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1

TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

Joye, BROTHERTON

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah Siver Site EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah Siver Site SUMMARY DOE proposes to construct and operate a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at H Area on the Savannah River Site (SRS) to provide the capability to extract tritium from commercial light water reactor (CLWR) targets and from targets of similar design. The proposed action is also DOE's preferred alternative. An action alternative is to construct and operate TEF at the Allied General Nuclear Services facility, which is adjacent to the eastern side of the SRS. Under the no-action alternative DOE could incorporate tritium extraction capabilities in the accelerator for production of

3

Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

1997-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

which was completed in October 1995, assessed the potential environmental impacts of technology and siting alternatives for the production of tritium for national security...

5

EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah Siver Site EIS-0271: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the...

6

Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah Siver Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A D E P A R T M E NT O F E N E R G Y DOE/EIS-0271 Construction & Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah River Site Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office Aiken, South Carolina Final Environmental Impact Statement March 1999 DOE/EIS-0271 March 1999 Preface iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement: Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah River Site (DOE/EIS-0271) LOCATION: Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina CONTACT: For additional information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), write or call: Andrew R. Grainger, NEPA Compliance Officer U.S. Department of Energy

7

Tritium Removal Facility High Tritium Distillation Simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A dynamic model was developed for the distillation mechanism of the Darlington Tritium Removal Facility. The model was created using the commercial software package MATLAB/Simulink.… (more)

Zahedi, Polad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah Siver Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 March 1999 Summary S-1 SUMMARY S.1 Introduction and Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is re- sponsible for ensuring that the nation has a sup- ply of materials sufficient to maintain its nuclear weapons stockpile at levels directed by the President of the United States. One of these materials is tritium - a gaseous isotope of hy- drogen that increases the yield of nuclear weap- ons. None of the weapons in the nuclear arsenal would be capable of functioning as designed without tritium. As long as the United States chooses to maintain a nuclear deterrent - of any size - it will need tritium. There are two factors that dictate the timing re- garding the nation's need for tritium. The first is that the U.S. no longer has the operating facili- ties needed to produce tritium. DOE has shut

9

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 May 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 2. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Part 1, page 14 Change: U.S. Department of Energy, Radiological Control

10

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE HANDBOOK DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Cover sheets parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 Change: Office of Environment, Safety & Health

11

Tritium Recycling (Processing) Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design, Operation, and Maintenance of Tritium System / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

Jack Metzler; Thuy Le

12

Tritium emission reduction at Darlington tritium removal facility using a Bubbler System  

SciTech Connect

Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station operates a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) to reduce and maintain low tritium levels in the Moderator and Heat Transport heavy water systems of Ontario's CANDU fleet by extracting, concentrating, immobilizing and storing as a metal tritide. Minimizing tritium releases to the environment is of paramount importance to ensure that dose to the public is as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) and to maintain credibility with the Public. Tritium is removed from the Cryogenic Distillation System to the Tritium Immobilization System (TIS) glove box via a transfer line that is protected by a rupture disc and relief valve. An overpressure event in 2003 had caused the rupture disc to blow, resulting in the release of a significant quantity of elemental tritium into the relief valve discharge line, which ties into the contaminated exhaust system. As a result of a few similar events occurring over a number of years of TRF operation, the released elemental tritium would have been converted to tritium oxide in the presence of a stagnant moist air environment in the stainless steel discharge line. A significant amount of tritium oxide hold-up in the discharge line was anticipated. To minimize any further releases to the environment, a Bubbler System was designed to remove and recover the tritium from the discharge line. This paper summarizes the results of several Bubbler recovery runs that were made over a period of a month. Approximately 3500 Ci of tritium oxide and 230 Ci of elemental tritium were removed and collected. The tritium contained in the water produced from the Bubbler system was later safely recovered in the station's downgraded D{sub 2}O clean-up and recovery system. (authors)

Kalyanam, K.; Leilabadi, A.; El-Behairy, O.; Williams, G. I. D.; Vogt, H. K. [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington Nuclear, PO Box 4000, Bowmanville, ON L1C 3Z8 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Radiological training for tritium facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Tritium Monitoring in the Environment at Tritium Separation Facility - ICIT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Carmen Varlam; Ioan Stefanescu; Ionut Faurescu; Denisa Faurescu; Diana Bogdan; Amalia Soare; Gheorghe Ionita

15

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tritium Tritium Facilities - December 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December 2012 December 2012 Review of Site Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of preparedness for severe natural phenomena events (NPEs) at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Savannah River Site's (SRS's) Tritium Facilities (TF). The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this review to evaluate the processes for identifying emergency response capabilities and maintaining them in a state of readiness in case of a severe NPE.

16

Tritium Emissions from a Detritiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

L. Rodrigo; O. El-Behairy; H. Boniface; C. Hotrum; K. McCrimmon

17

Report of the Task Group on operation Department of Energy tritium facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics on the operation of DOE Tritium facilities: Environment, Safety, and Health Aspects of Tritium; Management of Operations and Maintenance Functions; Safe Shutdown of Tritium Facilities; Management of the Facility Safety Envelope; Maintenance of Qualified Tritium Handling Personnel; DOE Tritium Management Strategy; Radiological Control Philosophy; Implementation of DOE Requirements; Management of Tritium Residues; Inconsistent Application of Requirements for Measurement of Tritium Effluents; Interdependence of Tritium Facilities; Technical Communication among Facilities; Incorporation of Confinement Technologies into New Facilities; Operation/Management Requirements for New Tritium Facilities; and Safety Management Issues at Department of Energy Tritium Facilities.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Tritium Facilities Modernization and Consolidation Project Process Waste Assessment (Project S-7726)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the Tritium Facility Modernization {ampersand} Consolidation (TFM{ampersand}C) Project (S-7726) at the Savannah River Site (SS), all tritium processing operations in Building 232-H, with the exception of extraction and obsolete/abandoned systems, will be reestablished in Building 233-H. These operations include hydrogen isotopic separation, loading and unloading of tritium shipping and storage containers, tritium recovery from zeolite beds, and stripping of nitrogen flush gas to remove tritium prior to stack discharge. The scope of the TFM{ampersand}C Project also provides for a new replacement R&D tritium test manifold in 233-H, upgrading of the 233- H Purge Stripper and 233-H/234-H building HVAC, a new 234-H motor control center equipment building and relocating 232-H Materials Test Facility metallurgical laboratories (met labs), flow tester and life storage program environment chambers to 234-H.

Hsu, R.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Oji, L.N.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

19

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and...

20

Tertiary Containment in a Multi-Room Tritium Facility  

SciTech Connect

An experimental system to provide tertiary containment at Mound has been upgraded to support a new multi-room tritium handling facility. This system is used to remove tritium from room air in the event of primary (process) and secondary (glovebox) containment failure. The upgraded system includes a faster response time, piping and valves that are more leaktight, and a new control panel that better indicates the system status and operating conditions.

Kent, L. R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Health physics manual of good practices for tritium facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide written guidance defining the generally accepted good practices in use at Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities. A {open_quotes}good practice{close_quotes} is an action, policy, or procedure that enhances the radiation protection program at a DOE site. The information selected for inclusion in this document should help readers achieve an understanding of the key radiation protection issues at tritium facilities and provide guidance as to what characterizes excellence from a radiation protection point of view. The ALARA (As Low as Reasonable Achievable) program at DOE sites should be based, in part, on following the good practices that apply to their operations.

Blauvelt, R.K.; Deaton, M.R.; Gill, J.T. [and others

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Safety System Oversight Assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Handling System INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW This report documents the results of the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) review of a safety system oversight (SSO) assessment of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) tritium gas handling system (TGHS). The assessment evaluated the TGHS's ability to perform as required by safety bases and other applicable requirements. The assessment was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) and was conducted October 25 - November 5, 2010. LASO was the overall lead organization for the evaluation, which included independent

23

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Containment Vital Safety System, January 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Independent Oversight Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility Tritium Gas Containment Vital Safety System January 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose............................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background...................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................ 1

24

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

25

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation Verification Review Processes June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Background ........................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Scope..................................................................................................................................................... 1

26

Report of Survey of the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility Report of Survey of the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility The purpose of this document is to report the results of a survey conducted at the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA Facility). The survey was conducted during the week of 3/20/00. The primary purpose of the survey is to identify facility conditions and issues that need to be addressed to transfer responsibility for the facility from the Office of Science (SC) to the Office of Environmental Management (EM). The second purpose is to provide EM with insight regarding the facility's risks and liabilities, which may influence the management of eventual downstream life-cycle activities. The survey and this report are part of a process for implementing the

27

Extraction of Hydrogen and Tritium Using High-Temperature Proton Conductor for Tritium Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

M. Tanaka; T. Sugiyama; T. Ohshima; I. Yamamoto

28

Operating Experience with the Sandia Tritium Facility Cleanup Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Containment and Control / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

P. Gildea

29

Tritium Instrumentation for the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories Tritium Extraction Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring and Measurement / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

E.C. Davey; R.G.C. McElroy; S. Kupca

30

NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: • Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina • Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio • Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor • Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site • Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

31

EIS-0161: Tritium Supply and Recycling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

new Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at the Department's Savannah River Site near Aiken, SC. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for...

32

REPORT OF SURVEY OF THE LOS ALAMOS TRITIUM SYSTEMS TEST ASSEMBLY FACILITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE LOS ALAMOS TRITIUM THE LOS ALAMOS TRITIUM SYSTEMS TEST ASSEMBLY FACILITY U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management & Office of Science Report of Survey of the Los Alamos Tritium Systems Test Assembly Facility Rev. E (Final) October 3, 2000 Contents 1. Introduction 1.1 Purpose 1.2 Facility Description 1.3 Organization Representatives 1.4 Survey Participants 2. Summary, Conclusions & Recommendations 2.1 Comparison With LCAM Requirements 2.2 Transfer Considerations 2.3 Post-Transfer EM Path Forward & Management Risk 2.4 Post-Transfer S&M Reduction via Administrative Contamination Limit Revision 2.5 Stable Metal Tritides Consideration During D&D 3. Survey Results

33

Environmental health-risk assessment for tritium releases at the National Tritium Labeling Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This risk assessment calculates the probability of experiencing health effects, including cancer incidence due to tritium exposure for three groups of people: (1) LBNL workers near the LBNL facility--Building 75--that uses tritium; (2) other workers at LBNL and nearby neighbors; and (3) people who use the UC Berkeley campus area, and some Berkeley residents. All of these groups share the same probability of health effects from the background radiation from natural sources in the Berkeley area environment, including an increased risk of developing a cancer of 11,000 chances per million. In calculating risk the authors assumed continuous operation in Building 75 for at least a human lifetime. Under this assumption, LBNL workers located near Building 75 have an additional risk of 60 chances out of one million to suffer a cancer; other workers at LBNL and people who live near LBNL have an additional risk of six chances out of one million over a lifetime of exposure; and users of the UC Berkeley campus area and other residents of Berkeley have an additional risk of less than once chance out of one million over a lifetime.

McKone, T.E.; Brand, K.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Health and Ecological Assessment Div.; Shan, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Superseding Superseding DOE-HDBK-1105-96 December 1996 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. (PART 1 OF 4) Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities Program Management Guide

35

A Scanning Electron Microscope Facility for Characterization of Tritium Containing Materials  

SciTech Connect

A scanning electron microscope (SEM) facility for the examination of tritium-containing materials is operational at Mound Laboratory. The SEM is installed with the sample chamber incorporated as an integral part of an inert gas glovebox facility to enable easy handling of radioactive and pyrophoric materials. A standard SEM (ERTEC Model B-1) was modified to meet dimensional, operational, and safety-related requirements. A glovebox was designed and fabricated which permitted access with the gloves to all parts of the SEM sample chamber to facilitate detector and accessory replacement and repairs. A separate console combining the electron optical column and specimen chamber was interfaced to the glovebox by a custom-made, neoprene bellows so that the vibrations normally associated with the blowers and pumps were damped. Photomicrographs of tritiated pyrophoric materials show the usefulness of this facility. Some of the difficulties involved in the investigation of these materials are also discussed.

Downs, G. L.; Tucker, P. A.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A New Method to Measure Small Volumes in Tritium Handling Facilities, Using p-V Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Z. Köllö; C. G. Alecu; H. Moosmann

37

Tritium Research Activities in KAERI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Hongsuk Chung et al.

38

Independent Oversight Review of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation, November 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the of the Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation May 2011 November 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Scope................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background ......................................................................................................................................... 1

39

Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Darlington tritium removal facility and station upgrading plant dynamic process simulation  

SciTech Connect

Ontario Power Generation Nuclear (OPGN) has a 4 x 880 MWe CANDU nuclear station at its Darlington Nuclear Div. located in Bowmanville. The station has been operating a Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) and a D{sub 2}O station Upgrading Plant (SUP) since 1989. Both facilities were designed with a Distributed Control System (DCS) and programmable logic controllers (PLC) for process control. This control system was replaced with a DCS only, in 1998. A dynamic plant simulator was developed for the Darlington TRF (DTRF) and the SUP, as part of the computer control system replacement. The simulator was used to test the new software, required to eliminate the PLCs. The simulator is now used for operator training and testing of process control software changes prior to field installation. Dynamic simulation will be essential for the ITER isotope separation system, where the process is more dynamic than the relatively steady-state DTRF process. This paper describes the development and application of the DTRF and SUP dynamic simulator, its benefits, architecture, and the operational experience with the simulator. (authors)

Busigin, A. [NITEK USA, Inc., 6405 NW 77 PL, Parkland, FL 33067 (United States); Williams, G. I. D.; Wong, T. C. W.; Kulczynski, D.; Reid, A. [Ontario Power Generation Nuclear, Box 4000, Bowmanville, ON L1C 3Z8 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

Demonstration of Tritium Extraction from Tritiated Methane in Helium by Utilizing Plasma Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Kazunari Katayama; Satoshi Fukada; Masabumi Nishikawa

45

Progress of Tritium Extraction and Measurement Methods Development from Liquid Breeder Blanket in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen/Tritium Behavior / Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials, Part A: Fusion Technology

Eo Hwak Lee; Suk Kwon Kim; Jae Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Seungyon Cho

46

A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project.

Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Baskett, R.L. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The Licensing Aspects of the Tritium Extraction Plant at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission Reactor / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

P.R. Ballantyne

48

Sources of tritium  

SciTech Connect

A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water.

Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development of an Integrated Monitoring System for a New Tritium Facility at Mound  

SciTech Connect

A stand-alone system was developed for monitoring process support services and tritium levels in gloveboxes, room air, room exhaust ducts, and stack exhaust. Sixty tritium monitors were built and interfaced to a Health Physics control room where all tritiuim levels are displayed and abnormal conditions appear as alarms on large display boards. The control room was designed for full remote control of all monitors, with the exception of those for gloveboxes, as well as for control and alarm display of many other functions, including the purge rate for glovebox atmosphere and the selection of room air discharge to stack or to a tritium cleanup system. The monitoring system is interfaced to a data gathering computer and an automatic dialing alarm syhstem.

Rhinehammer, T. B.; Burgess, T. E.; Spyrou, E. L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Tritium Breeding Ratio Required to Keep Tritium Balance in a D-T Fusion Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Masabumi Nishikawa

51

Tritium Extraction from Liquid Pb-16Li: A Critical Review of Candidate Technologies for ITER and DEMO Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket and Breeder Materials / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

I. Ricapito; A. Ciampichetti; R. Lässer; Y. Poitevin; M. Utili

52

Tritium Assay and Dispensing in TriMARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

S. H. Son; K. M. Song; S. K. Lee; K. W. Lee; B. W. Ko

53

Performance of Vacuum Pumps to be Used in Tritium Extraction Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this test was to measure pump operating characteristics for three different gases and a wider range of conditions than for the vendor data. Test results will be used by Engineering Development Section for incorporation in a computer model of the pump train.

Steimke, J.L.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

Potential role of the Fast Flux Test Facility and the advanced test reactor in the U.S. tritium production system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deparunent of Energy is currently engaged in a dual-track strategy to develop an accelerator and a conunercial light water reactor (CLWR) as potential sources of tritium supply. New analysis of the production capabilities of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site argues for considering its inclusion in the tritium supply,system. The use of the FFTF (alone or together with the Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) as an integral part of,a tritium production system would help (1) ensure supply by 2005, (2) provide additional time to resolve institutional and technical issues associated with the- dual-track strategy, and (3) reduce discounted total life-cycle`costs and near-tenn annual expenditures for accelerator-based systems. The FFRF would also provide a way to get an early start.on dispositioning surplus weapons-usable plutonium as well as provide a source of medical isotopes. Challenges Associated With the Dual-Track Strategy The Departinent`s purchase of either a commercial reactor or reactor irradiation services faces challenging institutional issues associated with converting civilian reactors to defense uses. In addition, while the technical capabilities of the individual components of the accelerator have been proven, the entire system needs to be demonstrated and scaled upward to ensure that the components work toge ther 1548 as a complete production system. These challenges create uncertainty over the ability of the du2a-track strategy to provide an assured tritium supply source by 2005. Because the earliest the accelerator could come on line is 2007, it would have to operate at maximum capacity for the first few years to regenerate the reserves lost through radioactive decay aftei 2005.

Dautel, W.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Tritium Fuel System Assessment on Economics and CO2 Emissions in DT Fusion Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

K. Yamazaki; T. Oishi

56

R&D Activities on the Tritium Storage and Delivery System in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

S. Cho et al.

57

Past 25 Years Results for Large Amount of Tritium Handling Technology in JAEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Toshihiko Yamanishi et al.

58

Improvement of Ultimate Pressure of Oil-Free Reciprocating Pump for Tritium Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Takumi Hayashi; Masayuki Yamada; Takumi Suzuki; Toshihiko Yamanishi

59

Commissioning Scenario Without Initial Tritium Inventory for a Demonstration Reactor Demo-CREST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concept and Facility / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

R. Hiwatari; K. Okano; Y. Ogawa

60

Deactivation Of Mound's Tritium Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deactivation of Mound? s tritium complex is on the critical path for the site exit plan. Under the site exit plan, the DOE Mound Plant in Miamisburg, Ohio, is undergoing significant effort to transition the former weapons facilities to commercial use. Mound will demolish, decontaminate, or transfer more than 100 facilities and 300 acres of land to a non-commercial organization, Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corp. (MMCIC) for the city's industrial site development. Among these facilities, deactivation of three tritium facilities presents the most challenge. These laboratory buildings were among some of the original buildings built at Mound in the late 1940s or early 1950s. Through the years, those buildings were used for tritium recovery, testing, research and development and are heavily contaminated with tritium and other radionuclides. The Mound Plant combined safe shutdown of these facilities into a single project. The first deactivation project of this magnitude in the...

Sam Cheng And

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Tritium in the aquatic environment  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is of environmental importance because it is released from nuclear facilities in relatively large quantities and because it has a half life of 12.26 y. Most of the tritium released into the atmosphere eventually reaches the aqueous environment, where it is rapidly taken up by aquatic organisms. This paper reviews the current literature on tritium in the aquatic environment. Conclusions from the review, which covered studies of algae, aquatic macrophytes, invertebrates, fish, and the food chain, were that aquatic organisms incorporate tritium into their tissue-free water very rapidly and reach concentrations near those of the external medium. The rate at which tritium from tritiated water is incorporated into the organic matter of cells is slower than the rate of its incorporation into the tissue-free water. If organisms consume tritiated food, incorporation of tritium into the organic matter is faster, and a higher tritium concentration is reached than when the organisms are exposed to only tritiated water alone. Incorporation of tritium bound to molecules into the organic matter depends on the chemical form of the ''carrier'' molecule. No evidence was found that biomagnification of tritium occurs at higher trophic levels. Radiation doses from tritium releases to large populations of humans will most likely come from the consumption of contaminated water rather than contaminated aquatic food products.

Blaylock, B.G.; Hoffman, F.O.; Frank, M.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tritium extraction furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of apparatus for heating an object such as a nuclear target bundle to release and recover hydrogen and contain the disposable residue for disposal. The apparatus comprises an inverted furnace, a sleeve/crucible assembly for holding and enclosing the bundle, conveying equipment for placing the sleeve onto the crucible and loading the bundle into the sleeve/crucible, a lift for raising the enclosed bundle into the furnace, and hydrogen recovery equipment including a trap and strippers, all housed in a containment having, negative internal pressure. The crucible/sleeve assembly has an internal volume that is sufficient to enclose and hold the bundle before heating; the crucible`s internal volume is sufficient by itself to hold and enclose the bundle`s volume after heating. The crucible can then be covered and disposed of, the sleeve, on the other hand, can be reused.

Heung, L.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mobility of Tritium in Engineered and Earth Materials at the NuMI Facility, Fermilab: Progress report for work performed between June 13 and September 30, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

converting any H 2 gas produced to water) and measuring thefor the tritium produced in pore water of the fractured rockfor the tritium produced in pore water of the fractured rock

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Post Service Examination of Tritium Process Components from the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device, Facility, and Operation / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

C.J.Caldwell-Nichols; M. Glugla; S. Gross; R. Lässer; T.L. Le; R.-D. Penzhorn; K.H. Simon

65

Subwog 12-D tritium technology meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Subwog 12-D Tritium Technology Meeting was held at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site during the week of May 21, 1990. Subwog 12-D was created as a subwog of JOWOG 12 to address the need to understand tritium applications throughout the entire weapons complex. This includes weapons related concerns, but is primarily intended to cover tritium production and handling, environmental, safety and health issues, compatibility with materials in general; and facility design, commissioning and decommissioning activities. Tritium technology issues discussed included the physical and chemical properties, kinetics, storage, reservoir loading techniques, isotope exchange, radiolysis/aging, process and handling technology, compatibility, purification and filtering, analysis, monitoring methods, function testing, packaging and shipping, environmental and operational safety, facility design and safety, glovebox atmosphere clean-up systems, glovebox/facility decommissioning, tritium production target materials, and tritium recovery. This document provides a collection of most of the unclassified extended abstracts and abstracts presented at Subwog 12-D.

Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Subwog 12-D tritium technology meeting. Abstracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first Subwog 12-D Tritium Technology Meeting was held at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site during the week of May 21, 1990. Subwog 12-D was created as a subwog of JOWOG 12 to address the need to understand tritium applications throughout the entire weapons complex. This includes weapons related concerns, but is primarily intended to cover tritium production and handling, environmental, safety and health issues, compatibility with materials in general; and facility design, commissioning and decommissioning activities. Tritium technology issues discussed included the physical and chemical properties, kinetics, storage, reservoir loading techniques, isotope exchange, radiolysis/aging, process and handling technology, compatibility, purification and filtering, analysis, monitoring methods, function testing, packaging and shipping, environmental and operational safety, facility design and safety, glovebox atmosphere clean-up systems, glovebox/facility decommissioning, tritium production target materials, and tritium recovery. This document provides a collection of most of the unclassified extended abstracts and abstracts presented at Subwog 12-D.

Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Field Office Tritium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Office Tritium Field Office Tritium Facilities - November 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities - November 2013 November 13, 2013 Review of Savannah River Field Office Tritium Facilities Radiological Controls Activity-Level Implementation This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the radiological protection program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium facilities implemented at the activity-level by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC and its subcontractors. The review was performed by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations within the broader context of an ongoing program of targeted assessments of radiological control programs, with an emphasis on

68

tritium1120  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY REPORT ON SUMMARY REPORT ON INSPECTION OF ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY' S TRITIUM SOURCE SELECTION PROCESS NOVEMBER 1998 DOE/IG-0431 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF INSPECTIONS INSPECTION REPORT November 23, 1999 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman /s/ Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Summary Report on "Inspection of Issues Associated With the Department of Energy' s Tritium Source Selection Process" BACKGROUND The Office of Inspector General received a letter dated August 31, 1998 from Senator Strom Thurmond concerning the selection of the tritium production source. The let-

69

Glossary Term - Tritium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Titans Previous Term (Titans) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Uranus) Uranus Tritium Discovered in 1934, tritium is an unstable isotope of the element hydrogen. An atom of tritium...

70

An In-Situ Tritium-Deuterium Gas-Purification System for Muon Catalyzed Fusion Experiments at the RIKEN-RAL Muon Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purification and Chemical Process / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

T. Matsuzaki; K. Nagamine; K. Ishida; M. Kato; H. Sugai; M. Tanase; G.H. Eaton

71

Tritium removal and separation technology developments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent increased interest from regulators and the public has led more organizations to consider the environmental impact and safety considerations of tritium handling. Examples include the significance of the tritium isotope separation system on ITER licensing, remediation of ground water from power utilities and government facilities and concerns of high tritium concentrations within operational CANDU reactors. GE Healthcare, formerly Amersham pic, has been producing tritium-labelled chemicals since the late 1940's. GE's manufacturing site located near Cardiff, UK has installed a tritium waste treatment and enrichment facility to radically reduce tritium discharges to the environment. This facility employs a continuous processing plant that recovers tritium from a complex mixture of tritiated organic and aqueous waste compounds. Two isotope separation techniques are used to achieve a final pure tritium product, which is used in the manufacturing of labelled compounds. Building upon this experience, together with Special Separations Applications Inc. (SSAI), GE has developed a large-scale diffusion-based isotope separation process as an alternative to conventional cryogenic distillation. Having a tritium inventory an order of magnitude lower than conventional cryogenic distillation, this process is attractive for heavy water detritiation, applicable to single and multi-unit CANDU reactors and research reactors as well as fusion applications. Additionally, the new process has advantages of being cryogen-free, less complex, simple to operate and having improved conventional and radiological safety. (authors)

Bonnett, I. [General Electric, Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., 1160 Monaghan Rd, Peterborough, ON K9J 7B5 (Canada); Busigin, A. [Special Separations Applications, Inc., 55 Water Street East, Brockville, ON K6V 1A3 (Canada); Shapiro, A. [General Electric GE, Global Research Center, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Tritium Permeation Estimate from APT and CLWR-TEF Waste Packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of tritium permeating out of waste containers has been estimated for the Accelerator Production of Tritium project (APT) and for the Commercial Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility project (CLWR-TEF). The waste packages analyzed include the Aluminum, Window, Tungsten, Lead, and Steel packages for the APT project, and the overpack of extracted Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) for the CLWR-TEF project. All of the tritium contained in the waste was assumed to be available as a gas in the free volume inside the waste container at the beginning of disposal, and to then permeate the stainless steel waste container. From estimates of the tritium content of each waste form, the void or free volume of the package, disposal temperature and container geometry, the amount of tritium exiting the waste container by permeation was calculated. Two tritium permeation paths were considered separately: through the entire wall surface area and through the weld area only, the weld area having reduced thickness and significantly less surface area compared to the wall area. Permeation out of the five APT waste containers at 50 degrees Celsius is mainly through the welds, and at 100 degrees Celsius is through the permeation out of the entire wall surface area. The largest maximum offgas rate from an APT waste stream at 50 degrees Celsius (estimated disposal temperature) was 1.8E-6 Ci/year from the weld of the Window waste package, and the smallest maximum offgas rate was 3.7E-5 Ci/year from the weld of the Lead waste package. Permeation from the CLWR-TEF overpack at 40 degrees Celsius is mainly through the entire wall surface area, with a maximum offgas rate of 1.3E-5 Ci/year.

