged from below DL to 150 ppt from flights over the North Atlantic, and from 9 to 104 ppt over the Tropical Atlantic. CS2 concentrations ranged from below DL to 29 ppt over the North Atlantic. Almost all CS2 measurements over the Tropical Atlantic were below DL.

  14. Basin Resonances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean WEIQING HAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Basin Resonances in the Equatorial Indian Ocean WEIQING HAN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic, LOCEAN, Paris, France BENE´ T DUNCAN Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University in the equatorial Indian Ocean (IO) interact to form basin resonances at the semiannual (180 day) and 90-day periods

  15. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida September-October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Sandy's powerful winds and the regions of heaviest precipitation. These highly-accurate, real-time data winds, torrential rains, and a storm surge that flooded low-lying regions from the Carolinas to Maine of the Caribbean and pelting Florida with tropical storm-force winds and rain. Hurricane Research Division (HRD

  16. Contribution of ocean, fossil fuel, land biosphere, and biomass burning carbon fluxes to seasonal and interannual variability in atmospheric CO 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    be corrected by a net outgassing of $0.6 Pg C/yr from riverone of the major regions of oceanic CO 2 outgassing.El Nin˜o conditions, outgassing is decreased by a thickening

  17. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJanuary-February 2007 Volume11,Number1 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in heat content and capture chemical changes in the entire water column. The National Oceanic and Atmo and Coastal Inlets Tracer Experiment cruise in late February. Two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride and rhoda

  18. Stochastic and mesoscopic models for tropical convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences, New York penetrative convection to heights of 5­10 km with associated anvil towers of clouds. Observational data

  19. Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirka, Gerhard H.

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

  20. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  1. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  2. Momentum Flux Budget across the AirSea Interface under Uniform and Tropical Cyclone Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    into ocean currents is equal to the flux from air (wind stress). However, when the surface wave field grows into currents under TCs. 1. Introduction The passage of a tropical cyclone (TC) over a warm ocean represents one is mainly due to the vertical turbulent mixing induced by the strong momentum flux into ocean currents

  3. Tropical cyclones and permanent El Nino in the early Pliocene epoch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedorov, Alexey V.

    Tropical cyclones (also known as hurricanes and typhoons) are now believed to be an important component of the Earth’s climate system1, 2, 3. In particular, by vigorously mixing the upper ocean, they can affect the ocean’s ...

  4. Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290­320 matm), considering that surface waterFurther observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily

  5. Oceans and Ecosystems Research Changing levels of Oceanic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmospheric, the remainder is taken up by land plants and oceans. · We study the uptake by the oceans both EPA qualified the increasing CO2 levels as a pollutant along with the other greenhouse gases Ch4, N2O & wind Algorithm development pCO2= f(SST, color) Co-located satellite data Regional satellite SST & color

  6. Contribution of Ocean, Fossil Fuel, Land Biosphere and Biomass Burning Carbon1 Fluxes to Seasonal and Interannual Variability in Atmospheric CO22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    1 Contribution of Ocean, Fossil Fuel, Land Biosphere and Biomass Burning Carbon1 Fluxes to Seasonal et al., 1989].18 Anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacture drive most of the recent by deforestation, discussed below) over the last 50 years. The fossil fuel plus4 cement input, in contrast

  7. The response of Petermann Glacier to large calving events and its future stability in the context of atmospheric and oceanic warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Cornelis J.; Nick, F. M.; Luckman, A.; Vieli, A.; van As, D.; Van De Wal, R.S.W.; Pattyn, F.; Hubbard, A. L.; Floricioiu, D.

    2012-11-05

    This study assesses the impact of a large 2010 calving event on the current and future stability of Petermann Glacier, Greenland, and ascertains the glacier’s interaction with different components of the climate and ocean system. We use a numerical...

  8. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2002 Volume 6, Number 3-4 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    atmospheric CO2 and its "green- house" warming effect. As anticipated, the addition of iron in both patches global warming. The R/V Revelle scientific team distributed several tons of iron sulfate and the inert

  9. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decrease-case scenario, they also allow users to anticipate the effects of environmental hazards and pollution crises

  10. A study of lightning activity over the warm pool western Pacific Ocean (TOGA-COARE region) for 1993 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Luis Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The warm pool western Pacific Ocean is an area of the equatorial tropics characterized by strong and frequent convection, and vigorous lightning activity. However, it has been noted by various researchers that the vast oceanic expanses experience...

  11. Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel (TIP) Report Michael J. McPhaden, TIP Chairman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Tropical Moored Buoy Implementation Panel (TIP) Report Michael J. McPhaden, TIP Chairman NOAA-Ocean Buoy Network) moored buoy array is designed to provide high quality data in real-time for improved

  12. NOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the oceans, coastal waters, and estuaries. investigating their currents, the structure and con- toursNOAA/NMFS Developments NOAA Observes Fifth Anniversary of Oceanic, Atmospheric, and Environmental Activities NOAA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, cele- brated its fifth anniversary 3

  13. ATMOSPHERIC AND OCEANIC SCIENCE LETTERS, 2013, VOL. 6, NO. 1, 39-43 Effects of Clouds and Aerosols on Surface Radiation Budget Inferred from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    of Atmospheric Physics, NUIST, Nanjing 210044, China 3 Global Change and Earth System Science (GCESS), Beijing Radiative Effects (AREs) are 12.7, ­37.6, and ­24.9 W m­2 , indicating that aerosols have LW warming impact have much stronger LW warming effect and SW cooling effect on the surface radiation budget than AREs

  14. An overview of coupled GCM biases in the tropics Ingo Richter1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tropical South America and un- derpredict it over tropical Africa. Despite cold SST biases over much), excessive shortwave solar radiation due to insufficient low- level cloud, and weak oceanic stratification biases affect seasonal forecasts and climate change projections, in order to maximize their utility

  15. Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dail, Holly Janine

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

  16. Reconciling disparate 20th Century Indo-Pacific ocean temperature5 trends in the instrumental record6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Matthew

    1 2 3 4 Reconciling disparate 20th Century Indo-Pacific ocean temperature5 trends in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific Ocean are consistent across26 the 4 datasets, it is uncertain whether theories for the response of the tropical Pacific Ocean to an1 increase in greenhouse gases. Assuming

  17. Decoding Ancient Ocean Acidification Signals from Plankton Shells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a measure of ancient ocean pH and adds confidence to its use in reconstructing ocean and atmospheric chemistry, as well as past climate change. The measurements also revealed...

  18. Separating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the atmosphere to the ocean on a similar time scale and that they penetrate into the ocean in a similar mannerSeparating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method M. Key Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

  19. ATOC/CHEM 5151 Problem 27 Oceanic Uptake of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    ATOC/CHEM 5151 ­ Problem 27 Oceanic Uptake of CO2 Answers will be posted Thursday, December 11, 2014 It is well known that as abundances of CO2 increase in the atmosphere, the pH of the oceans' of CO2 in the ocean begins with exchange between the atmosphere and ocean, a process that can be written

  20. Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Youmin

    Y. Tang Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Pacific: I interannual variability Received: 20 Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), an intermediate complexity dynamical ocean model cou- pled to either), hybrid models (e.g., Barnett et al. 1993; Balmaseda et al. 1994,1995), and fully coupled general

  1. Tropical Pacific mid-latitude teleconnections in medieval times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Kim

    records from widely distributed regions around the planet, and in many cases is consistent with a cool centennial-scale drought, elevated incidence of wild fire, cool sea surface temperatures (SSTs) along). Proxy records from the tropical Pacific Ocean show contemporaneous changes indicating cool central

  2. Experiment to Characterize Tropical Cloud Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, Jim H.; Jakob, Christian

    2005-08-02

    A major experiment to study tropical convective cloud systems and their impacts will take place around Darwin, Northern Australia in early 2006. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) is a collaboration including the DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) and ARM-UAV programs, NASA centers, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, and universities in the USA, Australia, Japan, the UK, and Canada. TWP-ICE will be preceded in November/December 2004 by a collaborating European aircraft campaign involving the EU SCOUT-O3 and UK NERC ACTIVE projects. Detailed atmospheric measurements will be made in the Darwin area through the whole Austral summer, giving unprecedented coverage through the pre-monsoon and monsoon periods.

  3. Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Leeuwen, Peter Jan

    Effects of correcting salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model in a tropical Pacific ocean model run for the period 1993­1997. Salinity and temperature corrections salinity with altimeter measurements in an equatorial Pacific ocean model, J. Geophys. Res., 107(C12), 8001

  4. Climate and the Tropical Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Presenter: Rick Lumpkin AOML Program Review 4-6 March 2014 What drives Tropical Atlantic climate changes and what are their impacts? #12;AOML Program Review2 Climate and the Tropical Atlantic Why this matters to NOAA and to society: Climate variability in the Tropical Atlantic

  5. Antarctic ice sheet fertilises the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Death, R.

    Southern Ocean (SO) marine primary productivity (PP) is strongly influenced by the availability of iron in surface waters, which is thought to exert a significant control upon atmospheric CO2 concentrations on glacial/interglacial ...

  6. Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatomy and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical and evolution of a cyclonic mesoscale eddy observed in the northeastern Pacific tropical-subtropical transition zone, J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, doi:10.1002/ 2013JC009339. 1. Introduction [2] Mesoscale eddy

  7. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Brazil | Amazon | land use | micrometeorology D eforestation in the tropics affects the land–atmosphere ex- change of trace gases and energyand energy (W·m ?2 ) ?uxes, calculated as (? = logged ? unlogged), in Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil.

