Sample records for triumph rebuilding greensburg

  1. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas To Be...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rebuilds as a National Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet) Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009...

  2. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas To Be...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    with many exceeding 50% savings. Greensburg recently constructed a 12.5-MW community wind farm to provide all the remaining energy needed for its energy-efficient buildings...

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg K-12 School (Revised) (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg...

  4. Rebuilding It Better; BTI-Greensburg, John Deere Dealership ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to save close to 50% in annual energy cost. 45491.pdf More Documents & Publications Building Green in Greensburg: BTI Greensburg John Deere Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg,...

  5. Re-Building Greensburg

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hewitt, Steven; Wallach, Daniel; Peterson, Stephanie;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rally residents behind the idea of "greening" Greensburg, inspiring the construction of numerous energy-efficient buildings, some of which generate their own renewable power with solar panels and wind turbines. Many of the town's government buildings use cutting edge energy-saving technologies, saving the local taxpayers' money. Greensburg has demonstrated to the world that any city can reach its energy efficiency and renewable energy goals today using widely available technologies.

  6. Re-Building Greensburg

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Greensburg, KS - A town that was devastated by a tornado in 2007, yet came back to be one of the Nation's most energy-efficient, sustainable communities. Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped...

  7. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting...

  8. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet) From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet) Fact sheet offering practical...

  9. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas, highlighting the Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database as a source of information for energy-efficient building techniques.

  10. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas, highlighting the Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database as a source of information for energy-efficient building techniques.

  11. From Tragedy to Triumph - Resources for Rebuilding Green after...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet) From Tragedy to Triumph - Resources for Rebuilding Green after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet) Fact sheet offering resources for builders and...

  12. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town- Green? April 2009 (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas, highlighting the Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database as a source of information for energy-efficient building techniques.

  13. Greensburg, Kansas : rebuilding a green town

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromberg, Anna (Anna Miriam)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tornado that hit Greensburg, Kansas, in May 2007, traveled down the center of Main Street at two hundred and five miles per hour and destroyed ninety-five percent of the town's built environment. The extensive damage ...

  14. A Tale of Two Cities: Greensburg Rebuilds as a National Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Leading the Nation in Clean Energy Deployment Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study;...

  15. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas; High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a summary of how NREL's technical assistance in Greensburg, Kansas, helped the town rebuild green after recovering from a tornado in May 2007.

  16. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding with Renewable Energy after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet offering practical information about rebuilding using wind, geothermal, and biomass. Includes a list of resources. Highlights successful projects in Greensburg, Kansas.

  17. Tale of Two Cities: Greensburg Rebuilds as a National Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a summary of how DOE and NREL's technical assistance in Greensburg, Kansas, helped the town rebuild green after recovering from a tornado in May 2007.

  18. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. City Hall (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document showcases the LEED-Platinum designed Greensburg City Hall, which was rebuilt green, after a massive tornado destroyed Greensburg, Kansas in May 2007.

  19. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009 (Report and Appendices)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This comprehensive case study describes technical assistance provided by NREL to help Greensburg, Kansas, rebuild as a green community after an EF-5 tornado nearly leveled the town in 2007.

  20. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009; Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This comprehensive case study describes technical assistance provided by NREL to help Greensburg, Kansas, rebuild as a green community after an EF-5 tornado nearly leveled the town in 2007.

  1. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, USD 422 Greensburg K-12 School (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the USD 422 K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas.

  2. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings NREL Helps Greensburg Set the Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL...

  3. Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

  4. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, City Hall (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designated City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  5. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. City Hall (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designated City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  6. Rebuilding It Better: City of Greensburg, Kansas, Business Incubator (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed SunChips Business Incubator in Greensburg, Kansas.

  7. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. City of Greensburg SunChips Business Incubator (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure details the energy efficient and sustainable aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed SunChips Business Incubator in Greensburg, Kansas.

  8. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, To Be...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes Resource Type Case studiesexamples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 8152010...

  9. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  10. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. Kiowa County Courthouse (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one in a series of five that showcases the green, sustainable buildings in Greensburg, Kansas. The Kiowa County Courthouse was one of only two buildings left standing after the tornado, which allowed the building to be renovated and refurbished rather than torn down.

  11. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009 (Brochure) This brochure describes the rebuilding of Greensburg, Kansas,...

  12. Greensburg Sustainable Comprehensive Plan

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Greensburg, KS In October 2007, the architectural and planning firm, BNIM, was selected formally by the City of Greensburg, with support from the USDA, to prepare the first phase of a comprehensive master plan to rebuild the city, which provides a framework for the rebuilding of Greensburg based around the principles of economic, social and environmental sustainability. The BNIM Planning team presented the final draft of Greensburg's Comprehensive Plan to the City Council and to a public hearing on January 16, 2008.

  13. A Tale of Two Cities: Greensburg Rebuilds as a National Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    town and beyond Five years after the tornado, Greensburg's per capita ratio of U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified...

  14. Rebuilding it Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital (Brochure) (Revised)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This brochure details the sustainable and green aspects of the LEED Platinum-designed Kiowa County Memorial Hospital in Greensburg, Kansas.

  15. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet offering practical information about building energy efficient buildings and using renewable energy. Includes a checklist and resources. Highlights successful projects in Greensburg, Kansas.

  16. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas To Be a 100%

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScience & Technology Facility at

  17. From Tragedy to Triumph: Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, To Be a 100%

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604° ShowCounty, California: Energyof

  18. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Homes after Disaster (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Efficiency/Renewable Energy Fact Sheets, No. 1. Series to include practical, useful info to help people change their behavior around energy usage and "greenness". Greensburg is hanging its future on sustainable development; these fact sheet sheets should help citizens understand what they can do to be a part of that focus. Fact Sheets cover: saving energy and water, using renewable energy (particular interest in small wind), driving "green", general sustainability, living green.

  19. From Tragedy to Triumph - Resources for Rebuilding Green after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet offering resources for builders and architects to rebuild homes, businesses, and public buildings with energy efficiency and renewable energy such as wind, solar, and geothermal.

  20. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE March,EnergyIllustrativeBTI-Greensburg

  1. Options for Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles in Greensburg, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrow, G.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paper describes DOE/NREL recommendations to rebuild Greensburg, Kansas, as a sustainable community after being struck by a tornado in 2007.

  2. Greensburg, Kansas: A Better, Greener Place to Live (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Brochure is for Greensburg city leadership (Chamber of Commerce, Mayor's Office, and others) to use to attract visitors and businesses to Greensburg, and to ensure the city?s commitment to sustainability. Content includes EERE subject matter and mentions DOE's role in rebuilding. The layout is designed to be used as a template for other cities in similar situations.

  3. Building Green in Greensburg: Greensburg State Bank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Greensburg State Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  4. NREL Helps Greensburg Set the Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After a massive tornado destroyed or severely damaged 95% of Greensburg, Kansas on May 4, 2007, key leaders in Greensburg and Kansas made a crucial decision not just to rebuild, but to remake the town as a model sustainable rural community. To help achieve that goal, experts from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) arrived in Greensburg in June 2007.

  5. Building Green in Greensburg: BTI Greensburg John Deere

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing BTI Greensburg John Deere dealership building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  6. Tale of Two Cities: Greensburg Resurrected as a National Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides a summary of how NREL's technical assistance in Greensburg, Kansas, helped the town rebuild green after recovering from a tornado in May 2007. Greensburg, Kansas, was like any rural community in America until a massive tornado leveled much of the town on May 4, 2007. Key leaders in Greensburg and Kansas made a crucial decision not just to rebuild, but to remake the town as a model sustainable community. To help achieve that goal, technical experts from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) arrived in Greensburg in June 2007. For three years, the experts worked with city leaders, business owners, residents, and other state, federal, and local agencies to identify ways to incorporate energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies into the town's rebuilding efforts. NREL conducted detailed studies to examine energy use; availability of renewable energy resources; energy options; and potential integrated energy solutions that could also be replicated in other communities recovering from disaster or working toward building green. Those recommendations were incorporated into the Greensburg Sustainable Comprehensive Master Plan and furthered the town's vision of becoming an affordable sustainable community. Technical assistance provided by NREL has impacted the following areas in Greensburg's resurrection. Residents also formed a non-profit organization, Greensburg GreenTown{trademark}, to provide resources and support for rebuilding. Through energy modeling, education, training, and onsite assistance, NREL helped renovate and rebuild homes in Greensburg that on average, use 40% less energy than similar buildings built to code - surpassing the goal NREL originally set to achieve 30% energy savings in residential buildings.

  7. A Tale of Two Cities: Greensburg Rebuilds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Energy-Efficient Homes Through energy modeling, education, training, and onsite assistance, DOE and NRELW of electricity, the LEED Platinum building is a model for other John Deere dealerships. Distributed Renewable Energy To help local distributed system owners get the most value for electricity sent back to the grid

  8. Greensburg Rebuilds Sustainably | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: CongestionDevelopment of aLoggingsubscriber to theFEDERALTheOn May

  9. Re-Building Greensburg | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaising funds for aRaymond Davis, Jr.,Re s pons

  10. Building Green in Greensburg: Prairie Pointe Townhomes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Prairie Pointe Townhomes in Greensburg, Kansas.

  11. Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Courthouse

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the renovated high-performing Kiowa County Courthouse building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  12. Building Green in Greensburg: Business Incubator Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing SunChips Business Incubator building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  13. Building Green in Greensburg: Centera Bank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Centera Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  14. Building Green in Greensburg: City Hall Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing City Hall building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  15. Building Green in Greensburg: The Peoples Bank

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Peoples Bank building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  16. Building Green in Greensburg: Dillons Kwik Shop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Dillons Kwik Stop building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  17. USD 422 Greensburg K-12 School

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing USD 422 K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas.

  18. Energy-Efficient Rebuilding After Tragedy: Inspiration from Greensburg...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    electricity from a wind energy system Emergency back-up generators that run on biodiesel Use of wind and solar power installations and ground-source heat pumps by residents...

  19. DOE and NREL Help Greensburg Rebuild Sustainably | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    being harnessed to help power this rural Kansas community. Kansas has the third-highest potential for wind energy of any state, making it an obvious choice for green-minded...

  20. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Business Incubator | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction Systems

  1. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, City Hall | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction SystemsInformation Hall

  2. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, K-12 School | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction SystemsInformation

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Courthouse | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction SystemsInformationEnergy

  4. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N. Secretary-General BanReanna

  5. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, Kiowa County Memorial Hospital |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchRay County, Missouri:ReSunRealRebersburg,Open

  6. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11Department ofMeeting Energy Savings Goals

  7. Rebuilding It Better; BTI-Greensburg, John Deere Dealership (Brochure)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11Department ofMeeting Energy Savings

  8. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas. USD 422 Greensburg K-12 School

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11Department ofMeeting Energy Savings GoalsOn

  9. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952<...

  10. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Homes after Disaster...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in utility bills and make your home a healthier and more comfortable place to live. Green homes save money with energy-saving features such as effective insulation,...

  11. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Homes after Disaster (Revised)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdfStatementFebruary 27,(Fact Sheet) | Department of

  12. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE March,EnergyIllustrative

  13. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding with Renewable Energy after Disaster,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE

  14. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding Green Buildings after Disaster, EERE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FY 2010FrequentlyScience andFrom(Fact

  15. From Tragedy to Triumph - Resources for Rebuilding Green after Disaster,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FY 2010FrequentlyScience andFrom(FactEERE

  16. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding with Renewable Energy after Disaster,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's2of Energy Energy DepartmentWorkEERE

  17. Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study Database The Greensburg High Performance Buildings Database highlights building case studies that include design details and energy information for the town's new...

  18. Building Green in Greensburg: Silo Eco-Home

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Silo Eco-Home building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  19. Building Green in Greensburg: Dwane Shank Motors GM Dealership

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Shank Motors GM Dealership building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  20. Building Green in Greensburg: 5.4.7 Arts Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing 5.4.7 Arts Center building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  1. Building Green in Greensburg: Kiowa County Memorial Hospital

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster highlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and sustainable features of the high-performing Kiowa County Memorial Hospital building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  2. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This executive summary provides an overview of an NREL assessment to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region around Greensburg, Kansas.

  3. NREL Helps Greensburg Set the Model for Green Communities (Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL Helps Greensburg Set the Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) NREL Helps...

  4. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study; NREL's Technical Assistance to Greensburg, June 2007-May 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11Department of

  5. City of Greensburg- Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In the aftermath of a May 2007 tornado that destroyed 95% of the city, the Greensburg City Council passed an ordinance requiring that all newly constructed or renovated municipally owned facilities...

  6. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas: Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This executive summary provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region.

  7. Palisades-Goshen Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO Website DirectoryCommunityFuturePalisades-Goshen-Rebuild

  8. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction Systems EngineeringOpen Energy

  9. Rebuilding It Better: BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction Systems EngineeringOpen

  10. Rebuilding Greensburg, Kansas, as a Model Green Community: A Case Study;

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N. Secretary-General BanReanna TrudellNREL's

  11. A Tale of Two Cities: Greensburg Rebuilds as a National Model for Green

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 A Strategic Framework for SMR DeploymentCommunities (Fact Sheet) |

  12. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haase, S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of a technical report on an assessment NREL conducted in Greensburg, Kansas, to identify potential opportunities to develop a biomass pelletization or briquetting plant in the region. See NREL/TP-7A2-45843 for the Executive Summary of this report.

  13. From Tragedy to Triumph - Rebuilding with Renewable Energy after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOEScience & Technology Facility at the

  14. From Tragedy to Triumph - Resources for Rebuilding Green after Disaster, EERE (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment of Energy's2of Energy Energy

  15. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewables Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg,...

  18. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into...

  19. Out of the Rubble and Towards a Sustainable Future: The Greening of Greensburg, Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stacey Swearingen

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following a devastating tornado there in 2007, the tiny city of Greensburg, Kansas has engaged in a sustainability-oriented recovery process through which it hopes to serve as a model for other communities planning for a ...

  20. Rebuilding of Rautaruukki blast furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallo, S.; Pisilae, E.; Ojala, K. [Rautaruukki Oy Raahe Steel (Finland)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rautaruukki Oy Raahe Steel rebuilt its blast furnaces in 1995 (BF1) and 1996 (BF2) after 10 year campaigns and production of 9,747 THM/m{sup 3} (303 NTHM/ft{sup 3}) and 9,535 THM/m{sup 3} (297 NTHM/ft{sup 3}), respectively. At the end of the campaigns, damaged cooling system and shell cracks were increasingly disturbing the availability of furnaces. The goal for rebuilding was to improve the cooling systems and refractory quality in order to attain a 15 year campaign. The furnaces were slightly enlarged to meet the future production demand. The blast furnace control rooms and operations were centralized and the automation and instrumentation level was considerably improved in order to improve the operation efficiency and to reduce manpower requirements. Investments in direct slag granulation and improved casthouse dedusting improved environmental protection. The paper describes the rebuilding.

  1. EIS-0483: Estes to Flatiron Substation Transmission Lines Rebuild...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EIS-0483: Estes to Flatiron Substation Transmission Lines Rebuild Project, Larimer County, Colorado EIS-0483: Estes to Flatiron Substation Transmission Lines Rebuild Project,...

  2. Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic GrowthAlbany-Eugene-Rebuild-Project Sign

  3. Rebuilding It Better: Greensburg, Kansas, High Performance Buildings Meeting Energy Savings Goals (Brochure) (Revised), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified11Department ofMeeting Energy Savings GoalsOn May

  4. A review of "Roman Triumphs and Early Modern English Culture." by Anthony Miller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Ullyot

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that it would be merely ill-mannered to quibble over minor ingredients in the recipe. Anthony Miller. Roman Triumphs and Early Modern English Culture. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave, 2001. vii + 223 pp. + 7 illus. $45.00. Review by MICHAEL ULLYOT... ouer death.? Upon reading Anthony Miller?s Roman Triumphs and Early Modern English Culture, one can appreciate a further reason for Henry?s funeral triumph. Originating in Roman ceremonial displays of military and imperial vigour, triumphs serve...

  5. Microfluidics for biological analysis: Triumphs and hurdles of CD platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Yogesh Moreshwar

    Microfluidics for biological analysis: Triumphs and hurdles of CD platforms JONATHAN SIEGRIST1 , R on microfluidic technologies has become extensive, particularly in regards to the develop- ment of sample. Centrifugal microfluidic platforms based on the compact-disc format are discussed, along with the advantages

  6. A rhetorical investigation of Triumph of the Will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schadler, Joseph Michael

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of German Military Power. . . . . Establishment of Elite Support 79 84 . 105 . . . 126 . 131 IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS . . . 138 Triumph of the Will in Retrospect. Influence of the Film. Influence of Riefenstahl's Techniques. . . . . 139... forward. Cartoon shorts, newsreels and even feature films presented the enemy as a monster? raping, pillaging, and destroying everything in his path. Cecil B. De Mille's The Little American (1916) portrays the Germans as depraved animals raping American...

  7. REBUILD AMERICA PROGRAM SCOPE OF WORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Brown; Bruce Exstrum

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities carried out by Aspen Systems Corporation in support of the Department of Energy's Rebuild America program during the period from October 9, 1999 to October 31, 2004. These activities were in accordance with the Scope of Work contained in a GSA MOBIS schedule task order issued by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This report includes descriptions of activities and results in the following areas: deployment/delivery model; program and project results; program representative support activities; technical assistance; web site development and operation; business/strategic partners; and training/workshop activities. The report includes conclusions and recommendations. Five source documents are also provided as appendices.

  8. Rebuilding for Sustainability: Case Studies in the Making (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billman, L.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has made significant contributions to communities suffering from natural disasters since 2007 in terms of technical assistance regarding energy efficiency and renewable energy options. NREL's work has covered all aspects of energy, including energy opportunities in community planning, policy design, new program design, and specific project design and implementation for energy related to electricity generation, building energy use, and transportation. This presentation highlights work done in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina; Greensburg, Kansas, following a devastating tornado; and New York and New Jersey following Hurricane Sandy.

  9. EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon. Additional information is available at the...

  10. EA-1891: Alvey-Fairview Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild DOEs Bonneville Power Administrations Alvey-Fairview No. 1 230-kV transmission line located between Eugene, Oregon, and Coquille, Oregon.

  11. Lovell-Yellowtail transmission line rebuild project, Western...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on Flickr. Western is rebuilding the Lovell-to-Yellowtail No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines. The 94-circuit-miles of lines are located between Lovell, Wyo., and Yellowtail...

  12. Microsoft Word - CX-Colville-Republic_Rebuild_WEB.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eric Orth Project Manager - TEP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Colville-Republic No. 1 115-kV rebuild project Budget Information: Work Order 00270698 PP&A Project No.: PP&A 1786...

  13. Overview of the Rebuild America Program in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Company, the utility. PG&E Energy Services is not regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission; and you do not have to buy PG&E Energy Services' products in order to continue to receive quality regulated services from Pacific Gas and Electric... in construction costs. Energy and IAQ monitoring and savings calculations have been performed at two of the three Rebuild America projects. The type of energy retrofit projects range from lighting retrofits to implementing EMCs. RESULTS Case Study: Bryan ISD...

  14. Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: An introduction to freshman composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Karen

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 8 CKlly, y~c'1Dt ~:A~c~dht 0 E * d~cf t (Gl t, 111. : ~ t, 9 d 0 1972), p. 3. 9 Walker Gibson, ~Seein and ~Writin , 2nd ed. (New York: David McKay Co. , Inc, 1974), p. iii. 10 K M '(, ~CD (N Y k: Hyd E kC . , 19707, p. 27. Kelly, "Toward... Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: An Introduction to Freshman Composition. (May 1978) Karen Davis, B. A. , Southwest Texas State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Forrest Dean Burt New teachers of composition need a handbook to supplement...

  15. How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild a Town -

  16. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and entrepreneurs helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into an energy efficient city, with solar panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.gov...

  17. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    helped rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into an energy efficient city, with solar panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideos...

  18. Decoupling Policies: Options to Encourage Energy Efficiency Policies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    encourage energy efficiency. 46606.pdf More Documents & Publications Greensburg, Kansas: Building a Model Green Community, How Would You Rebuild a Town - Green? April 2009...

  19. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Security + Safety Energy Literacy Principle 4 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders...

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Security + Safety Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and entrepreneurs helped...

  1. DOE and NREL Technical Assistance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    assistance to Greensburg, Kansas, in the following areas. MASTER PLAN FOR REBUILDING GREEN * Completed detailed studies on renewable energy sources, cost-effective energy...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. http:energy.goveerevideosenergy-101-wind-turbines-2014-update Video Re-Building Greensburg Civic leaders and...

  3. Search results | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebuild Greensburg, Kansas into an energy efficient city, with solar panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideos...

  4. EA-1952: Lane-Wendson No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 41.3-mile Lane-Wendson No. 1 transmission line between Eugene and Florence, Oregon.

  5. Rebuild America Program Brazos Valley Energy Conservation Coalition Quarterly Report for July September 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Brazos Valley Energy Conservation Coalition (BVECC), administered by the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) of Texas A&M University, in College Station, Texas received notification of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE)-Rebuild America award...

  6. EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to rebuild a 32-mile section of the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line in Lane and Linn Counties, OR.

  7. AbstractStock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    519 AbstractStock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing mortality (F. Iso pleths calculated in previous studies by deterministic models approximate median, rather than mean

  8. Microsoft Word - CX-Chehalis-Raymond_rebuild_2010_WEB.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    9, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Eric Orth Project Manager - TEP-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Rebuild a 19 mile section of the Chehalis-Raymond...

  9. INTERNSHIP AGREEMENT (Fall 2005) University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg This form must be completed prior to registering for an internship. To receive credit, students must have a faculty sponsor. Please print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    INTERNSHIP AGREEMENT (Fall 2005) University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg This form must be completed prior to registering for an internship. To receive credit, students must have a faculty sponsor. Please for the final signature prior to registering for the internship. General questions may be directed to Office

  10. EA-1931: Keeler to Tillamook Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the Keeler-Forest Grove and Forest Grove-Tillamook 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines between the cities of Hillsboro and Tillamook, in Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon. The 58-mile-long rebuild would include replacement of all wood-pole structures over 10 years in age. Some existing access roads would be improved to accommodate construction equipment and some new road access would be acquired or constructed in areas where access is not available.

  11. EA-1972: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild, Pinal County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration issued a Draft EA that assesses the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of a 35.6-mile transmission line that Western operates and maintains under an agreement with the Central Arizona Project. Additional information is available on the project website, http://www.wapa.gov/dsw/environment/ED2DOEEA1972.htm.

  12. EA-1665: Davis-Kingman 69-kV Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western plans to rebuild a 26.6-mile-long portion of the existing 27.3-mile-long DavisKingman Tap 69-kV Transmission Line within the existing ROW in order to improve the reliability of the transmission service.

  13. The Brazos Valley Energy Conservation Coalition, Part of the Rebuild America Program in Texas: Program Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Myers, M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -five of these facilities have authorized BVECC to conduct walk-through audits, and fourteen preliminary walkthrough audits have been performed. As of June 1999, nine facilities have joined the Rebuild America program covering a total of 8 million square feet of conditioned...

  14. EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of its 26-mile 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Hills Creek-Lookout Point transmission line, which is generally located between Lowell and Oakridge, in Lane County, Oregon.

  15. EA-1961: Kalispell-Kerr Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Kalispell and Polson, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding its 41-mile long 115 kilovolt (kV) wood-pole Kalispell-Kerr transmission line between Kalispell and Polson, Montana. Additional information is available on the project website, http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/KALISPELL_KERR/.