Clark, E.A.

1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estimation of tritium and helium inventory in the tritium handling system in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Korea, the Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility (WTRF) is under construction to reduce the amount of tritium present in the moderator and coolant of the CANDU type Wolsong nuclear power plants. Recently, a study on the tritium handling system for recovery of the tritium collected from the WTRF was started. Some tritium would enter the steel of the container walls and subsequently decay to helium. This helium can deteriorate the mechanical properties of the material of the tritium handling system. To evaluate the tritium and helium inventory in the stainless steel wall of this system, the time-dependent diffusion equation was developed, solved and the results are presented in this paper. These results were compared to previous work that evaluated the tritium inventory in the stainless steel wall of 50-L tritium containers. Tritium and helium concentration profiles and the corresponding inventories were evaluated with respect to the various parameters such as exposure time, temperature, and partial pressure. After 24 years, the helium inventory in the wall of the tritium handling system exceeds the tritium inventory. (authors)

Yook, D.; Lee, S.; Lee, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Eng., KAIST, 373-1, Kusong-dong, Yusong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Song, K. M.; Shon, S. H. [KEPRI, 103-16 Munji-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, 305-380 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Tritium Inventories in the High Vacuum Pumps of ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device, Facility, and Operation / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Chris Day; August Mack; Manfred Glugla; David K. Murdoch

75

1997 evaluation of tritium removal and mitigation technologies for Hanford Site wastewaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of a biennial assessment of tritium separation technology and tritium nitration techniques for control of tritium bearing wastewaters at the Hanford Site. Tritium in wastewaters at Hanford have resulted from plutonium production, fuel reprocessing, and waste handling operations since 1944. this assessment was conducted in response to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Jeppson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K.; Duncan, J.B.; Flyckt, D.L.; Mohondro, P.C.; Sinton, G.L.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

76

Pf/Zeolite Catalyst for Tritium Stripping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report described promising hydrogen (protium and tritium) stripping results obtained with a Pd/zeolite catalyst at ambient temperature. Preliminary results show 90-99+ percent tritium stripping efficiency may be obtained, with even better performance expected as bed configuration and operating conditions are optimized. These results suggest that portable units with single beds of the Pd/zeolite catalyst may be utilized as ''catalytic absorbers'' to clean up both tritium gas and tritiated water. A cart-mounted prototype stripper utilizing this catalyst has been constructed for testing. This portable stripper has potential applications in maintenance-type jobs such as tritium line breaks. This catalyst can also potentially be utilized in an emergency stripper for the Replacement Tritium Facility.

Hsu, R.H.

2001-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

77

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

78

Continuous aqueous tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for a selective on-line determination of aqueous tritium concentration is disclosed. A moist air stream of the liquid solution being analyzed is passed through a permeation dryer where the tritium and moisture and selectively removed to a purge air stream. The purge air stream is then analyzed for tritium concentration, humidity, and temperature, which allows computation of liquid tritium concentration.

McManus, Gary J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weesner, Forrest J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Tritium Surface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

Glovebox wipe surveys were conducted to correlate surface tritium contamination with atmospheric tritium levels. Surface contamination was examined as a function of tritium concentration and of tritium form, HT/T2 and HTO. The relationship between atmospheric HTO concentration and cleanup time was also investigated.

Sienkiewicz, Charles J.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Tritium Processing and Containment Practices at the Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report emphasizes the features of the United States Tritium Facility operation at the Savannah River Site. It outlines the buildings that represent the facility operating basis. It explores areas where new technology and proven methods of operation developed at the Site have made dramatic environmental and facility work enhancements over the last several years. These enhancements should be consideration for future facility designs and for any current tritium missions.

Buley, R.D.; Green, D.J.; Metzler, J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Record of Decision, Tritium Supply and Recycling Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63877 63877 Tuesday December 12, 1995 Part VII Department of Energy Record of Decision; Tritium Supply and Recycling Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement; Notice 63878 Federal Register / Vol. 60, No. 238 / Tuesday, December 12, 1995 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision: Tritium Supply and Recycling Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of Decision: Selection of Tritium Supply Technology and Siting of Tritium Supply and Recycling Facilities. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing this Record of Decision regarding DOE's proposal for Tritium Supply and Recycling Facilities. The Department is making three simultaneous decisions. First, the Department will pursue a dual track on the two most promising tritium supply

82

Development of tritium technology for the United States magnetic fusion energy program  

SciTech Connect

Tritium technology development for the DOE fusion program is taking place principally at three laboratories, Mound Facility, Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. This paper will review the major aspects of each of the three programs and look at aspects of the tritium technology being developed at other laboratories within the United States. Facilities and experiments to be discussed include the Tritium Effluent Control Laboratory and the Tritium Storage and Delivery System for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor at Mound Facility; the Lithium Processing Test Loop and the solid breeder blanket studies at Argonne; and the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos.

Anderson, J.L.; Wilkes, W.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Tritium Activities in Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Arkadiy A.Yukhimchuk

85

Continuous aqueous tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for a selective on-line determination of aqueous tritium concentration is disclosed. A moist air stream of the liquid solution being analyzed is passed through a permeation dryer where the tritium and moisture are selectively removed to a purge air stream. The purge air stream is then analyzed for tritium concentration, humidity, and temperature, which allows computation of liquid tritium concentration. 2 figs.

McManus, G.J.; Weesner, F.J.

1987-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

86

Tritium Activities in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Sigurd Gross

87

Tritium Activities in Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

S. Paek; D.H. Ahn; H. Lee; H. Chung

88

An Assessment of Tritium Supply Alternatives in Support of the U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons require the periodic replacement of tritium, a radioactive gas that decays at approximately 5.5 percent per year. Currently no tritium-supply facility exists in the US, and due to the decay, the tritium inventory will fall below the required ... Keywords: Decision Analysis-Multiple Criteria, Government-Defense

Detlof Von Winterfeldt; Eric Schweitzer

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Microsoft Word - Tritium Production and Environmental Impacts...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

The operational differences between a tritium production reactor and a nuclear power plant without tritium production are as follows: * Tritium Releases-The amount of tritium...

90

Process for recovering tritium from molten lithium metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium tritide (LiT) is extracted from molten lithium metal that has been exposed to neutron irradiation for breeding tritium within a thermonuclear or fission reactor. The extraction is performed by intimately contacting the molten lithium metal with a molten lithium salt, for instance, lithium chloride - potassium chloride eutectic to distribute LiT between the salt and metal phases. The extracted tritium is recovered in gaseous form from the molten salt phase by a subsequent electrolytic or oxidation step.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Operation Results on Safety Systems of Tritium Process Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device, Facility, and Operation / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Masayuki Yamada; Toshihiko Yamanishi; Wataru Shu; Takumi Suzuki; Hirofumi Nakamura; Yoshinori Kawamura; Yasunori Iwai; Kazuhiro Kobayashi; Kanetsugu Isobe; Masataka Nishi

92

Development and Experience of Tritium Control in Heavy Water Reactor “Fugen”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device, Facility, and Operation / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Koichi Kitamura; Takuya Kitabata; Akira Matsushima

93

Technology and component development for a closed tritium cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief summary on recent advances in the field of tritium technology concerning the most important subsystems of the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor, i.e. the plasma exhaust pumping system, the exhaust gas clean up system, the isotope separation, the tritium storage and the tritium extraction from a blanket is provided. Experimental results, single component developments, and technical tests including those with relevant amounts of tritium that constitute the basis of proposed integral process concepts are described. 48 refs., 2 tabs.

Penzhorn, R.D. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Radiochemie); Anderson, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Haange, R. (JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (UK)); Hircq, B. (CEA Centre d'Etudes de Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)); Meikle, A. (Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project, Mississauga, ON (Canada)); Naruse, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Accounting strategy of tritium inventory in the heavy water detritiation pilot plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a methodology for determination of tritium inventory in a tritium removal facility. The method proposed is based on the developing of computing models for accountancy of the mobile tritium inventory in the separation processes, of the stored tritium and of the trapped tritium inventory in the structure of the process system components. The configuration of the detritiation process is a combination of isotope catalytic exchange between water and hydrogen (LPCE) and the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes (CD). The computing model for tritium inventory in the LPCE process and the CD process will be developed basing on mass transfer coefficients in catalytic isotope exchange reactions and in dual-phase system (liquid-vapour) of hydrogen isotopes distillation process. Accounting of tritium inventory stored in metallic hydride will be based on in-bed calorimetry. Estimation of the trapped tritium inventory can be made by subtraction of the mobile and stored tritium inventories from the global tritium inventory of the plant area. Determinations of the global tritium inventory of the plant area will be made on a regular basis by measuring any tritium quantity entering or leaving the plant area. This methodology is intended to be applied to the Heavy Water Detritiation Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm. Valcea (Romania) and to the Cernavoda Tritium Removal Facility (which will be built in the next 5-7 years). (authors)

Bidica, N.; Stefanescu, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Cristescu, I. [TLK, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bornea, A.; Zamfirache, M.; Lazar, A.; Vasut, F.; Pearsica, C.; Stefan, I. [Inst. of Cryogenics and Isotopes Technologies, Uzinei Str. No. 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania); Prisecaru, I.; Sindilar, G. [Univ. Politehnica of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

97

PLUTONIUM-URANIUM EXTRACTION (PUREX) FACILITY ALARACT DEMONSTRATION FOR FILTER HOUSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an As Low As Reasonably Achievable Control Technology (ALARACT) demonstration for evaluating corrosion on the I-beam supporting filter housing No.9 for the 291-A-l emission unit of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The PUREX facility is currently in surveillance and maintenance mode. During a State of Washington, Department of Health (WDOH) 291-A-l emission unit inspection, a small amount of corrosion was observed at the base of a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter housing. A series of internal and external inspections identified the source of the corrosion material as oxidation of a small section of one of the carbon steel I-beams that provides support to the stainless steel filter housing. The inspections confirmed the corrosion is isolated to one I-beam support location and does not represent any compromise of the structural support or filter housing integrity. Further testing and inspections of the support beam corrosion and its cause were conducted but did not determine the cause. No definitive evidence was found to support any degradation of the housing. Although no degradation of the housing was found, a conservative approach will be implemented. The following actions will be taken: (1) The current operating filter housing No.9 will be removed from service. (2) The only remaining available filter housings (No.1, No.2, and No.3) will be placed in service. These filter housings have new HEPA filters fitted with stainless steel frames and faceguards which were installed in the spring of 2007. (3) Filter housings No.5 and No.10 will be put on standby as backups. To document the assessment of the unit, a draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing was prepared, and informally provided to WDOH on August 7, 2008. A follow up WDOH response to the draft ALARACT filter housing demonstration for the PUREX filter housing questioned whether deteriorated galvanized filter faceguards discovered during an internal filter housing inspection met American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) AG-l or Military Specification (MIL) 51068 standards. The filter system was designed and installed prior to the issuance of AG-l, February 1986; however, MIL 51068 did require galvanized faceguards. The faceguards are not necessary for filtration or structural purposes; it is concluded that the system is in compliance with the intent of the applicable standard. Appendix B provides supporting information to address this issue.

LEBARON GJ

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Frequently asked questions about tritium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently asked questions about tritium Frequently asked questions about tritium Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Tritium at Fermilab. If you have any questions about tritium at Fermilab, please call the Office of Communication at 630-840-3351, or submit a question online. Q: What is tritium? A: Tritium is a form of hydrogen. It's a weakly radioactive isotope with a half-life of 12.3 years. When tritium decays into ordinary helium, it emits low-energy particles called beta particles. Although tritium can be found as a gas, its most common form is water. The Earth's atmosphere contains low levels of tritium produced naturally when cosmic rays strike air particles. At Fermilab, small amounts of tritium are produced as a byproduct of accelerator operations. Q: Does the tritium at Fermilab constitute a health risk to employees or

99

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EPRI Tritium Management Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While tritium generated by nuclear power plants has insignificant dose impacts to the public, its management can be a significant issue in terms of public relations and perception. This document provides a tool for nuclear power plant decision makers to assess their operating strategies for tritium management.

2005-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Methods for tritium labeling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reagents and processes for reductively introducing deuterium or tritium into organic molecules are described. The reagents are deuterium or tritium analogs of trialkyl boranes, borane or alkali metal aluminum hydrides. The process involves forming these reagents in situ from alkali metal tritides or deuterides.

Andres, Hendrik (Hochwald, CH); Morimoto, Hiromi (El Cerrito, CA); Williams, Philip G. (Oakland, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Electrolytic tritium production  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports fifty-three electrolytic cells of various configurations and electrode compositions examined for tritium production. Significant tritium was found in 11 cells at levels between 1.5 and 80 times the starting concentration after enrichment corrections are made.

Storms, E.; Talcott, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., Nuclear Materials Technology Div. and Material Science and Technology Div., MS C348, Los Alamos, NM (US))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Oxidative Tritium Decontamination System, OTDS, provides a method and apparatus for reduction of tritium surface contamination on various items. The OTDS employs ozone gas as oxidizing agent to convert elemental tritium to tritium oxide. Tritium oxide vapor and excess ozone gas is purged from the OTDS, for discharge to atmosphere or transport to further process. An effluent stream is subjected to a catalytic process for the decomposition of excess ozone to diatomic oxygen. One of two configurations of the OTDS is employed: dynamic apparatus equipped with agitation mechanism and large volumetric capacity for decontamination of light items, or static apparatus equipped with pressurization and evacuation capability for decontamination of heavier, delicate, and/or valuable items.