  8. Oceans and Climate Change Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , animals, atmosphere and ocean ... totally isolated except for an energy source: the sun #12;The value of the Atlantic circulation (kinetic energy density) from altimetry satellites #12;Oceans and the Global) Daphnia (water flea) Duckweed (floating water lens) #12;#12;#12;microcosm: a sealed flask with plants

  9. CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CIGUATERA: TROPICAL FISH POISONING Marine Biological I · ·' iw« L I B R >*· ** Y JUL 3 -1350 WOODS POISONING By William Arcisz, Bacteriologist, Formerly with the Fishery Research Laboratory Branch in which Fish Poisoning is Prevalento........... 3 Symptoms of Ciguatera ...... 00

  10. Atmospheric Environment ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    that the influence of the urban region on wind patterns and atmospheric stability could be studied. HeightAtmospheric Environment ] (

  11. THE EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, Katsuwonus pelamis, IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE EARLY LIFE HISTORY OF SKIPJACK TUNA, Katsuwonus pelamis, IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN HOWARD O. YOSHIDA, Katsuwonus pelamis, were landed in the eastern Pacific (Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commis- sion, 1970

  12. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  13. Implementation Plan for the Hybrid Ocean Modeling Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the atmosphere and cryosphere. The oceans operate in the climate system to transfer information (heat, saltImplementation Plan for the Hybrid Ocean Modeling Environment HOME R. Hallberg (NOAA/GFDL), A Recent advances in simulating the ocean through the use of generalized hybrid coordinate modeling

  14. Cover image: Atmospheric rivers are long and concentrated bands of water vapor originating from the tropics that often result in precipitation extremes and flooding when they hit land. Pictured is a model representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shows an atmospheric river heading for the U.S. West Coast, transporting abundant moisture from in 2014. We're proud of their impact on science and on some of the most important challenges in energy--in part via development and use of new computational and imaging approaches. Molecular-level discoveries

  15. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Faculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley. Hydrodynamics/elasticity, computational

  16. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    . The Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown is coming to New England in order to monitor air pollutants associate New England with an abundance of natural beauty and rural character, but air pollutants can travel heavily polluted air comes from the southwest, and that the air coming from the west is also pretty

  17. National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration Emergency Notification System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    broadcast emergency information to affected employees via phone, email, or text. What You Need To Do · Enter your NOAA and personal cell phone numbers into the NOAA Staff Directory to be sure you can be reached for NOAA ­ as a federal employee, NOAA Corps employee, contractor, or other associate ­ you could receive

  18. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    curl) and downwind (crosswind) SST gradient, similar to theal. (2001). Downwind and crosswind SST gradient are computedcurl) and downwind (crosswind) SST gradient appear to be

  19. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    curl) and downwind (crosswind) SST gradient, similar to theal. (2001). Downwind and crosswind SST gradient are computedcurl) and downwind (crosswind) SST gradient appear to be

  20. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind powerflux components (wind stress, heat flux and fresh-waterWest Coast Surface Heat Fluxes, Wind Stress, and Wind Stress

  1. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind powerflux components (wind stress, heat flux and fresh-waterWest Coast Surface Heat Fluxes, Wind Stress, and Wind Stress

  2. Doctoral Programs Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Science Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret Kivelson, Member, National Academy of Sciences; Member

  3. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico:low-level winds blowing from the Gulf of Mexico and theover the Gulf of Mexico. The gap-forced wind jets are well

  4. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01

    Offshore wind forcing in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico:low-level winds blowing from the Gulf of Mexico and theover the Gulf of Mexico. The gap-forced wind jets are well

  5. Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOAA Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU...

  6. Science DMZ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcoming ReleaseSecurityPediatricNOAA Science Engagement Move your data

  7. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaii |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartment ofProgram |(Upstate NewDepartment of Energy Staff

  8. Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences Atmospheric, Oceanic & Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Research Areas High Energy Density Physics/Laboratory Astrophysics Magnetospheric & Ionosphere/Thermosphere Physics Planetary Magnetospheres Solar & Heliospheric Physics Space Weather Aeronomy For Faculty involved,Recipient, Department of Energy Early Career Award Margaret Kivelson, Member, National Academy of Sciences; Member

  9. Quaternary Science Reviews 20 (2001) 15611576 Millennial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen N.G. Pisiasa, *, A in the Northeast Pacific and the northwestern United States. 2. Study region 2.1. Ocean climate and biota.C. Mixa , L. Heusserb a College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, 104 Ocean

  10. Arguments to question Emanuel's hypothesis on the central role of tropical cyclones in driving the MOC are presented in attached papers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    paper claims that most of the wind-forced near- inertial energy is lost. Jacob. Relationship between oceanic energy fluxes and surface winds during tropical (1995) estimated theoretical limits for the energy flux from traveling hurricanes

  11. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  12. Oceanic stochastic parametrizations in a seasonal forecast system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrejczuk, M; Juricke, S; Palmer, T N; Weisheimer, A; Zanna, L

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of three stochastic parametrizations in the ocean component of a coupled model, on forecast reliability over seasonal timescales. The relative impacts of these schemes upon the ocean mean state and ensemble spread are analyzed. The oceanic variability induced by the atmospheric forcing of the coupled system is, in most regions, the major source of ensemble spread. The largest impact on spread and bias came from the Stochastically Perturbed Parametrization Tendency (SPPT) scheme - which has proven particularly effective in the atmosphere. The key regions affected are eddy-active regions, namely the western boundary currents and the Southern Ocean. However, unlike its impact in the atmosphere, SPPT in the ocean did not result in a significant decrease in forecast error. Whilst there are good grounds for implementing stochastic schemes in ocean models, our results suggest that they will have to be more sophisticated. Some suggestions for next-generation stochastic schemes are made.

  13. From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition and rare earth element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic composition, and S. Cravatte (2013), From the subtropics to the central equatorial Pacific Ocean: Neodymium isotopic waters (112 samples) in the Southern Tropical Pacific. The relatively detailed picture of these tracer

  14. Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachnik, Justin Paul

    2013-03-25

    This dissertation presents a series of work related to the representation of the Hadley circulation (HC) in atmospheric reanalyses and general circulation models (GCMs), with connections to the underlying tropical and ...

  15. Tropical precipitation simulated by the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM3): an evaluation based on TRMM satellite measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2005-11-01

    This study evaluates the simulation of tropical precipitation by the Community Climate Model, Version 3, developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. For an evaluation of the annual cycle of precipitation, ...

  16. Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchener, Paul

    Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in tropical algebra Tolerance eigenproblem in fuzzy algebra Tolerance interval eigenvectors in tropical and fuzzy algebra Martin Workshop Birmingham, May 16, 2013 #12;Interval eigenproblem in tropical and fuzzy algebra Tolerance

  17. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01

    eastern Pacific Ocean weather systems are ea. sy to observe on visual and infrared satellite images. However, it is difficult to quantify their moisture fields due to the great scarcity of conventional data. . In addition, it is difficult to examine... rainfall over the eastern part of the tropical Pacific Ocean because there are few island stations or ship reports available. Satellite passive microwave instruments have been used to determine precip- itable water, liquid water and precipitation over...

  18. Relative Role of Dynamic and Thermodynamic Processes in the Development of the Indian Ocean Dipole: An OGCM Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    in 1997 across the Indo-Pacific Ocean. In the tropical Pacific the largest El Nino in the last 100 years dipole events in the tropical IO, many of which coexisted with El Ninos (Reverdin et al. 1986, Hastenrath et al. 1993, Reason et al. 2000). In fact, the temporal correlation between the El Nino and IO dipole

  19. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds CO2 and N2 are degassed · S and Cl are from Earth's data · 1 km thick ocean, variable basalt layer and phyllosilicates · S is in sulfate and sulfide minerals Why? · ~ neutral pH, no trapping of atmospheric CO2

  20. Effects of the seasonal cycle on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Effects of the seasonal cycle on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole of atmospheric surface forcings on the development and termination of the Indian Ocean Zonal Dipole Mode (IOZDM) are studied using a nonlinear, 4-1/2 layer ocean model partially coupled to an advective atmospheric mixed

  1. Validation and analysis of microwave-derived rainfall over the tropics. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleishauer, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    A recently developed single channel microwave rain rate retrieval algorithm exists to measure global precipitation over the data-sparse tropical oceans. The objective of this study is to retrieve and validate rainfall using this algorithm, followed by an analysis of the derived rainfall fields. Retrieval consists of applying the algorithm technique to the extraction of four years worth of achieved data from the Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) instrument flown aboard the NIMBUS 5 satellite. The Pacific Atoll Raingage Data Set is chosen as a ground truth measure to validate the ESMR-Derived rainfall data against, comparing slope, intercept and correlation between 5 deg x 5 deg area average. Despite limitations imposed by the comparison of point measurements to area-averaged rainfall, results show a 0.80 correlation. Monthly and quarterly climatological mean rainfall estimates are produced, with a consequent analysis of prominent signals, especially in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) and the Indian monsoon. Latent heat flux is computed, using the ESMR-derived rainfall, and plotted to show qualitatively where seasonal latent thermodynamic energy sources and sinks exist in the atmosphere. A comparison of the summer and winter quarterly composites of the above products with previously compiled climatologies and Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) showed only minor discrepancies in location and intensity, which are discussed in some detail.

  2. The middle Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaquin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of scattered light above the planetary limb from 116 Viking Orbiter images are used to constrain the temporal and spatial behavior of aerosols suspended in the Martian atmosphere. The data cover a wide range of seasons, locations, and viewing geometry, providing information about the aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution. The typical atmospheric column contains one or more discrete, optically thin, ice-like haze layers between 30 and 90 km elevation whose composition is inferred to be water ice. Below the detached hazes, a continuous haze, interpreted to have a large dust component, extends from as much as 50 km to the surface. The haze distribution exhibits an annual variation that reflects a seasonally driven circulation in the middle atmosphere. The potential role of stationary gravity waves in modifying the middle atmosphere circulation is explored using a linear theory applied to a realistic Martian environment. Martian topography derived from radar observations is decomposed into Fourier harmonics and used to linearly superpose gravity waves arising from each component. The larger amplitude topography on Mars combined with the absence of extended regions of smooth topography like oceans generates larger wave amplitudes than on the Earth. The circulation of the middle atmosphere is examined using a two-dimensional, linearized, axisymmetric model successfully employed in the study of the terrestrial mesosphere. Illustrations of temperature and wind speeds are presented for the southern summer solstice and southern spring equinox.

  3. Low energy architecture in the tropics: from design to building construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry Boyer; Frédéric Miranville; François Payet

    2012-12-23

    This paper presents a realization of passive construction in Reunion, French Department in the Indian Ocean (southern hemisphere) submitted to a wet tropical climate. Aspects of passive construction were integrated at the design stage and this house does not present additional costs towards classical ones. This project was awarded a prize for architecture climate.

  4. Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci c | II ENSO prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Hybrid coupled models of the tropical Paci#12;c | II ENSO prediction by Youmin Tang 1 , William W: ytang@cims.nyu.edu #12; Abstract Two hybrid coupled models (HCMs), a dynamical ocean model coupled Introduction Models for ENSO prediction can be categorized into purely statistical models, hybrid coupled

  5. Pelagic and coastal sources of P wave microseisms: Generation under tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Pelagic and coastal sources of P wave microseisms: Generation under tropical cyclones Jian Zhang,1 2010; published 6 August 2010. [1] Nonlinear wave wave interactions generate double frequency (DF it is unclear whether DF surface waves generated in deep oceans are observed on land, we show that beamforming

  6. Low energy architecture in the tropics: from design to building construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Harry; Payet, François

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a realization of passive construction in Reunion, French Department in the Indian Ocean (southern hemisphere) submitted to a wet tropical climate. Aspects of passive construction were integrated at the design stage and this house does not present additional costs towards classical ones. This project was awarded a prize for architecture climate.