  16. EA-1987: Parker-Headgate Rock and Parker-Bouse Rebuild Project, Arizona and California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that will assess the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild the existing Parker Dam-Headgate Rock and Parker Dam-Bouse 161-kilovolt transmission lines along the Colorado River in western Arizona and eastern California.

  17. Rebuilding After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20-page "how-to" guide describing ways to turn a disaster into an opportunity to rebuild with greener energy technologies. It covers such topics as the importance of energy, options for communities, instructions for developing an energy plan, and other considerations. This guide is intended for the community leaders who have experienced a disaster.

  18. EIS-0502: Hot Springs to Anaconda Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EIS that will analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild approximately 120 miles of existing transmission line in Sanders, Lake, Missoula, Granite, Powell, and Deer Lodge Counties in Montana.

  19. EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington.

  20. EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion, and Linn Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon.

  1. Interpretation of ensembles created by multiple iterative rebuilding of macromolecular models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Turk, Dusan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterogeneity in ensembles generated by independent model rebuilding principally reflects the limitations of the data and of the model-building process rather than the diversity of structures in the crystal. Automation of iterative model building, density modification and refinement in macromolecular crystallography has made it feasible to carry out this entire process multiple times. By using different random seeds in the process, a number of different models compatible with experimental data can be created. Sets of models were generated in this way using real data for ten protein structures from the Protein Data Bank and using synthetic data generated at various resolutions. Most of the heterogeneity among models produced in this way is in the side chains and loops on the protein surface. Possible interpretations of the variation among models created by repetitive rebuilding were investigated. Synthetic data were created in which a crystal structure was modelled as the average of a set of perfect structures and the range of models obtained by rebuilding a single starting model was examined. The standard deviations of coordinates in models obtained by repetitive rebuilding at high resolution are small, while those obtained for the same synthetic crystal structure at low resolution are large, so that the diversity within a group of models cannot generally be a quantitative reflection of the actual structures in a crystal. Instead, the group of structures obtained by repetitive rebuilding reflects the precision of the models, and the standard deviation of coordinates of these structures is a lower bound estimate of the uncertainty in coordinates of the individual models.

  2. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission Line, Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 34-mile Midway-Moxee transmission line in Benton and Yakima Counties, Washington.

  3. EIS-0483: Estes to Flatiron Substation Transmission Lines Rebuild Project, Larimer County, Colorado

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration (Western) with USDA Forest Service, Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forest, as a cooperating agency is preparing an EIS that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild and upgrade two 115-kilovolt single-circuit transmission lines between the Flatiron Substation and the intersection of Mall Road and U.S. Highway 36 in Estes Park, Larimer County, Colorado. Additional information is available on Westerns project website.

  4. EA-1855: Creston-Bell Rebuild Project, Spokane and Lincoln Counties, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental Assessment DOE will prepare an EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts from rebuilding the Creston-Bell No. 1 115-kV transmission line, including the replacement of wood poles and associated structural components and conductor and access road improvements. The 54-mile long, wood pole line extends from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Creston substation to the BPA Bell substation near Spokane in Lincoln and Spokane Counties, Washington.

  5. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and Hood River Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild its 24-mile long, 115 kilovolt Bonneville-Hood River transmission line. The existing line runs between the Bonneville Powerhouse at Bonneville Dam in Multnomah County, Oregon, and BPA's existing Hood River Substation in Hood River County, Oregon. The project would include replacing structures and conductor wires, improving access roads, and constructing new access roads or trails where needed.

  6. EA-1948: Gila-North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild and Upgrade Project, Yuma County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this EA to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to rebuild and upgrade two parallel 4.8-mile transmission lines between the Gila and North Gila Substations and take actions in support of portions of Arizona Public Services construction of a new, 12.8 mile 230-kV transmission line between North Gila and a proposed substation in Yuma County, Arizona. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are cooperating agencies.

  7. Rebuilding a Greener New Orleans on Veteran's Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N. Secretary-General BanReannaRebuilding a

  8. EIS-0400: Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard-Windy Gap Substation Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Grand County, CO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration prepared an EIS, with the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Grand County (Colorado) as cooperating agencies, to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of rebuilding a 12-mile, 69 kV electric transmission line in Grand County. The proposed project would rebuild the single-circuit line as a double-circuit transmission line and add a second power transformer. Western identified potentially significant impacts while preparing an EA for this proposal (DOE/EA-1520) and prepared an EIS instead of completing the EA. Further information about the project is available on the project website.

  9. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire, Benton County, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOEs Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild its existing Midway-Benton No.1 transmission line in place, or to reroute a portion of the Midway-Benton No. 1 transmission line that currently crosses Gable Mountain and Gable Butte in order to avoid crossing these features.

  10. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Sawtooth Valley Project Conservation and Rebuilding Program : Supplemental Fnal Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document announces Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) proposal to fund three separate but interrelated actions which are integral components of the overall Sawtooth Valley Project to conserve and rebuild the Snake River Sockeye salmon run in the Sawtooth Valley of south-central Idaho. The three actions are as follows: (1) removing a rough fish barrier dam on Pettit Lake Creek and constructing a weir and trapping facilities to monitor future sockeye salmon adult and smolt migration into and out of Pettit Lake; (2) artificially fertilizing Readfish Lake to enhance the food supply for Snake River sockeye salmon juveniles released into the lake; and (3) trapping kokanee fry and adults to monitor the fry population and to reduce the population of kokanee in Redfish Lake. BPA has prepared a supplemental EA (included) which builds on an EA compled in 1994 on the Sawtooth Valley Project. Based on the analysis in this Supplemental EA, BPA has determined that the proposed actions are not major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. Therefore an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  11. Rebuilding After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up (Revised) (Brochure), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    20-page how-to guide describing ways to turn a disaster into an opportunity to rebuild with greener energy technologies. It covers such topics as the importance of energy, options for communities, instructions for developing an energy plan, and other considerations. This guide is intended for the community leaders who have experienced a disaster.

  12. The day the Dam Busters returned... in Canada Tom Chivers learns why Channel 4 asked engineers to rebuild Barnes Wallis's bouncing bomb.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    The day the Dam Busters returned... in Canada Tom Chivers learns why Channel 4 asked engineers to rebuild Barnes Wallis's bouncing bomb. Explosive: a scene from Channel 4?s new documentary about the Dam, at scale, under a plane, building a dam and blowing it up, is much more of an engineering exercise than

  13. Industrial Fellowship in Logistics Apply the tools of logistics science to analyze, modify or rebuild the logistics system of an industry-leader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chi-Guhn

    Industrial Fellowship in Logistics Project Apply the tools of logistics science to analyze, modify or rebuild the logistics system of an industry-leader automotive supplier company. Understand the logistics of logistics network, and investigate and quantify potential savings. Design the concept of a computerized

  14. EA-1617: Lovell-Yellowtail and Basin-Lovell Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOEs Western Area Power Administration prepared this EA and a finding of no significant impact for a proposal to rebuild the Lovell-Yellowtail (LV-YT) No. 1 and No. 2 115-kV transmission lines, located in Big Horn County, Wyoming, and Big Horn and Carbon Counties in Montana, and the Basin-Lovell 115-kV transmission line in Big Horn County, Wyoming.

  15. EIS-0379- Rebuild of the Libby (FEC) to Troy Section of BPAs 115-kilovolt Transmission Line in Libby, Lincoln County, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action on the proposed rebuilding, operation, and maintenance of a 17-mile-long portion of BPAs Libby to Bonners Ferry 115-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line in Lincoln County, Montana. The portion to be rebuilt would start at Flathead Electric Cooperatives (FEC) Libby Substation, in the town of Libby, Montana, and proceed west along an existing right-of-way for about 17 miles, terminating at BPAs Troy Substation just east of the town of Troy, Montana.

  16. Rebuilding the Babel Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.W.

    Johnson,C.W. Proceedings of the First Workshop on Human Computer Interaction for Mobile Devices Dept of Computing Science, University of Glasgow

  17. Bandon-Rouge Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIAL JohnE Pt he A dvanced La

  18. Kalispell-Kerr Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015Just PlainKaitlyn Faries

  19. Chehalis-Centralia Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma of the Rotating 2015 FAQ Useful

  20. UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    , communications, machinery, electrical equipment, pharmaceuticals * Federal agencies including Defense, Labor of Congress state agencies Core Courses 11 courses - 36 or 37 credits MATH 0220 Analytic Geometry and Calculus

  1. Greensburg Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrlMassachusetts:Group

  2. Greensburg, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,IISrlMassachusetts:Group581°,

  3. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefs, Nancy (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1997 the first phase of the Nez Perce Tribe White Sturgeon Project was completed and the second phase was initiated. During Phase I the ''Upper Snake River White Sturgeon Biological Assessment'' was completed, successfully: (1) compiling regional white sturgeon management objectives, and (2) identifying potential mitigation actions needed to rebuild the white sturgeon population in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. Risks and uncertainties associated with implementation of these potential mitigative actions could not be fully assessed because critical information concerning the status of the population and their habitat requirements were unknown. The biological risk assessment identified the fundamental information concerning the white sturgeon population that is needed to fully evaluate the effectiveness of alternative mitigative strategies. Accordingly, a multi-year research plan was developed to collect specific biological and environmental data needed to assess the health and status of the population and characterize habitat used for spawning and rearing. In addition, in 1997 Phase II of the project was initiated. White sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. During 1997, 316 white sturgeon were captured in the Snake River. Of these, 298 were marked. Differences in the fork length frequency distributions of the white sturgeon were not affected by collection method. No significant differences in length frequency distributions of sturgeon captured in Lower Granite Reservoir and the mid- and upper free-flowing reaches of the Snake River were detected. The length frequency distribution indicated that white sturgeon between 92 and 183 cm are prevalent in the reaches of the Snake River that were sampled. However, white sturgeon >183 have not changed markedly since 1970. I would speculate that some factor other than past over-fishing practices is limiting the recruitment of white sturgeon into larger size classes (>183 cm). Habitat, food resources, and migration have been severely altered by the impoundment of the Snake River and it appears that the recruitment of young may not be severely affected as recruitment of fish into size classes > 183 cm.

  4. Creston-Bell Rebuild Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of Energy CarlsbadWinter

  5. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fishereis Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2000 annual report covers the fourth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2000 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 53,277 hours of setline effort and 630 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2000. A total of 538 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 25 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 32.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 48 cm to 271 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 103 cm to 227 cm and averaged 163 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber open population estimator, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,725 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,668-5,783. A total of 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 54.7 km (34 miles) downstream to 78.8 km (49 miles) upstream; however, 43.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 31 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 138 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 34 white sturgeon eggs were recovered: 27 in the Snake River, and seven in the Salmon River.

  6. Evaluate Potenial Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A.; Hesse, Jay A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This report presents a summary of results from the 1997-2002 Phase II data collection and represents the end of phase II. From 1997 to 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon. A total of 1,785 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 77 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 25.8 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. Relative density of white sturgeon was highest in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River, with reduced densities of fish in Lower Granite Reservoir, and low densities the Salmon River. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir, the free-flowing Snake River and the Salmon River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. Total annual mortality rate was estimated to be 0.14 (95% confidence interval of 0.12 to 0.17). A total of 35 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 1999-2002. The movement of these fish ranged from 53 km (33 miles) downstream to 77 km (48 miles) upstream; however, 38.8 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate egg mats documented white sturgeon spawning in four consecutive years. A total of 49 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River from 1999-2002, and seven from the Salmon River during 2000.

  7. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

  8. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 2001 annual report covers the fifth year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 2001 white sturgeon were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. The Snake River was sampled between Lower Granite Dam (rkm 174) and the mouth of the Salmon River (rkm 303), and the Salmon River was sampled from its mouth upstream to Hammer Creek (rkm 84). A total of 45,907 hours of setline effort and 186 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 2001. A total of 390 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 12 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 36.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 42 cm to 307 cm and averaged 107 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 66 cm to 235 cm and averaged 160 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon <60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 2,483 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,208-7,477. An additional 10 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags during 2001. The locations of 17 radio-tagged white sturgeon were monitored in 2001. The movement of these fish ranged from 38.6 km (24 miles) downstream to 54.7 km (34 miles) upstream; however, 62.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 km (0.5 mile). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P<0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 30 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir had a higher relative weight factor than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 309 aged white sturgeon. The results suggest fish are currently growing faster than fish historically inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. A total of 14 white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River in 2001.

  9. City of Greensburg, Kansas (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |CityCity ofCity ofCityCity

  10. Assessment of Biomass Pelletization Options for Greensburg, Kansas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from Tarasa U.S.LLC |AquionMr.August 4, 2011Assessment

  11. Greensburg, Kansas: A Better, Greener Place to Live (Revised) (Brochure) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGoGreatGreenDepartment of Energy

  12. Kansas Business Rebuilds Greener After Destruction | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department's Commercial Building Initiative to speed development and market adoption of green building technologies. The public-private collaboration between John Deere and DOE...

  13. Gila to North Gila Transmission Line Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the new APS line. Western's land action entails acquiring up to an additional 50 feet right-of-way adjacent to the existing Gila Knob ROW, transferring a portion of the Gila...

  14. Line Rebuild, Relocation and Substation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices toLee

  15. Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC -9Microwave Plasma93

  16. A rhetorical investigation of Triumph of the Will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schadler, Joseph Michael

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and strengthening belief in the successes of one's own military forces. Together, the potential of the film to affect the beliefs and opinions of a nation was understood and utilized. Leif Furhammar and Folke Issakson remark that "although films serving the cause...

  17. Italian Renaissance Food-Fashioning or The Triumph of Greens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannetti, Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the God of poetry, Apollo, as very harsh, on the order ofprecise moment, the god Apollo makes an appearance, incitingsuffer. The justification Apollo gives for increasing the

  18. Shaoyang Triumph Billion Yuzitang Power Station | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AGShandong Lusa NewInformation ShanxiShaowuSJMERI

  19. Meadowlark House

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Greensburg GreenTown Chain of Eco-Homes Meadowlark House in Greensburg, Kansas.

  20. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartmentCounselGlassGreenHunter BiodieselGreeningEnergy

  1. Greensburg, Kansas--A Better, Greener Place to Live | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder JumpIowa:Greenport, New York:

  2. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGoGreatGreen

  3. NREL Helps Greensburg Set the Model for Green Communities (Fact Sheet),

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock,DepartmentsensorElectrolysis

  4. Rebuilding the American Auto Industry | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    was the right choice -- and the future is bright. Addthis Related Articles Fisker, Tesla, and American Auto Innovation Moniz: Tesla Repayment Shows the Strength of Energy...

  5. 2014 HAC Rural Housing Conference: Retool, Rebuild, Renew

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The biennial HAC Rural Housing Conference brings together stakeholders in the field of rural affordable housing from local nonprofits, federal agencies, Congress, state and local governments, and...

  6. Tectonic studies in Beichuan : rebuilding the Beichuan Middle School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christopher (Christopher Jordon)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In his essay, Studies in Tectonic Culture, Kenneth Frampton asserts that the built environment is "first and foremost a construction, and only later an abstract discourse." Building upon this logic, this thesis asks how ...

  7. Answering the bell : rebuilding New Orleans around neighborhood schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knudsen, Seth (Seth Cunningham)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schools are one of the most important and visible infrastructure elements in residential neighborhoods, given their large physical presence and the social network that they represent. A review of real estate, sociology, ...

  8. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    As the President said, there would be zero tolerance for red tape. We took that to heart. After human health and safety, restoring power and our fuel supplies was a top...

  9. Living in Arverne : rebuilding the experience of landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Elizabeth Rose, 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How do we approach the inhabitation of a landscape? Starting with an understanding of the ecological system, the design acts as an enabler to the landscape, both at the scale of the urban plan and at the scale of the ...

  10. Uncommon ground : property, coordination, and rebuilding New Orleans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Paul (Paul Burleson)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following Hurricane Katrina, difficult decisions must be made by both government and investors with respect to reconstitution of New Orleans' housing stock and neighborhoods. For investors, risk and uncertainty abound. For ...

  11. Overview of the Rebuild America Program in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage. Medical air scheduling, modify EMS controls. Install EMS systems, DDC EMS conversion, replace EMS. Control room temperature via EMS, repair and reactivate EMS. connect . - HI: Controls I individual rooftop unih, convert HVAC unih to central... . - . , - . . > . . . ballasts, use high eff~cien ballasts and lamps. L4: Exit signs I Replace exit light fixtures, energy elficient exit lights. change exit lights to LZ: Fixture changdreflectors L3: Uoerade photocells. Replaedremove lamps/Fixtures, convert incandescent...

  12. Rebuilding your flooded home: Guidelines for incorporating energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repairs to your flood-damaged home can add energy efficiency at the same time you address pressing structural needs, mainly by replacing and upgrading insulation in walls and floors, and checking your foundation for flood damage. Many energy efficiency options are available to you today that may not have been widely available when you built your house even if that was only a few years ago. Cost-effectiveness depends on several factors, including cost of fuel and materials, efficiency levels of the structure and components, and climate. This booklet offers some general tips to improve the efficiency of your home`s shell and equipment. Additional information on any issue covered in this booklet is available from various agencies within or near your community, including your state energy office, local community action agency, utilities, Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offices.

  13. EIS-0483: Estes to Flatiron Substation Transmission Lines Rebuild Project,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment ofStatement | Department ofLarimer

  14. EIS-0502: Hot Springs to Anaconda Transmission Line Rebuild Project,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartmentDepartmentStatement | Department of EnergyFERCMontana

  15. EECBG Success Story: Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River SiteDepartment ofDepartmentPowerDepartment of

  16. Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony of SecretaryBetweenTheMarch 2,the

  17. Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeriesDepartment of Energyof Energy Together

  18. Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowC -9Microwave

  19. Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|ofEvents »SSLEnergy WorkersDepartment ofRoad Map

  20. Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,PastRadiation LossesReducing Energy

  1. Alvey-Fairview No.1, 230 kV Rebuild

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta Fe Metro

  2. The Supreme Triumph of the Surgeon's Art': Narrative History of Endocrine Surgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiger, Martha A.; Shen, Wen T.; Felger, Erin A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear accident as childrenis estimated that the Chernobyl fallout will produce 16,0002 Cave, A. J. E. , 34, 35 Chernobyl nuclear accident, 155

  3. 3-D field computation: The near-triumph of commerical codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, L.R.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, more and more of those who design and analyze magnets and other devices are using commercial codes rather than developing their own. This paper considers the commercial codes and the features available with them. Other recent trends with 3-D field computation include parallel computation and visualization methods such as virtual reality systems.

  4. The triumph of pragmatism: Nigeria's role in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimah, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formed in 1960, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) became a key participant in the international oil industry after the so-called oil shock in the early 1970s. OPEC's power in world trade increased tremendously during the 1970s and, as oil prices skyrocketed, literature on OPEC proliferated. Although OPEC's demise has often been predicted since its creation; it has, however, endured. Thus study examines OPEC from distinct vantage points: those of regime theory, oligopoly models, and cartel theory. The aim is to gain insight into the activities of the organization as a whole and in terms of the behavior of one of its members, the Government of Nigeria. The objective is to ascertain which of these theories, or aspects of the theories, best describes OPEC's activities and Nigeria's actions as a member. The review of OPEC and Nigeria's role in its demonstrates that OPEC is difficult to classify. It is more than anything, a fluid coalition of Third World countries seeking to improve their national economies by ensuring better prices for crude oil, their chief export product; and helping other Third World countries focus global awareness on the chronic political and economic inequities in the international system. Therefore, OPEC and Nigeria's role is best explained by coalition theory.

  5. Triumph or Tragedy? A Brief History of Water Management in Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    /quantity of ground water by replenishing aquifers. 2. To impound floodwaters to supply irrigation systems in nearby Conservation Drip Irrigation Makes Effluent Reuse Easy #12;Desert Agriculture FAO 17% of world's farmland is irrigated 4% in Africa. irrigation! #12;#12;Past and Present Projected Israeli Water Supply (in

  6. Kiowa County Commons Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Kiowa County Commons Building in Greensburg, Kansas.

  7. Engineering work plan for PFP criticality alarm panel first unit re-build

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clem, W.E.

    1994-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the first step in increasing the quality, reliability, and ease of maintenance of the nine Criticality Alarm Panels (CAP) at PFP. Development control practices and guidelines of WHC-CM-6-1, EP-2.4 and WHC-IP-1026, EPG-2.4 are applied to develop a prototype of a replacement Criticality Alarm Panel (CAP) with facility-use potential. During the development of the prototype CAP, the design requirements of all of PFP`s nine CAPs are considered to develop standardized hardware and detailed design drawings that are tailored to PFP maintenance needs. Increased quality and reliability is achieved through quality hardware, proven technology and design techniques, and the use of the Class 1E workmanship standards of WHC-CM-8-1. The end result of the work described by this work plan is a verified/read-to-install replacement for CAP Z4 and verified/released H-2 drawings that are formatted such that they can easily be replicated when producing design drawings for the other eight CAPs.

  8. DOE/EA-1342: Shelton-Kitsap Transmission Line Rebuild Final Environmen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document request line: 800-622-4520. It is also available at the BPA, Environment, Fish & Wildlife website: www.efw.bpa.gov. For Further Information, Contact: Dawn R. Boorse -...

  9. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Help Rebuild Homes in New...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    being constructed in the wake of the hurricane were 15-30 percent better than required by code. NREL also helped city officials develop the Energy Smart New Orleans Plan, which...

  10. Monitoring and Verification Procedures Used in the Texas LoanSTAR and Rebuild America Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farouz, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buildings that receive energy conservation retrofits, including procedures that are used for measuring energy savings in buildings where hourly pre-retrofit and post-retrofit whole-building data have been collected; buildings where monthly pre...

  11. Rebuilding After Katrina: A Population-Based Study of Labor and Human Rights in New Orleans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Laurel; Pham, Phuong N; Stover, Eric; Vinck, Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    April 26, 2006). Ibid. United Nations Global Compact,Global Compact, The Ten Principles, July 26, 2000. http://guarantees. 2 The UN Global Compact initiative to promote

  12. Adventures in Architectural Symbolism: The Use and Misuse of Rebuilding Programs in Ancient Rome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahotsky, Brian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the sites of the Theater of Marcellus, the Temple of Jupiterthe stage at the Theater of Marcellus, allowing it to reopen

  13. Rebuilding for Sustainability: Spatial Analysis of Bolivar Peninsula after Hurricane Ike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subasinghe Arachchilage Don, Chamila Tharanga

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    should be compromised (Al-Nammari, 2006; Berke & Beatley, 1997; Daher, 2000; Giddings, 2000; Hardy & Beeton, 2001; Lefevre, 2000; Mileti, 1999; NHRAIC, 2001; Rothrock, 2000). The 1987 Brundtland Commission report, Our Common Future, defines...), and the reconstruction two period (commemorative) (Berke & Beatley, 1997; Haas, Kates, & Bowden, 1978 However, for the purpose of this research study, the reconstruction phase is referred to as the time needed to repair a dwelling or a settlement after a hurricane...