Gentile, Charles A. (Plainsboro, NJ), Guttadora, Gregory L. (Highland Park, NJ), Parker, John J. (Medford, NJ)

2006-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

FINAL REPORT FOR TRITIUM WATER MONITOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this Plant Directed Research and Demonstration (PDRD) task was to develop a system to safetly analyze tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facility. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to liquid-scintillation counting. The proposed system determines tritium concentrations by measuring Bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions in liquid samples. Results show that, after a short counting period (30 seconds), detection limits are three orders of magnitude below the described concentration of tritiated water in the zeolite beds. Additionally, this report covers the analysis of process samples and the investigation of several cell window materials including beryllium, aluminum, and copper. Final tests reveal that alternate window materials and thicknesses can be used to obtain useful results. In particular, a window of stainless steel of moderate thickness (0.3 cm) can be used for counting relatively high levels of tritium.

Sigg, R.; Ferguson, B.; DiPrete, D.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

106

Tritium breeding in fusion reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key technological problems that influence tritium breeding in fusion blankets are reviewed. The breeding potential of candidate materials is evaluated and compared to the tritium breeding requirements. The sensitivity of tritium breeding to design and nuclear data parameters is reviewed. A framework for an integrated approach to improve tritium breeding prediction is discussed with emphasis on nuclear data requirements.

Abdou, M.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

TRITIUM SYSTEMS KEYWORDS: tritium fuel cycle, re-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by long execution times. The large divergence in values be- tween characteristic time constants in fuel integrated simulation run is duplicated on a larger scale for the time period of interest such as doubling for the time- scale in the studies conducted here. When tritium decay is included in the net accumulation

Abdou, Mohamed

108

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium xide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen add oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, Rich (Cranbury, NJ); Ciebiera, Lloyd (Titusville, NJ); Tulipano, Francis J. (Teaneck, NJ); Vinson, Sylvester (Ewing, NJ); Walters, R. Thomas (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB adsorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB.

Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Tritium waste package  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A containment and waste package system for processing and shipping tritium oxide waste received from a process gas includes an outer drum and an inner drum containing a disposable molecular sieve bed (DMSB) seated within the outer drum. The DMSB includes an inlet diffuser assembly, an outlet diffuser assembly, and a hydrogen catalytic recombiner. The DMSB absorbs tritium oxide from the process gas and converts it to a solid form so that the tritium is contained during shipment to a disposal site. The DMSB is filled with type 4A molecular sieve pellets capable of adsorbing up to 1000 curies of tritium. The recombiner contains a sufficient amount of catalyst to cause any hydrogen and oxygen present in the process gas to recombine to form water vapor, which is then adsorbed onto the DMSB. 1 fig.

Rossmassler, R.; Ciebiera, L.; Tulipano, F.J.; Vinson, S.; Walters, R.T.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tritium catalyzed deuterium tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary assessment of the promise of the Tritium Catalyzed Deuterium (TCD) tokamak power reactors relative to that of deuterium-tritium (D-T) and catalyzed deuterium (Cat-D) tokamaks is undertaken. The TCD mode of operation is arrived at by converting the /sup 3/He from the D(D,n)/sup 3/He reaction into tritium, by neutron capture in the blanket; the tritium thus produced is fed into the plasma. There are three main parts to the assessment: blanket study, reactor design and economic analysis and an assessment of the prospects for improvements in the performance of TCD reactors (and in the promise of the TCD mode of operation, in general).

Greenspan, E.; Miley, G.H.; Jung, J.; Gilligan, J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

PRODUCTION OF TRITIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for the production of tritium by subjecting comminuted solid lithium fluoride containing the lithium isotope of atomic mass number 6 to neutron radiation in a self-sustaining neutronic reactor. The lithium fiuoride is heated to above 450 deg C. in an evacuated vacuum-tight container during radiation. Gaseous radiation products are withdrawn and passed through a palladium barrier to recover tritium. (AEC)

Jenks, G.H.; Shapiro, E.M.; Elliott, N.; Cannon, C.V.

1963-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thin film tritium dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method for tritium dosimetry. A dosimeter comprising a thin film of a material having relatively sensitive RITAC-RITAP dosimetry properties is exposed to radiation from tritium, and after the dosimeter has been removed from the source of the radiation, the low energy electron dose deposited in the thin film is determined by radiation-induced, thermally-activated polarization dosimetry techniques.

Moran, Paul R. (Madison, WI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Experience with Palladium Diffusers in Tritium Processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen isotopes are separated from other gases by permeation through palladium and palladium-silver alloy diffusers in the Tritium Facilities at the US Department of Energy Savannah River Site (SRS). Diffusers have provided effective service for almost forty years. This paper is an overview of the operational experience with the various diffuser types that have been employed at SRS. Alternative technologies being developed at SRS for purifying hydrogen isotopes are also discussed.

Motyka, T.; Clark, E.A.; Dauchess, D.A.; Heung, L.K.; Rabum, R.L.

1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

115

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

116

2009 EVALUATION OF TRITIUM REMOVAL AND MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1995, a state-approved land disposal site (SALDS) has received tritium contaminated effluents from the Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Tritium in this effluent is mitigated by storage in slow moving groundwater to allow extended time for decay before the water reaches the site boundary. By this method, tritium in the SALDS is isolated from the general environment and human contact until it has decayed to acceptable levels. This report contains the 2009 update evaluation of alternative tritium mitigation techniques to control tritium in liquid effluents and groundwater at the Hanford site. A thorough literature review was completed and updated information is provided on state-of-the-art technologies for control of tritium in wastewaters. This report was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-026-07B (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 2007). Tritium separation and isolation technologies are evaluated periodically to determine their feasibility for implementation to control Hanford site liquid effluents and groundwaters to meet the Us. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40 CFR 141.16, drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium of 20,000 pOll and/or DOE Order 5400.5 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Since the 2004 evaluation, there have been a number of developments related to tritium separation and control with potential application in mitigating tritium contaminated wastewater. These are primarily focused in the areas of: (1) tritium recycling at a commercial facility in Cardiff, UK using integrated tritium separation technologies (water distillation, palladium membrane reactor, liquid phase catalytic exchange, thermal diffusion), (2) development and demonstration of Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) using hydrogen/water exchange to separate tritium from water, (3) evaporation of tritium contaminated water for dispersion in the atmosphere, and (4) use of barriers to minimize the transport of tritium in groundwater. Continuing development efforts for tritium separations processes are primarily to support the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the nuclear power industry, and the production of radiochemicals. While these applications are significantly different than the Hanford application, the technology could potentially be adapted for Hanford wastewater treatment. Separations based processes to reduce tritium levels below the drinking water MCL have not been demonstrated for the scale and conditions required for treating Hanford wastewater. In addition, available cost information indicates treatment costs for such processes will be substantially higher than for discharge to SALDS or other typical pump and treat projects at Hanford. Actual mitigation projects for groundwater with very low tritium contamination similar to that found at Hanford have focused mainly on controlling migration and on evaporation for dispersion in the atmosphere.

LUECK KJ; GENESSE DJ; STEGEN GE

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feature photo Feature photo Tritium at Fermilab Tritium is a weakly radioactive form of hydrogen. In nature, it's formed when cosmic particles hit Earth's atmosphere. Here at Fermilab, tritium is an expected byproduct of the operation of our particle accelerators. This website provides information on the monitoring and management of tritium at Fermilab. Small but detectable levels of tritium –well below regulatory limits--are found in some ponds on the Fermilab site, in Indian Creek as it leaves the laboratory, and in some of Fermilab's sanitary sewer water. No tritium has been detected in wells on the Fermilab site. We are committed to go beyond merely satisfying regulatory limits, and work to keep the levels of tritium as low as possible. Though the levels of tritium discharged by Fermilab pose no health risk to

118

MODELING ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF TRITIUM FROM NUCLEAR INSTALLATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium source term analysis and the subsequent dispersion and consequence analyses supporting the safety documentation of Department of Energy nuclear facilities are especially sensitive to the applied software analysis methodology, input data and user assumptions. Three sequential areas in tritium accident analysis are examined in this study to illustrate where the analyst should exercise caution. Included are: (1) the development of a tritium oxide source term; (2) use of a full tritium dispersion model based on site-specific information to determine an appropriate deposition scaling factor for use in more simplified, broader modeling, and (3) derivation of a special tritium compound (STC) dose conversion factor for consequence analysis, consistent with the nature of the originating source material. It is recommended that unless supporting, defensible evidence is available to the contrary, the tritium release analyses should assume tritium oxide as the species released (or chemically transformed under accident's environment). Important exceptions include STC situations and laboratory-scale releases of hydrogen gas. In the modeling of the environmental transport, a full phenomenology model suggests that a deposition velocity of 0.5 cm/s is an appropriate value for environmental features of the Savannah River Site. This value is bounding for certain situations but non-conservative compared to the full model in others. Care should be exercised in choosing other factors such as the exposure time and the resuspension factor.

Okula, K

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

Drum bubbler tritium processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating tritium oxide from a gas stream containing tritium oxide. The gas stream containing tritium oxide is fed into a container of water having a head space above the water. Bubbling the gas stream containing tritium oxide through the container of water and removing gas from the container head space above the water. Thereafter, the gas from the head space is dried to remove water vapor from the gas, and the water vapor is recycled to the container of water.

Rule, Keith (Hopewell, NJ); Gettelfinger, Geoff (Lexington, MA); Kivler, Paul (Hamilton Square, NJ)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Monitoring of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Drum bubbler tritium processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating tritium oxide from a gas stream containing tritium oxide. The gas stream containing tritium oxide is fed into a container of water having a head space above the water. The tritium oxide is separated by bubbling the gas stream containing tritium oxide through the container of water and removing gas from the container head space above the water. Thereafter, the gas from the head space is dried to remove water vapor from the gas, and the water vapor is recycled to the container of water. 2 figs.

Rule, K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Kivler, P.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Tritium in Surface Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Water Surface Water Fermilab map Fermilab has conducted an environmental monitoring program on site for roughly 40 years. In November of 2005, for the first time, we detected low levels of tritium in Indian Creek, one of three creeks that travel through the Fermilab site. Low but measurable levels of tritium continue to be detected in Indian Creek. All tritium levels found on site are well below any federal health and environmental standards. The Department of Energy standard for surface water is 1,900 picocuries per milliliter, and our readings to date have remained in the single digits. The levels of tritium detected in Indian Creek are extremely low compared to what is safe for a lifetime of continuous exposure to tritium in surface water. The low levels of tritium in Indian Creek stem from particle beams produced

123

A New Hydrophobic Catalyst for Tritium Separation from Nuclear Effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. Popescu; Gh. Ionita; I. Stefanescu; A. Kitamoto

124

Kinetic Method for Hydrogen-Deuterium-Tritium Mixture Distillation Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

A. B. Sazonov; Z. G. Kagramanov; E. P. Magomedbekov

125

Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

Satoshi Fukada

126

Welding tritium aged stainless steel  

SciTech Connect

Stainless steels exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to He buildup within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for new weapon systems, and service life extensions of older systems, methods for welding/repair on tritium-exposed material will become important. Results are reported that indicate that both solid-state resistance welding and low-heat gas metal arc overlay welding are promising methods for repair or modification of tritium-aged stainless steel.

Kanne, W.R. Jr.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Tritium monitor and collection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter. 7 figs.

Bourne, G.L.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Grafwallner, E.G.; Wickham, K.L.; Maltrud, H.R.; Baker, J.D.

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

Tritium monitor and collection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next on-line getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

Bourne, Gary L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ely, Walter E. (Los Alamos, NM); Tuggle, Dale G. (Los Alamos, NM); Grafwallner, Ervin G. (Arco, ID); Wickham, Keith L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Maltrud, Herman R. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Tritium monitor and collection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This system measures tritium on-line and collects tritium from a flowing inert gas stream. It separates the tritium from other non-hydrogen isotope contaminating gases, whether radioactive or not. The collecting portion of the system is constructed of various zirconium alloys called getters. These alloys adsorb tritium in any of its forms at one temperature and at a higher temperature release it as a gas. The system consists of four on-line getters and heaters, two ion chamber detectors, two collection getters, and two guard getters. When the incoming gas stream is valved through the on-line getters, 99.9% of it is adsorbed and the remainder continues to the guard getter where traces of tritium not collected earlier are adsorbed. The inert gas stream then exits the system to the decay chamber. Once the on-line getter has collected tritium for a predetermined time, it is valved off and the next online getter is valved on. Simultaneously, the first getter is heated and a pure helium purge is employed to carry the tritium from the getter. The tritium loaded gas stream is then routed through an ion chamber which measures the tritium activity. The ion chamber effluent passes through a collection getter that readsorbs the tritium and is removable from the system once it is loaded and is then replaced with a clean getter. Prior to removal of the collection getter, the system switches to a parallel collection getter. The effluent from the collection getter passes through a guard getter to remove traces of tritium prior to exiting the system. The tritium loaded collection getter, once removed, is analyzed by liquid scintillation techniques. The entire sequence is under computer control except for the removal and analysis of the collection getter.

Baker, J.D.; Wickham, K.L.; Ely, W.E.; Tuggle, D.G.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Grafwaller, E.G.; Maltrud, H.R.; Bourne, G.L.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

130

Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended to serve as guidance, or to supplement EPA or other agency environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-1 Chapter 4. Uranium Mine and Extraction Facility Reclamation This chapter is not intended, it is an outline of practices which may or have been used for uranium site restoration. Mining reclamation for uranium mining sites. The existence of bonding requirements and/or financial guarantees in the cases where

131

Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Drum bubbler tritium processing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating tritium oxide from a gas stream containing tritium oxide. The gas stream containing tritium oxide is fed into a container of water having a head space above the water. Bubbling the gas stream containing tritium oxide through the container of water and removing gas from the container head space above the water. Thereafter, the gas from the head space is dried to remove water vapor from the gas, and the water vapor is recycled to the container of water.