  7. Mining an Ocean of Data: Application of modern statistical methods for addressing biological oceanography questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of their potential to store heat, sequester atmospheric carbon dioxide and influence major atmospheric weather events & Bidigare, 2005). With the introduction of satellite remote sensing of the oceans in the 1970s, traditional

  8. Mexican drought: an observational modeling and tree ring study of variability and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    by the state of the tropical Pacific Ocean with the Atlantical. (2005b). 1. POGA (Pacific Ocean-Global Atmosphere): Inoutside of the tropical Pacific Ocean that computes SST

  9. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    an effective tsunami warning system for this region.to put an effective tsunami warning system in place. The

  10. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    as the Indonesian Throughflow. Wave energy at a variety ofexamine the properties of wave energy propagating into theto show that intraseasonal wave energy is also effectively

  11. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    compared the spectral energy east and west of Lombok Strait.wave energy bypassed Lombok Strait and continued east alongpropagate east- ward from Lombok to Ombai. Because energy is

  12. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01

    as a proxy for Kelvin wave energy, and comparing the rms SLAas the Indonesian Throughflow. Wave energy at a variety ofexamine the properties of wave energy propagating into the

  13. Can the vertical motions in the eyewall of tropical cyclones support persistent UAV flight?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poh, Chung-Kiak

    2014-01-01

    Powered flights in the form of manned or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have been flying into tropical cyclones to obtain vital atmospheric measurements with flight duration typically lasting between 12 and 36 hours. Convective vertical motion properties of tropical cyclones have previously been studied. This work investigates the possibility to achieve persistent flight by harnessing the generally pervasive updrafts in the eyewall of tropical cyclones. A sailplane UAV capable of vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) is proposed and its flight characteristics simulated. Results suggest that the concept of persistent flight within the eyewall is promising and may be extendable to the rainband regions.

  14. Received 17 Oct 2014 | Accepted 6 Mar 2015 | Published 21 Apr 2015 Skilful multi-year predictions of tropical trans-basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikamoto, Yoshimitsu

    ocean basins. State-of-the-art climate model forecasts initialized from a realistic ocean state show and energy sectors worldwide. Climate predictions may exhibit enhanced skill on timescales of years-year predictions of tropical trans-basin climate variability Yoshimitsu Chikamoto1, Axel Timmermann1,2, Jing

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 23, PAGES 3857-3860, DECEMBER 1, 2000 Climatology of Intrusions into the Tropical Upper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    winds, observed over the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans during northern fall to spring, are important westerlies over the Pa- cific and Atlantic Oceans. These "westerly ducts" are im- portant for extratropical]. Because of their penetration deep into the tropics, intru- sion events can potentially have a large impact

  16. Bulletin of the Australian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Vol.18 page 104 BLUElink> Progress on operational ocean prediction for Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oke, Peter

    physics are also simpler in the ocean than in the atmosphere. Ocean attenuation of penetrative solar BLUElink> Progress on operational ocean prediction for Australia Gary B. Brassington1 , Graham Warren1 are now on standby. At their disposal are analyses and forecasts from the Bureau's new operational ocean

  17. Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard a,d,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard of the overturning circulation. Volumetrically the Pacific Ocean dominates the world ocean (it is three times larger of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA c Department of Geosciences, Princeton

  18. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  19. Photo: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , marine geophysics, ocean acoustics, and marine and atmospheric chemistry. The school is also known as onePhoto: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) was founded in 1943 in Biscayne Bay near Miami. It is the only subtropical applied and basic marine and atmospheric research

  20. On zonal jets in oceans Balasubramanya T. Nadiga1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    On zonal jets in oceans Balasubramanya T. Nadiga1 Received 26 January 2006; revised 29 March 2006 to the recently observed alternating zonal jets in oceans, the formation of these jets can be explained as due of alternating jets in Jovian atmospheres and two dimensional turbulence in zonally-periodic configurations

  1. The unstable CO2 feedback cycle on ocean planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitzmann, D; Godolt, M; Grenfell, J L; Heng, K; Patzer, A B C; Rauer, H; Stracke, B; von Paris, P

    2015-01-01

    Ocean planets are volatile rich planets, not present in our Solar System, which are thought to be dominated by deep, global oceans. This results in the formation of high-pressure water ice, separating the planetary crust from the liquid ocean and, thus, also from the atmosphere. Therefore, instead of a carbonate-silicate cycle like on the Earth, the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration is governed by the capability of the ocean to dissolve carbon dioxide (CO2). In our study, we focus on the CO2 cycle between the atmosphere and the ocean which determines the atmospheric CO2 content. The atmospheric amount of CO2 is a fundamental quantity for assessing the potential habitability of the planet's surface because of its strong greenhouse effect, which determines the planetary surface temperature to a large degree. In contrast to the stabilising carbonate-silicate cycle regulating the long-term CO2 inventory of the Earth atmosphere, we find that the CO2 cycle feedback on ocean planets is negative and has strong...

  2. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

  3. ENSO regimes and the late 1970's climate shift: The role of synoptic weather and South Pacific ocean spiciness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Kane, Terence J.; Matear, Richard J.; Chamberlain, Matthew A.; Oke, Peter R.

    2014-08-15

    South Pacific subtropical density compensated temperature and salinity (spiciness) anomalies are known to be associated with decadal equatorial variability, however, the mechanisms by which such disturbances are generated, advect and the degree to which they modulate the equatorial thermocline remains controversial. During the late 1970's a climate regime transition preceded a period of strong and sustained El Nino events. Using an ocean general circulation model forced by the constituent mechanical and thermodynamic components of the reanalysed atmosphere we show that the late 1970's transition coincided with the arrival of a large-scale, subsurface cold and fresh water anomaly in the central tropical Pacific. An ocean reanalysis for the period 1990–2007 that assimilates subsurface Argo, XBT and CTD data, reveals that disturbances occur due to the subduction of negative surface salinity anomalies from near 30° S, 100° W which are advected along the ?=25–26 kgm{sup ?3} isopycnal surfaces. These anomalies take, on average, seven years to reach the central equatorial Pacific where they may substantially perturb the thermocline before the remnants ultimately ventilate in the region of the western Pacific warm pool. Positive (warm–salty) disturbances, known to occur due to late winter diapycnal mixing and isopycnal outcropping, arise due to both subduction of subtropical mode waters and subsurface injection. On reaching the equatorial band (10° S–0° S) these disturbances tend to deepen the thermocline reducing the model's ENSO. In contrast the emergence of negative (cold–fresh) disturbances at the equator are associated with a shoaling of the thermocline and El Nino events. Process studies are used to show that the generation and advection of anomalous density compensated thermocline disturbances critically depend on stochastic forcing of the intrinsic ocean by weather. We further show that in the absence of the inter-annual component of the atmosphere forcing Central Pacific El Nino events are manifest.

  4. Shackleton, N.J., Curry, W.B., Richter, C., and Bralower, T.J. (Eds.), 1997 Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 154

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Ocean Drilling Program, Scientific Results, Vol. 154 285 19. PLEISTOCENE VARIATIONS IN DEEPATLANTIC Hydrography The northward surface Gulf Stream flow transports accumulated tropical heat and salt to higher

  5. +---NORTH CAROLINA HURRICANES A Descriptive Listing of Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cyclones Which Have Affected the State #12;National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau t on the s t a t e , o r passed close enough offshore t o have been a serious threat t o the coastal area, information on wind speed experienced i n connection with the storm is given. Prior t o about 1870, no actual

  6. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  7. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  8. A Simple Multicloud Parameterization for Convectively Coupled Tropical Waves. Part II: Nonlinear Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    , British Columbia, Canada ANDREW J. MAJDA Department of Mathematics, and Center for Atmosphere Ocean clouds, and deep penetrative cumulus clouds (Lin and Johnson 1996; Johnson et al. 1999). Furthermore

  9. Ocean Observing System Simulation Experiments at AOML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    criteria and rigorous validation methods developed for atmospheric OSSE systems* · Partnership with CIMAS The system has been rigorously validated to demonstrate that credible impact assessments are obtained without: Improve ocean analyses and forecasts for two applications · Predict transport and dispersion of oil spills

  10. MFR PAPER 1174 Monitoring the Ocean Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1174 Monitoring the Ocean Environment L. E. EBER INTRODUCTION Atmospheric purposes of monitoring the marine environment are to collect synoptic observations adequate for in and oceanographic conditions in the vicinity of the sea sur- face have historically been monitored by mariners

  11. Testing the Role of Radiation in Determining Tropical Cloud-Top Temperature BRYCE E. HARROP AND DENNIS L. HARTMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    AND DENNIS L. HARTMANN Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington of climate change, and the strongest energy exchanges are in the tropics. Hartmann and Larson (2002) proposed troposphere, so must the efficiency of atmospheric cooling by radiative emission. Hartmann et al. (2001

  12. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 21 APRIL 2013 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1799 Robust direct effect of carbon dioxide on tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rainfall to climate change remains a challenge1 . Rising concentrations of carbon dioxide are expected carbon dioxide concentrations on tropical circulation and precipitation by analysing results from a suite with higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, which affects the strength of atmospheric vertical motions

  13. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI Atmospheric, Oceanic January 2012, in final form 3 May 2012) ABSTRACT The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using

  14. Ocean mixed layer processes in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation in coupled general circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    Ocean mixed layer processes in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation in coupled general circulation to be larger for CGCMs with a larger ocean heat transport in the region. Keywords Pacific Decadal Oscillation Á. 1994a, b; Zhanget al. 1996), ocean-atmosphere interactions over the North Pacific (e.g., Latif

  15. Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU National Center of high-resolution wind in coastal ocean modeling. This paper tests the Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) at the 9-, 27-, and 81-km grid resolutions in simulating wind off the central

  16. The signature of ozone depletion on tropical temperature trends, as revealed by their seasonal cycle in model integrations with single forcings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polvani, Lorenzo M.

    [1] The effect of ozone depletion on temperature trends in the tropical lower stratosphere is explored with an atmospheric general circulation model, and directly contrasted to the effect of increased greenhouse gases and ...

  17. The Role of Wave Energy Accumulation in Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Tropical North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    The Role of Wave Energy Accumulation in Tropical Cyclogenesis over the Tropical North Atlantic "wave energy"). Relative vorticity increases locally leading to an increase in the likelihood scales of interaction. The importance of wave energy accumulation for tropical cyclogenesis

  18. Tropical bases by regular projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hept, Kerstin

    2007-01-01

    We consider the tropical variety $\\mathcal{T}(I)$ of a prime ideal $I$ generated by the polynomials $f_1, ..., f_r$ and revisit the regular projection technique introduced by Bieri and Groves from a computational point of view. In particular, we show that $I$ has a short tropical basis of cardinality at most $r + \\codim I + 1$ at the price of increased degrees, and we provide a computational description of these bases.