  14. EA-1912: Midway-Benton No. 1 Rebuild Project, near town of Desert Aire,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphi AutomotiveLinac CoherentBenton County, WA |

  15. EA-1951: Midway-Moxee Rebuild and Midway-Grandview Upgrade Transmission

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinalLine, Benton and Yakima

  16. EA-1952: Lane-Wendson No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Lane County,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinalLine, Benton and

  17. EA-1961: Kalispell-Kerr Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Kalispell and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased onFinalLine,DOEPolson, Montana |

  18. EA-1967: Hills Creek-Lookout Point Transmission Line Rebuild, Lane County,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedThe U.S. Department ofOregon |

  19. EA-1972: Electric District 2 to Saguaro No. 2 Transmission Line Rebuild,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedThe U.S.Pinal County, Arizona |

  20. EA-1981: Bonneville-Hood River Transmission Line Rebuild, Multnomah and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedTheCounty, Idaho | Department

  1. EA-1987: Parker-Headgate Rock and Parker-Bouse Rebuild Project, Arizona and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBasedTheCounty,

  2. DOE Announces Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » ContactDepartment of Energy| Department

  3. Rebuilding After Disaster: Going Green from the Ground Up | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook iconQuito,JumpReaction Systems Engineering

  4. DOE Tour of Zero: The Candlewood Hills Rebuild by BPC Green Builders |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics workDepartment of

  5. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Help Rebuild Homes in New Orleans on

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E Ambassadors and C3EDepartment3 AnnualANNOUNCEMENT OFandVeterans

  6. NREL: Technology Deployment - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Assistance: The DOENREL Approach NREL Helps Greensburg Set the Model for Green Communities Renewable Energy Community: Key Elements Federal Agencies Department of...

  7. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideosre-building-greensburg Current search Search found 1 item Video Remove Video filter...

  8. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideosre-building-greensburg Download Build a Pizza Box Solar Oven Check out this...

  9. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideosre-building-greensburg Current search Search found 1 item National Security + Safety...

  10. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    panels and wind turbines, after a devastating tornado in 2007. http:energy.goveerevideosre-building-greensburg Current search Search found 1 item Emergency Response &...

  11. I35W collapse, rebuild, and structural health monitoring - challenges associated with structural health monitoring of bridge systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, C. E.; Hedegaard, B.; Shield, C. K.; Stolarski, H. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    During evening rush hour traffic on August 1, 2007, the major interstate highway bridge carrying I35W over the Mississippi River in Minneapolis catastrophically failed, tragically taking the lives of thirteen people and injuring many more. The steel truss bridge, constructed in 1967, was undergoing deck reconstruction during the collapse, and was estimated to carry more than 140,000 vehicles daily. This tragedy generated great interest in employment of structural health monitoring systems. The I35W St. Anthony Falls Bridge, a post-tensioned concrete box bridge constructed to replace the collapsed steel truss bridge, contains over 500 instruments to monitor the structural behavior. Numerical models of the bridge are being developed and calibrated to the collected data obtained from truck load tests and thermal effects. The data obtained over the first few years of monitoring are being correlated with the calibrated models and used to develop the baseline bridge behavior. This information is being used to develop a system to monitor and interpret the long-term behavior of the bridge. This paper describes the instrumentation, preliminary results from the data and model calibration, the plan for developing long-term monitoring capabilities, and the challenges associated with structural health monitoring of bridge systems. In addition, opportunities and directions for future research required to fully realize the objectives of structural health monitoring are described.

  12. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  13. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Scott R.; Tuell, Michael A. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were captured, marked, and population data were collected in the Snake River between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River. A total of 13,785 hours of setline effort and 389 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1998. Of the 278 white sturgeon captured in the Snake River, 238 were marked for future identification. Three sturgeon were captured in the Salmon River and none were captured in the Clearwater River. Since 1997, 6.9% of the tagged fish have been recovered. Movement of recaptured white sturgeon ranged from 98.5 kilometers downstream to 60.7 kilometers upstream, however, less than 25% of the fish moved more than 16 kilometers (10 miles). In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 51.5 cm to 286 cm and averaged 118.9 cm. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). In addition, the proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 37% since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River.

  14. The US needs a new soft era By focusing on science and education, America can rebuild its relations with the Arab world.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    society and are the ones whom Barack Obama's Cairo initiative, "to seek a new beginning between the United States and Muslims around the world ... based upon mutual interest and mutual respect", must motivate there was a woman. In Alexandria my friends were Christians and Muslims. For my generation, America was not exactly

  15. Microsoft Word - PR 01 13 BPA to meet with public for feedback on proposed rebuild of 71-year-old transmission line

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE LMI-EFRCAddendum 1April1 Page3 Page 1 BPA1 13

  16. A review of "Domestic Arrangements in Early Modern England." by Kari McBride ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karen L. Raber

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    so much worthy food for thought that it would be merely ill-mannered to quibble over minor ingredients in the recipe. Anthony Miller. Roman Triumphs and Early Modern English Culture. Houndmills and New York: Palgrave, 2001. vii + 223 pp. + 7 illus... wanted breath, / Yet he should ride in tryumph ouer death.? Upon reading Anthony Miller?s Roman Triumphs and Early Modern English Culture, one can appreciate a further reason for Henry?s funeral triumph. Originating in Roman ceremonial displays...

  17. GEOL 5303 Project Presentations Presenter name: ______________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    pertinent materials. 10 7 4 0 Conclusion: What did you learn? Presenter summarizes total project (triumphsGEOL 5303 Project Presentations Presenter name: ______________________________________________ Project title: ___________________________________________________________ Project content Superb

  18. "Roses are Rosas": Juan Gmez-Quiones A Chicano Poet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tovar, Ins H.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    triumphs overexperience. the poet pronounces that come, theabrupt "Por Vida" whereby the poet indicales his recognitionpersonal view from Ihe poet shows US a woman characterized

  19. Above Sea: Modern and Contemporary Art from the Ruins of Shanghai's New Heaven on Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jenny Grace

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    womens liberation, anti-feudalism, the re-examination ofbourgeois imperialism and feudalism), its style (easilysocialism triumph over feudalism, imperialism, capitalism,

  20. Futurism in Venice, Crisis and la musica dellavvenire, 1924*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Harriet

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to win the race with cinematography. 95 Depero too hadAfter asking Why does cinematography triumph? despiteand transforms rapidly. Cinematography is varied and rich,

  1. Why Has the Number of International Non-Governmental Organizations Exploded since 1960?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Edward A L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 April 2010. Rebuilding Haiti: Dreaming beyond the rubble.A few months after the Haiti earthquake, the Republic of

  2. 22681

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    efficiency and standards Financing energy programs Rating and labeling Bioenergy and biobased products Fuel cells Rebuild America Biomass power ...

  3. CITIES AND MILEAGE IN PA Abingdon Heights 252

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Mifflin SD 85 Grantham 95 Granvtille 95 Greensburg 400 Grove City 40 HAAC (Harrisburg) 88 Hamburg 100 Hanover 96 Harleyville 132 Harrisburg 90 Harrisburg Airport 70 Harrisburg Univ. Center (Dixon Center) 97 Philadelphia Airport 160 Philadelphia-Harrisburg 204 Phoenixville 100 Pittsburgh 528 Pittstown 251 Plymouth

  4. University of Pittsburgh Fact Book 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    Universities University Maps Pittsburgh Campus Map, 2005-06 Johnstown Campus Map, 2005-06 Greensburg Campus Map, 2005-06 Titusville Campus Map, 2005-06 Bradford Campus Map, 2005-06 UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATION Membership of the Board of Trustees, 2005-06 University Officers Organization Charts University Officers Chancellor

  5. Evaluation of Delisting Criteria and Rebuilding Schedules for Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook, Fall Chinook and Sockeye Salmon : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 10 of 11.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, Steven P.; Neeley, Doug

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a framework for distinguishing healthy and threatened populations, and we analyze specific criteria by which these terms can be measured for threatened populations of salmon in the Snake River. We review reports and analyze existing data on listed populations of salmon in the Snake River to establish a framework for two stages of the recovery process: (1) defining de-listing criteria, and (2) estimating the percentage increase in survival that will be necessary for recovery of the population within specified time frames, given the de-listing criteria that must be achieved. We develop and apply a simplified population model to estimate the percentage improvement in survival that will be necessary to achieve different rates of recovery. We considered five main concepts identifying de-listing criteria: (1) minimum population size, (2) rates of population change, (3) number of population subunits, (4) survival rates, and (5) driving variables. In considering minimum population size, we conclude that high variation in survival rates poses a substantially greater probability of causing extinction than does loss of genetic variation. Distinct population subunits exist and affect both the genetic variability of the population and the dynamics of population decline and growth. We distinguish between two types of population subunits, (1) genetic and (2) geographic, and we give examples of their effects on population recovery.

  6. Why Aid Does Work Aid works, when it is practical, targeted, science-based and measurable.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    diseases such as polio, diphtheria, and measles. These clear aid triumphs have saved the lives of millions Africa finally to escape from the trap of extreme poverty. Ironically, when under-financed and flawed aid

  7. Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

  8. SWORDS INTO PLOUGHSHARES: The Struggle to Build an Ordered Community of Liberty on the southeast Kansas Frontier 1867-1876

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John N.

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a study of the settlement of southeast Kansas in the years immediately following the Civil War. It begins with the first settlers who arrived in 1867 and concludes with the triumph of the settlers in ...

  9. Facades of modernity : image, performance, and transformation in the Egyptian metropolis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elshahed, Mohamed (Mohamed Kamal)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shifting political, social and cultural landscapes in contemporary Cairo with the triumph of Neolibralism are defining the city's modem heritage. In order to create a narrative of transformation of architectural production ...

  10. Essays on Structural Estimation in the European Car Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noton Norambuena, Carlos Esteban

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each firm can have several brands (for example BMW producesbrands BMW and since 1994 also the brand Rover-Triumph).Simca DAF US Audi Korea BMW MCC Mercedes Spain Princess

  11. Varieties of Cotton for Central East Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, H. F. (Harry Forrest); McNess, George Thomas

    1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    staple. Wannamaker-Cleveland was sec- ~nd in yield with a higher percentage of lint and a longer staple than Ferguson Roundnose. Mebane Triumph, 3latchless Big Boll, and Lone Star followed in the order named in yield of lint per acre. It is notice... us on Roundnose. .... Wannamaker-Cleveland. Mehane Triumph.. ......... ........ Matchless Big Boll. Lone Star. ................ Surecrop .................. ........... Union Bi Boll.. ........ ~levelanf~ig Boll. Webb...

  12. CX-010887: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Area Power Administration (WAPA) proposes to rebuild approximately 8 miles of transmission lines west of the town of Kimball, in Kimball County, Nebraska. CX-010887.pdf More...

  13. Planning and Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates Planning Ten-Year Capital Program Projects Lovell-Yellowtail Transmission Line Rebuild project Studies WACM Wind production summary overview (Oct. 2006)...

  14. Managements Discussion and Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy and new technologies. The agency funds regional efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Columbia River...

  15. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Jocelyn AugustinoFEMA. Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Energy Department Secretary Steven Chu recounts his meeting with utility crews at the front...

  16. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nath (2000). Improve Steam Turbine Efficiency. HydrocarbonOIT (1999). Rebuilding steam turbine generator reduces costscan be driven by a steam turbine or an electric motor. Hot

  17. Energy Department Launches Microgrid Competition to Support Resiliency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    system." The Microgrid 2014 MVP Challenge builds on efforts by the Sandy Rebuilding Task Force to harness innovation in energy infrastructure and help communities become more...

  18. EIS-0457: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0457: EPA Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties,...

  19. EIS-0457: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EPA announces the availability the Final EIS that evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild a 32-mile section of the...

  20. EA-1366: Preliminary Environmental Assessment | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power Administration proposes to rebuild the first 17 miles of the Santiam-Chemawa transmission line from Santiam Substation to the line's connection to Portland General...

  1. EA-1456: Finding of No Signficant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyanne Transmission Line Rebuild Project Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming and Weld County, Colorado

  2. LARRY ZIMMER 123 Loch Levin Lane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    : equipment utilization studies, economic justification, process reliability improvements, production line process for equipment rebuilder (result was an 80% capacity increase with no additions to current facility

  3. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

  4. INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION SECTION 1 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 1-13 September 13, 1995 to 6 percent by 2015 to rebuild weak fish and wildlife populations, the Council's program calls for participation and funding funding and staffing fish and wildlife rebuilding measures, or run the almost certain risk

  5. Redesigning rural life : relocation and In Situ urbanization in a Shandong village by Saul Kriger Wilson.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Saul Kriger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chinese government's attempts to improve village public service provision, limit the loss of arable land, and coordinate urbanization have converged in land readjustment schemes to rebuild some villages as more densely ...

  6. EA-1456: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cheyenne- Miracle Mile (CH-MM) and Ault-Cheyenne (AU-CH) 115 kilovolt (115-kV ) transmission lines to 230-kV. The proposed project consists of rebuilding these transmission lines...

  7. EcoCAR Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since childhood, Lynn Gantt has had a deep seeded passion for cars and the mechanics that drive them. The Virginia native spent his weekends rebuilding antique tractors with his dad to race at...

  8. REINTEGRATINGBOSNIA TENYEARSAFTERTHEDAYTONAGREEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    REINTEGRATINGBOSNIA TENYEARSAFTERTHEDAYTONAGREEMENT Reintegrating Bosnia: Ten Years after Reintegrating Bosnia: Ten Years after the Dayton Agreement 1636 SSWB/International Institute, 1080 S. University Includes a keynote address on human rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina and sessions on Rebuilding Communities

  9. Did the Great Recession Wipe Out a Decade of Economic Progress in Colorado?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Did the Great Recession Wipe Out a Decade of Economic Associate Professor of Economics Michael Marturana Research Economist Colorado rebuild. To make better decisions about Colorado's open economic path

  10. CX-012360: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cowlitz Tap Rebuild and Access Road Maintenance CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.24, B4.13 Date: 06/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. Burialand : ritual infrastructure for public amenity in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Li, M. Arch. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the nature of burial place as a daily public space to mourn people's loss and celebrate their life in the ordinary cities. It seeks a new architectural typology of cemetery to rebuild a relationship ...

  12. Understanding place after Katrina : predatory planning and cultural resistance in New Orleans Trem Neighborhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagel, Kiara L

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fate of New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina is uncertain. The rebuilding of the Gulf Coast presents the nation with the most massive redevelopment project in a single location ever. Reminiscent of the ...

  13. Rolling contact orthopaedic joint design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slocum, Alexander Henry, Jr

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arthroplasty, the practice of rebuilding diseased biological joints using engineering materials, is often used to treat severe arthritis of the knee and hip. Prosthetic joints have been created in a "biomimetic" manner to ...

  14. Microsoft Word - xx xx 13 Midway pole replacement news release...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    07 13 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 CONTACT: Mike Hansen, 503-230-4328 or 503-230-5131 BPA to hold public meeting on proposed rebuild...

  15. October 6, 2006 Tom Karier, Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    subbasin plans feature these species. Failure to protect, mitigate, and enhance the full suite of affected populations and is not on track to rebuild populations to five million fish above Bonneville Dam by 2025

  16. Whose city? Whose schools? : a case study of civic engagement and planning "from below" to promote education equity in New Orleans public schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tahbildar, Dulari

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How and why have ordinary citizens claimed their stake in the process of rebuilding public education in post-Katrina New Orleans, and what are the lessons for planning in post-disaster contexts? This paper investigates ...

  17. The Enbridge "Steam Saver" Program: Steam Boiler Plant Efficiency-Update to Year End 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, B.; Johnson, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or refractory. Improve condensate return. Add an Oxygen trim system Repair heat exchangers to permit condensate return.. Replace or re-build the boiler control system. Fix steam leaks. Repair a defective economizer. Implement a pressurized condensate...

  18. Plant-Wide Energy Conservation Program Yields Impressive Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlkes, R. P.; Zupko, A. J.; Adams, J. W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to heating system and process changes by Installing improved boiler control systems and Initiating operator training programs. ? When rebuilding heat treating equipment, ceramic fiber insulation was used, yielding reduced heat losses and faster...

  19. Microsoft Word - CX-B3S4-WhiteBluffs_Benton-B3S4_Reroute_FY14...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.13 Upgrading and rebuilding existing powerlines Location: Benton County, Washington; Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Pasco District. See table below...

  20. National Disaster Resilience Competition Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Communities recovering from natural disasters have an important choice: rebuild damaged areas as they were, or put investments and policy changes in place that help them to be more resilient to...

  1. Investigation of contemporary problems and practices in post-hurricane reconstruction in the commercial sector of the southeast region of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharjee, Suchayita S.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis addresses the problems faced by contractors during the recovery and rebuilding process after hurricanes that struck the southeast region of the United States in 2004-2005 hurricane seasons. It also deals with the practices they normally...

  2. Obtaining Disaster Assistance for Public Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Greg

    2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    County and municipal governments, as well as certain private non-profit organizations, may qualify for assistance in rebuilding public infrastructure after a natural disaster. This leaflet details the assistance programs available from the Federal...

  3. LongviewCowlitzFiberCX

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    new ground disturbance. To accommodate the additional weight of the fiber cable on the transmission line, BPA would need to rebuild eight towers to a higher pole class: 110, 2...

  4. The Architecture of Homelessness: Space, Marginality, and Exile in Modern French and Japanese Literature and Film

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correia, Jane Ramey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. Pinkney, David H. Napoleon III and the rebuilding ofthat of Meiji Japan and of Napoleon IIIs Second Empire inhis narratives: Louis-Napoleons coup dtat is the backdrop

  5. CX-012404: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Palisades-Swan Valley Transmission Line Rebuild CX(s) Applied: B4.13 Date: 06/30/2014 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. Design of a robot for gait rehabilitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosecker, Caitlyn Joyce

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to walk is important for independent living and when this capacity is affected by injury, gait therapy is the traditional approach to re-train the nervous system, to re-build muscle strength, to improve balance, ...

  7. Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................... 35 03 Rebuilding Coal Power Plants to Biomass.......................................................................................................................... 27 01 Advanced Pulverized Fuel Power PlantTechnology Data for Energy Plants June 2010 #12;ISBNwww: 978-87-7844-857-6 #12;2 Table of contents

  8. Extensive Renovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When renovations to a Federal facility are extensiveeither a full building addition or taking the original facility down-to-stud and rebuilding it entirelythe process is much closer to the design...

  9. Microsoft Word - PR 31 13 Hills Creek-Lookout Public Meeting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31 13 Bonneville Power Administration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE August 21, 2013 CONTACT: Teresa Waugh, 503-230-7536 or 503-230-5131 Input sought on rebuild of aging transmission line...

  10. Microsoft Word - PR 22 13 Kalispell-Kerr Public Meeting w photo...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 13 Bonneville Power Administration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 29, 2013 CONTACT: Teresa Waugh, 503-230-7536 or 503-230-5131 BPA to meet with public on proposed rebuild of...

  11. Building on lessons learned : too high hopes without HOPE VI?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kristen J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By providing substantial grants to public housing authorities to demolish and rebuild distressed public housing and provide services to public housing residents, the HOPE VI program has helped transform these developments ...

  12. PROJECT GOALS Promote the ideas of sustainable living through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tanks installation of drip irrigation systems rebuilding the herb spiral establishing an orchard installing a pump for the water tanks installing a timer system for the drip irrigation extending

  13. Builders of a Nation: Womens Experiences in Postwar Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Barbara

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? 45 Builders of a Nation: Womens Experiences in Postwar Germany Barbara Brennan The German women who survived the Second World War are often characterized by the familiar images of long lines of women digging the country out from... underneath the rubble. However, their contributions to the rebuilding of Germany reach much further than the act of physically rebuilding the country. The sacrifices required of them for the survival their families and themselves were tremendous...

  14. The Geometry Of War The Geometry Of War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslaksen, Helmer

    The Geometry Of War 1 #12;The Geometry Of War GEM1518K Mathematics in Arts &Architecture Presenting : The Geometry Of War Prepared by: 1) Linda Tjoe Matriculation number: U017984E 2) Lince Salim Matriculation017997 2 #12;The Geometry Of War Contents Page(s) Introduction 1 1.1 Early Canon 2 1.2 The Triumph

  15. Zap! Issue 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the output of his 'Highland Mist' dispenser. I mlit;t admit Scott's achievement was a triumph of inver.i:ivE: skil1. It cO/i,bined the innocent ap])earance of an early domestic re.dio with the effectiv'nf'ss of a medieval thumb scrf'VI. Now, how...

  16. A review of "Galileo in Rome: The Rise and Fall of a Troublesome Genius" by William R. Shea and Mariano Artigas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alessandro Giostra

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Galileo left Rome in April 1611 and in a letter to the Florentine grand duke sent by Cardinal Francesco Maria del Monte his triumph was made clear. In the third chapter, ?Roman Clouds? (49-93), the authors high- light the events that led to the first...

  17. A. World Summit on Sustainable Development : A First Critical Assessment, here p. 1-3 B. Lecture at the University of Bonn, BIMUN/Bonn International Model United Nations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Sven Oliver

    A. World Summit on Sustainable Development : A First Critical Assessment, here p. 1-3 B. Lecture / NACHLESE World Summit on Sustainable Development: A First Critical Assessment By Prof. Dr. Uwe Holtz on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg was a failure, an opportunity wasted, the triumph of "hard" neo

  18. WHAT ELSE IS How uses, not innovations, drive human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapin, Steven

    sterling silver. In front of me is a wooden bookstand, made for me by a talented friend and festooned of progress: every so often, it seems, an innovation--the steam engine, electricity, computers--brings a new across the sky." Or the triumph of theoretical physics and metallurgical engineering at Hiroshima

  19. Copyright 2005 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London, England)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2005 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London, England) July 11, 2005 Monday London Edition 1 SECTION: COMMENT; Pg. 19 LENGTH: 922 words HEADLINE: Hope and generosity can triumph, nudged the world closer to this prospect. With the backdrop of the bombs in London, the Gleneagles

  20. phenix.mr_rosetta: a new tool for difficult molecular replacement problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Read, Randy [UNIV OF CAMBRIDGE; De Maio, Frank [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Baker, David [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX development team is working with the Baker laboratory at the University of Washington to combine the power of Rosetta structure modeling with PHENIX automated molecular replacement (MR), model-building, density modification, and refinement. The basic idea is to find MR solutions with phenix. automr, rebuild them with Rosetta, including electron density map information, then rebuild those models with phenix. autobuild. The combination of Rosetta rebuilding and phenix rebuilding is the key part of this method. MR solutions are found with phenix. automr (Phaser), scored with LLG (optionally following Rosetta relaxation), the best solutions are picked and rebuilt with Rosetta including map information, the resulting models are scored with Rosetta, and then rescored with LLG, and the top models are rebuilt with phenix. autobuild. It can be very useful for cases where the search model used in molecular replacement is slightly too distant to rebuild successfully with phenix. autobuild. It can also be useful in cases where the model is too distant to even find a molecular replacement solution, and prerefinement with Rosetta can yield an improved search model.

  1. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix E: Transmission Reinforcement Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five transmission line options and several reactive (voltage support) options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAERP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. These options were derived from earlier study work that was summarized in Puget Sound Reinforcement Transmission Options'' and New Cross Mountain Transmission Line Alternative: The Crosstie'', which are attached. The initial Transmission Options study report recognized the value to system performance of adding an entirely new circuit rather than rebuilding an existing one. However, siting realities require that rebuild options be considered. Typically, the most attractive rebuild options would be the lowest capacity (lowest voltage) circuits. But because of corridor location, length and terminal proximity, the rebuild options listed below appear to be the most promising. Schematic diagrams and QV Curves of each option are also attached. It should be noted that Snoqualmie and Echo Lake refer to the same station east of Puget Sound and Naneum and Kittitas refer to the same station in the Ellensburg area. 100 figs., 20 tabs.