Rule, Keith; Gettelfinger, Geoff; Kivler, Paul

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Overview of tritium fast-fission yields  

SciTech Connect

Tritium production rates are very important to the development of fast reactors because tritium may be produced at a greater rate in fast reactors than in light water reactors. This report focuses on tritium production and does not evaluate the transport and eventual release of the tritium in a fast reactor system. However, if an order-of-magnitude increase in fast fission yields for tritium is confirmed, fission will become the dominant production source of tritium in fast reactors.

Tanner, J.E.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Tritium Aging Effects in Zirconium-Cobalt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Storage, Distribution, and Transportation / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

K.J. Maynard; W.T. Shmayda; A.G. Heics

135

Tritium Transport Vessel Using Depleted Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Storage, Distribution, and Transportation / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology In Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

L. K. Heung

136

Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Tritium Production from Palladium Alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of palladium alloys have been loaded with deuterium or hydrogen under low energy bombardment in a system that allows the continuous measurement of tritium. Long run times (up to 200 h) result in an integration of the tritium and this, coupled with the high intrinsic sensitivity of the system ({approximately}0.1 nCi/l), enables the significance of the tritium measurement to be many sigma (>10). We will show the difference in tritium generation rates between batches of palladium alloys (Rh, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Be, B, Li, Hf, Hg and Fe) of various concentrations to illustrate that tritium generation rate is dependent on alloy type as well as within a specific alloy, dependent on concentration.

Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Thoma, D.J.; Teter, D.F.; Tuggle, D.G.

1998-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Decontaminating and Melt Recycling Tritium Contaminated Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and several university and industrial partners are evaluating recycling radioactively contaminated stainless steel. The goal of this program is to recycle contaminated stainless steel scrap from US Department of Energy national defense facilities. There is a large quantity of stainless steel at the DOE Savannah River Site from retired heavy water moderated Nuclear material production reactors (for example heat exchangers and process water piping), that will be used in pilot studies of potential recycle processes. These parts are contaminated by fission products, activated species, and tritium generated by neutron irradiation of the primary reactor coolant, which is heavy (deuterated) water. This report reviews current understanding of tritium contamination of stainless steel and previous studies of decontaminating tritium exposed stainless steel. It also outlines stainless steel refining methods, and proposes recommendations based on this review.

Clark, E.A.

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

WASTE CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYMERIC COMPONENTS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent independent review led to uncertainty about the technical basis for characterizing the residual amount of tritium in polymer components used in the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities that are sent for waste disposal. A review of a paper published in the open literature firmly establishes the basis of the currently used characterization, 10 Ci/cc. Information provided in that paper about exposure experiments performed at the DOE Mound Laboratory allows the calculation of the currently used characterization. These experiments involved exposure of high density polyethylene (HD-PE) to initially 1 atm tritium gas. In addition, a review of recent research at the Savannah River Site not only further substantiates this characterization, but also establishes its use for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon{reg_sign}), and Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide. 10 Ci/cc tritium is a representative characterization for any type of polymer components exposed at ambient temperature and at approximately 1 atm. tritium gas.

Clark, E

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effects of Tritium Gas Exposure on Polymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

E. A. Clark; E. B. Fox; M. C. Kane; G. C. Staack

142

A study of tritium in municipal solid waste leachate and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasingly clear in the last few years that the vast majority of municipal solid waste landfills produce leachate that contains elevated levels of tritium. The authors recently conducted a study of landfills in New York and New Jersey and found that the mean concentration of tritium in the leachate from ten municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills was 33,800 pCi/L with a peak value of 192,000 pCi/L. A 2003 study in California reported a mean tritium concentration of 99,000 pCi/L with a peak value of 304,000 pCi/L. Studies in Pennsylvania and the UK produced similar results. The USEPA MCL for tritium is 20,000 pCi/L. Tritium is also manifesting itself as landfill gas and landfill gas condensate. Landfill gas condensate samples from landfills in the UK and California were found to have tritium concentrations as high as 54,400 and 513,000 pCi/L, respectively. The tritium found in MSW leachate is believed to derive principally from gaseous tritium lighting devices used in some emergency exit signs, compasses, watches, and even novelty items, such as 'glow stick' key chains. This study reports the findings of recent surveys of leachate from a number of municipal solid waste landfills, both open and closed, from throughout the United States and Europe. The study evaluates the human health and ecological risks posed by elevated tritium levels in municipal solid waste leachate and landfill gas and the implications to their safe management. We also assess the potential risks posed to solid waste management facility workers exposed to tritium-containing waste materials in transfer stations and other solid waste management facilities. (authors)

Mutch Jr, R. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mahony, J. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Composition containing aerogel substrate loaded with tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Ellefson, Robert E. (Centerville, OH); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Reed, Scott (Albuquerque, NM); Walko, Robert J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Differential atmospheric tritium sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The mixture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H.sub.2 or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

Griesbach, Otto A. (Langhorne, PA); Stencel, Joseph R. (Skillman, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Separation of Tritium from Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proprietary tritium loading bed developed by Molecular Separations, Inc (MSI) has been shown to selectively load tritiated water as waters of hydration at near ambient temperatures. Tests conducted with a 126 {micro}C{sub 1} tritium/liter water standard mixture showed reductions to 25 {micro}C{sub 1}/L utilizing two, 2-meter long columns in series. Demonstration tests with Hanford Site wastewater samples indicate an approximate tritium concentration reduction from 0.3 {micro}C{sub 1}/L to 0.07 {micro}C{sub 1}/L for a series of two, 2-meter long stationary column beds Further reduction to less than 0.02 {micro}C{sub 1}/L, the current drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL), is projected with additional bed media in series. Tritium can be removed from the loaded beds with a modest temperature increase and the beds can be reused Results of initial tests are presented and a moving bed process for treating large quantities of wastewaters is proposed. The moving bed separation process appears promising to treat existing large quantities of wastewater at various US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The enriched tritium stream can be grouted for waste disposition. The separations system has also been shown to reduce tritium concentrations in nuclear reactor cooling water to levels that allow reuse. Energy requirements to reconstitute the loading beds and waste disposal costs for this process appear modest.

JEPPSON, D.W.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

146

Primer on tritium safe handling practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Primer is designed for use by operations and maintenance personnel to improve their knowledge of tritium safe handling practices. It is applicable to many job classifications and can be used as a reference for classroom work or for self-study. It is presented in general terms for use throughout the DOE Complex. After reading it, one should be able to: describe methods of measuring airborne tritium concentration; list types of protective clothing effective against tritium uptake from surface and airborne contamination; name two methods of reducing the body dose after a tritium uptake; describe the most common method for determining amount of tritium uptake in the body; describe steps to take following an accidental release of airborne tritium; describe the damage to metals that results from absorption of tritium; explain how washing hands or showering in cold water helps reduce tritium uptake; and describe how tritium exchanges with normal hydrogen in water and hydrocarbons.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for laser-assisted isotope separation of tritium, using infrared multiple photon dissociation of tritium-bearing products in the gas phase. One such process involves the steps of (1) catalytic exchange of a deuterium-bearing molecule XYD with tritiated water DTO from sources such as a heavy water fission reactor, to produce the tritium-bearing working molecules XYT and (2) photoselective dissociation of XYT to form a tritium-rich product. By an analogous procedure, tritium is separated from tritium-bearing materials that contain predominately hydrogen such as a light water coolant from fission or fusion reactors.

Herman, Irving P. (Castro Valley, CA); Marling, Jack B. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Behavior of Environmental Tritium at NIFS Toki Site of Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

S. Sugihara et al.

149

Tritium Concentration in Environmental Samples Around the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Shigeru Kitabatake et al.

150

Large Scale Tritium Recovery from Obsolete Illumination Devices at LLNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

J. M. Mintz; D. K. Spencer; D. M. Holck

151

Modeling the Build-Up of Organically Bound Tritium in Crops After Acute Tritium Exposure in Greenhouse's Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Yu. Balashov; A. Golubev; V. Golubeva; S. Mavrin; U. Pereligina

152

The Uranium-Tritium System - The Storage of Tritium  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamics of the uranium-tritium system were determined over the pressure range of 2 x 10 to the minus 4 to 20 atm from experimental composition-pressure-temperature data. Both enthalpy and entropy were shown to vary slightly with composition by analysis of van't Hoff plots for the U-D system and the U-T system. The evolution of helium-3 borne in the lattice of a fully tritiated sample of uranium was studied over a period of several months, and the relative proportion of helium-3 and tritium in the evolved gas from an aged UT3 sample was determined at several temperatures. The desorption and absorption characteristics of a typical uranium-tritium storage bed have been studied and observed for several years.

Carlson, R. S.

1976-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Circulation of Tritium in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The input of bomb tritium into the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere waters has demonstrated the spread of a tracer in three dimensions in the North Pacific Ocean. Subsurface tritium maxima in middle and low latitudes clearly show the importance ...

Rana A. Fine; Joseph L. Reid; H. Göte Östlund

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Overview of Recent Tritium Experiments in TPE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium retention in plasma-facing components influences the design, operation, and lifetime of fusion devices such as ITER. Most of the retention studies were carried out with the use of either hydrogen or deuterium. Tritium Plasma Experiment is a unique linear plasma device that can handle radioactive fusion fuel of tritium, toxic material of beryllium, and neutron-irradiated material. A tritium depth profiling method up to mm range was developed using a tritium imaging plate and a diamond wire saw. A series of tritium experiments (T2/D2 ratio: 0.2 and 0.5 %) was performed to investigate tritium depth profiling in bulk tungsten, and the results shows that tritium is migrated into bulk tungsten up to mm range.

Masashi Shimada; T. Otsuka; R. J. Pawelko; P. Calderoni; J. P. Sharpe

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

EVALUATION OF ALTERNATE STAINLESS STEEL SURFACE TREATMENTS FOR MASS SPECTROSCOPY AND OTHER TRITIUM SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

There are specific components in the SRS Tritium Facilities that are required to introduce as few chemical impurities (such as protium and methane) as possible into the process gas. Two such components are the inlet systems for the mass spectroscopy facilities and hydrogen isotope mix standard containers. Two vendors now passivate stainless steel components for these systems, and both are relatively small businesses whose future viability can be questioned, which creates the need for new sources. Stainless steel containers were designed to evaluate alternate surface treatment vendors for tritium storage and handling for these high purity tritium systems. Five vendors applied their own 'best' surface treatments to two containers each - one was a current vendor, another was a chemical vapor deposited silicon coating, and the other three were electropolishing and chemical cleaning vendors. Pure tritium gas was introduced into all ten containers and the composition was monitored over time. The only observed impurities in the gas were some HT, less CT{sub 4}, and very small amounts of T{sub 2}O in all cases. The currently used vendor treated containers contained the least impurities. The chemical vapor deposited silicon treatment resulted in the highest impurity levels. Sampling one set of containers after about one month of tritium exposure revealed the impurity level to be nearly the same as that after more than a year of exposure - this result suggests that cleaning new stainless steel components by tritium gas contact for about a month may be a worthy operation.

Clark, E.; Mauldin, C.; Neikirk, K.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

156

Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art tritium Hydride Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilized unique fast-cycling 5.63 mole uranium beds (50.9 g to T/sub 2/ at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops.

Nasise, J.E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Some new techniques in tritium gas handling as applied to metal hydride synthesis  

SciTech Connect

A state-of-the-art tritium Hydriding Synthesis System (HSS) was designed and built to replace the existing system within the Tritium Salt Facility (TSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This new hydriding system utilizes unique fast-cycling 7.9 mole uranium beds (47.5g of T at 100% loading) and novel gas circulating hydriding furnaces. Tritium system components discussed include fast-cycling uranium beds, circulating gas hydriding furnaces, valves, storage volumes, manifolds, gas transfer pumps, and graphic display and control consoles. Many of the tritium handling and processing techniques incorporated into this system are directly applicable to today's fusion fuel loops. 12 refs., 7 figs.

Nasise, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Status and practicality of detritiation and tritium production strategies for environmental remediation  

SciTech Connect

Operation of nuclear facilities throughout the world generates wastewater, groundwater and surface water contaminated with tritium. Because of a commitment to minimize radiation exposures to ''levels as low as reasonably achievable'', the US Department of Energy supports development of tritium isotope separation technologies. Also, DOE periodically documents the status and potential viability of alternative tritium treatment technologies and management strategies. The specific objectives of the current effort are to evaluate practical engineering issues, technology acceptability issues, and costs for realistic tritium treatment scenarios. A unique feature of the assessment is that the portfolio of options was expanded to include various management strategies rather than only evaluating detritiation technologies. The ultimate purpose of this effort is to assist Environmental Restoration and its support organizations in allocating future investments.

Fulbright, H.H.; Schwirian-Spann, A.L.; Brunt, V. van [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (US); Jerome, K.M.; Looney, B.B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (US)

1996-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

159

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON POLYMERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of tritium gas exposure on various polymers have been studied over the last several years. Despite the deleterious effects of beta exposure on many material properties, structural polymers continued to be used in tritium systems. Improved understanding of the tritium effects will allow more resistant materials to be selected. Currently polymers find use mainly in tritium gas sealing applications (eg. valve stem tips, O-rings). Future uses being evaluated including polymeric based cracking of tritiated water, and polymer-based sensors of tritium.