  19. The land-atmosphere water flux in the tropics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    variations in energy and carbon exchange over forest andfrom a Douglas fir forest using the energy balance approach.measurements of energy partition for Amazonian forest. Quar-

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999

  1. The global climate for December 1990-February 1991: Strong temperature and precipitation contrasts over North America and Eurasia; mixed ENSO conditions in the tropics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelliah, M. )

    1993-07-01

    During most of the December 1990-February 1991 season sharp transcontinental temperature anomaly contrasts were evident in North America, Eurasia, and Australia. Large-scale atmospheric precipitations are more difficult to characterize. In the equatorial tropics there was some evidence of conditions similar to ENSO near the date line, but an almost complete failure of other ENSO components to appear in the east Pacific and in the tropical atmospheric circulation. 12 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Proceedings of the sixth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented at the 1996 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team meeting held at San Antonio, Texas. The history and status of the ARM program at the time of the meeting helps to put these papers in context. The basic themes have not changed. First, from its beginning, the Program has attempted to respond to the most critical scientific issues facing the US Global Change Research Program. Second, the Program has been strongly coupled to other agency and international programs. More specifically, the Program reflects an unprecedented collaboration among agencies of the federal research community, among the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) national laboratories, and between DOE`s research program and related international programs, such as Global Energy and Water Experiment (GEWEX) and the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Next, ARM has always attempted to make the most judicious use of its resources by collaborating and leveraging existing assets and has managed to maintain an aggressive schedule despite budgets that have been much smaller than planned. Finally, the Program has attracted some of the very best scientific talent in the climate research community and has, as a result, been productive scientifically.

  3. Atmospheric methane during the last four glacial-interglacial cycles: Rapid changes and their link with Antarctic temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Atmospheric methane during the last four glacial-interglacial cycles: Rapid changes and their link; published 24 June 2004. [1] Atmospheric methane (CH4) recorded in Antarctic ice cores represents the closest and Atmospheric Dynamics: Ocean/atmosphere interactions (0312, 4504); KEYWORDS: climate, atmospheric methane, ice

  4. Correlations of the first and second derivatives of atmospheric CO2 with global surface temperature and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation respectively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leggett, L M W

    2014-01-01

    Understanding current global climate requires an understanding of trends both in Earth's atmospheric temperature and the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a characteristic large-scale distribution of warm water in the tropical Pacific Ocean and the dominant mode of year-to-year climate variability (Holbrook et al. 2009. However, despite much effort, the average projection of current climate models has become statistically significantly different from the observed 21st century global surface temperature trend (Fyfe 2013)and has failed to reflect the statistically significant evidence that annual-mean global temperature has not risen in the 21st century (Fyfe 2013, Kosaka 2013). Modelling also provides a wide range of predictions for future ENSO variability, some showing an increase, others a decrease and some no change (Guilyardi, et al. 2012; Bellenger, 2013). Here we present correlations which include the current era and do not have these drawbacks. The correlations arise as follows. First it has been sho...

  5. A study of the abundance and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric carbon dioxide and oceanic carbon in relation to the global carbon cycle. Final technical report, February 15, 1990--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge can be gained about the fluxes and storage of carbon in natural systems and their relation to climate by detecting temporal and spatial patterns in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. When patterns in its {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotopic ratio are included in the analysis, there is also a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. The authors systematically measured the concentration and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to produce time series data essential to reveal these temporal and spatial patterns. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, the result also involved measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water and of CO{sub 2} in air near growing land plants. The study was coordinated with a study of the same title concurrently funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The study called for continued atmospheric measurements at an array of ten stations from the Arctic Basin to the South Pole. Air was collected in flasks brought back to the laboratory for analysis, except at Mauna Loa. Observatory, Hawaii, where continuous measurements were also carried out.

  6. The millennial atmospheric lifetime of anthropogenic CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    /ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, rangingThe millennial atmospheric lifetime of anthropogenic CO2 David Archer & Victor Brovkin Received: 19

  7. Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Mechanisms for Tropical Tropospheric Circulation Change in Response to Global Warming* JIAN MA change in global warming is studied by comparing the response of an atmospheric general circulation model globally in response to SST warming. A diagnostic framework is developed based on a linear baroclinic model

  8. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com The carbon balance of tropical forest regions, 19902005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    the biosphere to the atmosphere, through the combustion and decomposition of vegetation biomass. The exact of knowledge of the carbon balance of the tropical bio- sphere, looking at both CO2 emissions from land use, principally because they contain the more substantial biomass carbon stocks, but also because so few data

  9. Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthier, Etienne

    Solid precipitation on a tropical glacier in Bolivia measured with an ultrasonic depth gauge Jean effect produces precipitation at midday in the Andean valleys and in the afternoon in the high mountains the main source of melting energy. INDEX TERMS: 3354 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Precipitation

  10. On detecting biospheres from thermodynamic disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Catling, David C

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in the atmospheres of Solar System planets, in which we quantify the difference in Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere compared to that of all the atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere, as measured by this available Gibbs free energy, is not unusual by Solar System standards and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's atmosphere is in contact with a surface ocean, which means that gases can react with water, and so a multiphase calculation that includes aqueous species is required. We find that the disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole o...

  11. Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Theme Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: Observing, Understanding Observing System for Climate #12;Performance 4 Global Tropical Moored Buoy Array: A coordinated multi-national effort to develop and sustain moored buoy observing systems for climate research

  12. The Dynamics and Predictability of Tropical Cyclones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason A.

    2010-01-15

    Through methodology unique for tropical cyclones in peer-reviewed literature, this study explores how the dynamics of moist convection affects the predictability of tropical cyclogenesis. Mesoscale models are used to perform ...

  13. The multiple vortex nature of tropical cyclogenesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippel, Jason Allen

    2005-02-17

    This thesis contains an observational analysis of the genesis of Tropical Storm Allison (2001). Using a paradigm of tropical cyclone formation as the superposition of potential vorticity (PV) anomalies, the importance of different scales of PV...

  14. A Ventilation Index for Tropical Cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Brian

    An important environmental control of both tropical cyclone intensity and genesis is vertical wind shear. One hypothesized pathway by which vertical shear affects tropical cyclones is midlevel ventilation—or the flux of ...

  15. The Combined Effect of Ocean Acidification and Euthrophication on water pH and Aragonite Saturation State in the Northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Tigreros, Fenix

    2013-04-10

    Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing the rate at which anthropogenic CO2 is accumulating in the ocean, and thereby acidifying ocean water. However, accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 is not the only process affecting...

  16. 8, 42214266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 4221 #12;ACPD 8, 4221­4266, 2008 Tropical forest fire

  17. Geography 102, Spring 2006 Tropical Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hours: Tu/Th 9:30p.m-10:30p.m., and by appointment Office: Bunche Hall 1176 Phone: 206 that underly the development of Tropical Cli- mates - the laws that govern the movement of air; solar radiation Circulation in the Tropics - the Hadley Cells, the Trade Winds, the InterTropical Convergence Zone

  18. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  19. The mean molecular mass of Titan's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    , Mars, Mars #12;Science Questions · Mean molecular mass (µ) -> Chemical composition · How did Titan form? · Current reservoirs of volatiles · Ethane/methane puddles/ocean · Thermal structure of atmosphere #12, delicate, etc ­ T/p sensors are simple, cheap, reliable · Is it possible to know µ based on simple

  20. Dynamics of Jupiter's Atmosphere Andrew P. Ingersoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Dowling University of Louisville Peter J. Gierasch Cornell University Glenn S. Orton Jet Propulsion no topography, i.e., no con- tinents or oceans; its atmosphere merges smoothly with the planet's fluid interior with falling ice and rain. On Jupiter, the separation mechanism is still to be determined. The winds of Jupiter

  1. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    of the monsoon forecasting models, which many times do not represent the heat energy available to the atmosphere, have a great demand for accurate, long range forecast (LRF) of mon- soon rainfall, which has always. We studied the impacts of ocean mean temperature (OMT), representing the heat energy of the upper

  2. Synoptic scale sensitivity of TIROS-N moisture channels in the tropics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, Keith Gordon

    1987-01-01

    -Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Dr. James P. McGuirk Dr. Aylmer H. Thompson Water vapor radiance data obtained from a satellite-borne radiometer were evaluated for synoptic information content and accuracy over the tropical eastern Pac'fic Ocean. An upper moist... cluster of elevated BTs was observed over the subtropical Pacific adjacent to the western flank of a series of moisture bursts. Collocated rawinsonde soundings and satellite BTs consistently showed excellent agreement within this region, indicating...

  3. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  4. A Model Evaluation Data Set for the Tropical ARM Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jakob, Christian

    This data set has been derived from various ARM and external data sources with the main aim of providing modelers easy access to quality controlled data for model evaluation. The data set contains highly aggregated (in time) data from a number of sources at the tropical ARM sites at Manus and Nauru. It spans the years of 1999 and 2000. The data set contains information on downward surface radiation; surface meteorology, including precipitation; atmospheric water vapor and cloud liquid water content; hydrometeor cover as a function of height; and cloud cover, cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure information provided by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP).

  5. Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usoskin, Ilya G.

    Author's personal copy Solar modulation in surface atmospheric electricity R. Giles Harrison a is the major source of air's electrical conductivity over the oceans and well above the continents atmospheric electrical circuit, including the local vertical current density and the related surface potential

  6. The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    720 The blue shark (Prionace glauca) is an oceanic species that occurs in tem- perate and tropical); numerically, the blue shark is the top nontarget species captured by the U.S. longline pelagic Atlantic fleet) on the catch rate of several target and bycatch species, including the blue shark. However, they did

  7. Temporal Data Mining for the Discovery and Analysis of Ocean Climate Indices*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    , El Nino, the anomalous warming of the eastern tropical region of the Pacific, has been linked America [Tay98]. For this paper, we will be concerned with teleconnections, such as El Nino, that involve of the Earth's oceans. For example, the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) is an OCI that is associated with El

  8. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  9. Cirrus cloud-temperature interactions over a tropical station, Gadanki from lidar and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S, Motty G, E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Satyanarayana, M., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Krishnakumar, V., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com; Dhaman, Reji k., E-mail: mottygs@gmail.com [Department of Optoelectronics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Trivandrum-695 581, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the radiation budget of the earth's atmospheric system and are important to characterize their vertical structure and optical properties. LIDAR measurements are obtained from the tropical station Gadanki (13.5{sup 0} N, 79.2{sup 0} E), India, and meteorological indicators derived from Radiosonde data. Most of the cirrus clouds are observed near to the tropopause, which substantiates the strength of the tropical convective processes. The height and temperature dependencies of cloud height, optical depth, and depolarization ratio were investigated. Cirrus observations made using CALIPSO satellite are compared with lidar data for systematic statistical study of cirrus climatology.

  10. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  12. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, November 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J.