  2. A Magazine of Nature: "Garden and Forest" and the Rise of American Environmental Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Shen

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ; in 1890, 164,000 miles; and in 1900, 193,000 miles. The spreading railroad system made the transportation of raw materials and products go farther and faster. The major triumph of the second industrial revolution?the wide application of electric power... the same income and getting along in harmony. Science and technology progressed to meet human needs and enhance their happiness, and individual freedom was secured by improvement in the power of production. Looking backward, however, West clearly...

  3. Trafalgar Refought: The Professional and Cultural Memory of Horatio Nelson During Britains Navalist Era, 1880-1914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesario, Bradley

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . The traditional military history approach, in-depth studies of Nelson?s battles, remained widespread, with books by Nicholas Tracy in 1996, Tim Clayton and Phil Craig in 2004, and separate contributions by Roy Adkins, Nicholas Best, and Colin White in 2005... (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 4 Nicholas Tracy, Nelson?s Battles: The Triumph of British Seapower (Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2008; originally printed 1996); Tim Clayton and Phil Craig, Trafalgar: The Men, the Battle, the Storm (London...

  4. Varieties of Cotton for East Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killough, D. T. (David Thornton); McNess, George Thomas

    1927-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Variety Roberts Big Boll. . Truitt. ........... ......... Crowder. Mebane Triumph.. Cook ............ Peterkin. ......... ....... Lone Star. ........ Crenshaw. Cleveland Big Boll Durango ......... Source of Seed * N L Willett Seed CO: Augusta... Boykin, Mebane, Cliett, Kasch, Truitt, Lone Star, Rowden, and Acala, are well adapted to this section of the state. These higher-yielding varieties are characterized by medium- to large-sized bolls; by percentages of lint rang- ing from 33.1 to 39...

  5. Cotton Variety Experiments at Substation No. 2, Troup.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hotchkiss, W. S.; Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ...................... ............................ Lone Star .................... Hawkln's Prolific.. .................. Cleveland Big Boll.. Lone Star ............................. Percentage of lint Results in 1917 No. of bolls per lb. Fifty-three varieties were tested in 1917, and data... Type Mebane or Triumph Truitt Rowden Lone Star Acala Half and Half The varieties tested each year are arranged in the tables according to their rank in yield of lint cotton. Tables 3 to 6, inclusive, give information on the percentage of lint...

  6. Hortus Imaginum: Essays in Western Art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Plan of San Simpliciano (Basilica Virginum), Milan (after Borroni) 13. Plan of San Lorenzo, Milan (first project) 14. Plan of the Chapel of San Vittore, Milan (after Verzone) 15. Door of exterior portal, south aisle, Augsburg Cathedral, detail... of Charles V (Italian), 1552. Bologna, Museo Civico 62. Juan de Orea, Triumph of Peace, relief, c. 1551. Granada, Alhambra, west facade of the Palace of Charles V (Photo: Mas) 63. Juan de Orea, Battle of Muhlberg, relief, c. 1552. Granada, Alhambra, west...

  7. Transitional relief housing for tsunami victims of Tamil Nadu, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Shauna

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of the recent tsunami that swept across Asia, there is a dire need to salvage and rebuild the lives and livelihoods that were swept away. The aim of this thesis project is to design and model a transitional ...

  8. SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK SECTION 2 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM 2-4 September 13, 1995 #12;SECTION 2 SYSTEMWIDE GOAL AND FRAMEWORK September 13, 1995 2-4 FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM determine and rebuilding of weak native fish stocks and those stocks that are resident fish substitutions under

  9. PROTECTED AREAS AMENDMENTS AND.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as critical fish and wildlife habitat. The "protected areas" amendment is a major step in the Council's efforts to rebuild fish and wildlife populations that have been damaged by hydroelectric development. Low also imposed significant costs. The Northwest's fish and wildlife have suffered extensive losses

  10. Resource Stewardship Tips for 2012 Recreational Red Snapper Season

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    trying to catch a bigger fish may have unintended consequences when water temperatures approach the mid creating a thermocline. The result is temperature shock and possibly death for the fish which remains rebuild and are reflected by the numerous large fish landed. Red Snapper dominate many Gulf of Mexico

  11. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition. Quarterly report No. 7, February 1, 1989--April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor has been designed in order to retard the formation of nitrogen oxides by injection of reburning fuel. The design and the rebuilding of the new combustor was completed. Several new features were incorporated in the new design so that it would last longer. The design and construction of the furnace are discussed in this report. (VC)

  12. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1989-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor has been designed in order to retard the formation of nitrogen oxides by injection of reburning fuel. The design and the rebuilding of the new combustor was completed. Several new features were incorporated in the new design so that it would last longer. The design and construction of the furnace are discussed in this report. (VC)

  13. Regional Summary Pacific Management Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Bocaccio, Pacific ocean perch, cowcod, and darkblotched and widow rockfish are currently in rebuildingRegional Summary Pacific Management Context The Pacific Region includes California, Oregon, and Washington. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC

  14. OUR MISSION Advance the observational and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    as the Commonwealth Solar Observatory in 1924. During the Second World War, it was the design and prototype centre & ASTROPHYSICS Watch the progress of the rebuilding: www.mso.anu.edu.au #12;RESEARCH SCHOOL OF ASTRONOMY research telescope. It was damaged beyond repair in the firestorm of 18 January 2003. CONSTRUCTION Built

  15. CHAPTER 7: CROSS-CAMPUS ELEMENTS The Goals and Objectives for housing, set forth in Chapter 4 and Appendix D,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullins, Dyche

    's plans for housing in response to these goals. Rebuilding the Aldea student housing complex is a first. The pressure of student demand may push rental rates up, remove housing from the supply that would otherwise Area and its dampening effect on faculty recruitment and retention. Especially for junior faculty being

  16. NOAA Support for Puget Sound Shellfish: Native Oysters, Abalone &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Support for Puget Sound Shellfish: Native Oysters, Abalone & a Healthy Marine Habitatnoaa shellfish aquaculture and conservation in Puget Sound as part of NOAA's comprehensive strategy,000 to Rebuild Native Oysters in Puget Sound According to The Nature Conservancy, "shellfish reefs are the most

  17. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the uncertainties embedded in health care reform, and shrinking or stagnant federal research funding. Our Strategic center, the dynamic rebuilding of the health care system in the immediate geographic region, the reality strategically positioning SOM and LSU HealthCare Network for the completion of the new University Hospital

  18. Jack DiEnna Executive Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    !!! The entire face of New York and New Jersey has been dramatically changed by the effects of the Storm. In NY technology could have a positive impact, in the rebuilding process with it's Triple E benefits of Energy systems. #12;Why GHP Technology? The US Department of Energy states, 36% of the primary energy used

  19. Recursive Programming Model for Crop Production on the Texas High Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Lacewell, R. D.; Ellis, J. R.

    , the model will loop through up to 20 iterations, rebuilding the LP matrix for each iteration and writing a report for each period. The feedback section of the recursive model is used to update the groundwater situation after solution of each iteration...

  20. Disaster Resiliency and Recovery: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is the nation's leader in energy efficient and renewable energy technologies, practices, and strategies. For the last 15 years, NREL has provided expertise, tools, and innovations to private industry; federal, state, and local governments; non-profit organizations; and communities during the planning, recovery, and rebuilding stages after disaster strikes.

  1. 2011 ISRP Retrospective Presented by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but is there competition ­ hatchery vs wild? · Possible density dependent factors as stock size rebuilds. The ISRP sees Time Frames for Results How long will it take to measure the effects of habitat actions? #12;Some improvements will be almost immediate... Hemlock Dam before removal After removal #12;Some will take decades

  2. New Orleans and Energy Efficiency

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rosenburg, Zachary

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saint Bernard Project works tirelessly with volunteers, veterans and homeowners to continue the rebuilding. With the help of the Department of Energy and the Department of Housing and Urban Development they will be able to apply a greater energy efficiency strategy to help New Orleans and the country reduce our dependence on foreign oil.

  3. P3s Public-Private Partnerships? Or Peripatetic Pain in the Pants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Vegas to Phoenix ! I-69 Texas to Indiana Rebuild with tolls + added capacity: ! Key long-haul truck"/shift in short-haul setting. ! Greater payloads in long-haul setting. ! Keys to trucking industry support Investment Need Is Improved Goods Movement ! Two types of toll truckway project: ! Short-haul port

  4. After devastating storms tore through Oklahoma, youth from across the state and nation stepped up and began raising money and supplies to help those in need.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    #12;After devastating storms tore through Oklahoma, youth from across the state and nation stepped efforts to aid 4-H families, Oklahoma farms and ranches, or the rebuilding effort for the Oklahoma Trap Association, please contact the Oklahoma 4-H Foundation. Oklahoma 4-H Foundation 205 4-H Youth Development

  5. A review of "John Lowin and the English Theatre, 1603-1647" by Barbara Wooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunker, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assumed a more active role as a citizen with duties and responsibility over apprentices and financial oversight in the rebuilding of the Globe. Woodings commentary on the first decade 213 seventeenth-century news of Lowins career advocates for his...

  6. Energy Policy 33 (2005) 483498 Simulating the impacts of a strategic fuels reserve in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a strategic fuels reserve (SFR) designed to limit the increase in gasoline prices in the days following. The demand for gasoline is the sum of the retail demand and the wholesale demand to rebuild inventory. Background Gasoline prices in California are more volatile than in the rest of the country due to a variety

  7. 25 NOVEMBER 2005 VOL 310 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org1276 CREDIT:J.GRAYSON/HELIFILMSAUSTRALIAPTYLTD/GETTYIMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    such as solar and wind power. As the city rebuilds, efficient mass transit and use of wetlands for assimilation productive coastal wet- land ecosystem in the United States, the Mississippi delta. Louisiana and the fed the wet- lands have fragmented and disappeared. One of the most notable of the canals is the Mississippi

  8. Becoming Resilient: Disaster Planning and Recovery: NREL Experts Assist Before and After a Disaster (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hotchkiss, E.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet provides information on how private industry; federal, state, and local governments; non-profit organizations; and communities can utilize NREL's expertise, tools, and innovations to incorporate energy efficiency and renewable energy into the planning, recovery, and rebuilding stages of disaster.

  9. Rising Above the Water: New Orleans Implements Energy Efficiency and Sustainability Practices Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the technical assistance that the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory, provided to New Orleans, Louisiana, which helped the city incorporate energy efficiency into its rebuilding efforts for K-12 schools and homes following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. NREL also provided support and analysis on energy policy efforts.

  10. Mn/DOT's Ombudsman Program Collaboration and Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Mn/DOT's Ombudsman Program Collaboration and Process #12;Overview Ombudsman exists to rebuild trust on the environmental and municipal consent processes can be critical #12;A Large Organization #12;Tragedy;Ombudsman Does Not... ! Advocate for one party or point of view ! Own any formal process or policy

  11. The Holmesian Federation Issue 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ido, Imust not return now. The stakes are far too high, ftwould be a bitter triumph indeed to hang the Colonel for the doctor's murder. "Irealize that when Ireturn - jIreturn - my friend is as likely to knock me down as shake my hand, and Icould.... Iwillendeavor to keep in touch, but Ido not trust the telegraph, having outfoxed ftmyself too many times in the past. The Ambassador has kindly agreed to deliver this parcel for an "agent" of your most secret bureau; Ido hope you enjoy the pastilles...

  12. EcoCAR Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gantt, Lynn

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Since childhood, Lynn Gantt has had a deep seeded passion for cars and the mechanics that drive them. The Virginia native spent his weekends rebuilding antique tractors with his dad to race at tractor pulls across the state, and now the Virginia Tech graduate student is the proud team co-leader of Virginia Tech's EcoCAR Challenge team -- the winners of the three-year long competition, as announced last night at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C..

  13. Cooling Tower Considerations for Energy Optimizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accumulat- ing in the strainers and tubes. The California Redwood Institute states that the service life of thin section Redwood used in cooling towers .is a'pproximately 15 to 20 years. Therefore, in these older-type towers the fill Is usually... of the art cellular film fill packing. Figure 6. Eight cell blow-thru tower where rebuilding lowered the water temperature 4OF greatly reducing compressor head pressures and temperatures thereby lowering energy consumption throughout the system...

  14. A watershed-level economic assessment of the downstream effects of steepland erosion on shrimp production, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samayoa, Ana Marcela

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    farmers without secure land tenure. Hypothesis 3. 3. If artisan shrimp farmers were to gain access to secure tenure, then the likely result would be higher ecological spillover costs due to more clearing of mangrove forest for the construction of shrimp... to the agricultural sector valued at $800 million (The Economist Intelligence Unit 1998), and severe damage to the nation's infrastructure which includes 33 destroyed bridges and 75 damaged bridges (Honduras This Week 1998). As Honduras rebuilds and as international...

  15. Ironmaking conference proceedings: Volume 56

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The proceedings contain 86 papers divided into the following topical sections: Coal and coke; Cokemaking operations; Cokemaking research; Cokemaking -- Process innovations; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace -- Improvements/optimization; Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace -- Rebuilds/repairs/relines; Blast furnace -- Campaign extension; Pelletizing; Sintering; Waste oxide recycle; Battery operations; Burden control; Direct reduction and smelting; Temperature control from ironmaking through finishing; Expert systems; Steelmaking; and Casting. Papers within scope have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  16. EcoCAR Challenge Profile: Virginia Tech

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since childhood, Lynn Gantt has had a deep seeded passion for cars and the mechanics that drive them. The Virginia native spent his weekends rebuilding antique tractors with his dad to race at tractor pulls across the state, and now the Virginia Tech graduate student is the proud team co-leader of Virginia Tech's EcoCAR Challenge team -- the winners of the three-year long competition, as announced last night at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C..

  17. The Racialization of Day Labor Work in the U.S. Labor Market: Examining the Exploitation of Immigrant Labor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murga, Aurelia Lorena

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    in October 2005 that it was ?unconscionable that illegal workers would be brought into Louisiana aggravating our employment crisis and depressing earnings for our workers.? Consequently, the senator requested that DHS ?institute a zero tolerance policy... for the use of illegal workers in government contracts for reconstruction? (Browne-Dianis et al. 2006:12). As a result, immigrant workers who had begun to spearhead the rebuilding of New Orleans were the ones held accountable and blamed for these actions...

  18. Building commissioning: The key to quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide is written to aid building owners and retrofit project managers currently participating in the Rebuild America program. The Guide provides information on implementing building commissioning projects that will optimize the results of existing building equipment improvements and retrofits projects. It should be used in coordination with Rebuild America`s Community Partnership Handbook. The Handbook describes, in detail, eight important steps necessary for planning and carrying out a community-wide energy-efficiency program. In step number 7 of the Handbook, commissioning is shown to be an integral aspect of implementing a building retrofit. The commissioning process ensures that a facility is safe, efficient, comfortable, and conducive to the presumed activities for which it was constructed. Rebuild America strongly encourages its partners to incorporate commissioning into their retrofit projects. By verifying the correct installation, functioning, operation, and maintenance of equipment, the commissioning process ensures that efficiency measures will continue to deliver benefits over the long term. Although commissioning can take place after the equipment has been installed, it is more effective when it takes place over the entire equipment installation process.

  19. Julian Schwinger: Nuclear Physics, the Radiation Laboratory, Renormalized QED, Source Theory, and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Milton

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Julian Schwinger's influence on twentieth century science is profound and pervasive. Of course, he is most famous for his renormalization theory of quantum electrodynamics, for which he shared the Nobel Prize with Richard Feynman and Sin-itiro Tomonaga. But although this triumph was undoubtedly his most heroic work, his legacy lives on chiefly through subtle and elegant work in classical electrodynamics, quantum variational principles, proper-time methods, quantum anomalies, dynamical mass generation, partial symmetry, and more. Starting as just a boy, he rapidly became the pre-eminent nuclear physicist in the late 1930s, led the theoretical development of radar technology at MIT during World War II, and then, soon after the war, conquered quantum electrodynamics, and became the leading quantum field theorist for two decades, before taking a more iconoclastic route during his last quarter century.

  20. Lunar Laser Ranging, Gravitomagnetism and Frame-Dragging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignazio Ciufolini

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past century Einstein's theory of General Relativity gave rise to an experimental triumph, however, there are still aspects of this theory to be measured or more accurately tested. One of the main challenges in experimental gravitation, together with the direct detection of gravitational waves, is today the accurate measurement of the gravitomagnetic field generated by the angular momentum of a body. Here, after a description of frame-dragging and gravitomagnetism and of the main experiments to detect these relativistic phenomena, we show that the fundamental tests of General Relativity performed by Lunar Laser Ranging do not, however, include a measurement of the intrinsic gravitomagnetic field generated by the angular momentum of a body.

  1. The Irish Potato.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, R. H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ........ Fair .. 166.09 196.02 i 9^9 166.09 198.01 10.5 5.0 Dib .. Early .. Good . . . . 114.34 114.34 4.5 Bliss? Triumph (2nd crop seed) Sta... Early .. Very good 270.50 0.50 271.00 (t) Carman No. 1 .............................. Thor. Late . . . G o o... ............................ Hen.. F a i r ........ 237.76 1.99 239.75 5.2 Early O h io .................................. 11 en .. Earlv . . Good . . . . 277.69 0.54 278.23 5.0 Early Puritan.............................. H en.. Medium F a i r ........ 295.54 11.90 307.44 5...

  2. Search for new charged bosons and dark matter in final states with one lepton and missing transverse energy with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Read, Alexander Lincoln

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model (SM), the current theory of elementary particles and interactions, has been extremely successful in predicting and describing experimental results. The prediction of the electron's anomalous magnetic moment served as an early triumph of quantum electrodynamics, and one success after another has followed, including the discovery of the weak interaction gauge bosons $W^\\pm$ and $Z^0$, and more recently the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012. In spite of the success of the theory, though, there are phenomena which it does not explain, such as the dark matter and dark energy making up most of the universe. Extensions of the SM aiming to address its shortcomings typically predict observable deviations from the theory. Although theories predicting significant deviations from the SM in the energy regime so far explored can be immediately excluded, theories that predict deviations at higher, unexplored energies are still viable. Therefore, exploring physics...

  3. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  4. A state, characteristics, and perspectives of the Czech combined heating and power (CHP) systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadrnozka, J. [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The combined production of electricity and heat is a significant method for saving primary energy sources like fossil fuels, as well as reducing the production of CO{sub 2} and its emission to the atmosphere. The paper discusses the total efficiency of combined heat and power generation (CHP), comparing various types of CHP plants. The paper then describes the situation in the Czech Republic with regard to their centralized heat supply. The author concludes that there is no simple way to rebuild the Czech CHP systems, and that it would be better to start construction on more modern plants. He lists several starting principles to follow in the planning and design stage.

  5. Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Terry

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report details the results of total work efforts and progress made from July 2000 - July 2008 under the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) cooperative agreement DE-FC26-00NT40802, Building Stronger State Energy Partnerships with the U.S. Department of Energy. Major topical project areas in this final report include work efforts in the following areas: Rebuild America/Energy Smart Schools, Higher Education Initiative, Winter/Summer Fuels Outlook Conferences, Energy Emergency, Clean Energy Integration, Energy Star, and Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. All required deliverables have been provided to the National Energy Technology Laboratory and DOE program officials.

  6. Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpushkin, T. Yu., E-mail: timka83@yandex.ru [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

  7. Wind Turbine Gearbox Failure Modes - A Brief (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.; McDade, M.; Errichello, R.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbine gearboxes are not always meeting 20-year design life. Premature failure of gearboxes increases cost of energy, turbine downtime, unplanned maintenance, gearbox replacement and rebuild, and increased warranty reserves. The problem is widespread, affects most Original Equipment Manufacturers, and is not caused by manufacturing practices. There is a need to improve gearbox reliability and reduce turbine downtime. The topics of this presentation are: GRC (Gearbox Reliability Collaborative) technical approach; Gearbox failure database; Recorded incidents summary; Top failure modes for bearings; Top failure modes for gears; GRC test gearbox; Bearing nomenclature; Test history; Real damage; Gear sets; Bearings; Observations; and Summary. 5 refs.

  8. Investigating the Current Terrorist Threat to the U.S. Homeland - Determining al-Qa'ida's Targeting Strategy: Who's in the Crosshairs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacon-Ward, Ashley; Bell, Kevin; Brandt, Gretchen; Brown, Nathan; Figuerola, Andy; Foix, Marissa; Formanek, Mary; Holden, David; Vrdoljak, Denis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    East. Al-Qa?ida will continue to view Europe as a target of convenience but, at the same time, will seek to develop its capability to attack the US Homeland. As things currently stand, al- Qa?ida will likely have to first rebuild its capabilities..., or resources (to include safe havens, money, recruits, weapons), necessary to enable it to conduct attacks in the United States and evaluate counterterrorism actions both at home and abroad designed to diminish those means. For the second region, Europe...

  9. Solar Policy Environment: New Orleans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To use unprecedented rebuilding of the city of New Orleans is an opportunity for the Office of Recovery Management and its partners to encourage solar in New Orleans energy marketplace. While all Solar Cities grantees are undertaking market transformation activities that will both remove barriers to the adoption of solar technologies and reduce the cost of solar technologies, the reconstruction process affords New Orleans a window of opportunity to structurally alter the ways in which solar technologies are regulated, incentivized, produced, and consumed in the Greater New Orleans area.

  10. EA-1931: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011DDelphiFEA-2013.pdfBased on the finalNNSA hasRebuild,

  11. How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the past 12

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild a Town

  12. How can I invite users to join an OpenEI community group? | OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild a

  13. How can I query data on OpenEI and generate a map? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild aquery data

  14. How cleantech-as-a-service will drive renewable energy adoption | OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild aquery

  15. How do I contribute utility rates to this database? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild aqueryHow do

  16. How do I join this group? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild aqueryHow

  17. How to Integrate Climate Change Adaptation into National-Level Policy and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:Project Jump to:Would You Rebuild

  18. Albeni Falls-Sand Creek

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic GrowthAlbany-Eugene-Rebuild-Project

  19. 3D spectroscopy with VLT/GIRAFFE - II: Are Luminous Compact Galaxies merger remnants ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Puech; F. Hammer; H. Flores; G. Ostlin; T. Marquart

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Luminous Compact Galaxies are enigmatic sources by many aspects. They can reach the luminosity of the Milky Way within a radius of only a few kpc. They also represent one of the most rapidly evolving populations of galaxies since they represent up to 1/5 of the luminous galaxies at redshift z= 0.7 while being almost absent in the local Universe. The measurement of their dynamics is crucial to our understanding of LCGs since this has the potential of telling us which physical process(es) that drives them, and ultimately to link them to the existing present-day galaxies. Here we derive the 3 dimensional velocity fields and velocity dispersion (sigma) maps of 17 Luminous Compact Galaxies selected from the Canada France Redshift Survey and the Hubble Deep Field South with redshifts ranging from z=0.4 to z=0.75. We find that only 18% of them show rotational velocity fields typical of rotating disks, the others showing more complex kinematics. Assuming that LCGs are not too far from equilibrium, about half of LCGs then appear to be either non-relaxed objects, or objects that are not supported by velocity dispersion alone. This supports the view that an important fraction of LCGs are probably mergers. It brings additional support to the ``spiral rebuilding scenario'' in which LCGs correspond to a previous or post-merger phase before the disk re-building.