Clark, E.; Fox, E.; Kane, M.; Staack, G.

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Tritium Handling and Safe Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1129-2007 March 2007 ____________________ DOE HANDBOOK TRITIUM HANDLING AND SAFE STORAGE U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1129-2007

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM EXPOSURE ON UHMW-PE, PTFE, AND VESPEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of three polymers, Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, also known as Teflon{reg_sign}), and Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide were exposed to 1 atmosphere of tritium gas at ambient temperature for varying times up to 2.3 years in closed containers. Sample mass and size measurements (to calculate density), spectra-colorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were employed to characterize the effects of tritium exposure on these samples. Changes of the tritium exposure gas itself were characterized at the end of exposure by measuring total pressure and by mass spectroscopic analysis of the gas composition. None of the polymers exhibited significant changes of density. The color of initially white UHMW-PE and PTFE dramatically darkened to the eye and the color also significantly changed as measured by colorimetry. The bulk of UHMW-PE darkened just like the external surfaces, however the fracture surface of PTFE appeared white compared to the PTFE external surfaces. The white interior could have been formed while the sample was breaking or could reflect the extra tritium dose at the surface directly from the gas. The dynamic mechanical response of UHMW-PE was typical of radiation effects on polymers- an initial stiffening (increased storage modulus) and reduction of viscous behavior after three months exposure, followed by lowering of the storage modulus after one year exposure and longer. The storage modulus of PTFE increased through about nine months tritium exposure, then the samples became too weak to handle or test using DMA. Characterization of Vespel{reg_sign} using DMA was problematic--sample-to-sample variations were significant and no systematic change with tritium exposure could be discerned. Isotopic exchange and incorporation of tritium into UHMW-PE (exchanging for protium) and into PTFE (exchanging for fluorine) was observed by FT-IR using an attenuated total reflectance method. No significant change in the Vespel{reg_sign} infrared spectrum was observed after three months exposure. Protium significantly pressurized the UHMW-PE containers during exposure to about nine atmospheres (the initial pressure was one atmosphere of tritium). This is consistent with the well-known production of hydrogen by irradiation of polyethylene by ionizing radiation. The total pressure in the PTFE containers decreased, and a mass balance reveals that the observed decrease is consistent with the formation of small amounts of {sup 3}HF, which is condensed at ambient temperature. No significant change of pressure occurred in the Vespel{reg_sign} containers; however the composition of the gas became about 50% protium, showing that Vespel{reg_sign} interacted with the tritium gas atmosphere to some degree. The relative resistance to degradation from tritium exposure is least for PTFE, more for UHMW-PE, and the most for Vespel{reg_sign}, which is consistent with the known relative resistance of these polymers to gamma irradiation. This qualitatively agrees with the concept of equivalent effects for equivalent absorbed doses of radiation damage of polymers. Some of the changes of different polymers are qualitatively similar; however each polymer exhibited unique property changes when exposed to tritium. Information from this study that can be applied to a tritium facility is: (1) the relative resistance to tritium degradation of the three polymers studied is the same as the relative resistance to gamma irradiation in air (so relative rankings of polymer resistance to ionizing radiation can be used as a relative ranking for assessing tritium compatibility and polymer selection); and (2) all three polymers changed the gas atmosphere during tritium exposure--UHMW-PE and Vespel{reg_sign} exposed to tritium formed H{sub 2} gas (UHMW-PE much more so), and PTFE exposed to tritium formed {sup 3}HF. This observation of forming {sup 3}HF supports the general concept of minimizing chlorofluorocarbon polymers in tritium systems.

Clark, E; Kirk Shanahan, K

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Precision Shock Tuning on the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility [ J.?D. Lindl et al. Phys. Plasmas 11 339 (2004)] are underway with the goal of compressing deuterium-tritium fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (?R) to sustain ...

Frenje, Johan A.

163

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for providing the nation with nuclear weapons and ensuring that these weapons remain safe and reliable. Tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, is an essential component of every weapon in the current and projected U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. Unlike other materials utilized in nuclear weapons, tritium decays at a rate of 5.5 percent per year. Accordingly, as long as the nation relies on a nuclear deterrent, the tritium in each nuclear weapon must be replenished periodically. Currently the U.S. nuclear weapons complex does not have the capability to produce the amounts of tritium that will be required to continue supporting the nation's stockpile. The ''Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling'' (Final Programmatic EIS), DOE/EIS-0161, issued in October 1995, evaluated the alternatives for the siting, construction, and operation of tritium supply and recycling facilities at five DOE sites for four different production technologies. This Programmatic EIS also evaluated the impacts of using a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) without specifying a reactor location. In the Record of Decision for the Final Programmatic EIS (60 FR 63878), issued December 12, 1995, DOE decided to pursue a dual-track approach on the two most promising tritium supply alternatives: (1) to initiate purchase of an existing commercial reactor (operating or partially complete) or reactor irradiation services; and (2) to design, build, and test critical components of an accelerator system for tritium production. At that time, DOE announced that the final decision would be made by the Secretary of Energy at the end of 1998.

N /A

1999-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Assembly of High-Areal-Density Deuterium-Tritium Fuel from Indirectly Driven Cryogenic Implosions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility has been used to compress deuterium-tritium to an average areal density of ~1.0±0.1??g?cm[superscript -2], which is 67% of the ignition requirement. These conditions were obtained using 192 ...

Casey, Daniel Thomas

165

Tritium Handling and Safe Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-HDBK-1129-2008 December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK TRITIUM HANDLING AND SAFE STORAGE U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS DOE-HDBK-1129-2008 ii This page is intentionally blank. DOE-HDBK-1129-2008 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION PAGE FOREWORD................................................................................................................................ ix ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................ xi 1.0 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................

166

A Prototype Four-Inch Short Hydride (FISH) Bed as a Replacement Tritium Storage Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Storage / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

J. E. Klein; E. G. Estochen; K. L. Shanahan; L. K. Heung

167

The Behaviors of Tritium and Helium-3 in China Developed Hydrogen Resistant Stainless Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Storage / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Y. Sun et al.

168

Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to the recovery of tritium from various tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium. More particularly, the invention relates to the recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules by reaction with uranium wherein the reaction is conducted in a reactor which permits the reaction to occur as a moving front reaction from the point where the tritium enters the reactor charged with uranium down the reactor until the uranium is exhausted.

Swansiger, W.A.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development of Catalyst for Recovery of Tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket Material and Process / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Kenzo Munakata; Satoshi Yamatsuki; Yoshihiro Yokoyama; Seigo Kanjo; Dmitri Ianovski; Yamato Asakura; Tatsuhiko Uda

170

Reclassification of the Tritium Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document is a collection of the required actions that were taken to reclassify Building 968, the Tritium Research Laboratory, at Sandia National Laboratories/California.

Johnson, A.J.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Tritium-Helium Effects in Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material Interaction / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

G. R. Caskey; Jr.

172

Thermal Removal Of Tritium From Concrete And Soil To Reduce Groundwater Impacts  

SciTech Connect

Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg C (1,500 deg F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg C (212 deg F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total of four units to batch treat concrete rubble and soil. Post treatment sampling verified that the activity in the treated soil and concrete met the treatment standards for each medium which allowed the treated concrete rubble and soil to be disposed of on site as backfill. During testing and operations a total of 1,261-m{sup 3} (1,650-yd{sup 3}) of contaminated concrete and soils were treated with an actual incurred cost of $3,980,000. This represents a unit treatment cost of $3,156/m{sup 3} ($2,412/yd{sup 3}). In 2011 the project was recognized with an e-Star Sustainability Award by DOE's Office of Environmental Management.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tritium research laboratory cleanup and transition project final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Tritium Research Laboratory Cleanup and Transition Project Final Report provides a high-level summary of this project`s multidimensional accomplishments. Throughout this report references are provided for in-depth information concerning the various topical areas. Project related records also offer solutions to many of the technical and or administrative challenges that such a cleanup effort requires. These documents and the experience obtained during this effort are valuable resources to the DOE, which has more than 1200 other process contaminated facilities awaiting cleanup and reapplication or demolition.

Johnson, A.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Transfer Model of Tritium in a Local Hydrosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Safety / Proceedings of the Fifth Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion, and Isotopic Applications Belgirate, Italy May 28-June 3, 1995

Kiriko Miyamoto; Ken-ichi Kimura; Shozo Hongo

175

TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL BASE METAL AND WELDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium reservoirs are constructed from welded stainless steel forgings. While these steels are highly resistant to the embrittling effects of hydrogen isotopes and helium from tritium decay; they are not immune. Tritium embrittlement is an enhanced form of hydrogen embrittlement because of the presence of helium-3 from tritium decay which nucleates as nanometer-sized bubbles on dislocations, grain boundaries, and other microstructural defects. Steels with decay helium bubble microstructures are hardened and less able to deform plastically and become more susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and its isotopes. Ductility, elongation-to-failure, and fracture toughness are reduced by exposures to tritium and the reductions increase with time as helium-3 builds into the material from tritium permeation and radioactive decay. Material and forging specifications have been developed for optimal material compatibility with tritium. These specifications cover composition, mechanical properties, and select microstructural characteristics like grain size, flow-line orientation, inclusion content, and ferrite distribution. For many years, the forming process of choice for reservoir manufacturing was high-energy-rate forging (HERF), principally because the DOE forging facility owned only HERF hammers. Today, some reservoir forgings are being made that use a conventional, more common process known as press forging (PF or CF). One of the chief differences between the two forging processes is strain rate: Conventional hydraulic or mechanical forging presses deform the metal at 4-8 ft/s, about ten-fold slower than the HERF process. The material specifications continue to provide successful stockpile performance by ensuring that the two forging processes produce similar reservoir microstructures. While long-term life storage tests have demonstrated the general tritium compatibility of tritium reservoirs, fracture-toughness properties of both conventionally forged and high-energy-rate forged are needed for designing and establishing longer tritium-reservoir lifetimes, ranking materials, and, potentially, for qualifying new forging vendors or processes. Measurements on the effects of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of CF stainless steels having similar composition, grain size, and mechanical properties to previously studied HERF steels are needed and have not been conducted until now. The compatibility of stainless steel welds with tritium represents another concern for long-term reservoir performance. Weldments have not been well-characterized with respect to tritium embrittlement, although a recent study was completed on the effect of tritium and decay helium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L weldments. This study expands the characterization of weldments through measurements of tritium and decay helium effects on the fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel for conventional forgings and weldments in the non-charged, hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged-and-aged conditions.

Morgan, M.

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, Leslie D. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A study of electrolytic tritium production  

SciTech Connect

Tritium production is being investigated using cathodes made from palladium and its alloys with various surface treatments. Three anode materials have been studied as well as different impurities in the electrolyte. Tritium has been produced in about 10% of the cells studied but there is, as yet, no pattern of behavior that would make the effect predictable. 15 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Storms, E.K.; Talcott, C.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

DOE handbook: Tritium handling and safe storage  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Handbook was developed as an educational supplement and reference for operations and maintenance personnel. Most of the tritium publications are written from a radiological protection perspective. This handbook provides more extensive guidance and advice on the null range of tritium operations. This handbook can be used by personnel involved in the full range of tritium handling from receipt to ultimate disposal. Compliance issues are addressed at each stage of handling. This handbook can also be used as a reference for those individuals involved in real time determination of bounding doses resulting from inadvertent tritium releases. This handbook provides useful information for establishing processes and procedures for the receipt, storage, assay, handling, packaging, and shipping of tritium and tritiated wastes. It includes discussions and advice on compliance-based issues and adds insight to those areas that currently possess unclear DOE guidance.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Investigation of the tritium release from Building 324 in which the stack tritium sampler was off, April 14 through 17, 1998  

SciTech Connect

On April 14, 1998, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researcher performing work in the Building 324 facility approached facility management and asked if facility management could turn off the tritium sampler in the main exhaust stack. The researcher was demonstrating the feasibility of treating components from dismantled nuclear weapons in a device called a plasma arc furnace and was concerned that the sampler would compromise classified information. B and W Hanford Company (BWHC) operated the facility, and PNNL conducted research as a tenant in the facility. The treatment of 200 components in the furnace would result in the release of up to about 20 curies of tritium through the facility stack. The exact quantity of tritium was calculated from the manufacturing data for the weapons components and was known to be less than 20 curies. The Notice of Construction (NOC) approved by the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) had been modified to allow releasing 20 curies of tritium through the stack in support of this research. However, there were irregularities in the way the NOC modification was processed. The researcher was concerned that data performed on the sampler could be used to back-calculate the tritium content of the components, revealing classified information about the design of nuclear weapons. He had discussed this with the PNNZ security organization, and they had told him that data from the sampler would be classified. He was also concerned that if he could not proceed with operation of the plasma arc furnace, the furnace would be damaged. The researcher told BWHC management that the last time the furnace was shut down and restarted it had cost $0.5 million and caused a six month delay in the project`s schedule. He had already begun heating up the furnace before recognizing the security problem and was concerned that stopping the heatup could damage the furnace. The NOC that allowed the research did not have an explicit requirement to operate the sampler during a release. The sampler was installed several years previously for other research. After reviewing the NOC and other safety basis documents, and after consulting environmental compliance specialists, facility management agreed to turn off the sampler.