    2002-12-03

    Fall 2002 Intensive Operation Periods: Single Column Model and Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle--In an Intensive Operation Period (IOP) on November 3-23, 2002, researchers at the SGP CART site are collecting a detailed data set for use in improving the Single Column Model (SCM), a scaled-down climate model. The SCM represents one vertical column of air above Earth's surface and requires less computation time than a full-scale global climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results in large-scale global models. With measured values for a starting point, the SCM predicts atmospheric variables during prescribed time periods. A computer calculates values for such quantities as the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface and predicts how clouds will evolve and interact with incoming light from the sun. Researchers compare the SCM's predictions with actual measurements made during the IOP, then adjust the submodels to make predictions more reliable. A second IOP conducted concurrently with the SCM IOP involves high-altitude, long-duration aircraft flights. The original plan was to use an unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV), but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) aircraft Proteus will be substituted because all UAVs have been deployed elsewhere. The UAV is a small, instrument-equipped, remote-control plane that is operated from the ground by a computer. The Proteus is a manned aircraft, originally designed to carry telecommunications relay equipment, that can be reconfigured for uses such as reconnaissance and surveillance, commercial imaging, launching of small space satellites, and atmospheric research. The plane is designed for two on-board pilots in a pressurized cabin, flying to altitudes up to 65,000 feet for as long as 18 hours. The Proteus has a variable wingspan of 77-92 feet and is 56 feet long. The plane can carry up to 7,260 pounds of equipment, making it a versatile research tool. The Proteus is making measurements at the very top of the cirrus cloud layer to characterize structures of these clouds. These new measurements will provide more accurate, more abundant data for use in improving the representation of clouds in the SCM. 2002-2003 Winter Weather Forecast--Top climate forecasters at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Climate Prediction Center say that an El Nino condition in the tropical Pacific Ocean will influence our winter weather this year. Although this El Nino is not as strong as the event of the 1997-1998 winter season, the United States will nevertheless experience some atypical weather. Strong impacts could be felt in several areas. Nationally, forecasters are predicting warmer-than-average temperatures over the northern tier of states and wetter-than-average conditions in the southern tier of states during the 2002-2003 winter season. Kansas residents should expect warmer and wetter conditions, while Oklahoma will be wetter than average.

  14. The tropical double description method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allamigeon, Xavier; Goubault, Eric

    2010-01-01

    We develop a tropical analogue of the classical double description method allowing one to compute an internal representation (in terms of vertices) of a polyhedron defined externally (by inequalities). The heart of the tropical algorithm is a characterization of the extreme points of a polyhedron in terms of a system of constraints which define it. We show that checking the extremality of a point reduces to checking whether there is only one minimal strongly connected component in an hypergraph. The latter problem can be solved in almost linear time, which allows us to eliminate quickly redundant generators. We report extensive tests (including benchmarks from an application to static analysis) showing that the method outperforms experimentally the previous ones by orders of magnitude. The present tools also lead to worst case bounds which improve the ones provided by previous methods.

  15. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  16. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 22 JANUARY 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1375 Observed changes in top-of-the-atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    anthropogenic forcing is stored in the ocean. The remainder heats the atmosphere and land, and melts snow-of-the-atmosphere radiation and upper-ocean heating consistent within uncertainty Norman G. Loeb1 *, John M. Lyman2 of sunlight absorbed by Earth and the thermal radiation emitted back to space1 . An apparent inconsistency has

  17. Oceanic control of the sea ice edge and multiple equilibria in the climate system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J. (Brian Edward James)

    2010-01-01

    I study fundamental mechanisms of atmosphere-ocean-sea ice interaction. Hierarchies of idealized models are invoked to argue that multiple equilibria and abrupt change are robust features of the climate system. The main ...

  18. Recent distribution of lead in the Indian Ocean reflects the impact of regional emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Echegoyen, Yolanda

    Humans have injected lead (Pb) massively into the earth surface environment in a temporally and spatially evolving pattern. A significant fraction is transported by the atmosphere into the surface ocean where we can observe ...

  19. The Role of Oceans and Sea Ice in Abrupt Transitions between Multiple Climate States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Brian E. J.

    The coupled climate dynamics underlying large, rapid, and potentially irreversible changes in ice cover are studied. A global atmosphere–ocean–sea ice general circulation model with idealized aquaplanet geometry is forced ...

  20. Fluid dynamics of sinking carbon dioxide hydrate particle releases for direct ocean carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Aaron C. (Aaron Chunghin), 1978-

    2008-01-01

    One strategy to remove anthropogenic CO? from the atmosphere to mitigate climate change is by direct ocean injection. Liquid CO? can react with seawater to form solid partially reacted CO? hydrate composite particles (pure ...

  1. Climate-induced changes in carbon and nitrogen cycling in the rapidly warming Antarctic coastal ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henley, Sian Frances

    2013-07-01

    The western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is a hotspot of climatic and oceanographic change, with a 6°C rise in winter atmospheric temperatures and >1°C warming of the surface ocean since the 1950s. These trends are having ...

  2. Using Computer Simulations to Help Understand Flow Statistics and Structures at the Air-Ocean Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Lian

    The interaction among atmosphere, oceans, and surface waves is an important process with many oceanographic and environmental applications. It directly affects the motion and fate of pollutants such as oil spills. The ...

  3. Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    1960 through 2001, Carbon Dioxide Inf. Anal. Cent. , OakAtmospheric and oceanic carbon dioxide models, Science, 282,Data on Global Change, Carbon Dioxide Inf. Anal. Cent. , Oak

  4. Meridional Eddy Heat Flux Density: Direct observations of q in the ocean are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Meridional Eddy Heat Flux Density: ·Direct observations of q in the ocean are sparse and exhibit large spatio-temporal variability. ·Differential heating of the globe causes a net transport of heat (Qtot) poleward by the ocean and atmosphere. ·Models predict at 36oN in the Pacific that total heat

  5. Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions quantities of CH4 are stored in marine sediment in the form of methane hydrate, bubbles, and dissolved CH4 in pore water. Here I discuss the various pathways for methane to enter the ocean and atmosphere

  6. Influence of terrestrial weathering on ocean acidification and the next glacial inception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeebe, Richard E.

    H, a process known as ocean acidification, which may adversely affect marine organisms. We investigate whether. Introduction [2] Humans have released over 300 Pg of carbon (1 Pg C = 1015 g C) mainly from fossil fuel unfortunately has its price: ocean acidification. Uptake of atmospheric CO2 lowers seawater pH and [CO3 2À

  7. Oxygenation of the ocean and sediments: Consequences for the seafloor carbonate factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    precipitation on the seafloor is caused by a decrease in CaCO3 saturation in sediments related to increased oxic cycling of organic carbon and a decline in the size of the marine DIC reservoir. Using a simple model of CaCO3 saturation in the ocean, we show that changes in ocean­atmosphere redox and the size

  8. Upper ocean control on the solubility pump of CO2 by Takamitsu Ito1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    and the degree of saturation of the waters. The depth of thermocline sets the relative volume of warm and cold waters, which sets the mean solubility of CO2 in the ocean. The degree of saturation depends lead to changes in atmospheric pCO2 of as much as 30 ppmv. The deep ocean carbon reservoir

  9. 2 On zonal jets in oceans 3 Balasubramanya T. Nadiga1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    2 On zonal jets in oceans 3 Balasubramanya T. Nadiga1 4 Received 26 January 2006; revised 29 March to the 7 recently observed alternating zonal jets in oceans, the 8 formation of these jets can be explained, originally studied in the context of 13 alternating jets in Jovian atmospheres and two 14 dimensional

  10. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  11. The mean climate of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM4) in forced SST and fully coupled experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neale, Richard; Richter, Jadwiga; Park, Sungsu; Lauritzen, P. H.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Zhang, Minghua

    2013-07-15

    The Community Atmosphere Model, version 4 (CAM4) was released as the atmosphere component of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) and is described. The finite volume dynamical core available in CAM3 is now the default due to its superior transport and conservation properties. Deep convection parameterization changes include a dilute plume calculation of convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the introduction of a formulation for Convective Momentum Transport (CMT). For the cloud fraction an additional calculation is performed following macrophysical state updates that provides improved thermodynamic condistancy. A freeze-drying modification is further made to the cloud fraction calculation in very dry environments, such as arctic Winter, where cloud fractionand cloud water estimates were often inconsistant in CAM3. In CAM4 the finite volume dynamical core leads to a degradation in the excessive trade-wind simulation, but with an accompanying reduction in zonal stresses at higher latitudes. Plume dilution leads to a moister deep tropics alleviating much of the mid-tropospheric dry biases and reduces the persistant precipitation biases over the Arabian peninsular and the southern Indian ocean during the Indian Monsoon. CMT reduces much of the excessive trade-wind biases in eastern ocean basins. The freeze drying modification alleviates much of the high latitude, winter-time excessive cloud bias and improves the associated surface cloud-related energy budget, but the updated cloud macrophysical calculation generally leads to reduced cloud fraction and cloud forcing away from high latitudes. Although there are marginal improvements in time-averaged, large-scale hydrology there are signficant improvements in regional climate features such as the generation of tropical and propagation of stationary waves from the Pacific into mid-latitudes and in the seasonal frequency of Northern Hemisphere blocking events. A 1? versus 2? horizontal resolution of the finite volume 24 dynamical core exhibits signficiant improvements in model climate. Improvements in the fully coupled mean climate between CAM3 and CAM4 are also much more signficant than in forced Sea Surface Temperature (SST) simulations. Furthermore, improvements in the transient characteristics ofthe model climate, documented elsewhere, are substantial.

  12. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using satellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between ? 0.2 and ? 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previousmore »studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550?nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds. « less

  13. Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under the New Climate Change Agreement-A Case Study in Cambodia Jump to: navigation, search Name Benefits of Tropical Forest Management Under...

  14. Model Predictability-Form Lorenz System to Operational Ocean and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Model Predictability- Form Lorenz System to Operational Ocean and Atmospheric Models Peter C Chu. Poberezhny, 2002: Power law decay in model predictability skill. Geophysical Research Letters, 29 (15), 10 Six Months Four-Times Daily Data From July 9, 1998 for Verification #12;Model Generated Velocity

  15. NOAA COASTAL OCEAN PROGRAM Decision Analysis Series No. 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that grew out of them. The handbook contains the written substance of the material being taught A Handbook for Coastal Resource Policymakers U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric have been selected through an extensive peer review process. To learn more about the COP

  16. Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Tallahassee, Florida K. PETER KOLTERMANN Bundesamt für Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie, Hamburg, Germany for thermal wind calculations or the specific flux dataset chosen. In addition, flux-based calculations do. Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various

  17. How is the ocean filled? Geoffrey Gebbie1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    hydrographic property to distinguish between North Atlantic Deep Water and Ant- arctic Bottom Water, finding of the deep Pacific than North Atlantic Deep Water. Another answer might be obtained if more water masses were heat, freshwater, and gases with the atmosphere, but once water sinks into the ocean interior

  18. A critical evaluation of the upper ocean heat budget in the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis data for the south central equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu H.; Lin W.; Liu, X.; Zhang, M.