  20. Assessment of the advantages and feasibility of a nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of rebuilding and testing a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) for the Mars mission has been investigated. Calculations indicate that an NTR would substantially reduce the earth-orbit assembled mass compared to LOX/LH/sub 2/ systems. The mass savings were 36% and 65% for the cases of total aerobraking and of total propulsive braking respectively. Consequently, the cost savings for a single mission of using an NTR, if aerobraking is feasible, are probably insufficient to warrant the NTR development. If multiple missions are planned or if propulsive braking is desired at Mars and/or at Earth, then the savings of about $7B will easily pay for the NTR development. Estimates of the cost of rebuilding a NTR were based on the previous NERVA program's budget plus additional costs to develop a flight ready engine. The total cost to build the engine would be between $4 to 5B. The concept of developing a full-power test stand at Johnston Atoll in the Pacific appears very feasible. The added expense of building facilities on the island should be less than $1.4B.

  1. No. 2 battery design and start-up at Bethlehem`s Burns Harbor Div.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayton, L.R. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., Chesteron, IN (United States); Buss, W.E. [Thyssen Still Otto Technical Services, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 1, 1993, the No. 2 battery at the Burns Harbor Div. was shutdown in preparation for a pad up rebuild. Work for this project had been ongoing for several years. Awarding of the turnkey contract for the rebuild had occurred in Sept. 1992, to a Davy International/Davy Songer joint venture and Thyssen Still Otto for the design and construction of the facility. The project was to include the replacement of the existing 82 oven facility, utilizing the latest in battery design and technology. The overall design philosophy was to construct a battery having a 30-year operational life capability, incorporating emission control systems to comply with existing and future Clean Air Act regulation. Construction work for the project was completed two months ahead of schedule, with the first charges made on Dec. 17, 1994. Beginning with the first pushes on the following day, the battery began stable operations at the 24-hr coking rate Jan. 3, 1995. At that time, production began increasing in planned states, with the designed coking rate achieved on March 13. The paper will detail the overall design philosophy for No. 2 battery along with related facilities, highlight key features of the design providing for 30-year life and environmental compliance, review the start-up and detail current operational performance.

  2. Dynamical tunneling and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srihari Keshavamurthy

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This article summarizes the recent work on the influence of dynamical tunneling on the control of quantum systems. Specifically, two examples are discussed. In the first, it is shown that the bichromatic control of tunneling in a driven double well system is hampered by the phenomenon of chaos-assisted tunneling. The bichromatic control landscape exhibits several regions indicating lack of control with every such region involving chaos-assisted tunneling. The second example illustrates the failure of controlling the dissociation dynamics of a driven Morse oscillator due to the phenomenon of resonance-assisted tunneling. In particular, attempts to control the dissociation dynamics by rebuilding local phase space barriers are foiled due to resonance-assisted tunneling.

  3. LHCb Tag Collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuente Fernndez, P; Cousin, N

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHCb physics software consists of hundreds of packages, each of which is developed by one or more physicists. When the developers have some code changes that they would like released, they commit them to the version control system, and enter the revision number into a database. These changes have to be integrated into a new release of each of the physics analysis applications. Tests are then performed by a nightly build system, which rebuilds various configurations of the whole software stack and executes a suite of run-time functionality tests. A Tag Collector system has been developed using solid standard technologies to cover both the use cases of developers and integration managers. A simple Web interface, based on an AJAX-like technology, is available. Integration with software management and Nightly Build programs is possible via a Python API. Data are stored in a relational database with the help of an ORM (Object-Relational Mapping) library.

  4. Final report to the Department of Energy: Green Schools Project DE-FC01-99EE10685. Schools for the 21st century: Transferring the Green Schools experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrigan, Merrilee

    2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes five major activities that the Alliance to Save Energy performed for the years 2000 and 2001 to support and compliment DOE's Energy Smart Schools Partnership. The major tasks under this project were to: (1) Promote the School Efficiency Peer Exchange program for school personnel; (2) develop the Earth Apple Awards program and disseminate the best award-winning ideas; (3) link Green Schools with Rebuilt with at least one metropolitan area such as Philadelphia or Buffalo; (4) support Rebuild/Energy Smart Schools through working at the state level to develop business, state, and local government and through making presentations in support of school efficiency; (5) update the curriculum search originally conducted in 1995.

  5. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) program. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.D. (comp.)

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is reported on the development of two superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units. One is a 30-MJ unit for use by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to stabilize power oscillations on their Pacific AC Intertie, and the second is a 1- to 10-GWh unit for use as a diurnal load leveling device. Emphasis has been on the stabilizing system. The manufacturing phase of the 30-MJ superconducting coil was initiated and the coil fabrication has advanced rapidly. The two converter power transformers were manufactured, successfully factory tested, and shipped. One transformer reached the Tacoma Substation in good condition; the other was dropped enroute and has been returned to the factory for rebuilding. Insulation of the 30-MJ coil has been examined for high voltage effects apt to be caused by transients such as inductive voltage spikes from the protective dump circuit. The stabilizing system converter and protective energy dump system were completed, factory tested, and delivered.

  6. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program : Hatchery Element : Annual Progress Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000 are presented in this report.

  7. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-Year Site Plan Project Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the currently active and proposed infrastructure projects listed in Appendix B of the Idaho National Laboratory 2013-2022 Ten Year Site Plan (DOE/ID-11449). It was produced in accordance with Contract Data Requirements List I.06. The projects delineated in this document support infrastructure needs at INL's Research and Education Campus, Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor Complex and the greater site-wide area. The projects provide critical infrastructure needed to meet current and future INL opereational and research needs. Execution of these projects will restore, rebuild, and revitalize INL's physical infrastructure; enhance program execution, and make a significant contribution toward reducing complex-wide deferred maintenance.

  8. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, David E.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook salmon in the Yakima River basin. The objectives were to: (1) determine the abundance, distribution and survival of naturally produced fry and smolts in the Yakima River; (2) evaluate different methods of fry and smolt supplementation into the natural rearing environment while maintaining as much as possible the gentic integrity of naturally produced stocks; (3) locate and define areas in the watershed which may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; (4) define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and (5) determine physical and biological limitations for production within the system.

  9. Ironmaking Conference Proceedings: Volume 53

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference provided shared insight into the challenges being encountered as the industry moves to more closely couple ironmaking capacity with the steelmaking/continuous caster process. The proceedings are divided into the following sections: Cokemaking operations; Cokemaking process control and quality; Coal and coke research; Cokemaking environmental; Developing cokemaking technologies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace burdening; Blast furnace raw materials; Blast furnace rebuilds/relines/repairs; Blast furnace control; Blast furnace refractories; Blast furnace injection; Direct reduction and smelting; Sintering; Joint ironmaking and steelmaking; Process technology forum--New processes; and Process technology forum--Fluid flow and process control. Sixty-one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Burden distribution control for maintaining the central gas flow at No. 1 blast furnace in Pohang Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, S.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Suh, Y.K.; Ahn, T.J.; Kim, S.M. [Pohang Iron and Steel Co. Ltd. (Korea, Republic of). Technical Research Labs.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The causes for temperature lowering at the upper shaft center in Pohang No. 1 blast furnace were investigated. The test operation with charging notch change in the actual blast furnace and with a 1/12 scale model to Pohang No. 1 blast furnace were carried out in order to improve central gas flow in the shaft. Finally, rebuilding of the lower bunker interior was performed using the results of model experiments. It was confirmed that the main reason for the gas temperature lowering at the upper shaft center was the smaller particle size at center than the wall according to the discharging characteristics of center feed bunker with stone box. The central gas flow could be secured through modifying the stone box in the bunker.

  11. Ironmaking conference proceedings. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical presentations at this conference displayed a renewed sense of viability of the coke and ironmaking community. In addition, many of the papers show that the environmental aspects of ironmaking are being integrated into day-to-day operations rather than being thought of as separate responsibilities. This volume contains 68 papers divided into the following sections: Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace fundamental studies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace repairs/rebuilds/modernization; Process control techniques for blast furnaces; Cokemaking general; Cokemaking environmental; Coke--by-products--plant operations; Coal and coke research; Battery operations; Pelletizing; Direct reduction and smelting; and Sintering. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  12. A Prototype Front-End Readout Chip for Silicon Microstrip Detectors Using an Advanced SiGe Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grillo, A A; Daniel, L; Horn, G; Martchovsky, A; Martinez-McKinney, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Seiden, A; Wilder, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upgrade of the ATLAS detector for the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will require a rebuild of the Inner Detector as well as replacement of the readout electronics of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter and other detector components. We proposed some time ago to study silicon germanium (SiGe) BiCMOS technologies as a possible choice for the required silicon microstrip and calorimeter front-end chips given that they showed promise to provide necessary low noise at low power. Evaluation of the radiation hardness of these technologies has been under study. To validate the expected performance of these technologies, we designed and fabricated an 8-channel front-end readout chip for a silicon microstrip detector using the IBM 8WL technology, a likely choice for the ATLAS upgrade. Preliminary electrical characteristics of this chip will be presented.

  13. Multi-unit operations considerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Walter E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Thomas C. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan Gregory

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several nuclear weapons programs have or are pursuing the implementation of multi-unit operations for tasks such as disassembly and inspection, and rebuild. A multi-unit operation is interpreted to mean the execution of nuclear explosive operating procedures in a single facility by two separate teams of technicians. The institution of a multi-unit operations program requires careful consideration of the tools, resources, and environment provided to the technicians carrying out the work. Therefore, a systematic approach is necessary to produce safe, secure, and reliable processes. In order to facilitate development of a more comprehensive multi-unit operations program, the current work details categorized issues that should be addressed prior to the implementation of multi-unit operations in a given weapons program. The issues have been organized into the following categories: local organizational conditions, work process flow/material handling/workplace configuration, ambient environmental conditions, documented safety analysis, and training.

  14. Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

  15. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricane Katrina was the largest natural disaster in the United States, striking the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, and flooding 80% of New Orleans; to make matters worse, the city was flooded again only three weeks later by the effects of Hurricane Rita. Many of the buildings, including schools, were heavily damaged. The devastation of schools in New Orleans from the hurricanes was exacerbated by many years of deferred school maintenance. This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The experiences of four new schools-Langston Hughes Elementary School, Andrew H. Wilson Elementary School (which was 50% new construction and 50% major renovation), L.B. Landry High School, and Lake Area High School-and one major renovation, Joseph A. Craig Elementary School-are described to help other school districts and design teams with their in-progress and future school building projects in hot-humid climates. Before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans had 128 public schools. As part of the recovery planning, New Orleans Public Schools underwent an assessment and planning process to determine how many schools were needed and in what locations. Following a series of public town hall meetings and a district-wide comprehensive facility assessment, a Master Plan was developed, which outlined the renovation or construction of 85 schools throughout the city, which are expected to be completed by 2017. New Orleans Public Schools expects to build or renovate approximately eight schools each year over a 10-year period to achieve 21st century schools district-wide. Reconstruction costs are estimated at nearly $2 billion.

  16. Wheat Production in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, I. M.; Porter, K. B.; Lahr, Keith; Merkle, Owen G.; Futrell, M. C.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -27 19 10 34.3 87 Tascosa 20.0 13 60.7 4-24 5-29 49 3 1 32.8 92 Early Blackhull 19.7 25 59.7 4-18 5-24 53 12 35.5 87 Comanche 19.4 9 56.9 4-26 5-29 38 14 34.6 82 Tenmarq 16.8 25 56.7 4-27 6- 1 53 25 35.2 88 Triumph 12.0 3 58.8 4-20 5-27 70 84....5 137 Atlas 66 19.7 15 55.0 4-17 5-26 28 4 34.4 108 Red May 18.0 10 56.5 4-24 5-26 44 45 32.8 92 Denton' 17.3 24 55.8 4-29 6-1 29 38 35.8 91 Austin 19.6 25 56.1 4-21 5-27 34 9 36.4 100 DURUM VARIETIES Sentry 24.4 15 61.2 4-12 5-22 14 Tr 37.2 106...

  17. Unanswered Questions in the Electroweak Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; ,

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article is devoted to the status of the electroweak theory on the eve of experimentation at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. A compact summary of the logic and structure of the electroweak theory precedes an examination of what experimental tests have established so far. The outstanding unconfirmed prediction of the electroweak theory is the existence of the Higgs boson, a weakly interacting spin-zero particle that is the agent of electroweak symmetry breaking, the giver of mass to the weak gauge bosons, the quarks, and the leptons. General arguments imply that the Higgs boson or other new physics is required on the TeV energy scale. Indirect constraints from global analyses of electroweak measurements suggest that the mass of the standard-model Higgs boson is less than 200 GeV. Once its mass is assumed, the properties of the Higgs boson follow from the electroweak theory, and these inform the search for the Higgs boson. Alternative mechanisms for electroweak symmetry breaking are reviewed, and the importance of electroweak symmetry breaking is illuminated by considering a world without a specific mechanism to hide the electroweak symmetry. For all its triumphs, the electroweak theory has many shortcomings.

  18. Helioseismology and Solar Abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Helioseismology has allowed us to study the structure of the Sun in unprecedented detail. One of the triumphs of the theory of stellar evolution was that helioseismic studies had shown that the structure of solar models is very similar to that of the Sun. However, this agreement has been spoiled by recent revisions of the solar heavy-element abundances. Heavy element abundances determine the opacity of the stellar material and hence, are an important input to stellar model calculations. The models with the new, low abundances do not satisfy helioseismic constraints. We review here how heavy-element abundances affect solar models, how these models are tested with helioseismology, and the impact of the new abundances on standard solar models. We also discuss the attempts made to improve the agreement of the low-abundance models with the Sun and discuss how helioseismology is being used to determine the solar heavy-element abundance. A review of current literature shows that attempts to improve agreement between solar models with low heavy-element abundances and seismic inference have been unsuccessful so far. The low-metallicity models that have the least disagreement with seismic data require changing all input physics to stellar models beyond their acceptable ranges. Seismic determinations of the solar heavy-element abundance yield results that are consistent with the older, higher values of the solar abundance, and hence, no major changes to the inputs to solar models are required to make higher-metallicity solar models consistent with helioseismic data.

  19. Geothermal regimes of the Clearlake region, northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amador, M. [ed.; Burns, K.L.; Potter, R.M.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first commercial production of power from geothermal energy, at The Geysers steamfield in northern California in June 1960, was a triumph for the geothermal exploration industry. Before and since, there has been a search for further sources of commercial geothermal power in The Geysers--Clear Lake geothermal area surrounding The Geysers. As with all exploration programs, these were driven by models. The models in this case were of geothermal regimes, that is, the geometric distribution of temperature and permeability at depth, and estimates of the physical conditions in subsurface fluids. Studies in microseismicity and heat flow, did yield geophysical information relevant to active geothermal systems. Studies in stable-element geochemistry found hiatuses or divides at the Stoney Creek Fault and at the Collayomi Fault. In the region between the two faults, early speculation as to the presence of steamfields was disproved from the geochemical data, and the potential existence of hot-water systems was predicted. Studies in isotope geochemistry found the region was characterized by an isotope mixing trend. The combined geochemical data have negative implications for the existence of extensive hydrothermal systems and imply that fluids of deep origin are confined to small, localized systems adjacent to faults that act as conduits. There are also shallow hot-water aquifers. Outside fault-localized systems and hot-water aquifers, the area is an expanse of impermeable rock. The extraction of energy from the impermeable rock will require the development and application of new methods of reservoir creation and heat extraction such as hot dry rock technology.

  20. Was the Higgs boson discovered?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen Anh Ky; Nguyen Thi Hong Van

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard model has postulated the existence of a scalar boson, named the Higgs boson. This boson plays a central role in a symmetry breaking scheme called the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism (or the Brout-Englert-Higgs-Guralnik-Hagen-Kibble mechanism, for completeness) making the standard model realistic. However, until recently at least, the 50-year-long-sought Higgs boson had remained the only particle in the standard model not yet discovered experimentally. It is the last but very important missing ingredient of the standard model. Therefore, searching for the Higgs boson is a crucial task and an important mission of particle physics. For this purpose, many theoretical works have been done and different experiments have been organized. It may be said in particular that to search for the Higgs boson has been one of the ultimate goals of building and running the LHC, the world's largest and most powerful particle accelerator, at CERN, which is a great combination of science and technology. Recently, in the summer of 2012, ATLAS and CMS, the two biggest and general-purpose LHC collaborations, announced the discovery of a new boson with a mass around 125 GeV. Since then, for over two years, ATLAS, CMS and other collaborations have carried out intensive investigations on the newly discovered boson to confirm that this new boson is really the Higgs boson (of the standard model). It is a triumph of science and technology and international cooperation. Here, we will review the main results of these investigations following a brief introduction to the Higgs boson within the theoretical framework of the standard model and Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism as well as a theoretical and experimental background of its search. This paper may attract interest of not only particle physicists but also a broader audience.

  1. Inflation with stable anisotropic hair: is it cosmologically viable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigbjrn Hervik; David F. Mota; Mikjel Thorsrud

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently an inflationary model with a vector field coupled to the inflaton was proposed and the phenomenology studied for the Bianchi type I spacetime. It was found that the model demonstrates a counter-example to the cosmic no-hair theorem since there exists a stable anisotropically inflationary fix-point. One of the great triumphs of inflation, however, is that it explains the observed flatness and isotropy of the universe today without requiring special initial conditions. Any acceptable model for inflation should thus explain these observations in a satisfactory way. To check whether the model meets this requirement, we introduce curvature to the background geometry and consider axisymmetric spacetimes of Bianchi type II,III and the Kantowski-Sachs metric. We show that the anisotropic Bianchi type I fix-point is an attractor for the entire family of such spacetimes. The model is predictive in the sense that the universe gets close to this fix-point after a few e-folds for a wide range of initial conditions. If inflation lasts for N e-folds, the curvature at the end of inflation is typically of order exp(-2N). The anisotropy in the expansion rate at the end of inflation, on the other hand, while being small on the one-percent level, is highly significant. We show that after the end of inflation there will be a period of isotropization lasting for about 2N/3 e-folds. After that the shear scales as the curvature and becomes dominant around N e-folds after the end of inflation. For plausible bounds on the reheat temperature the minimum number of e-folds during inflation, required for consistency with the isotropy of the supernova Ia data, lays in the interval (21,48). Thus the results obtained for our restricted class of spacetimes indicates that inflation with anisotropic hair is cosmologically viable.

  2. Building a 40% Energy Saving House in the Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Bonar, Jacob [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a home that uses 40% less energy than the energy-efficient Building America standard - a giant step in the pursuit of affordable near-zero-energy housing through the evolution of five near-zero-energy research houses. This four-bedroom, two-bath, 1232-ft2 house has a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) index of 35 (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100), which qualifies it for federal energy efficiency and solar incentives. The house is leading to the planned construction of a similar home in Greensburg, Kansas, and 21 staff houses in the Walden Reserve, a 7000-unit "deep green" community in Cookville, Tennessee. Discussions are underway for construction of similar houses in Charleston, South Carolina, Seattle, Washington, Knoxville and Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and upstate New York. This house should lead to a 40% and 50% Gate-3, Mixed-Humid-Climate Joule for the DOE Building America Program. The house is constructed with structurally-insulated-panel walls and roof, raised metal-seam roof with infrared reflective coating, airtight envelope (1.65 air changes per hour at 50 Pascal), supply mechanical ventilation, ducts inside the conditioned space, extensive moisture control package, foundation geothermal space heating and cooling system, ZEHcor wall, solar water heater, and a 2.2 kWp grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system. The detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 compared to all the houses in this series are shown in Tables 1 and 2. Based on a validated computer simulation of ZEH5 with typical occupancy patterns and energy services for four occupants, energy for this all-electric house is predicted to cost only $0.66/day ($0.86/day counting the hookup charges). By contrast, the benchmark house would require $3.56/day, including hookup charges (these costs are based on a 2006 residential rates of $0.07/kWh and solar buyback at $0.15/kWh). The solar fraction for this home located in Lenoir City, Tennessee, is predicted to be as high as 41%(accounting for both solar PV and the solar water heater). This all-electric home is predicted to use 25 kWh/day based on the one year of measured data used to calibrate a whole-building simulation model. Based on two years of measured data, the roof-mounted 2.2 kWp PV system is predicted to generate 7.5 kWh/day. The 2005 cost to commercially construct ZEH5, including builder profit and overhead, is estimated at about $150,000. This cost - for ZEH5's panelized construction, premanufactured utility wall (ZEHcor), foundation geothermal system, and the addition of the walkout lower level, and considering the falling cost for PV - suggests that the construction cost per ft2 for a ZEH5 two-story will be even more cost-competitive. The 2005 construction cost estimate for a finished-out ZEH5 with 2632 ft2 is $222,000 or $85/ft2. The intention of this report is to help builders and homeowners make the decision to build zero-energy-ready homes. Detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data from about 100 sensors monitoring thermal performance for a one-year period are presented. This information should be specifically useful to those considering structural insulated panel walls and roof, foundation geothermal space heating and cooling, solar water heater and roof-mounted, photovoltaic, grid-tied systems.

  3. Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

  4. Beneficial Use of Drilling Waste - A Wetland Restoration Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pioneer Natural Resources

    2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that treated drill cuttings derived from oil and gas operations could be used as source material for rebuilding eroding wetlands in Louisiana. Planning to supply a restoration site, drill a source well, and provide part of the funding. Scientists from southeastern Louisiana University's (SLU) Wetland Biology Department were contracted to conduct the proposed field research and to perform mesocosm studies on the SLU campus. Plans were to use and abandoned open water drill slip as a restoration site. Dredged material was to be used to create berms to form an isolated cell that would then be filled with a blend of dredged material and drill cuttings. Three elevations were used to test the substrates ability to support various alternative types of marsh vegetation, i.e., submergent, emergent, and upland. The drill cuttings were not raw cuttings, but were treated by either a dewatering process (performed by Cameron, Inc.) or by a stabilization process to encapsulate undesirable constituents (performed by SWACO, Division of Smith International).

  5. DOWNHOLE VIBRATION MONITORING & CONTROL SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin E. Cobern

    2005-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is to develop a system to both monitor the vibration of a bottomhole assembly, and to adjust the properties of an active damper in response to these measured vibrations. Phase I of this program, which entailed modeling and design of the necessary subsystems and design, manufacture and test of a full laboratory prototype, was completed on May 31, 2004. The principal objectives of Phase II are: more extensive laboratory testing, including the evaluation of different feedback algorithms for control of the damper; design and manufacture of a field prototype system; and, testing of the field prototype in drilling laboratories and test wells. Work during this quarter centered on the rebuilding of the prototype using the improved valve design described in the last report. Most of the components have been received and assembly has begun. Testing is expected to resume in August. In April, a paper was presented at the American Association of Drilling Engineers National Technical Conference in Houston. The paper was well received, and several oilfield service and supply companies sent inquiries regarding commercial distribution of the system. These are currently being pursued, but none have yet been finalized.

  6. Commissioning of the PF Ring after the Reconstruction for the Straight-sections Upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, T.; Asaoka, S.; Cheng, W. X.; Haga, K.; Harada, K.; Hori, Y.; Izawa, M.; Kasuga, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Maezawa, H.; Mishina, A.; Mitsuhashi, T.; Miyajima, T.; Miyauchi, H.; Nagahashi, S.; Nogami, T.; Obina, T.; Pak, C. O.; Sakanaka, S.; Sasaki, H. [Light Source Division, Photon Factory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)] (and others)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At the 2.5-GeV ring of the Photon Factory, a large reconstruction of the lattice around the straight sections has been accomplished in 2005. Thus reconstruction is the main part of the straight-sections upgrade project to rebuild existing undulators and to increase the number of undulator beamlines. As a result of the reconstruction, four short straight sections have been newly created and the lengths of the existing straight sections have been much extended. To exploit the new straight sections, short-period narrow-gap undulators which have a sufficiently high brilliance in hard x-ray range have been developed. The reconstruction work of the ring was completed in a seven-month shutdown from March to September, 2005. In the area over two thirds of the storage ring, all the quadrupole magnets and all the beam ducts have been renewed and rearranged to construct the new lattice. Recommissioning of the storage ring was finished at the end of October, 2005. Though we made no in-situ baking for the beam ducts, recovery of the beam lifetime has favorably progressed due to the vacuum scrubbing by the synchrotron radiation.