Brown, D.H.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Radiochemical Analysis of Tritium for ITER Type B Metallic Radwastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

H. J. Ahn; J. Park; K. Song; B-C Na; S. Rosanvallon; D. Stout

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Atmospheric Deposition of Tritium at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium source terms at nuclear power plants consist of several sources that include plant vents and cooling impoundments, cooling towers, and treatment ponds. Cooling lakes and reservoirs can be sources of airborne tritium. Methods are presented for estimating these source terms and predicting resulting deposition of tritium using metrological models and for estimating infiltration of tritium using hydrogeological models.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Solubility of Tritium in Cu-Be Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interaction with Materials / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

M. Matsuyama; K. Shinmura; Z. Chen; Y. Torikai

183

Tritium Transfer in Porous Concrete Materials Coated with Hydrophobic Paints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

S. Fukada et al.

184

Tritium Monitoring for Liquid Lithium by Permeation Through Iron Window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

Juro Yagi; Akihiro Suzuki; Takayuki Terai

185

Adsorption Capacity of Tritium on Mordenite at Low Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium, Safety, and Environment / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

Yoshinori Kawamura; Yasunori Iwai; Takumi Hayashi; Toshihiko Yamanishi; Kenzo Munakata

186

Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL); Bennett, Edgar F. (Downers Grove, IL); Yule, Thomas J. (West Chicago, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tritium monitor with improved gamma-ray discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and method are presented for selective measurement of tritium oxide in an environment which may include other radioactive components and gamma radiation, the measurement including the selective separation of tritium oxide from a sample gas through a membrane into a counting gas, the generation of electrical pulses individually representative by rise times of tritium oxide and other radioactivity in the counting gas, separation of the pulses by rise times, and counting of those pulses representative of tritium oxide. The invention further includes the separate measurement of any tritium in the sample gas by oxidizing the tritium to tritium oxide and carrying out a second separation and analysis procedure as described above.

Cox, S.A.; Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

188

Tritium laboratory with multiple purposes at NIPNE Magurele Romania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tritium Laboratory from NIPNE (Romania)) is part of Radioisotope Research and Production Center. The Tritium Laboratory has been in operation since 1960, and carries out R and D activities involving tritium sources in gaseous, liquids and solid state, provides specialized service to CANDU NPP Cernavoda (Romania)), and provides tritium assay services to internal and external customers. The paper presents the activities and perspectives of Tritium Laboratory and its performances in accordance with Quality System Management. (authors)

Matei, L.; Postolache, C. [Horia Hulubei, National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering NIPNE, 407 Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele Ilfov (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Molton, Peter M. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tritium containing polymers having a polymer backbone substantially void of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Review of the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities Implementation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of safety basis documents, the preparation of safety evaluation reports, the unreviewed safety question process, potential inadequacy of the safety basis, and specifically...

192

Tritium experiments on components for fusion fuel processing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

SciTech Connect

Under a collaborative agreement between US and Japan, two tritium processing components, a palladium diffuser and a ceramic electrolysis cell have been tested with tritium for application to a Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for plasma exhaust processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fundamental characteristics, compatibility with tritium, impurities effects with tritium, and long-term behavior of the components, were studied over a three year period. Based on these studies, an integrated process loop, JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' equipped with above components was installed at the TSTA for full scale demonstration of the plasma exhaust reprocessing.

Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Tritium Inventory in Aries-AT  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an investigation into the tritium inventory expected in the ARIES-AT fusion reactor. ARIES-AT features silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix as its primary construction. It uses the same fusion power core as the previous ARIES-RS. Based on experimental results of several researchers, consideration was given to swelling, sputtering, film coatings, erosion, and implantation. Estimates were made of tritium inventory using the TMAP4 code. About 700 g of tritium may be expected in the machines, two thirds of which would reside in the first wall. Under assumed accident conditions that involve firs wall temperatures up to 1000°C, evolution of retained tritium may be expected to vary from 0.8 to nearly 40 percent depending on the temperature of the first wall.

Longhurst, Glen Reed

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC)  

SciTech Connect

Idaho National Laboratory developed the Tritium Permeation Analysis Code (TPAC) for tritium permeation in the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (VHTR). All the component models in the VHTR were developed and were embedded into the MATHLAB SIMULINK package with a Graphic User Interface. The governing equations of the nuclear ternary reaction and thermal neutron capture reactions from impurities in helium and graphite core, reflector, and control rods were implemented. The TPAC code was verified using analytical solutions for the tritium birth rate from the ternary fission, the birth rate from 3He, and the birth rate from 10B. This paper also provides comparisons of the TPAC with the existing other codes. A VHTR reference design was selected for tritium permeation study from the reference design to the nuclear-assisted hydrogen production plant and some sensitivity study results are presented based on the HTGR outlet temperature of 750 degrees C.

Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Mike Patterson

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, L.D.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement is described in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release. 1 fig.

Galloway, T.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release.

Galloway, Terry R. (Berkeley, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Background Levels of Atmospheric Tritium and OBT at NIFS Toki Site of Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Tatsuhiko Uda; Masahiro Tanaka; Toshiya Tamari; Hideki Kakiuchi; Noriyuki Momoshima

199

Tritium Concentration in River Water and Groundwater Collected in Rokkasho, Aomori, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Hidenao Hasegawa; Shinji Ueda; Hiroshi Kakimoto; Satoko Takaya; Shun'ichi Hisamatsu

200

Consequences of Different Meteorological Scenarios in the Environmental Impact Assessment of Tritium Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

P. Castro; M. Velarde; J. Ardao; J. M. Perlado; L. Sedano

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

TRITIUM OPERATIONS AT THE LABORATORY FOR LASER ENERGETICS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester has conducted inertial confinement fusion experiments since the early 1970s. Beginning in 1996, LLE filled and fielded targets containing DT gas with pressures as high as 30 atm. Facilities are being upgraded to prepare, characterize, and field targets with DT ice on their inner surface. To this end, process loops that can pressurize DT gas to 1200 bar and operate at 17 K are in the final stages of commissioning. To preclude both accidental and chronic tritium releases and to minimize the potential for exposures to personnel, both metal hydride-based and oxidation drier-based cleanup systems have been installed and commissioned with hydrogen. Cryogenic DT targets will be fielded in 2006.

Shmayda, W.T.; Loucks, S.J.; Janezic, R.; Duffy, T.W.; Harding, D. R.; Lund, L.D.

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

202

Tritium diffusion in lithium oxide solid breeder materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of data of tritium diffusion in Li/sub 2/O is presented. Also diffusion coefficients in Li/sub 2/O of tritium, lithium, oxygen, hydrogen, and deuterium are given. (MOW)

Shearer, J.A.; Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Simulation of Bomb Tritium Entry into the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium is used in a model calibration study that is aimed at developing three-dimensional ocean circulation and mixing models for climate and geochemical simulations. The North Atlantic tritium distribution is modeled using a three-dimensional ...

J. L. Sarmiento

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Tritium Removal from Tritiated Water Using Mesoporous Silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

A. Taguchi; R. Akai; M. Saito; Y. Torikai; M. Matsuyama; M. Ogura; S. Uchida

205

The Progress of Tritium Science & Technology in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Sun Ying

206

Tritium production using highly enriched fuel  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary studies utilizing the MOFDA code have been made for tritium production at the K reactors using 33 and 35 grams per foot oralloy (93.5% U-235) in aluminum in conjunction with standard K5N and K5E fuel elements, respectively. For this report, it was assumed that all tritium would be produced in discrete charges of LiAl target elements. It is intended that the study will be extended at some later time to include LiAl splines. The analysis includes the effect of coolant loss on reactivity for hot-or-cold and green-or-exposed conditions for several oralloy loading fractions.

Miller, R.L.

1967-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOE’s 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods.

208

Plasma wall interaction and tritium retention in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been operating safely and routinely with deuterium-tritium fuel for more than two years. In this time, TFTR has produced an impressive number of record breaking results including core fusion power, {approximately} 2 MW/m{sup 3}, comparable to that expected for ITER. Advances in wall conditioning via lithium pellet injection have played an essential role in achieving these results. Deuterium-tritium operation has also provided a special opportunity to address the issues of tritium recycling and retention. Tritium retention over two years of operation was approximately 40%. Recently, the in-torus tritium inventory was reduced by half through a combination of glow discharge cleaning, moist-air soaks, and plasma discharge cleaning. The tritium inventory is not a constraint in continued operations. The authors present recent results from TFTR in the context of plasma wall interactions and deuterium-tritium issues.

Skinner, C.H.; Amarescu, E.; Ascione, G. [and others

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and .sup.3 He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, Mark L. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Jay C. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample is disclosed. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and [sup 3]He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1993-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

211

Tritium Time Series from Ocean Station P  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present time series of tritium (3H) concentrations at varying depths in the water column at Ocean Station P(50°N, 145°W) in the northeast Pacific. Measurements started in the fall of 1974, at the time of the GEOSECS mapping of the North ...

A. E. Gargett; G. Ostlund; C. S. Wong

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Operating and maintenance experience in tritium environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of practical experience gained over more than twenty years from analyzing failures of process equipment operated in tritium and deuterium environments. Significant improvements have been achieved in design and procurement of new equipment, testing and selection of materials, and gradually more favorable maintenance experience. Preferred materials and inspection methods are described. 6 tabs.

Tuer, G.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Small system for tritium accelerator mass spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an apparatus for ionizing and accelerating a sample containing isotopes of hydrogen and detecting the ratios of hydrogen isotopes contained in the sample. An ion source generates a substantially linear ion beam including ions of tritium from the sample. A radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator is directly coupled to and axially aligned with the source at an angle of substantially zero degrees. The accelerator accelerates species of the sample having different mass to different energy levels along the same axis as the ion beam. A spectrometer is used to detect the concentration of tritium ions in the sample. In one form of the invention, an energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a foil to block the passage of hydrogen, deuterium and {sup 3}He ions, and a surface barrier or scintillation detector to detect the concentration of tritium ions. In another form of the invention, a combined momentum/energy loss spectrometer is used which includes a magnet to separate the ion beams, with Faraday cups to measure the hydrogen and deuterium and a surface barrier or scintillation detector for the tritium ions.

Roberts, M.L.; Davis, J.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Tritium management in fusion synfuel designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two blanket types are being studied: a lithium-sodium pool boiler and a lithium-oxide- or lithium-sodium pool boiler and a lithium-oxide- or aluminate-microsphere moving bed. For each, a wide variety of current technology was considered in handling the tritium. Here, we show the pool boiler with the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle first developed and now being piloted by the General Atomic Company. The tritium (T/sub 2/) will be generated in the lithium-sodium mixture where the concentration is approx. 10 ppM and held constant by a scavenging system consisting mainly of permeators. An intermediate sodium loop carries the blanket heat to the thermochemical cycle, and the T/sub 2/ in this loop is held to 1 ppM by a similar scavenging system. With this design, we have maintained blanket inventory at 1 kg of tritium, kept thermochemical cycle losses to 5 Ci/d and environmental loss to 10 Ci/d, and held total plant risk inventory at 7 kg tritium.

Galloway, T.R.

1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

216

DEVELOPMENT OF THE BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect

A new radioactive shipping packaging for transporting bulk quantities of tritium, the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP), has been designed for the Department of Energy (DOE) as a replacement for a package designed in the early 1970s. This paper summarizes significant design features and describes how the design satisfies the regulatory safety requirements of the Code of Federal Regulations and the International Atomic Energy Agency. The BTSP design incorporates many improvements over its predecessor by implementing improved testing, handling, and maintenance capabilities, while improving manufacturability and incorporating new engineered materials. This paper also discusses the results from testing of the BTSP to 10 CFR 71 Normal Conditions of Transport and Hypothetical Accident Condition events. The programmatic need of the Department of Energy (DOE) to ship bulk quantities of tritium has been satisfied since the late 1970s by the UC-609 shipping package. The current Certificate of Conformance for the UC-609, USA/9932/B(U) (DOE), will expire in late 2011. Since the UC-609 was not designed to meet current regulatory requirements, it will not be recertified and thereby necessitates a replacement Type B shipping package for continued DOE tritium shipments in the future. A replacement tritium packaging called the Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP) is currently being designed and tested by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The BTSP consists of two primary assemblies, an outer Drum Assembly and an inner Containment Vessel Assembly (CV), both designed to mitigate damage and to protect the tritium contents from leaking during the regulatory Hypothetical Accident Condition (HAC) events and during Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT). During transport, the CV rests on a silicone pad within the Drum Liner and is covered with a thermal insulating disk within the insulated Drum Assembly. The BTSP packaging weighs approximately 500 lbs without contents and is 50-1/2 inches high by 24-1/2 inches in outside diameter. With contents the gross weight of the BTSP is 650 lbs. The BTSP is designed for the safe shipment of 150 grams of tritium in a solid or gaseous state. To comply with the federal regulations that govern Type B shipping packages, the BTSP is designed so that it will not lose tritium at a rate greater than the limits stated in 10CFR 71.51 of 10{sup -6} A2 per hour for the 'Normal Conditions of Transport' (NCT) and an A2 in 1 week under 'Hypothetical Accident Conditions' (HAC). Additionally, since the BTSP design incorporates a valve as part of the tritium containment boundary, secondary containment features are incorporated in the CV Lid to protect against gas leakage past the valve as required by 10CFR71.43(e). This secondary containment boundary is designed to provide the same level of containment as the primary containment boundary when subjected to the HAC and NCT criteria.

Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 10 (2013) Simulating Tritium Retention in Tungsten with a Multiple Trap Model in the TMAP Code a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurately predicting the quantity of tritium retained in plasma facing components is a key safety issue for licensing future fusion power reactors. Retention of tritium in the lattice damage caused when high energy neutrons collide with atoms in the structural material of the reactor’s plasma facing components (PFCs) is an area of ongoing experimental research at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) under the US/Japan TITAN collaboration. Recent experiments with the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE), located in the INL’s Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, demonstrate that this damage can only be simulated by computer codes like the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) if one assumes that the lattice damage produced by these neutrons results in multiple types of hydrogen traps (energy wells) within the material, each possessing a different trap energy and density. Previous attempts to simulate the quantity of deuterium released from neutron irradiated TPE tungsten targets indicated that at least six different traps are required by TMAP to model this release. In this paper we describe a recent extension of the TMAP trap site model to include as many traps as required by the user to simulate retention of tritium in neutron damaged tungsten. This model has been applied to data obtained for tungsten irradiated to a damage level of 0.025 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) after exposure to a plasma in TPE.