    2011-08-26

    Coupled ocean-atmospheric models suffer from the common bias of a spurious rain belt south of the central equatorial Pacific throughout the year. Observational constraints on key processes responsible for this bias are scarce. The recently available reanalysis from a coupled model system for the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) data is a potential benchmark for climate models in this region. Its suitability for model evaluation and validation, however, needs to be established. This paper examines the mixed layer heat budget and the ocean surface currents - key factors for the sea surface temperature control in the double Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone in the central Pacific - from 5{sup o}S to 10{sup o}S and 170{sup o}E to 150{sup o}W. Two independent approaches are used. The first approach is through comparison of CFSR data with collocated station observations from field experiments; the second is through the residual analysis of the heat budget of the mixed layer. We show that the CFSR overestimates the net surface flux in this region by 23 W m{sup -2}. The overestimated net surface flux is mainly due to an even larger overestimation of shortwave radiation by 44 W m{sup -2}, which is compensated by a surface latent heat flux overestimated by 14 W m{sup -2}. However, the quality of surface currents and the associated oceanic heat transport in CFSR are not compromised by the surface flux biases, and they agree with the best available estimates. The uncertainties of the observational data from field experiments are also briefly discussed in the present study.

  19. 7, 69036958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 7, 6903­6958, 2007 Tropical Forest fire emissions R. J. Yokelson et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions The Tropical Forest and fire emissions experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor Forest Service, Fire Sciences Laboratory, Missoula, MT, USA Received: 4 May 2007 ­ Accepted: 10 May 2007

  20. Changing concentrations of CO, CH4, C5H8, CH3Br, CH3I, and dimethyl sulfide during the Southern Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wingenter, Oliver W.

    Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments Oliver W. Wingenter* , Karl B. Haase*, Peter Strutton§ , Gernot Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801; College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences-2025 Contributed by F. Sherwood Rowland, April 19, 2004 Oceanic iron (Fe) fertilization experiments have advanced

  1. Ocean Energy Resource Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States.

  2. ENCYCLOPEDIA OCEAN SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENCYCLOPEDIA OF OCEAN SCIENCES Editor-in-Chief JOHN H. STEELE Editors STEVE A. THORPE KARL K in Marine Biology 26: 115-168. Rosland Rand Giske .I (1997) A dynamic model for tbe life history

  3. Constructing a Merged Cloud-Precipitation Radar Dataset for Tropical Convective Clouds during the DYNAMO/AMIE Experiment at Addu Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney; Ellis, Scott; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Bharadwaj, Nitin

    2014-05-16

    To improve understanding of the convective processes key to the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) initiation, the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) collected four months of observations from three radars, the S-band Polarization Radar (S-Pol), the C-band Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research & Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Ka-band Zenith Radar (KAZR) on Addu Atoll in the tropical Indian Ocean. This study compares the measurements from the S-Pol and SMART-R to those from the more sensitive KAZR in order to characterize the hydrometeor detection capabilities of the two scanning precipitation radars. Frequency comparisons for precipitating convective clouds and non-precipitating high clouds agree much better than non-precipitating low clouds for both scanning radars due to issues in ground clutter. On average, SMART-R underestimates convective and high cloud tops by 0.3 to 1.1 km, while S-Pol underestimates cloud tops by less than 0.4 km for these cloud types. S-Pol shows excellent dynamic range in detecting various types of clouds and therefore its data are well suited for characterizing the evolution of the 3D cloud structures, complementing the profiling KAZR measurements. For detecting non-precipitating low clouds and thin cirrus clouds, KAZR remains the most reliable instrument. However, KAZR is attenuated in heavy precipitation and underestimates cloud top height due to rainfall attenuation 4.3% of the time during DYNAMO/AMIE. An empirical method to correct the KAZR cloud top heights is described, and a merged radar dataset is produced to provide improved cloud boundary estimates, microphysics and radiative heating retrievals.

  4. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  5. Professor Brian Toon Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    weapons, such as currently possessed by India and Pakistan and 6 other nations, threaten more fatalities bombs, such as India and Pakistan, could produce climate change unprecedented in recorded human history, but the entire planet. Global climate change following a war between India and Pakistan, using less than 0

  6. US Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research and expert commentary that has resulted from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. It includes peer in this bibliography are sorted into three subject categories: natural, medical, and social sciences. Data sets, fact bibliography on oil spills and oil spill remediation around the world entitled "Resources on Oil Spills

  7. David C. Noone Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Research 1998 Visiting Research Scholar, British Antarctic Survey Honors and Awards (select) 2012 for Research in Environmental Sciences Campus Box 216, University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0216 Phone: +1, polar and past climate, cycles of water and carbon, and stable isotopes. Biographical narrative: Dr

  8. Thomas H Zurbuchen, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    College of Engineering, University of Michigan thomasz@umich.edu Exploring Imaging Plasma Spectrometer! · Primary role: Heavy ion composition! · Measures E/q and Time of flight (TOF.84-10.14 hrs local time.! #12;MESSENGER Instruments! 12! #12;Why Plasma Physicists Care! 13! · Important test

  9. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    N/m 2 per 10000km) against crosswind SST gradients ( ? C peroverlaid with contours crosswind SST gradients ( ? C perpositive (negative) crosswind SST gradients at 0.4 ? C per

  10. Effects of atmospheric inorganic nitrogen deposition on ocean biogeochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Keith

    nitrogen (ammonia and nitrate) sources include fossil fuel combustion [Hameed and Dignon, 1988], biomass burning, soil emissions and breakdown of urea from domestic animals [Warneck, 1988]. Jickells [2005

  11. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    a shifted maximum wind stress offshore when compare to Fig.strengthening winds while extending offshore. A seasonalthe shift of wind stress peak offshore (Fig. 3.30) changes

  12. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere feedbacks in boundary current systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putrasahan, Dian Ariyani

    2012-01-01

    to about 600km offshore, beyond which wind stress curla shifted maximum wind stress offshore when compare to Fig.strengthening winds while extending offshore. A seasonal

  13. U. S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Core Financial System (CFS) interfaced with standard Commerce-wide administrative systems part of the Commerce CBS/CFS. Similar Non-Core CBS modules are located at the Census Bureau

  14. Ocean color and atmospheric dimethyl sulfide: On their mesoscale variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrai, Patricia A; Balch, William M; Cooper, David J; Saltzman, Eric S

    1993-01-01

    periods of' time, covering mesoscale Campbell, J. W. and W.Dimethyl Sulfide' On Their Mesoscale Variability PATRICIA A.Miami, Miami, Florida The mesoscale variability of dimethyl

  15. Atmosphere and Ocean Origins of North American Droughts* RICHARD SEAGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    of droughts that also impact Mexico and/or Canada. For example, the 1950s U.S. Southwest * Lamont% of total variance in northeastern Mexico, the southern Great Plains, and the Gulf Coast states but less-motion disasters whose beginnings and ends are even often hard to identify. However, while the social and financial

  16. United States Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cung-cp nhng c lng công-sc hot ng chính xác cho vic ánh bt tôm. Tuy-nhiên, hp-ng vi S Liên-Kt ng-vì nhng c lng chính xác t l cho cá-hng-con b-chêt tùy thuc-vào ngành hi-sn tôm là iu ch-yu trong k-hành và là mt cách tin-li và hiu qu nht xác nh chính xác s lng và v trí nhng công-sc hat-ng xy ra trong

  17. United States Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Thái LGL ang cung-cp nhng c lng công-sc hot ng chính xác cho vic ánh-bt tôm. Tuy-nhiên, hp-ng vi S Liên-vì nhng c lng chính xác t l cho cá-hng-con b-chêt tùy thuc-vào ngành ánh-bt tôm là iu ch-yu trong k-Ngh-Nghip iêu-hành và là mt cách tin-li và hiu qu nht xác nh chính xác s lng và v trí nhng công-sc hat-ng xy ra

  18. The Monsoon as a Selfregulating Coupled OceanAtmosphere System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    ) in winter and --2 PW (southward) in summer. Thus, the wind­induced heat transport works to cool the summer The majority of the population of the planet reside in the monsoon regions. The livelihood and well being

  19. College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Earth history, Stratigraphy and Sedimentology, geology field methods, and graduate courses in their area through significant contributions to the fields of Stratigraphy, Sedimentology, #12;and/or Earth Systems

  20. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Weather Bureau Hurricane Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Wind damaged some roofs and blew down treao and power lines i n South Carolina. The tornadoera which of Cape Hatkras t o north of Charleston, South Carolina. The storm remained stationary a t first, with its Virginia and northeaetern North Carolina during the afternoon of July 10, it was attended by several

  1. Xin-Zhong Liang Department of Atmosphere & Ocean Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    are rela@vely small · HRM3: SWd is quite realis@c, while T2m (MM5I, HRM3) domain spectral nudging (ECP2, CRCM) NARCCAP IA correla

  2. U^DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Food Science North Carolina State University Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 ABSTRACT The present or combined application of mechanical shock, heat shock, rotation, centrifugal force, pressure, #12;vacuum

  3. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    estimates of the total run size for each listed group of fish. Several Snake River species will have Smolts Arriving at Various Locations in the Columbia River Basin in 2014 Each year your office requests arriving at selected Columbia and Snake River projects. These estimates are necessary for evaluating

  4. NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION FISCAL YEAR 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Services ORF - 27 35 Periodical, Pamphlets, and Audiovisual Products ORF - 29 36 Average Grade and Salary

  5. HANNAH GOSNELL College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , Australia #12;20062011 Assistant Professor of Geography Department of Geosciences, Water Resources of Colorado, Boulder, CO Department of Geography "Water, Fish, Tribes, and Choice: A Geographic of Geography "Rangeland Reform '94 and the Politics of the Old West: An Analysis of Institutional

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National Marine Fisheries Service Jump to:

  7. Technical Sessions B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. Coal StocksSuppliersmillion Technical Sessions S..T. J.AB.

  8. Tropical Cloud Cluster Climatology, Variability, and Genesis Productivity CHRISTOPHER C. HENNON,* PHILIPPE P. PAPIN,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    . TALLEY,* AND CHARLES N. HELMS 1 * University of North Carolina at Asheville, Asheville, North Carolina 1, North Carolina @ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/National Weather Service, Elko, Nevada & Air Force Combat Climatology Center, Asheville, North Carolina (Manuscript received 13 June 2012

  9. Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii, Honolulu. Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

  10. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  11. Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation for the near-ocean-surface high-resolution downwelling irradiance statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zao

    We present a numerical study of the near-surface underwater solar light statistics using the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer (RT) simulations in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system. Advanced variance-reduction ...