  7. Growth of Spirals: Secular or Driven by Mergers ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hammer

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical phenomena contributing to the galaxy growth can be tested all the way to z= 1. Galaxy mass, extinction, star formation and gas metal abundance can be measured in a robust way, as well as the distribution of the galaxy morphologies. I discuss here the observational methods and their accuracy. Physical quantities can be evaluated with uncertainties much lower than 0.3 dex, if they are based on 2 sets of independent measurements. For example, at a given IMF, the star formation rate is well estimated by combining flux measurements of the extinction corrected Balmer line and of the mid-IR continuum. Spiral mass growth had occurred from gas accretion and from merging. Gas accretion can explain at most half of the spiral mass growth: at moderate redshift, the numerous population of compact, merger and irregular galaxies requires another origin. A spiral rebuilding scenario is able to reproduce all the evolutionary trends observed since z~1, and could be at the origin of the present-day, numerous population of early type spirals.

  8. Analysis of Salmon and Steelhead Supplementation, 1990 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William H.; Coley, Travis C.; Burge, Howard L.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supplementation or planting salmon and steelhead into various locations in the Columbia River drainage has occurred for over 100 years. All life stages, from eggs to adults, have been used by fishery managers in attempts to establish, rebuild, or maintain anadromous runs. This report summarizes and evaluates results of past and current supplementation of salmon and steelhead. Conclusions and recommendations are made concerning supplementation. Hatchery rearing conditions and stocking methods can affect post released survival of hatchery fish. Stress was considered by many biologists to be a key factor in survival of stocked anadromous fish. Smolts were the most common life stage released and size of smolts correlated positively with survival. Success of hatchery stockings of eggs and presmolts was found to be better if they are put into productive, underseeded habitats. Stocking time, method, species stocked, and environmental conditions of the receiving waters, including other fish species present, are factors to consider in supplementation programs. The unpublished supplementation literature was reviewed primarily by the authors of this report. Direct contact was made in person or by telephone and data compiled on a computer database. Areas covered included Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Alaska, California, British Columbia, and the New England states working with Atlantic salmon. Over 300 projects were reviewed and entered into a computer database. The database information is contained in Appendix A of this report. 6 refs., 9 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. Environmental Assessment of the Gering-Stegall 115-kV Transmission Line Consolidation Project, Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to consolidate segments of two transmission lines near the Gering Substation in Gering, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska. The transmission lines are both located in Scotts Bluff County, Nebraska, within the city of Gering. Presently, there are three parallel 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines on separate rights-of-way (ROW) that terminate at the Gering Substation. The project would include dismantling the Archer-Gering wood-pole transmission line and rebuilding the remaining two lines on single-pole steel double circuit structures. The project would consolidate the Gering-Stegall North and Gering-Stegall South 115-kV transmission lines on to one ROW for a 1.33-mile segment between the Gering Substation and a point west of the Gering Landfill. All existing wood-pole H-frame structures would be removed, and the Gering-Stegall North and South ROWs abandoned. Western is responsible for the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the line. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the proposed construction, operation, and maintenance of the 115-kV transmission line consolidation. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE finds that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA).

  10. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Analytic Formulation for the Evaluation of Spline Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Errichello, R.; Halse, C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gearboxes in wind turbines have not been achieving their expected design life; however, they commonly meet and exceed the design criteria specified in current standards in the gear, bearing, and wind turbine industry as well as third-party certification criteria. The cost of gearbox replacements and rebuilds, as well as the down time associated with these failures, has elevated the cost of wind energy. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2006; its key goal is to understand the root causes of premature gearbox failures and improve their reliability using a combined approach of dynamometer testing, field testing, and modeling. As part of the GRC program, this paper investigates the design of the spline coupling often used in modern wind turbine gearboxes to connect the planetary and helical gear stages. Aside from transmitting the driving torque, another common function of the spline coupling is to allow the sun to float between the planets. The amount the sun can float is determined by the spline design and the sun shaft flexibility subject to the operational loads. Current standards address spline coupling design requirements in varying detail. This report provides additional insight beyond these current standards to quickly evaluate spline coupling designs.

  11. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Appendix E, Transmission Reinforcement Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this appendix to the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) report is to provide an update of the latest study work done on transmission system options for the Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Also included in the attachments to the EIS are 2 reports analyzing the voltage stability of the Puget Sound transmission system and a review by Power Technologies, Inc. of the BPA voltage stability analysis and reactive options. Five transmission line options and several reactive options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAFRP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. Plans were designed to provide at least 500 MVAR reactive margin.

  12. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, Fisheries Resource Management, Yakima Indian Nation1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, Larry

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to evaluate enhancement methodologies that can be used to rebuild runs of spring chinook to the Yakima River system. In January, 1983, 100,000 fish raised at Leavenworth National Fish Hatchery were transported to Nile Springs Rearing Ponds on the Naches River. These fish were allowed a volitional release as smolts in April. An additional 100,000 smolts were transported from Leavenworth Hatchery in April and immediately released to the Upper Yakima River. Relative survival of smolts from their points of release to a trap at Prosser (RM48) was 1.69:1 for fish from Nile Springs, versus the trucked smolts. The fish from Nile Springs arrived at Prosser and McNary Dam approximately 1 week earlier than the transported fish. To better determine the magnitude and location of releases, distribution and abundance studies were undertaken. There is a decrease in abundance from upstream areas over time, indicating a general downstream movement. In the Naches System, the lower Naches River is heavily utilized by juvenile spring chinook during the early summer. A preliminary study evaluated physical limitations of production. On a single evening 67 fish were killed on diversion screens at Chandler Canal. This constituted 5.7% of the wild spring chinook entering the canal and 8.2% of the fall chinook. The larger hatchery spring chinook sustained a 2.3% loss. Adult returns resulted in 443 redds in the Yakima System, with 360 in the Yakima River and 83 in the Naches System.

  13. Development of a Natural Rearing System to Improve Supplemental Fish Quality, 1991-1995 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maynard, Desmond J.; Flagg, Thomas A.; Mahnken, Conrad V.W.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), presents research findings and guidelines for development and evaluation of innovative culture techniques to increase postrelease survival of hatchery fish. The Natural Rearing Enhancement System (NATURES) described in this report is a collection of experimental approaches designed to produce hatchery-reared chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that exhibit wild-like behavior, physiology, and morphology. The NATURES culture research for salmonids included multiple tests to develop techniques such as: raceways equipped with cover, structure, and natural substrates to promote development of proper body camouflage coloration; feed-delivery systems that condition fish to orient to the bottom rather than the surface of the rearing vessel; predator conditioning of fish to train them to avoid predators; and supplementing diets with natural live foods to improve foraging ability. The underlying assumptions are that NATURES will: (1) promote the development of natural cryptic coloration and antipredator behavior; (2) increase postrelease foraging efficiency; (3) improve fish health and condition by alleviating chronic, artificial rearing habitat-induced stress; and (4) reduce potential genetic selection pressures induced by the conventional salmon culture environment. A goal in using NATURES is to provide quality fish for rebuilding depleted natural runs.

  14. The human side of Hurricane Andrew

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, R.; Callander, R.C.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the long-term psychological effects of the nation`s worst natural disaster on the employees of the Turkey Point nuclear power plant. It also examines the efforts made by plant personnel and company volunteers to aid employees` families affected by the storm. Despite significant damage at the plant, unit 4 was returned to service 5 weeks after the August 24, 1992, hurricane. Unit 3 was returned to service on December 3, 1992. Unit 3 was originally scheduled to start a refueling outage the day Hurricane Andrew struck. While plant personnel are still recovering from Andrew`s impact, the plant`s performance has never been better. On May 26, 1993, the plant completed a record-breaking 46-day refueling outage - 7 days ahead of schedule and $3 million under budget. Turkey Point`s recovery, return to service, and superior performance would not have been possible without the efforts of hundreds of employees who put their personal tragedies aside and focused on the common goal of the plant`s operation. To help employees with rebuilding their lives, the plant launched extensive assistance programs. Although the plant returned to normal operation, plant personnel continue to struggle in a community whose infrastructure (homes, schools, stores, etc.) have been almost eliminated.

  15. Photovoltaic application for disaster relief

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, W.R. Jr.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricanes, floods, tornados, and earthquakes are natural disasters that can happen at any time destroying homes, businesses, and natural surroundings. One such disaster, Hurricane Andrew, devastated South Florida leaving several hundred-thousand people homeless. Many people were without electrical service, functioning water and sewage systems, communications, and medical services for days, even weeks in the aftermath of the storm. Emergency management teams, the military, and countless public and private organizations staged a massive relief effort. Dependency on electrical utility power became a pronounced problem as emergency services were rendered to survivors and the rebuilding process started. Many of the energy needs of emergency management organizations, relief workers, and the general public can be satisfied with solar electric energy systems. Photovoltaic (PV) power generated from solar energy is quiet, safe, inexhaustible and pollution-free. Previously, photovoltaics have supplied emergency power for Hurricanes Hugo and Andrew, and the earthquake at Northridge in Southern California. This document focuses on photovoltaic technology and its application to disaster relief efforts.

  16. Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS); Information Needs, 1992 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charlie (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Kinney, William J. (Washington Department of Fishereis, Olympia, WA); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful application of adaptive management to rebuilding the Columbia Basin`s anadromous fish resources requires that available information and experience be organized and shared between numerous organizations and individuals. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin`s collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases and recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognize these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project is now completing the process of scoping and identification of information needs. Construction of prototype systems will begin in 1992. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information on System scoping and needs identification phase.

  17. Improved crystallographic models through iterated local density-guided model deformation and reciprocal-space refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Read, Randy J. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Adams, Paul D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T. [Stanford University, 318 Campus Drive West, Stanford, CA 94305-5432 (United States); Afonine, Pavel V.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A density-based procedure is described for improving a homology model that is locally accurate but differs globally. The model is deformed to match the map and refined, yielding an improved starting point for density modification and further model-building. An approach is presented for addressing the challenge of model rebuilding after molecular replacement in cases where the placed template is very different from the structure to be determined. The approach takes advantage of the observation that a template and target structure may have local structures that can be superimposed much more closely than can their complete structures. A density-guided procedure for deformation of a properly placed template is introduced. A shift in the coordinates of each residue in the structure is calculated based on optimizing the match of model density within a 6 radius of the center of that residue with a prime-and-switch electron-density map. The shifts are smoothed and applied to the atoms in each residue, leading to local deformation of the template that improves the match of map and model. The model is then refined to improve the geometry and the fit of model to the structure-factor data. A new map is then calculated and the process is repeated until convergence. The procedure can extend the routine applicability of automated molecular replacement, model building and refinement to search models with over 2 r.m.s.d. representing 65100% of the structure.

  18. Pellet property requirements for future blast-furnace operations and other new ironmaking processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Oshnock, T.W. [U.S. Steel, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements for the physical, chemical and metallurgical properties of pellets have continued to become more stringent as blast-furnace productivity and coke rate have been rapidly improved during the last decade. In addition, the age and deterioration of the North American coke batteries, the lack of capital to sufficiently rebuild them, and the threat of increasingly more stringent environmental controls for the coke batteries has forced North American ironmakers to begin implementing pulverized coal injection to minimize the coke requirements for the blast furnace and to seriously investigate developing other ironmaking processes that use coal instead of coke. Therefore, the next major step in North American ironmaking has included injecting pulverized coal (PC) at 200 kilograms per ton of hot metal (kg/ton) [400 pounds per net ton of hot metal (lb/NTHM)] or greater which will result in the coke rate decreasing to less than 300 kg/ton (600 lb/NTHM) or less. As a result, the pellets will spend more time in the furnace and will be required to support more total weight. Pellets can also be a major iron unit source for other cokeless ironmaking processes such as the COREX process or the AISI direct ironmaking process. This paper will explore the pellet property requirements for future blast-furnace operations and cokeless ironmaking processes.

  19. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  20. Unmanned operation of the coke guides at Hoogovens IJmuiden Coke Plant 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vos, D.; Mannes, N.; Poppema, B. [Hoogovens IJmuiden B.V. (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the bad condition of batteries and many ovens under repair, Hoogovens was forced to partially repair and rebuild the Coke plant No. 1. The production of coke at Coke plant No. 1 is realized in 3 production blocks subdivided in 6 batteries. Besides a renovated installation, all coke oven machines were renewed. A total of five identical machine sets are available. Each consists of a pusher machine, larry car, coke guide and quench car with diesel locomotive. A complete automated control system was implemented. The main objectives were a highly regular coking and pushing process, automated traveling and positioning and a centrally coordinated interlocking of machine functions. On each operational machine however an operator performed the supervisory control of the automated machine functions. After years of good experience with the automated system, economical reasons urged further personnel reduction from 1994 on. Totally 375 people were involved, including the maintenance department. To reduce the occupation at coke plant No. 1, the coke guide was the first machine to be fully automated because of the isolated and uncomfortable working place.

  1. Single taphole blast furnace casthouse performance optimizing cost and availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowles, R.D.; Searls, J.B.; Peay, W.R. [Geneva Steel, Provo, UT (United States); Brenneman, R.G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The No. 2 blast furnace is a single taphole furnace with a convection air-cooled iron trough. The iron runner system is designed to fill four 90 ton open-top ladles per cast, which are transported by locomotive to the steel shop. The slag runner system is capable of filling three 800 ft{sup 3} slag pots per cast. The No. 2 blast furnace was blown in from mini-reline with this new casthouse configuration in early December 1991. It was operated for nearly three years until it was banked for planned stove repairs and a trough rebuild in late September 1994. During this period, the furnace produced just over 2.5 million tons of hot metal across the original trough refractory lining system, with 13 intermediate hot patch castable repairs. The entire casthouse refractory usage (main trough, runner systems, and covers) during this campaign was 1.06 pounds per net ton of hot metal. Investigation of the lining during demolition indicated that the trough lining campaign could have been extended to at least 3.0 million tons. This paper will discuss how operating practices, mechanical design, refractory design, maintenance philosophy, and attention to detail synergistically contributed to the long campaign life and low refractory consumption rate.

  2. The 1994 intermediate reline of H-3 furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, J.D.; Nanavati, K.S.; Spirko, E.J.; Wakelin, D.H.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LTV Steel`s Indiana Harbor Works H-3 Blast Furnace was rebuilt in 1988 to provide reliable operations at high production rates without damage to the shell for an overall campaign. This Rebuild included: (1) complete bosh and partial stack shell replacement; (2) a spray cooled carbon bosh; (3) a row of staves at the mantle and six rows of stack staves, all stack staves had noses (ledges at the top of the stave) with the exception of row 5; (4) silicon carbide filled semi graphite brick for the bosh, silicon carbide brick from the mantle area and to the top of stave row No. 1, super duty brick in front of the remaining staves and phosphate bonded high alumina brick in the upper stack; (5) movable throat armor; (6) upgraded instrumentation to follow furnace operation and lining wear occurring in the furnace. No work was done to the hearth walls and bottom, since these had been replaced in 1982 with a first generation graphite cooled design and has experienced 7.7 million NTHM. The furnace was blown in November 18, 1988 and operated through September 3, 1994, at which time it was blown down for its first intermediate repair after 7.85 million NTHM. This paper summarizes the operation of the furnace and then discusses the major aspects of the 1994 intermediate repair.

  3. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance to Beichuan Reconstruction: Creating and Designing Low- to Zero-carbon Communities in New Beichuan, Sichuan Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Wang, Chuang; Hong, Tianzhen; Levine, Mark

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Beichuan county, located in north of Sichuan Province, was the most severely damaged township in last May's Sichuan earthquake. Reconstruction of a new Beichuan is a high-profiled project by the governments. In addition to constructing structurally-sound, quake-safe buildings in the new development, rebuilding Beichuan presents an opportunity for constructing new low- to zero-carbon communities in the region. In fact, building up greener communities in the reconstruction has become a top priority for the county, which, at an estimated 7 square km, is expected to have 50,000 residents in 2015 and 70,000 in 2020. The recent focus of construction projects is on the east side of the river, while land on its west bank will be reserved for development in the mid- to long-term. In the near term, a number of new public buildings are scheduled to be constructed starting in November 2009. As indicated by the deputy county chief, Mr. He Wang, the construction timeframe is unusually tight. Many buildings, although in various stages of planning and design, will be constructed starting in November 2009. Timely expert advice on design improvement and planning considerations will benefit the integration of energy efficiency and environmental benign elements in Beichuan's reconstruction, and will help promoting integrated development of green communities with low- to zero-carbon emission from the region.

  4. Antiwhirl PDC bits increased penetration rates in Alberta drilling. [Polycrystalline Diamond Compact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrosky, D. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)); Osmak, G. (Petro-Canada, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

    1993-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The antiwhirl PDC bits and an inhibitive mud system contributed to the quicker drilling of the time-sensitive shales. The hole washouts in the intermediate section were dramatically reduced, resulting in better intermediate casing cement jobs. Also, the use of antirotation PDC-drillable cementing plugs eliminated the need to drill out plugs and float equipment with a steel tooth bit and then trip for the PDC bit. By using an antiwhirl PDC bit, at least one trip was eliminated in the intermediate section. Offset data indicated that two to six conventional bits would have been required to drill the intermediate hole interval. The PDC bit was rebuildable and therefore rerunnable even after being used on five wells. In each instance, the cost of replacing chipped cutters was less than the cost of a new insert roller cone bit. The paper describes the antiwhirl bits; the development of the bits; and their application in a clastic sequence, a carbonate sequence, and the Shekilie oil field; the improvement in the rate of penetration; the selection of bottom hole assemblies; washout problems; and drill-out characteristics.

  5. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume III; Washington Subbasin Below McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fisheries, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  6. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume V; Idaho Subbasins, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keifer, Sharon (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Rowe, Mike (Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall, ID); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  7. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume IV; Washington Subbasin Above McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fishereis, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  8. Accelerating Battery Design Using Computer-Aided Engineering Tools: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Heon, G. H.; Smith, K.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer-aided engineering (CAE) is a proven pathway, especially in the automotive industry, to improve performance by resolving the relevant physics in complex systems, shortening the product development design cycle, thus reducing cost, and providing an efficient way to evaluate parameters for robust designs. Academic models include the relevant physics details, but neglect engineering complexities. Industry models include the relevant macroscopic geometry and system conditions, but simplify the fundamental physics too much. Most of the CAE battery tools for in-house use are custom model codes and require expert users. There is a need to make these battery modeling and design tools more accessible to end users such as battery developers, pack integrators, and vehicle makers. Developing integrated and physics-based CAE battery tools can reduce the design, build, test, break, re-design, re-build, and re-test cycle and help lower costs. NREL has been involved in developing various models to predict the thermal and electrochemical performance of large-format cells and has used in commercial three-dimensional finite-element analysis and computational fluid dynamics to study battery pack thermal issues. These NREL cell and pack design tools can be integrated to help support the automotive industry and to accelerate battery design.

  9. Accelerating Design of Batteries Using Computer-Aided Engineering Tools (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer-aided engineering (CAE) is a proven pathway, especially in the automotive industry, to improve performance by resolving the relevant physics in complex systems, shortening the product development design cycle, thus reducing cost, and providing an efficient way to evaluate parameters for robust designs. Academic models include the relevant physics details, but neglect engineering complexities. Industry models include the relevant macroscopic geometry and system conditions, but simplify the fundamental physics too much. Most of the CAE battery tools for in-house use are custom model codes and require expert users. There is a need to make these battery modeling and design tools more accessible to end users such as battery developers, pack integrators, and vehicle makers. Developing integrated and physics-based CAE battery tools can reduce the design, build, test, break, re-design, re-build, and re-test cycle and help lower costs. NREL has been involved in developing various models to predict the thermal and electrochemical performance of large-format cells and has used in commercial three-dimensional finite-element analysis and computational fluid dynamics to study battery pack thermal issues. These NREL cell and pack design tools can be integrated to help support the automotive industry and to accelerate battery design.

  10. Big George to Carter Mountain 115-kV transmission line project, Park and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to rebuild, operate, and maintain a 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between the Big George and Carter Mountain Substations in northwest Wyoming (Park and Hot Springs Counties). This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the regulations of the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) and the Department of Energy (DOE). The existing Big George to Carter Mountain 69-kV transmission line was constructed in 1941 by the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, with 1/0 copper conductor on wood-pole H-frame structures without an overhead ground wire. The line should be replaced because of the deteriorated condition of the wood-pole H-frame structures. Because the line lacks an overhead ground wire, it is subject to numerous outages caused by lightning. The line will be 54 years old in 1995, which is the target date for line replacement. The normal service life of a wood-pole line is 45 years. Under the No Action Alternative, no new transmission lines would be built in the project area. The existing 69-kV transmission line would continue to operate with routine maintenance, with no provisions made for replacement.

  11. Sibley station low-sulfur coal conversion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupinskas, R.L. [Sargent & Lundy LLC, Chicago, IL (United States); Rembold, D.F. [Missouri Public Service, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After embarking on an upgrade project in 1986 that was designed to allow efficient and reliable operation of its coal-fired Sibley station through 2010, Missouri Public Service (MPS) faced the uncertainty of impending acid-rain legislation. To protect its investment in the Sibley Rebuild Program, the utility evaluated compliance options based on the emerging legislation and concluded that switching to low-sulfur coal offered the least-cost compliance approach. Compared to installing a scrubber, switching to a low-sulfur coal was also more straightforward, although not without challenges and complications. This paper reviews the Sibley low-sulfur coal conversion program. At Sibley, fuel switching was chosen only after numerous internal and external studies; it withstood late challenges from natural gas and allowance trading. Switching demanded additional equipment to blend Power River Basin coals and other coals, and demanded additional and upgraded protective equipment in the areas of fire protection, dust collection, and explosion prevention. In the year since the coal conversion project was completed the facility has operated reliably, the economic benefits of the lower cost Powder River Basin coals have been realized, and the station has also met the requirements of both phases of the acid rain legislation. Fuel switching at Sibley required a team approach and careful analysis. The coal conversion project also required attention and dedication by team members in order to minimize fuel costs while maintaining optimum plant efficiency and availability.