  12. Response and impact of equatorial ocean dynamics and tropical instability waves in the tropical Atlantic under global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Atlantic under global warming: A regional coupled downscaling study Hyodae Seo1,2 and ShangPing Xie1. Under global warming, both global and regional models exhibit an increased (decreased) rainfall thermal stratification is suggested to be more important under global warming. The strengthened upwelling

  13. The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment: overview and airborne fire emission factor measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    W. M. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:Physics The Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment:A. : The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment:

  14. Interannual Variations in Upper-Ocean Heat Content and Heat Transport Convergence in the Western North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ocean heat storage rate. On the contrary, a positive anomaly in heat released to the atmosphere corresponds advection, controls the interannual variations in heat storage rate, which suggests that geostrophicInterannual Variations in Upper-Ocean Heat Content and Heat Transport Convergence in the Western

  15. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  16. Steroid estrogens in ocean sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braga, O.; Smythe, G.A.; Schäfer, Andrea; Feitz, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper gives results from a study measuring the abundance of steroid hormones in ocean sediments in the proximity of a deep ocean sewage outfall. The outfall is discharge point for an enhanced primary sewage treatment ...

  17. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    the same conditions). 3) To demonstrate a working knowledge of fluid mechanics, naval architecture: Design/Fluid Mechanics Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior Focus: Naval Architecture and High Speed Small vessel under a variety of foil configurations, sea conditions, propulsion states and loads. 2) To perform

  18. Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Discriminating robust and non-robust atmospheric circulation responses to global warming Michael response to global warming in a set of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) is investigated. The global-warmed climate is forced by a global pattern of warmed ocean surface temperatures

  19. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature received 25 October 2013, in final form 24 July 2014) ABSTRACT The wind speed response to mesoscale SST Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

  20. Atmospheric carbon dioxide in a less dusty world P. Parekh,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide in a less dusty world P. Parekh,1,2 S. Dutkiewicz,1 M. J. Follows,1, P., S. Dutkiewicz, M. J. Follows, and T. Ito (2006), Atmospheric carbon dioxide in a less dusty would favor reduced dust transport and lower iron supply to the oceans. Near-future climate change

  1. Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Kirk

    2008-05-09

    The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

  2. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  3. Strategic Plan National Ocean Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan of the National Ocean Service 2005-2010 U.S. Department of Commerce National Oceanic Strategic Plan for 2005 to 2010. This Plan heralds a new era for the ocean and coasts as NOS responds these challenges. The NOS Strategic Plan is synchronous with the NOAA Strategic Plan -- one NOAA, one workforce

  4. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  5. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Richter Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  6. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  7. Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Engineering by Design Ocean Engineering Bachelor of Science Degree Virginia Tech For more engineering is a diverse field. At Virginia Tech, the major focus areas are ocean energy systems and ocean in the aerospace and related industries and in the shipbuilding, naval engineering, and ship design fields. Some

  8. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  9. GFD 2 2013 P. Rhines Term Project suggestions 14 April 2013 1 The source of mesoscale eddies in the ocean. Baroclinic instability is a key process, sort of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , balanced by atmosphere/ocean exchange of heat and fresh- water. The coupled flow of heat, salt and mass (MOCs) and transformation of water masses. The ocean circulation transports heat and salt poleward data and with ocean model output, as well as simplified models which involve just a few water `types

  10. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  11. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  12. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  13. Research by BNL investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886. BNL-62609 DOE research on atmospheric aerosols S are an programs dealing with atmospheric science, subsurface science, environmental radon, ocean margins

  14. Tropical cyclone preparedness and response : opportunities for operations research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Maurice D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores how operations research methods can be applied in the emergency response community by looking at two recent tropical storm disasters; tropical cyclone Yemyin in Pakistan, June 2007 and super typhoon ...

  15. Diurnal analysis of intensity trends in Atlantic tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowch, Roman S

    2013-01-01

    I postulate that a diurnal cycle may exist in observational variables related to tropical cyclone (TC) intensity. Prior studies document a significant diurnal signal in moist convection across tropical regions. Since ...

  16. Channel planform dynamics of an alluvial tropical river 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Aldo

    2005-08-29

    apparently plays a relatively minor role as a formative event in shaping the overall humid tropical landscape. A third objective was to develop an empirical model for predicting bend migration rates in humid tropical rivers, resulting in empirical...

  17. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States DONGMIN LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, In-Sik

    The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States DONGMIN LEE GESTAR, University The authors examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology precipitation dataset used is the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation

  18. Project title: Global environmental change: biomineral proxies of ocean chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10

    for tomato plants. Tyndall conference was a brainstorming session, tables many farfetched ideas for solving with CO2 problem. Carbon Sequestration: Mining Cos. Geological Cos. Auto industry Schlumberger, BP. PIs want to hold a followup conference in a... ;objective met#7;objective changed#7;#7;1#7;The oceans play a central role in modulating the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Indicators of the chemistry of past oceans and the variation of global climate over Earth history are locked up...

  19. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  20. Climate Science in the Tropics: Waves, Vortices, Boualem Khouider1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stechmann, Samuel N.

    Climate Science in the Tropics: Waves, Vortices, and PDEs Boualem Khouider1 , Andrew J Majda2 and climate on the entire globe, yet contemporary operational computer models are often deficient.10 Keywords: Climate science, Tropical meteorology, waves, vortices, convection, PDEs, MJO, GCMs, tropical

  1. Tropical cyclone energy dispersion under vertical shears Xuyang Ge,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tim

    Tropical cyclone energy dispersion under vertical shears Xuyang Ge,1 Tim Li,1,2 and Xiaqiong Zhou1] Tropical cyclone Rossby wave energy dispersion under easterly and westerly vertical shears is investigated, and X. Zhou (2007), Tropical cyclone energy dispersion under vertical shears, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L

  2. LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    THESIS LOW LEVEL JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS Submitted by GABRIELA MORA ROJAS Department LEVEL JETS IN THE TROP- ICAL AMERICAS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE JETS IN THE TROPICAL AMERICAS The climatologies of five tropical low level jets are studied through

  3. What is a Hurricane? Tropical system with maximum sustained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Hurricane 101 #12;What is a Hurricane? · Tropical system with maximum sustained surface wind of 74 mph or greater. A hurricane is the worst and the strongest of all tropical systems. · Also known as a tropical cyclone. #12;Hurricanes in Florida · 1851-2004 Florida's Hurricane Total: 110 Southwest Florida

  4. Constraints on soluble aerosol iron flux to the Southern Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conway, T. M.; Wolff, E. W.; Röthlisberger, R.; Mulvaney, R.; Elderfield, H. E.

    2015-06-17

    that an increase in bioavailable atmospheric Fe supply of 5-10x could double export 207 production40, meaning the LGM EDC soluble Fe flux could be large enough to drive big changes in 208 primary productivity, nutrient utilization and carbon sequestration... of iron-limitation in the Southern Ocean during ice ages, with potentially increased carbon storage 3 in the ocean, has been invoked as one driver of glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 cycles. Ice and 4 marine sediment records demonstrate...

  5. Alien plant invasions in tropical and sub-tropical savannas: patterns, processes and prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foxcroft, Llewellyn C.; Richardson, David M.; Rejmánek, Marcel; Pyšek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Tanzania Species Family Alien plant invasions in savannasLo pez-Olmedo et al. 2007). Alien plant invasions in Africanspecies of naturalised alien plants for tropical savannas in

  6. Could we identify hot Ocean-Planets with CoRoT, Kepler and Doppler velocimetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Selsis; B. Chazelas; P. Borde; M. Ollivier; F. Brachet; M. Decaudin; F. Bouchy; D. Ehrenreich; J. -M. Griessmeier; H. Lammer; C. Sotin; O. Grasset; C. Moutou; P. Barge; M. Deleuil; D. Mawet; D. Despois; J. F. Kasting; A. Leger

    2007-07-12

    Planets less massive than about 10 MEarth are expected to have no massive H-He atmosphere and a cometary composition (50% rocks, 50% water, by mass) provided they formed beyond the snowline of protoplanetary disks. Due to inward migration, such planets could be found at any distance between their formation site and the star. If migration stops within the habitable zone, this will produce a new kind of planets, called Ocean-Planets. Ocean-planets typically consist in a silicate core, surrounded by a thick ice mantle, itself covered by a 100 km deep ocean. The existence of ocean-planets raises important astrobiological questions: Can life originate on such body, in the absence of continent and ocean-silicate interfaces? What would be the nature of the atmosphere and the geochemical cycles ? In this work, we address the fate of Hot Ocean-Planets produced when migration ends at a closer distance. In this case the liquid/gas interface can disappear, and the hot H2O envelope is made of a supercritical fluid. Although we do not expect these bodies to harbor life, their detection and identification as water-rich planets would give us insight as to the abundance of hot and, by extrapolation, cool Ocean-Planets.

  7. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  8. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01

    310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversionfor the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary

  9. Chapter 4587 TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN WIND SHEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, David S.

    , it is shown that small values of wind shear in the range of 1.25 to 5 ms -1 are the most favorable, and very and middle troposphere, and a relatively small value of vertical wind shear, which is the change with heightChapter 4587 TROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN WIND SHEAR: CLIMATOLOGICAL RELATIONSHIPS AND PHYSICAL

  10. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  11. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA Related Links AntarcticaNews fromOceanic

  12. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncIncOccidental,OceanLtd

  13. A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Intermediate Depths of the Atlantic Ocean: AAIW delta^13C Variability During the Younger Dryas and Lithoherms in the Straits of Florida 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookshire, Brian

    2012-02-14

    greater coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere at the locus of AAIW formation (increased efficiency of the thermodynamic process). Deepwater coral mounds are aggregates of corals, other organisms, their skeletal remains, and sediments that occur...

  14. OCEAN PREDICTION WITH THE HYBRID COORDINATE OCEAN MODEL (HYCOM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . of South Florida, Fugro-GEOS, ROFFS, Orbimage, Shell, ExxonMobil #12;414 ERIC P. CHASSIGNET ET AL-resolving, real-time global and basin-scale ocean prediction system in the context of the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE). Keywords: HYCOM, GODAE, LAS, data assimilation, metrics. 1. Introduction

  15. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  16. Comparison of the Carbon System Parameters at the Global CO2 Survey Crossover Locations in the North and South Pacific Ocean, 1990-1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feely, Richard A [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Lamb, Marilyn F. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Greeley, Dana J. [NOAA, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL); Wanninkhof, Rik [NOAA, Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML)

    1999-10-01

    As a collaborative program to measure global ocean carbon inventories and provide estimates of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C02) uptake by the oceans. the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Energy have sponsored the collection of ocean carbon measurements as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment and Ocean-Atmosphere Carbon Exchange Study cruises. The cruises discussed here occurred in the North and South Pacific from 1990 through 1996. The carbon parameters from these 30 crossover locations have been compared to ensure that a consistent global data set emerges from the survey cruises. !'he results indicate that for dissolved inorganic carbon. fugacity of C02• and pH. the a~:,rreements at most crossover locations are well within the design specifications for the global CO) survey: whereas. in the case of total alkaliniry. the agreement between crossover locations is not as close.