  12. Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

  13. Failing in place for low-serviceability storage infrastructure using high-parity GPU-based RAID.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, Matthew L.; Ward, H. Lee; Skjellum, Anthony (University of Alabama at Birmingham)

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to provide large quantities of high-reliability disk-based storage, it has become necessary to aggregate disks into fault-tolerant groups based on the RAID methodology. Most RAID levels do provide some fault tolerance, but there are certain classes of applications that require increased levels of fault tolerance within an array. Some of these applications include embedded systems in harsh environments that have a low level of serviceability, or uninhabited data centers servicing cloud computing. When describing RAID reliability, the Mean Time To Data Loss (MTTDL) calculations will often assume that the time to replace a failed disk is relatively low, or even negligible compared to rebuild time. For platforms that are in remote areas collecting and processing data, it may be impossible to access the system to perform system maintenance for long periods. A disk may fail early in a platform's life, but not be replaceable for much longer than typical for RAID arrays. Service periods may be scheduled at intervals on the order of months, or the platform may not be serviced until the end of a mission in progress. Further, this platform may be subject to extreme conditions that can accelerate wear and tear on a disk, requiring even more protection from failures. We have created a high parity RAID implementation that uses a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to compute more than two blocks of parity information per stripe, allowing extra parity to eliminate or reduce the requirement for rebuilding data between service periods. While this type of controller is highly effective for RAID 6 systems, an important benefit is the ability to incorporate more parity into a RAID storage system. Such RAID levels, as yet unnamed, can tolerate the failure of three or more disks (depending on configuration) without data loss. While this RAID system certainly has applications in embedded systems running applications in the field, similar benefits can be obtained for servers that are engineered for storage density, with less regard for serviceability or maintainability. A storage brick can be designed to have a MTTDL that extends well beyond the useful lifetime of the hardware used, allowing the disk subsystem to require less service throughout the lifetime of a compute resource. This approach is similar to the Xiotech ISE. Such a design can be deliberately placed remotely (without frequent support) in order to provide colocation, or meet cost goals. For workloads where reliability is key, but conditions are sub-optimal for routine serviceability, a high-parity RAID can provide extra reliability in extraordinary situations. For example, for installations requiring very high Mean Time To Repair, the extra parity can eliminate certain problems with maintaining hot spares, increasing overall reliability. Furthermore, in situations where disk reliability is reduced because of harsh conditions, extra parity can guard against early data loss due to lowered Mean Time To Failure. If used through an iSCSI interface with a streaming workload, it is possible to gain all of these benefits without impacting performance.

  14. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

  15. International Safeguards Technology and Policy Education and Training Pilot Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G A; Essner, J T; Dougan, A D; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokava, E; Wehling, F; Martin, J; Charlton, W

    2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A major focus of the National Nuclear Security Administration-led Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. NNSA launched two pilot programs in 2008 to develop university level courses and internships in association with James, Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) at the Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS) and Texas A&M University (TAMU). These pilot efforts involved 44 students in total and were closely linked to hands-on internships at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between TAMU, LANL, and LLNL. The LANL-based coursework was shared with the students undertaking internships at LLNL via video teleconferencing. A weeklong hands-on exercise was also conducted at LANL. A second pilot effort, the International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at MIIS in cooperation with LLNL. Speakers from MIIS, LLNL, and other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. The two pilots programs concluded with an NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The value of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of the two programs in the coming years.

  16. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1997 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Willard, Catherine (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 1997 are presented in this report. One hundred twenty-six female sockeye salmon from one captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1997. Successful spawn pairings produced approximately 148,781 eyed-eggs with a cumulative mean survival to eyed-egg rate of 57.3%. Approximately 361,600 sockeye salmon were released to Sawtooth basin waters in 1997. Reintroduction strategies included eyed-eggs (brood year 1997), presmolts (brood year 1996), and prespawn adults for volitional spawning (brood year 1994). Release locations included Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1997 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  17. Improving macromolecular atomic models at moderate resolution by automated iterative model building, statistical density modification and refinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure for iterative model-building, statistical density modification and refinement at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 ) is described. An iterative process for improving the completeness and quality of atomic models automatically built at moderate resolution (up to about 2.8 ) is described. The process consists of cycles of model building interspersed with cycles of refinement and combining phase information from the model with experimental phase information (if any) using statistical density modification. The process can lead to substantial improvements in both the accuracy and completeness of the model compared with a single cycle of model building. For eight test cases solved by MAD or SAD at resolutions ranging from 2.0 to 2.8 , the fraction of models built and assigned to sequence was 4691% (mean of 65%) after the first cycle of building and refinement, and 78-95% (mean of 87%) after 20 cycles. In an additional test case, an incorrect model of gene 5 protein (PDB code 2gn5; r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the more recent refined structure 1vqb at 1.56 ) was rebuilt using only structure-factor amplitude information at varying resolutions from 2.0 to 3.0 . Rebuilding was effective at resolutions up to about 2.5 . The resulting models had 60-80% of the residues built and an r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms from the refined structure of 0.20 to 0.62 . The algorithm is useful for building preliminary models of macromolecules suitable for an experienced crystallographer to extend, correct and fully refine.

  18. BPA/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound Power & Light Company (Puget Power) propose to upgrade the existing high-voltage transmission system in the Whatcom and Skagit counties area between the towns of Custer and Sedro Woolley, including some areas within the City of Bellingham, starting in 1995. A Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the project was issued in November 1993, followed by a 45-day public comment period. Public response to the DEIS included the identification of several new transmission route alternatives in the Lake Whatcom area. BPA issued a Supplemental DEIS in April 1995 to provide a second public review-and-comment period. Rebuilding an existing 230-kV line to a double-circuit 230-kV transmission line was identified in the Supplemental DEIS as the Proposed Action. The Supplemental DEIS also examined in detail a North Shore Road alternative which was proposed by some members of the public. Public comments on the EIS were listed and responded to in the Supplemental DEIS. In May 1995, a second set of open houses and public meetings was held to review the Supplemental DEIS. Electromagnetic field (EMF) effects raised as an issue in the DEIS continued to be an issue of public concern in the meetings. The EIS has identified impacts that would generally be classified as low to moderate and localized. Effects on soils and water resources in sensitive areas (e.g., near Lake Whatcom) would be low to moderate; there would be little change in magnetic fields; noise levels would remain at existing levels; and land use and property value impacts would be minimal. Threatened and endangered species would not be adversely affected, and all proposed actions in wetlands would be covered by a Corps of Engineers Nationwide Permit. Visual and socioeconomic would be low to moderate. There would be no effect on cultural resources.

  19. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) â?? Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : â?¢ Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. â?¢ Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. â?¢ Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. â?¢ Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. â?¢ Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. â?¢ Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. â?¢ Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. â?¢ Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  20. The NPR, NPT and the prospects for disarmament

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In Prague's Hradcany Square on April 5, 2009, President Barack Obama offered a bold vision of the nuclear future that encompasses both reducing nuclear dangers and pursuing the goal of a world without nuclear weapons while maintaining, as long as nuclear weapons remain, a safe secure, and effective arsenal, to deter potential adversaries and to assure U.S. allies and other security partners that they can count on America's security commitments. The agenda put forward in Prague involves the full range of issues from deterrence to nonproliferation and disarmament. The 2010 Nuclear Posture Review (NPR) report, reflecting the twin objectives of the Prague speech, for the first time places the United States effort to lead expanded international efforts to rebuild and strengthen the global nuclear nonproliferation regime at the top the U.S. nuclear agenda. This attention underscores the fact that the top priority of the United States is to discourage additional states from acquiring nuclear weapon capabilities and to stop terrorist groups from acquiring weapon-usable nuclear materials. It also reinforced the view that positively influencing the 2010 Review Conference (RevCon) of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) was a key objective of the Obama Administration. The NPR developed both the vision and the policy, but details of implementation will need to be developed and better understood. This paper will address the Nuclear Posture Review and its implementation, as well as it's relation to, and impact on, the NPT RevCon and the long term prospects for nonproliferation and disarmament.

  1. Nuclear Forensic Inferences Using Iterative Multidimensional Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Heller, M A

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear forensics involves the analysis of interdicted nuclear material for specific material characteristics (referred to as 'signatures') that imply specific geographical locations, production processes, culprit intentions, etc. Predictive signatures rely on expert knowledge of physics, chemistry, and engineering to develop inferences from these material characteristics. Comparative signatures, on the other hand, rely on comparison of the material characteristics of the interdicted sample (the 'questioned sample' in FBI parlance) with those of a set of known samples. In the ideal case, the set of known samples would be a comprehensive nuclear forensics database, a database which does not currently exist. In fact, our ability to analyze interdicted samples and produce an extensive list of precise materials characteristics far exceeds our ability to interpret the results. Therefore, as we seek to develop the extensive databases necessary for nuclear forensics, we must also develop the methods necessary to produce the necessary inferences from comparison of our analytical results with these large, multidimensional sets of data. In the work reported here, we used a large, multidimensional dataset of results from quality control analyses of uranium ore concentrate (UOC, sometimes called 'yellowcake'). We have found that traditional multidimensional techniques, such as principal components analysis (PCA), are especially useful for understanding such datasets and drawing relevant conclusions. In particular, we have developed an iterative partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) procedure that has proven especially adept at identifying the production location of unknown UOC samples. By removing classes which fell far outside the initial decision boundary, and then rebuilding the PLS-DA model, we have consistently produced better and more definitive attributions than with a single pass classification approach. Performance of the iterative PLS-DA method compared favorably to that of classification and regression tree (CART) and k nearest neighbor (KNN) algorithms, with the best combination of accuracy and robustness, as tested by classifying samples measured independently in our laboratories against the vendor QC based reference set.

  2. Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

  3. Monitoring and Evaluation of Supplemented Spring Chinook Salmon and Life Histories of Wild Summer Steelhead in the Grande Ronde Basin, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boe, Stephen J.; Crump, Carrie A.; Weldert, Rey L. [Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the ninth annual report for a multi-year project designed to monitor and evaluate supplementation of endemic spring Chinook salmon in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River. These two streams historically supported anadromous fish populations that provided significant tribal and non-tribal fisheries, but in recent years, have experienced severe declines in abundance. Conventional and captive broodstock supplementation methods are being used to restore these spring Chinook salmon populations. Spring Chinook salmon populations in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, and other streams in the Snake River Basin have experienced severe declines in abundance over the past two decades (Nehlsen et al. 1991). A supplementation program was initiated in Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River, incorporating the use of both captive and conventional broodstock methods, in order to prevent extinction in the short term and eventually rebuild populations. The captive broodstock component of the program (BPA Project 199801001) uses natural-origin parr collected by seining and reared to maturity at facilities near Seattle, Washington (Manchester Marine Laboratory) and Hood River, Oregon (Bonneville Hatchery). Spawning occurs at Bonneville Hatchery, and resulting progeny are reared in hatcheries. Shortly before outmigration in the spring, juveniles are transferred to acclimation facilities. After an acclimation period of about 2-4 weeks, volitional release begins. Any juveniles remaining after the volitional release period are forced out. The conventional broodstock component uses returning adults collected at traps near the spawning areas, transported to Lookingglass Hatchery near Elgin, Oregon, held, and later spawned. The resulting progeny are reared, acclimated, and released similar to the captive broodstock component. All progeny released receive one or more marks including a fin (adipose) clip, codedwire tag, PIT tag, or visual implant elastomer tag. The numbers of adults used for conventional broodstock are determined by an agreement among comanagers (Zimmerman and Patterson 2002). Activities for this project focus on two life stages of spring Chinook salmon: juveniles during the migration from freshwater to the ocean and adults during prespawning migration through the end of spawning. Life history, production, and genetics are monitored and used to evaluate program effectiveness.

  4. Solar Success Story at Moanalua Terrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar systems prove to be the environmentally and economically sound choice for heating water in U.S. Navy housing at Moanalua Terrace in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Hawaii is a perfect environment for solar water heating,'' according to Alan Ikeda, a Housing Management Specialist with the Pacific Naval Facility Engineering Command Housing Department in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. ''The sun shines most of the time, we don't have to worry about freezing, the state offers a 35% solar tax credit, and our local utility supports the purchase and installation of solar systems with generous rebates.'' The Hawaiian Electric Company's (HECO's) $1,500 per unit rebate for solar water heaters installed on new construction helped persuade the Navy to take advantage of Hawaii's solar resource and install solar water heaters on family housing units. At Moanalua Terrace, the Navy had demolished 752 units of family housing, which they are rebuilding in four phases. Designers decided to use the opportunity to give the solar systems a try. When the 100 homes in Phase I were built, money was not available for solar water heaters. However, Ikeda subsequently secured a $130,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to retrofit the Phase I homes with solar systems. In retrofit applications, HECO rebates $800 per unit ($80,000 total) on approved equipment, and Pearl Harbor Family Housing will pay the difference of the estimated $340,000 total cost, or about $130,000. The 136 units built during Phase II of the Moanalua Terrace project included solar systems in their specifications, so the Navy was able to take advantage of the $1,500 per system HECO rebate for approved solar water heaters in new construction. The Navy chose direct (open-loop) active systems that circulate potable water through flat-plate collectors coated with a black chrome selective surface. Each system consists of a 4-foot by 8-foot (1.2-m by 2.4-m) collector made by American Energy Technologies, Ltd., and an 80-gallon (302-liter) Rheem tank containing an electric backup element.

  5. Energy R and D in Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runci, PJ

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Germany's total national (i.e., combined public and private sector) funding for R&D stood at $42 billion in 1997. The private sector accounted for nearly 62% ($24 billion) of the total, while the public sector accounted for approximately 38%. Since the late 1970s, when the public and private sectors each funded roughly half of Germany's R&D, the private sector has steadily assumed a larger and larger role as the dominant supporter of R&D activity, while overall government funding has remained essentially flat for much of the past two decades. In addition to declining relative to private R&D expenditures, public R&D expenditures in Germany declined by 4% in real terms between 1991 and 1997, to approximately $15 billion. The reduction in R&D investments in the public sector can be attributed in large part to the financial challenges associated with German reunification and related shifts in social priorities including efforts to address high unemployment and to rebuild basic infrastructure in the eastern states. R&D expenditures have also declined as a percentage of the total public budget, from a peak of 3.4% in 1985 to 2.7% in 1996. Energy R&D has been the hardest hit of all major socioeconomic areas of R&D expenditure funded by the German government. Between 1981 and 1997, public energy R&D fell from approximately $1.6 billion to $400 million--a 75% real decline. The $850 million reduction in Germany's fission R&D budget (which constituted two-thirds of government R&D investment in 1985) explains some 90% of the funding decline. Negative public perceptions regarding the safety and environmental impacts of nuclear energy have reduced nuclear power's viability as a long-term energy option for Germany. Discussions of a complete nuclear phaseout are now under way. At the same time, the German government has slashed its investments in fossil energy R&D by more than 90%. While energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies have fared relatively well in comparison with other energy technology areas, government support for all areas of energy R&D has declined in absolute terms since 1990. Remaining public and private sector energy R&D investments focus increasingly technology demonstration and commercialization efforts with relatively short time horizons.

  6. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Paul A.; Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2001 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2001, 26 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Basin. Twenty-three of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Three of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on October 12, 2001). Nine anadromous adults were incorporated into the captive broodstock program spawning design in 2001. The remaining adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Two sockeye salmon females from the anadromous group and 152 females from the brood year 1998 captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2001. Spawn pairings produced approximately 118,121 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 42.0%. Presmolts (106,166), smolts (13,915), and adults (79) were planted or released into Stanley Basin waters in 2001. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and two unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2001 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  7. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willard, Catherine; Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2002 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. n 2002, 22 anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Fifteen of these adults were captured at adult weirs located on the upper Salmon River and on Redfish Lake Creek. Seven of the anadromous sockeye salmon that returned were observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir and allowed to migrate upstream volitionally (following the dismantling of the weir on September 30, 2002). All adult returns were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. Based on their marks, returning adult sockeye salmon originated from a variety of release options. Sixty-six females from brood year 1999 and 28 females from brood year 2000 captive broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2002. Spawn pairings produced approximately 65,838 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 55.1%. Presmolts (140,410), smolts (38,672), and adults (190) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2002. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and three unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game facilities (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery). Three of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2002 spawning design, and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  8. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J,; Heindel, Jeff A.; Kline, Paul A. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Marine Fisheries Service at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Marine Fisheries Service are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases are also reported under separate cover. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 1999 are presented in this report. In 1999, seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley and were captured at the adult weir located on the upper Salmon River. Four anadromous adults were incorporated in the captive broodstock program spawning design for year 1999. The remaining three adults were released to Redfish Lake for natural spawning. All seven adults were adipose and left ventral fin-clipped, indicating hatchery origin. One sockeye salmon female from the anadromous group and 81 females from the captive broodstock group were spawned at the Eagle Fish Hatchery in 1999. Spawn pairings produced approximately 63,147 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed-stage of development averaging 38.97%. Eyed-eggs (20,311), presmolts (40,271), smolts (9,718), and adults (21) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 1999. Supplementation strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Redfish Lake Creek, upper Salmon River (below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir), Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, four broodstocks and three production groups were in culture at the Eagle Fish Hatchery. Two of the four broodstocks were incorporated into the 1999 spawning design and one broodstock was terminated following the completion of spawning.

  9. Dynamic Line Rating Oncor Electric Delivery Smart Grid Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Justin; Smith, Cale; Young, Mike; Donohoo, Ken; Owen, Ross; Clark, Eddit; Espejo, Raul; Aivaliotis, Sandy; Stelmak, Ron; Mohr, Ron; Barba, Cristian; Gonzalez, Guillermo; Malkin, Stuart; Dimitrova, Vessela; Ragsdale, Gary; Mitchem, Sean; Jeirath, Nakul; Loomis, Joe; Trevino, Gerardo; Syracuse, Steve; Hurst, Neil; Mereness, Matt; Johnson, Chad; Bivens, Carrie

    2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric transmission lines are the lifeline of the electric utility industry, delivering its product from source to consumer. This critical infrastructure is often constrained such that there is inadequate capacity on existing transmission lines to efficiently deliver the power to meet demand in certain areas or to transport energy from high-generation areas to high-consumption regions. When this happens, the cost of the energy rises; more costly sources of power are used to meet the demand or the system operates less reliably. These economic impacts are known as congestion, and they can amount to substantial dollars for any time frame of reference: hour, day or year. There are several solutions to the transmission constraint problem, including: construction of new generation, construction of new transmission facilities, rebuilding and reconductoring of existing transmission assets, and Dynamic Line Rating (DLR). All of these options except DLR are capital intensive, have long lead times and often experience strong public and regulatory opposition. The Smart Grid Demonstration Program (SGDP) project co-funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Oncor Electric Delivery Company developed and deployed the most extensive and advanced DLR installation to demonstrate that DLR technology is capable of resolving many transmission capacity constraint problems with a system that is reliable, safe and very cost competitive. The SGDP DLR deployment is the first application of DLR technology to feed transmission line real-time dynamic ratings directly into the system operations State Estimator and load dispatch program, which optimizes the matching of generation with load demand on a security, reliability and economic basis. The integrated Dynamic Line Rating (iDLR)1 collects transmission line parameters at remote locations on the lines, calculates the real-time line rating based on the equivalent conductor temperature, ambient temperature and influence of wind and solar radiation on the stringing section, transmits the data to the Transmission Energy Management System, validates its integrity and passes it on to Oncor and ERCOT (Electric Reliability Council of Texas) respective system operations. The iDLR system is automatic and transparent to ERCOT System Operations, i.e., it operates in parallel with all other system status telemetry collected through Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) employed across the company.

  10. Disaster: would your community bounce back?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, Benjamin H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    What makes some communities or organizations able to quickly bounce back from a disaster, while others take a long time to recover? This question has become very important for emergency planners in federal, state, and local government - particularly since the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina, which nearly destroyed New Orleans five years ago. These events have made people aware that we can't always prevent disasters, but might be able to improve the ability of communities and regions to respond to and bounce back from major disruptions. Social scientists have found that most communities are, in fact, quite resilient to most disasters. People tend to work together, overcome divisions, identify problems, and develop improvised solutions. This often leads to a greater sense of community and a sense of personal accomplishment. Long-term recovery can be harder, but rebuilding can create jobs and stimulate economies. Communities may even end up better than they were before. But there are some disturbing exceptions to this trend, including Hurricane Katrina. The hurricane killed many people, the federal and local emergency response was not effective, people who could not evacuate were housed in the Superdome and Convention Center in terrible conditions, crime was prevalent, and local government did not appear to have control over the situation. A significant portion of the population was eventually evacuated to other cities. Even five years later, many people have not returned, and large parts of the city have not been rebuilt. Clearly, New Orleans lacked sufficient resilience to overcome a disaster of the magnitude of Katrina. There are four factors that social scientists are beginning to agree are important for community resilience: (1) A strong, diverse economy - Stable jobs, good incomes, diversity of industries, personal savings; (2) Robust social networks - Community members know each other, help each other, and have connections outside the community; (3) Competent organizations - Government, health care, community service, and religious organizations are competent and trustworthy, and have resources to handle community needs; and (4) High-quality infrastructure - Road, power, and water systems (etc.) are in good condition and are designed to provide service even if some connections are destroyed. To explore how these factors make communities resilient, I will tell two stories of disasters. The first is the Buffalo Creek flood, which wiped out a coal mining community in West Virginia in 1972. This is a classic example of community that was not resilient in the aftermath of a disaster. The second example is the Vietnamese immigrant community in the Versailles neighborhood of New Orleans. In spite of being relatively poor and culturally isolated, this community was one of the first to fully rebound following Hurricane Katrina.

  11. Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing: Five-Axle Combination Tractor-Flatbed Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, in coordination with the Federal Highway Administration, sponsored the Heavy and Overweight Vehicle Brake Testing (HOVBT) program in order to provide information about the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) on braking performance. Because the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations limit the number of braking system defects that may exist for a vehicle to be allowed to operate on the roadways, the examination of the effect of brake defects on brake performance for increased loads is also relevant. The HOVBT program seeks to provide relevant information to policy makers responsible for establishing load limits, beginning with providing test data for a combination tractor/trailer. This testing was conducted on a five-axle combination vehicle with tractor brakes meeting the Reduced Stopping Distance requirement rulemaking. This report provides a summary of the testing activities, the results of various analyses of the data, and recommendations for future research. Following a complete brake rebuild, instrumentation, and brake burnish, stopping tests were performed from 20 and 40 mph with various brake application pressures (15 psi, 25 psi, 35 psi, 45 psi, 55 psi, and full system pressure). These tests were conducted for various brake conditions at the following GVWs: 60,000, 80,000, 91,000, 97,000, 106,000, and 116,000 lb. The 80,000-lb GVWs included both balanced and unbalanced loads. The condition of the braking system was also varied. To introduce these defects, brakes (none, forward drive axle, or rear trailer axle) were made inoperative. In addition to the stopping tests, performance-based brake tests were conducted for the various loading and brake conditions. Analysis of the stopping test data showed the stopping distance to increase with load (as expected) and also showed that more braking force was generated by the drive axle brakes than the trailer axle brakes. The constant-pressure stopping test data revealed a linear relationship between brake application pressure and was used to develop an algorithm to normalize stopping data for weight and initial speed.

  12. Dielectric-Lined High-Gradient Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Rectangular particle accelerator structures with internal planar dielectric elements have been studied, with a view towards devising structures with lower surface fields for a given accelerating field, as compared with structures without dielectrics. Success with this concept is expected to allow operation at higher accelerating gradients than otherwise on account of reduced breakdown probabilities. The project involves studies of RF breakdown on amorphous dielectrics in test cavities that could enable high-gradient structures to be built for a future multi-TeV collider. The aim is to determine what the limits are for RF fields at the surfaces of selected dielectrics, and the resulting acceleration gradient that could be achieved in a working structure. The dielectric of principal interest in this study is artificial CVD diamond, on account of its advertised high breakdown field ({approx}2 GV/m for dc), low loss tangent, and high thermal conductivity. Experimental studies at mm-wavelengths on materials and structures for achieving high acceleration gradient were based on the availability of the 34.3 GHz third-harmonic magnicon amplifier developed by Omega-P, and installed at the Yale University Beam Physics Laboratory. Peak power from the magnicon was measured to be about 20 MW in 0.5 {micro}s pulses, with a gain of 54 dB. Experiments for studying RF high-field effects on CVD diamond samples failed to show any evidence after more than 10{sup 5} RF pulses of RF breakdown up to a tangential surface field strength of 153 MV/m; studies at higher fields were not possible due to a degradation in magnicon performance. A rebuild of the tube is underway at this writing. Computed performance for a dielectric-loaded rectangular accelerator structure (DLA) shows highly competitive properties, as compared with an existing all-metal structure. For example, comparisons were made of a DLA structure having two planar CVD diamond elements with a all-metal CERN structure HDS operating at 30 GHz. It was shown that the ratio of maximum surface electric field to accelerating field at the metal wall is only 0.35-0.4 for DLA, much smaller than the value 2.2 for HDS; and the ratio of surface magnetic field to accelerating field is 3.0 mA/V for DLA, compared with 3.45 mA/V for HDS. These values bode well for DLA in helping to avoid breakdown and to reducing pulsed surface heating and fatigue. The shunt impedance is found to be 160-175 M{Omega}/m for DLA, as compared to 99 M{Omega}/m for HDS. Conclusions are reached from this project that CVD diamond appears promising as a dielectric with a high threshold for RF breakdown, and that rectangular accelerator structures can be devised using planar CVD diamond elements that could be operated at higher acceleration gradients with low probability of RF breakdown, as compared with corresponding all-metallic structures.

  13. Lake Roosevelt Fisheries Evaluation Program : Limnological and Fisheries Monitoring Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Holly; Lee, Chuck; Scofield, Ben; Pavlik, Deanne

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Coulee Dam was constructed in 1939 without a fish ladder, which eliminated steelhead (Onchorhynchus mykiss), chinook salmon (O. twshwastica), coho salmon (O. kisutch) and sockeye salmon (O. nerka) from returning to approximately 1,835 km (1,140 miles) of natal streams and tributaries found in the upper Columbia River Drainage in the United States and Canada. The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 gave the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the authority and responsibility to use its legal and financial resources, 'to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries. This is to be done in a manner consistent with the program adopted by the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC), and the purposes of the Act' (NWPPC, 1987). With the phrase 'protect, mitigate and enhance', Congress signaled its intent that the NWPPC's fish and wildlife program should do more than avoid future hydroelectric damage to the basin's fish and wildlife. The program must also counter past damage, work toward rebuilding those fish and wildlife populations that have been harmed by the hydropower system, protect the Columbia Basin's fish and wildlife resources, and mitigate for harm caused by decades of hydroelectric development and operations. By law, this program is limited to measures that deal with impacts created by the development, operation and management of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. However, off-site enhancement projects are used to address the effects of the hydropower system on fish and wildlife (NWPPC 1987). Resident game fish populations have been established in Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake, the reservoir behind Grand Coulee Dam, since the extirpation of anadromous fish species. The resident game fish populations are now responsible for attracting a large percentage of the recreational visits to the region. An increase in popularity has placed Lake Roosevelt fifth amongst the most visited State and Federal parks in Washington. Increased use of the reservoir prompted amplified efforts to enhance the Native American subsistence fishery and the resident sport fishery in 1984 with hatchery supplementation of rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and kokanee salmon (O. nerka). This was followed by the formation of the Spokane Tribal Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project (LRMP) in 1988 and later by formation of the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project in 1991. The Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project began in July 1991 as part of the BPA, Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers System Operation Review process. This process sought to develop an operational scenario for the federal Columbia River hydropower system to maximize the in-reservoir fisheries with minimal impacts to all other stakeholders in the management of the Columbia River. The Lake Roosevelt Monitoring/Data Collection Program (LRMP) is the result of a merger between the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (BPA No. 8806300) and the Lake Roosevelt Data Collection Project (BPA No. 9404300). These projects were merged in 1996 forming the Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Program (LRMP), which continues the work historically completed under the separate projects. The LRMP has two main goals. The first is to develop a biological model for Lake Roosevelt that will predict in-reservoir biological responses to a range of water management operational scenarios, and to develop fisheries and reservoir management strategies accordingly. The model will allow identification of lake operations that minimize impacts on lake biota while addressing the needs of other interests (e.g. flood control, hydropower generation, irrigation, and downstream resident and anadromous fisheries). Major components of the model will include: (1) quantification of entrainment and other impacts to phytoplankton, zooplankton and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification

  14. FY 2008 Next Generation Safeguards Initiative International Safeguards Education and Training Pilot Progerams Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreicer, M; Anzelon, G; Essner, J; Dougan, A; Doyle, J; Boyer, B; Hypes, P; Sokova, E; Wehling, F

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Key component of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) launched by the National Nuclear Security Administration is the development of human capital to meet present and future challenges to the safeguards regime. An effective university-level education in safeguards and related disciplines is an essential element in a layered strategy to rebuild the safeguards human resource capacity. Two pilot programs at university level, involving 44 students, were initiated and implemented in spring-summer 2008 and linked to hands-on internships at LANL or LLNL. During the internships, students worked on specific safeguards-related projects with a designated Laboratory Mentor to provide broader exposure to nuclear materials management and information analytical techniques. The Safeguards and Nuclear Material Management pilot program was a collaboration between the Texas A&M University (TAMU), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It included a 16-lecture course held during a summer internship program. The instructors for the course were from LANL together with TAMU faculty and LLNL experts. The LANL-based course was shared with the students spending their internship at LLNL via video conference. A week-long table-top (or hands-on) exercise on was also conducted at LANL. The student population was a mix of 28 students from a 12 universities participating in a variety of summer internship programs held at LANL and LLNL. A large portion of the students were TAMU students participating in the NGSI pilot. The International Nuclear Safeguards Policy and Information Analysis pilot program was implemented at the Monterey Institute for International Studies (MIIS) in cooperation with LLNL. It included a two-week intensive course consisting of 20 lectures and two exercises. MIIS, LLNL, and speakers from other U.S. national laboratories (LANL, BNL) delivered lectures for the audience of 16 students. The majority of students were senior classmen or new master's degree graduates from MIIS specializing in nonproliferation policy studies. Other university/organizations represented: University of California in LA, Stanford University, and the IAEA. Four of the students that completed this intensive course participated in a 2-month internship at LLNL. The conclusions of the two pilot courses and internships was a NGSI Summer Student Symposium, held at LLNL, where 20 students participated in LLNL facility tours and poster sessions. The Poster sessions were designed to provide a forum for sharing the results of their summer projects and providing experience in presenting their work to a varied audience of students, faculty and laboratory staff. The success of bringing together the students from the technical and policy pilots was notable and will factor into the planning for the continued refinement of their two pilot efforts in the coming years.

  15. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  16. Supplementation in the Columbia Basin : Summary Report Series : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report broadly defines the scope of supplementation plans and activities in the Columbia Basin. It provides the foundation for more detailed analysis of supplementation in subsequent reports in this series. Topics included in this report are: definition of supplementation, project diversity, objectives and performance standards, uncertainties and theory. Since this is a progress report, the content is subject to modification with new information. The supplementation theory will continue to evolve throughout the duration of RASP and beyond. The other topics in this report are essentially complete and are not expected to change significantly. This is the first of a series of four reports which will summarize information contained in the larger, RASP progress and completion reports. Our goal is to make the findings of RASP more accessible by grouping related topics into smaller but complete narratives on important aspects of supplementation. We are planning to publish the following reports under the general title Supplementation in the Columbia River Basin: Part 1, Background, Description, Performance Measures, Uncertainty and Theory; Part 2, Theoretical Framework and Models; Part 3, Planning Guidelines; and Part 4, Regional Coordination of Research and Monitoring. Supplementation is expected to be a major contributor to the planned increase in salmon and steelhead production in the Columbia Basin. The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) uses three approaches to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin: (1) enhance fish production; (2) improve passage in the mainstem rivers; and (3) revise harvest management to support the rebuilding of fish runs (NPPC 1987). The fish production segment calls for a three-part approach focused on natural production, hatchery production, and supplementation. Supplementation is planned to provide over half of the total production increases. The Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated as a result of a request by NPPC to address long-standing concerns about the need to coordinate supplementation research, monitoring and evaluation. Such coordination was also recommended by the Supplementation Technical Work Group. In August 1990, the NPPC gave conditional approval to proceed with the final design of the Yakima Production Project. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund immediately a supplementation assessment to reevaluate, prioritize and coordinate all existing and planned supplementation monitoring and evaluation activities in the basin. Providing for the participation of the fishery agencies and tribes and others having expertise in this area. RASP addresses four principal objectives: (1) provide an overview of ongoing and planned supplementation activities and identify critical uncertainties associated with supplementation, (2) construct a conceptual framework and model which estimates the potential benefits and risks of supplementation and prioritizes uncertainties, (3) provide guidelines for the development of supplementation projects, (4) develop a plan for regional coordination of research and monitoring. These objectives, once attained, will provide the technical tools fishery managers need to carry out the Council's direction to protect and enhance salmon and steelhead. RASP has further divided the four broad objectives into 12 technical topics: (1) definition of supplementation; (2) description of the diversity of supplementation projects; (3) objectives and performance standards; (4) identification of uncertainties; (5) supplementation theory; (6) development of a conceptual model of supplemented populations; (7) development of spreadsheet model of risks and benefits of supplementation; (8) classification of stocks, streams, and supplementation strategies; (9) regional design of supplementation evaluation and monitoring; (10) guidelines for planning supplementation projects (11) application of the spreadsheet model to supplementation planning; and (12)

  17. Snake River Sockeye Salmon Captive Broodstock Program; Hatchery Element, 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Dan J.; Heindel, Jeff A.; Redding, Jeremy (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 20, 1991, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed Snake River sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka as endangered under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. In 1991, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the National Marine Fisheries Service initiated efforts to conserve and rebuild populations in Idaho. Initial steps to recover sockeye salmon included the establishment of a captive broodstock program at the Idaho Department of Fish and Game Eagle Fish Hatchery. Sockeye salmon broodstock and culture responsibilities are shared with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at two locations adjacent to Puget Sound in Washington State. Activities conducted by the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are reported under separate cover. Idaho Department of Fish and Game monitoring and evaluation activities of captive broodstock program fish releases (annual report to the Bonneville Power Administration for the research element of the program) are also reported separately. Captive broodstock program activities conducted between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2004 for the hatchery element of the program are presented in this report. In 2004, twenty-seven anadromous sockeye salmon returned to the Sawtooth Valley. Traps on Redfish Lake Creek and the upper Salmon River at the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery intercepted one and four adults, respectively. Additionally, one adult sockeye salmon was collected at the East Fork Salmon River weir, 18 were seined from below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir, one adult sockeye salmon was observed below the Sawtooth Fish Hatchery weir but not captured, and two adult sockeye salmon were observed in Little Redfish Lake but not captured. Fish were captured/collected between July 24 and September 14, 2004. The captured/collected adult sockeye salmon (12 females and 12 males) originated from a variety of release strategies and were transferred to Eagle Fish Hatchery on September 14, 2004 and later incorporated into hatchery spawn matrices. Nine anadromous females, 102 captive females from brood year 2001, and one captive female from brood year 2000 broodstock groups were spawned at the Eagle Hatchery in 2004. Spawn pairings produced approximately 140,823 eyed-eggs with egg survival to eyed stage of development averaging 72.8%. Eyed-eggs (49,134), presmolts (130,716), smolts (96), and adults (241) were planted or released into Sawtooth Valley waters in 2004. Reintroduction strategies involved releases to Redfish Lake, Alturas Lake, and Pettit Lake. During this reporting period, five broodstocks and five unique production groups were in culture at Idaho Department of Fish and Game (Eagle Fish Hatchery and Sawtooth Fish Hatchery) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (Oxbow Fish Hatchery) facilities. Two of the five broodstocks were incorporated into the 2004 spawning design.

  18. Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

  19. BUILDING A NETWORK FOR NEUTRON SCATTERING EDUCATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pynn, Roger [ORNL; Baker, Shenda Mary [ORNL; Louca, Despo A [ORNL; McGreevy, Robert L [ORNL; Ekkebus, Allen E [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Anderson, Ian S [ORNL

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a concerted effort supported by the National Science Foundation, the Department of Commerce, and the Department of Energy, the United States is rebuilding its leadership in neutron scattering capability through a significant investment in U.S. neutron scattering user facilities and related instrumentation. These unique facilities provide opportunities in neutron scattering to a broad community of researchers from academic institutions, federal laboratories, and industry. However, neutron scattering is often considered to be a tool for 'experts only' and in order for the U.S. research community to take full advantage of these new and powerful tools, a comprehensive education and outreach program must be developed. The workshop described below is the first step in developing a national program that takes full advantage of modern education methods and leverages the existing educational capacity at universities and national facilities. During March 27-28, 2008, a workshop entitled 'Building a Network for Neutron Scattering Education' was held in Washington, D.C. The goal of the workshop was to define and design a roadmap for a comprehensive neutron scattering education program in the United States. Successful implementation of the roadmap will maximize the national intellectual capital in neutron sciences and will increase the sophistication of research questions addressed by neutron scattering at the nation's forefront facilities. (See Appendix A for the list of attendees, Appendix B for the workshop agenda, Appendix C for a list of references. Appendix D contains the results of a survey given at the workshop; Appendix E contains summaries of the contributed talks.) The workshop brought together U.S. academicians, representatives from neutron sources, scientists who have developed nontraditional educational programs, educational specialists, and managers from government agencies to create a national structure for providing ongoing neutron scattering education. A concerted effort was made to involve representatives from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and minority educational institutions (MEIs). The roadmap contained herein provides the path to a national infrastructure for education of students, faculty, and professional researchers who wish to make use of national neutron scattering facilities but do not have (or do not believe they have) the educational background to do so. Education of other stakeholders, including the public, students in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12), and policy makers is also included. The opening sessions of the workshop provided the current status of neutron scattering education in North America, Europe, and Australia. National neutron sources have individually developed outreach and advertising programs aimed at increasing awareness among researchers of the potential applications of neutron scattering. However, because their principal mission is to carry out scientific research, their outreach efforts are necessarily self-limiting. The opening session was designed to build awareness that the individual programs need to be coupled with, and integrated into, a broader education program that addresses the complete range of experience, from the student to the experienced researcher, and the wide range of scientific disciplines covered by neutron scattering. Such a program must also take full advantage of existing educational programs and expertise at universities and expand them using modern distance learning capabilities, recognizing that the landscape of education is changing.

  20. Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

  1. Phase I Water Rental Pilot Project : Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riggin, Stacey H.; Hansen, H. Jerome

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented as a part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement (NTSA) between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to improve juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage in the lower Snake River with the use of rented water for flow augmentation. The primary purpose of this project is to summarize existing resource information and provide recommendations to protect or enhance resident fish and wildlife resources in Idaho with actions achieving flow augmentation for anadromous fish. Potential impacts of an annual flow augmentation program on Idaho reservoirs and streams are modeled. Potential sources of water for flow augmentation and operational or institutional constraints to the use of that water are identified. This report does not advocate flow augmentation as the preferred long-term recovery action for salmon. The state of Idaho strongly believes that annual drawdown of the four lower Snake reservoirs is critical to the long-term enhancement and recovery of salmon (Andrus 1990). Existing water level management includes balancing the needs of hydropower production, irrigated agriculture, municipalities and industries with fish, wildlife and recreation. Reservoir minimum pool maintenance, water quality and instream flows are issues of public concern that will be directly affected by the timing and quantity of water rental releases for salmon flow augmentation, The potential of renting water from Idaho rental pools for salmon flow augmentation is complicated by institutional impediments, competition from other water users, and dry year shortages. Water rental will contribute to a reduction in carryover storage in a series of dry years when salmon flow augmentation is most critical. Such a reduction in carryover can have negative impacts on reservoir fisheries by eliminating shoreline spawning beds, reducing available fish habitat, and exacerbating adverse water quality conditions. A reduction in carry over can lead to seasonal reductions in instream flows, which may also negatively affect fish, wildlife, and recreation in Idaho. The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project does provide opportunities to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat by improving water quality and instream flows. Control of point sources, such as sewage and industrial discharges, alone will not achieve water quality goals in Idaho reservoirs and streams. Slow, continuous releases of rented water can increase and stabilize instream flows, increase available fish and wildlife habitat, decrease fish displacement, and improve water quality. Island integrity, requisite for waterfowl protection from mainland predators, can be maintained with improved timing of water releases. Rebuilding Snake River salmon and steelhead runs requires a cooperative commitment and increased flexibility in system operations to increase flow velocities for fish passage and migration. Idaho's resident fish and wildlife resources require judicious management and a willingness by all parties to liberate water supplies equitably.

  2. Tucannon River Spring Chinook Salmon Captive Broodstock Program, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallinat, Michael; Varney, Michelle

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the objectives, tasks, and accomplishments of the Tucannon River Spring Chinook Captive Broodstock Program during 2002. The WDFW initiated a captive broodstock program in 1997. The overall goal of the Tucannon River captive broodstock program is for the short-term, and eventually long-term, rebuilding of the Tucannon River spring chinook salmon run, with the hope that natural production will sustain itself. The project goal is to rear captive salmon selected from the supplementation program to adults, spawn them, rear their progeny, and release approximately 150,000 smolts annually into the Tucannon River between 2003-2007. These smolt releases, in combination with the current hatchery supplementation program (132,000 smolts) and wild production, are expected to produce 600-700 returning adult spring chinook to the Tucannon River each year from 2005-2010. The captive broodstock program collected fish from five (1997-2001) brood years (BY). As of January 1, 2003, WDFW has approximately 11 BY 1998, 194 BY 1999, 314 BY 2000, 447 BY 2001, and 300 BY 2002 (for extra males) fish on hand at LFH. The 2002 eggtake from the 1997 brood year (Age 5) was 13,176 eggs from 10 ripe females. Egg survival was 22%. Mean fecundity based on the 5 fully spawned females was 1,803 eggs/female. The 2002 eggtake from the 1998 brood year (Age 4) was 143,709 eggs from 93 ripe females. Egg survival was 29%. Mean fecundity based on the 81 fully spawned females was 1,650 eggs/female. The 2002 eggtake from the 1999 brood year (Age 3) was 19,659 eggs from 18 ripe females. Egg survival was 55%. Mean fecundity based on the 18 fully spawned fish was 1,092 eggs/female. The total 2002 eggtake from the captive brood program was 176,544 eggs. A total of 120,833 dead eggs (68%) were removed with 55,711 live eggs remaining for the program. As of May 1, 2003 we had 46,417 BY 2002 captive brood progeny on hand A total of 20,592 excess BY 01 fish were marked as parr (AD/CWT) and released during May 2002 into the Tucannon River (rkm 40-45). This allowed us to stay within our maximum allowed number (150,000) of smolts released. On August 20, 97 (21 1998 BY and 76 1999 BY) adult captive broodstock were determined to be in excess of eggtake goals and were outplanted into the Tucannon River at Panjab Bridge (rkm 74.5). Released fish were tagged with Monel jaw tags and radio transmitters were inserted into ten females for tracking and monitoring. Due to the low frequency of natural spawning by released fish, high mortality due to predation and illegal harvest, and high egg mortality in the hatchery during 2002, priority will be to release excess progeny as parr to stay within smolt release goals rather than release excess captive broodstock as adults. During April 2003, WDFW volitionally released 140,396 BY 2001 captive broodstock progeny smolts from Curl Lake Acclimation Pond into the Tucannon River. These fish were marked with agency-only wire tags and no fin clips in order to differentiate them from the supplementation fish (CWT/Right Red VIE/No Finclip). A total of 1,007 captive brood progeny smolts were PIT tagged to compare their outmigration with smolts from the supplementation program (1,010 tagged). Monitoring their survival and future releases to adult returns, along with future natural production levels, will determine the success or failure of this captive broodstock program.

  3. International Linear Collider Reference Design Report Volume 2: Physics at the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aarons, Gerald; Abe, Toshinori; Abernathy, Jason; Ablikim, Medina; Abramowicz, Halina; Adey, David; Adloff, Catherine; Adolphsen, Chris; Afanaciev, Konstantin; Agapov, Ilya; Ahn, Jung-Keun; Aihara, Hiroaki; Akemoto, Mitsuo; del Carmen Alabau, Maria; Albert, Justin; Albrecht, Hartwig; Albrecht, Michael; Alesini, David; Alexander, Gideon; Alexander, Jim; Allison, Wade; /SLAC /Tokyo U. /Victoria U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Tel Aviv U. /Birmingham U. /Annecy, LAPP /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /DESY /Royal Holloway, U. of London /CERN /Pusan Natl. U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LAL /Notre Dame U. /Frascati /Cornell U., Phys. Dept. /Oxford U. /Hefei, CUST /Bangalore, Indian Inst. Sci. /Fermilab

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The triumph of 20th century particle physics was the development of the Standard Model and the confirmation of many of its aspects. Experiments determined the particle constituents of ordinary matter, and identified four forces that hold matter together and transform it from one form to another. Particle interactions were found to obey precise laws of relativity and quantum theory. Remarkable features of quantum physics were observed, including the real effects of 'virtual' particles on the visible world. Building on this success, particle physicists are now able to address questions that are even more fundamental, and explore some of the deepest mysteries in science. The scope of these questions is illustrated by this summary from the report Quantum Universe: (1) Are there undiscovered principles of nature; (2) How can we solve the mystery of dark energy; (3) Are there extra dimensions of space; (4) Do all the forces become one; (5) Why are there so many particles; (6) What is dark matter? How can we make it in the laboratory; (7) What are neutrinos telling us; (8) How did the universe begin; and (9) What happened to the antimatter? A worldwide program of particle physics investigations, using multiple approaches, is already underway to explore this compelling scientific landscape. As emphasized in many scientific studies, the International Linear Collider is expected to play a central role in what is likely to be an era of revolutionary advances. Discoveries from the ILC could have breakthrough impact on many of these fundamental questions. Many of the scientific opportunities for the ILC involve the Higgs particle and related new phenomena at Terascale energies. The Standard Model boldly hypothesizes a new form of Terascale energy, called the Higgs field, that permeates the entire universe. Elementary particles acquire mass by interacting with this field. The Higgs field also breaks a fundamental electroweak force into two forces, the electromagnetic and weak forces, which are observed by experiments in very different forms. So far, there is no direct experimental evidence for a Higgs field or the Higgs particle that should accompany it. Furthermore, quantum effects of the type already observed in experiments should destabilize the Higgs boson of the Standard Model, preventing its operation at Terascale energies. The proposed antidotes for this quantum instability mostly involve dramatic phenomena at the Terascale: new forces, a new principle of nature called supersymmetry, or even extra dimensions of space. Thus for particle physicists the Higgs boson is at the center of a much broader program of discovery, taking off from a long list of questions. Is there really a Higgs boson? If not, what are the mechanisms that give mass to particles and break the electroweak force? If there is a Higgs boson, does it differ from the hypothetical Higgs of the Standard Model? Is there more than one Higgs particle? What are the new phenomena that stabilize the Higgs boson at the Terascale? What properties of Higgs boson inform us about these new phenomena? Another major opportunity for the ILC is to shed light on the dark side of the universe. Astrophysical data shows that dark matter dominates over visible matter, and that almost all of this dark matter cannot be composed of known particles. This data, combined with the concordance model of Big Bang cosmology, suggests that dark matter is comprised of new particles that interact weakly with ordinary matter and have Terascale masses. It is truely remarkable that astrophysics and cosmology, completely independently of the particle physics considerations reviewed above, point to new phenomena at the Terascale. If Terascale dark matter exists, experiments at the ILC should be able to produce such particles in the laboratory and study their properties. Another list of questions will then beckon. Do these new particles really have the correct properties to be the dark matter? Do they account for all of the dark matter, or only part of it? What do their properties tell us about the evolut