  17. Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-08-01

    By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

  18. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  19. Oceans and Human Health (and climate change)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    Oceans and Human Health (and climate change) Tracy K. Collier Science Dimensions and Ocean Health in a Changing Climate, USC March 12, 2013 1 #12 use Climate change Closes the loop in understanding connections between ocean health and human health

  20. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  1. Marine Ecosystems Ocean Environment Research Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been studying how CO2 emissions affect the ocean system for more than three decades and conQnue to monitor ocean acidificaQon in all the world's oceans from

  2. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  3. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  4. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  5. Ocean Systems Lecture 16 & 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    to thrive in oceans and lakes they need sunlight and nutrients. But thermal stratification tends to separateOcean Systems Lecture 16 & 17 #12;Hydroclimate, heat budgets and stratification For plants the nature of stratification. Light, less dense, water floats on top of colder, less dense water. Plankton

  6. On the relationship between Synoptic Wintertime Atmospheric Variability and path shifts in the Gulf Stream and the Kuroshio Extension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Terrence M.

    to a few years due to propagation of wind-forced variability within the ocean. Yet these shiftsOn the relationship between Synoptic Wintertime Atmospheric Variability and path shifts in the Gulf of wintertime atmospheric variability in the synoptic band (2:8 days) using a relatively new data set for air

  7. Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences 1959­2009 WayneBurt. #12;Oceanography and Atmospheric in Oceanography (TENOC). Wayne Burt immediately responds with proposal to President Strand of Oregon State College to start a graduate Department of Oceanography. 1959 Oregon State Board of Higher Education approves

  8. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Surface Topography Mission/ Jason 2 Launch PreSS KiT/JUNe 2008 #12;#12;Media Contacts Steve .............................................................................................................................. 7 Why Study Ocean Surface Topography

  10. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is...

  11. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  12. Ocean Power (4 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    our existing non-renewable resources. Ocean power is divided into three categories: wave energy, tidal energy, and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) Systems. It is...

  13. A climatology of tropical moisture bursts in the eastern North Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Neil Ray

    1986-01-01

    composited from the northbound orbital passes on the sun-lit half of the earth. The night IR is a composite of the southbound return passes on the dark side. Any feature observed by the satellite on a northbound pass, for example, will be observed again..., is obIectivelo def'ined ui terms of appearance m unenhanced IR satellite imagery as a continuous hand of upper, or middle arid upper, level clouds v;hich i? 2000 km in length and crosses 15'N. The de(in tion is pnmarily geometric and does...

  14. Methane oxidation in the eastern tropical North Pacific Ocean water column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    PACK ET AL. EASTERN PACIFIC METHANE OXIDATIONA method for measuring methane oxidation rates using low-levels of C-labeled methane and accelerator mass

  15. Assessing the uncertainties of model estimates of primary productivity in the tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Ciotti, A. , Dierssen, H. , Dowell, M. , Dunne, J. , Esaias,mark.dowell@jrc.it (M. Dowell), jpd@gfdl.noaa.gov (J.Scott C. Doney m , Mark Dowell n , John Dunne o , Bernard

  16. Marine megafauna in environmental extremes : : distribution and oceanic dispersal of polar and tropical tetrapods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gearheart, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    caretta) during their offshore migration. Ethology, 83(3),to their swim direction. Offshore the Bird’s Head Peninsula,40 km perpendicularly offshore from the nesting beaches. The

  17. Influence of Saharan Aerosols on Phytoplankton Biomass in the Tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    and goethite, in the first derivatives were observed (555 to 580 for hematite and 435 nm for goethite

  18. HISTORICAL CLIMATOLOGY SERIES 6-2 TROPICAL CYCLONES OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC OCEAN, 1851 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Neumann1 , Joan E. David, and Eric S. Blake National Hurricane Center Gregory R. Hammer National Climatic

  19. The Impact of Horizontal Resolution on the Tropical Heat Budget in an Atlantic Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    ) removes these problems. Provided with observed wind velocity, SST, and incoming solar radiation the ABLM be limited by our ability to predict SST. To date, a rather impressive op- erational prediction

  20. MICRONEKTON OF THE EASTERN TROPICAL PACIFIC OCEAN: FAMILY COMPOSITION, DISTRIBUTION, ABUNDANCE, AND RELATIONS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pelamis) from the same areas; agreement between catches and stomach samples was fair for crustaceans

  1. Variation of surface currents and effects on dispersion in the Tropical Pacific Ocean 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Doyle Jackson

    1980-01-01

    annual scale, the ITCZ is very well defined east of 170 'W and o occurs at around 8 N. West of 170 the light variable winds 0 o of the doldrums separate the two systems. The position of the ITCZ varies seasonally following the sun toward the summer... (Tabata, 197 5) North Ecuatorial Countercurrent The North Ecuatorial Countercurrent flows eastward against the wind between 4'N laf. and 10'N lat. across the entire Pacific transporting warm water from west to east. The flow is in approximate...

  2. Seasonal mixed layer salinity balance of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), seasonal variations of precipitation are more significant and drive a pronounced seasonal cycle of mixed; published 15 February 2008. [1] In this study the causes of the seasonal cycle of mixed layer salinity cycle in sea surface salinity (SSS) with significant spatial inhomogeneity. For example, horizontal

  3. Intersecting Cold Pools: Convective Cloud Organization by Cold Pools over Tropical Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLANIsProcessRegulationRadiative Transfer Model and

  4. COPYRIGHT NOTICE: Jorge L. Sarmiento and Nicolas Gruber: Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    of carbon between the two other important reservoirs of the global carbon cycle: the terrestrial biosphere that substantial changes must have occured in the distribution of carbon between the different reservoirs. Several with the oceanic carbon cycle, since this reservoir controls atmospheric CO2 on any timescale longer than a few

  5. Six centuries of changing oceanic mercury Yanxu Zhang1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyatt Jaeglé

    anthropogenic releases of Hg to the atmosphere by mining and coal combustion have resulted in a significant biogeochemical model to show that surface ocean Hg concentrations have increased fourfold over the last 600 years primarily from Hg mining and use of Hg in amalgam extraction of gold and silver ores [Lacerda, 1997; Nriagu

  6. www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nørvåg, Kjetil

    1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author ­ Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Outline · Introduction · Wind Turbine Operational Conditions · Wind Turbine Operation under Atmospheric Icing · Wind Turbine Operation under Fault Condition · Conclusions www.cesos.ntnu.no M. Etemaddar

  7. Journal of Oceanography, Vol. 62, pp. 887 to 902, 2006 Ocean carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Katsumi

    , anthropogenic carbon, sequestration, numerical model, biogeochemistry. * E-mail address: katsumi@umn.edu Copyright©The Oceanographic Society of Japan/TERRAPUB/Springer Model Simulations of Carbon Sequestration from the atmosphere into the oceans. The chain of events amounts to carbon sequestration, because

  8. THE SPECTRUM OF OCEANIC VARIABILITY (Part 1) Stephen Riser, University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    , heating/cooling, tides, geothermal heating (generally large spatial scales, > 1000 km) Energy dissipation gradient yields ocean pressure force to the east. wind wind sea level wind 100° W140° E #12;ENSO Atmosphere;13 April 1993 31 July 1993 Rossby wave propagation is clearly evident near the Equator; at other latitudes

  9. Forcing of Ocean and Sea Ice Variability by the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    hemisphere ocean. 1 #12;1 The atmospheric jet stream and southern hemisphere geography If the earth's surface in solar forcing would also be zonally-symmetric. This would generate, in turn, a mid-latitude jet stream the well-known wavenumber 2 stationary wave pattern in the climatological mean state of the NH jet stream

  10. Forcing of Ocean and Sea Ice Variability by the Southern Hemisphere Annular Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    hemisphere ocean. 1 #12; 1 The atmospheric jet stream and southern hemisphere geography If the earth in solar forcing would also be zonally­symmetric. This would generate, in turn, a mid­latitude jet stream the well­known wavenumber 2 stationary wave pattern in the climatological mean state of the NH jet stream

  11. SPRING 2010 ISSUE 11 JMBA Global Marine Environment 3 ur oceans comprise 97% of the water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    on Earth and cover around 71% of the surface. They are the world's main heat and CO2 store and play a key the atmosphere since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. A proportion of the carbon uptake is exported via the four ocean `carbon pumps' (Solubility, Biological, Continental Shelf and Carbonate Counter

  12. Scatterometer observations of wind variations induced by oceanic islands: Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scatterometer observations of wind variations induced by oceanic islands: Implications for wind-driven of the Hawaiian and Cabo Verde islands on the mean atmospheric flow. A wake of weak winds, flanked by accelerated winds, appears for each major island of both archipelagos. The resulting wind stress curl displays

  13. Could we identify hot Ocean-Planets with CoRoT, Kepler and Doppler velocimetry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selsis, F; Borde, P; Ollivier, M; Brachet, F; Decaudin, M; Bouchy, F; Ehrenreich, D; Griessmeier, J M; Lammer, H; Sotin, C; Grasset, O; Moutou, C; Barge, P; Deleuil, M; Mawet, D; Despois, D; Kasting, J F; Léger, A

    2007-01-01

    Planets less massive than about 10 MEarth are expected to have no massive H-He atmosphere and a cometary composition (50% rocks, 50% water, by mass) provided they formed beyond the snowline of protoplanetary disks. Due to inward migration, such planets could be found at any distance between their formation site and the star. If migration stops within the habitable zone, this will produce a new kind of planets, called Ocean-Planets. Ocean-planets typically consist in a silicate core, surrounded by a thick ice mantle, itself covered by a 100 km deep ocean. The existence of ocean-planets raises important astrobiological questions: Can life originate on such body, in the absence of continent and ocean-silicate interfaces? What would be the nature of the atmosphere and the geochemical cycles ? In this work, we address the fate of Hot Ocean-Planets produced when migration ends at a closer distance. In this case the liquid/gas interface can disappear, and the hot H2O envelope is made of a supercritical fluid. Althou...

  14. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  15. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  16. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore »embedded functional traits.« less

  17. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES Observations from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    samples from the recovery cruise and Bob O'Malley for evaluation of the CTD sensors used on the deployment p. 8 b. Instrument Calibration p. 9 Ocean Temperature and Salinity Sensors p. 9 Met Sensors p. 10 Doppler Profiler Compass p. 10 ADCP/ADP Battery Capacity p. 11 Pressure Sensors p. 11 CTD Sensors p. 12 c

  18. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    address: Center for Atmospheric Chemistry Study, Departmenttween phytoplankton, atmospheric chemistry, and climate areno. 12 ? 4601– 4605 CHEMISTRY Atmospheric aerosol deposition

  19. INTER-AMERICAN TROPICAL TUNA COMMISSION La Jolla, California (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESOLUTION C-12-09 CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT MEASURES FOR BLUEFIN TUNA IN THE EASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN the Western and Central Pacific Ocean (WCPO) and in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (EPO); Affirming Committee for Tuna and Tuna-like Species in the North Pacific Ocean (ISC) and the IATTC scientific staff

  20. Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Clarence Strait Tidal Energy Project, Tenax Energy Tropical Tidal Test Centre, Jump to: navigation, search 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...