Brad J. Merrill; Masashi Shimada; Paul W. Humrickhouse

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

220

Apparatus to recover tritium from tritiated molecules  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for recovering tritium from tritiated compounds is provided, including a preheater for heating tritiated water and other co-injected tritiated compounds to temperatures of about 600.degree. C. and a reactor charged with a mixture of uranium and uranium dioxide for receiving the preheated mixture. The reactor vessel is preferably stainless steel of sufficient mass so as to function as a heat sink preventing the reactor side walls from approaching high temperatures. A disposable copper liner extends between the reaction chamber and stainless steel outer vessel to prevent alloying of the uranium with the outer vessel. The uranium dioxide functions as an insulating material and heat sink preventing the reactor side walls from attaining reaction temperatures to thereby minimize tritium permeation rates. The uranium dioxide also functions as a diluent to allow for volumetric expansion of the uranium as it is converted to uranium dioxide.

Swansiger, William A. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Recovery of tritium from tritiated molecules  

SciTech Connect

A method of recovering tritium from tritiated compounds comprises the steps of heating tritiated water and other co-injected tritiated compounds in a preheater to temperatures of about 600.degree. C. The mixture is injected into a reactor charged with a mixture of uranium and uranium dioxide. The injected mixture undergoes highly exothermic reactions with the uranium causing reaction temperatures to occur in excess of the melting point of uranium, and complete decomposition of the tritiated compounds to remove tritium therefrom. The uranium dioxide functions as an insulating material and heat sink preventing the reactor side walls from attaining reaction temperatures to thereby minimize tritium permeation rates. The uranium dioxide also functions as a diluent to allow for volumetric expansion of the uranium as it is converted to uranium dioxide. The reactor vessel is preferably stainless steel of sufficient mass so as to function as a heat sink preventing the reactor side walls from approaching high temperatures. A disposable copper liner extends between the reaction chamber and stainless steel outer vessel to prevent alloying of the uranium with the outer vessel. Apparatus used to carry out the method of the invention is also disclosed.

Swansiger, William A. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Chromatographic Measurement of Isotopic Hydrogen Impurities in Purified Tritium  

SciTech Connect

A cryogenic gas chromatograph is described that was constructed for dedicated analysis of permanent gas and hydrogen isotopic impurities in tritium and deuterium-tritium mixtures. The operating characteristics of this instrument and some results are presented in order to introduce gas chromatography as an analytical technique for potential application to CTR technology situations that require accurate measurement of parts per million and higher levels of isotopic and permanent gas impurities in tritium, deuterium, or mixtures of the isotopes.

Warner, D. K.; Kinard, C.; Bohl, D. R.

1970-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

DOE-HDBK-1129-2007: Tritium Handling and Safe Storage; Replaced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HDBK-1129-2007: Tritium Handling and Safe Storage; Replaced by DOE-HDBK-1129-2008 DOE-HDBK-1129-2007: Tritium Handling and Safe Storage; Replaced by DOE-HDBK-1129-2008 Tritium...

224

RFNC-VNIIEF Tritium Technologies for Fundamental Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties and Reaction / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Radiy I. Il'kaev; Valentin N. Lobanov; Arkadiy A. Yukhimchuk

225

Recovery of Tritium from Pharmaceutical Mixed Waste Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

W. T. Shmayda; R. D. Gallagher

226

Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Hans A. Schmutz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Low Concentration Conversion of Tritium Gas to Tritiated Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental Study / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

C. E. Easterly,1 H. Noguchi,2; M. R. Bennett3

228

Use of Gas Chromatography in the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis and Monitoring / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

R. Lsser; M. Glugla; S. Grnhagen; K. Gnther; R.-D. Penzhorn; J. Wendel

229

Deuterium and Tritium Applications to the Quantitative Study ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 1994 ... Deuterium and Tritium Applications to the Quantitative Study of Hydrogen Local Concentration Metals and Related Embrittlement by J. Chene ...

230

Overview of Tritium Activities at AECL - Past and Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety, Environment, and Tritium Handling / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

L. Rodrigo; H. Boniface; S. Suppiah

231

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulsion Tritium Transport...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

September 2007 pdficon Tritium Transport Model Comments and Responses Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment...

232

Studies of Tritium Characterization in Concrete at the ...  

Studies of Tritium Characterization in Concrete at the Savannah River Site Robert C. Hochel#, Elliot A. Clark* #Analytical Development, *Materials Science and Technology

233

Potential of Fusion Energy in the Context of Tritium Supply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and Model / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

K. Tokimatsu; Y. Asaoka; K. Okano; S. Konishi

234

Comparison and Evaluation of Various Tritium Decontamination Techniques and Processes  

SciTech Connect

In support of fusion energy development, various techniques and processes have been developed over the past two decades for the removal and decontamination of tritium from a variety of items, surfaces, and components. Tritium decontamination, by chemical, physical, mechanical, or a combination of these methods, is driven by two underlying motivational forces. The first of these motivational forces is safety. Safety is paramount to the established culture associated with fusion energy. The second of these motivational forces is cost. In all aspects, less tritium contamination equals lower operational and disposal costs. This paper will discuss and evaluate the various processes employed for tritium removal and decontamination.

C.A. Gentile; S.W. Langish; C.H. Skinner; L.P. Ciebiera

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Time Dependent Tritium Inventories of a Fusion Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and Model / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Isao Aoki; Satoshi Konishi; Ryouichi Kurihara; Yasunori Iwai; Masataka Nishi

236

EFFECTS OF TRITIUM GAS EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of four formulations of ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM) elastomer were exposed to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere and ambient temperature for various times up to about 420 days in closed containers. Two formulations were carbon-black-filled commercial formulations, and two were the equivalent formulations without filler synthesized for this work. Tritium effects on the samples were characterized by measuring the sample volume, mass, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties and by noting changes in appearance. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature increased significantly with tritium exposure, and the unfilled formulations ceased to behave as elastomers after the longest tritium exposure. The filled formulations were more resistant to tritium exposure. Tritium exposure made all samples significantly stiffer and therefore much less able to form a reliable seal when employed as O-rings. No consistent change of volume or density was observed; there was a systematic lowering of sample mass with tritium exposure. In addition, the significant radiolytic production of gas, mainly protium (H{sub 2}) and HT, by the samples when exposed to tritium was characterized by measuring total pressure in the container at the end of each exposure and by mass spectroscopy of a gas sample at the end of each exposure. The total pressure in the containers more than doubled after {approx}420 days tritium exposure.

Clark, E.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

237

Luis Alvarez, the Hydrogen Bubble Chamber, Tritium, and Dinosaurs  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Luis Alvarez, the Hydrogen Bubble Chamber, Tritium, and Dinosaurs Resources with Additional Information Patents Luis Alvarez Courtesy Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 'Luis...

238

Recovery and Packaging of Tritium from Canadian Heavy Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission Reactor / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

W.J. Holtslander; T.E. Harrison; V. Goyette; J.M. Miller

239

Hydrogen isotope distillation for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system of four, interlinked, cryogenic fractional distillation columns has been designed as a prototype for fuel processing for fusion power reactors. The distillation system will continuously separate a feedstream of 360 g moles/day of roughly 50-50 deuterium-tritium containing approximately 1% H into four product streams: (1) a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal; (2) a stream of high-purity D/sub 2/ for simulated neutral beam injection; (3) a stream of DT for simulated reactor refueling; and (4) a stream of high purity T/sub 2/ for refueling and studies on properties of tritium and effects of tritium on materials.

Bartlit, J.R.; Denton, W.H.; Sherman, R.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Screen Test of Tritium Recovery from Stainless Steel Type 316  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decontamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

A. Perevezentsev; K. Watanabe; M. Matsuyama; Y. Torikai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

TRITIUM BARRIER MATERIALS AND SEPARATION SYSTEMS FOR THE NGNP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contamination of downstream hydrogen production plants or other users of high-temperature heat is a concern of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Due to the high operating temperatures of the NGNP (850-900 C outlet temperature), tritium produced in the nuclear reactor can permeate through heat exchangers to reach the hydrogen production plant, where it can become incorporated into process chemicals or the hydrogen product. The concentration limit for tritium in the hydrogen product has not been established, but it is expected that any future limit on tritium concentration will be no higher than the air and water effluent limits established by the NRC and the EPA. A literature survey of tritium permeation barriers, capture systems, and mitigation measures is presented and technologies are identified that may reduce the movement of tritium to the downstream plant. Among tritium permeation barriers, oxide layers produced in-situ may provide the most suitable barriers, though it may be possible to use aluminized surfaces also. For tritium capture systems, the use of getters is recommended, and high-temperature hydride forming materials such as Ti, Zr, and Y are suggested. Tritium may also be converted to HTO in order to capture it on molecular sieves or getter materials. Counter-flow of hydrogen may reduce the flux of tritium through heat exchangers. Recommendations for research and development work are provided.

Sherman, S; Thad Adams, T

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

242

Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

244

Low-Level Measurement with a Noble Gas Mass Spectrometer for Organically Bound Tritium in Environmental Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

H. Kakiuchi et al.

245

TRITIUM PRODUCTION BY NEUTRON-IRRADIATION OF ALUMINUM-LITHIUM ALLOY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing tritium by neutron-bombarding aluminum --lithium alloy and heating the alloy for the release of the tritium formed is described. (AEC)

Abraham, B.M.

1963-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

246

Combined System of Monothermal Chemical Exchange Process with Electrolysis and Thermal Diffusion Process for Enriching Tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

Asashi Kitamoto; Katsuo Hasegawa; Takashi Masui

247

Tritium-Enrichment via CECE-Process with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis (HOT ELLY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

W. Keil; E. Erdle

248

Tritium Activities for Fusion Technology in Bruyères-le-Châtel Center — CEA — France  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Fusion Tritium Program / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

B. Hircq

249

Tritium Technology Development in EEC Laboratories — Contributions to Design Goals for NET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Fusion Tritium Program / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

P. Dinner; M. Chazalon; H. Dworschak; L. Maineri; A. Bruggeman; D. Leger; J. Darvas; H.D. Rohrig; R.D. Penzhorn

250

FACILITY SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SURVEY & TRANSFER SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview Transfer Activities Checklist Pre-Survey Information Request Survey Report Content Detailed Walkdown Checklist Walkdown Checklist Clipboard Aids S & M Checklist Survey Report Example - Hot Storage Garden Survey Report Example - Tritium System Test Assembly Survey Report Example - Calutron Overview As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning. Requirements and guidance for such transfers are contained in:  DOE Order 430.1B Chg. 2, REAL PROPERTY & ASSET MANAGEMENT  DOE Guide 430.1-5, TRANSITION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE The transfer process is illustrated in the Transfer Process figure. The purpose here is to provide examples of methods and

251

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) before Upgrade to Component Test Facility (CTF)  

SciTech Connect

The compact (R0~1.2-1.3m) Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is aimed at providing a fully integrated, continuously driven fusion nuclear environment of copious fusion neutrons. This facility would be used to test, discover, understand, and innovate scientific and technical solutions for the challenges facing DEMO, by addressing the multi-scale synergistic interactions involving fusion plasma material interactions, tritium fuel cycle, power extraction, and the nuclear effects on materials. Such a facility properly designed would provide, initially at the JET-level plasma pressure (~30%T2) and conditions (e.g., Hot-Ion H-Mode), an outboard fusion neutron flux of 0.25 MW/m2 while requiring a fusion power of 19 MW. If and when this research operation is successful, its performance can be extended to 1 MW/m2 and 76 MW by reaching for twice the JET plasma pressure and Q. High-safety factor q and moderate- plasmas would minimize plasma-induced disruptions, helping to deliver reliably a neutron fluence of 1 MW-yr/m2 and a duty factor of 10% presently anticipated for the FNS research. Success of this research will depend on achieving time-efficient installation and replacement of all components using extensive remote handling (RH). This in turn requires modular designs for all internal components, including the single-turn toroidal field coil center-post with RH-compatible bi-directional sliding joints. Such device goals would further dictate placement of support structures and vacuum seal welds behind the internal and shielding components. If these further goals could be achieved, the FNSF would provide a ready upgrade path to the Component Test Facility (CTF), which would aim to test, at higher neutron fluence and duty cycle, the demanding fusion nuclear engineering and technologies for DEMO. This FNSF-CTF strategy would be complementary to the ITER and the Broader Approach programs, and thereby help mitigate the risks of an aggressive world fusion DEMO R&D Program. The key physics and technology research needed in the next decade to manage the potential risks of this FNSF are identified.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Tritium labeling of organic compounds deposited on porous structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for labeling organic compounds with tritium is carried out by depositing the selected compound on the extensive surface of a porous structure such as a membrane filter and exposing the membrane containing the compound to tritium gas activated by the microwave discharge technique. The labeled compound is then recovered from the porous structure.

Ehrenkaufer, Richard L. E. (Speonk, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY); Hembree, Wylie C. (Woodcliff Lake, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tritium measurement technique using in-bed'' calorimetry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium heels'' from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and in-bed'' tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Tritium measurement technique using ``in-bed`` calorimetry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium ``heels`` from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and ``in-bed`` tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus_minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Accelerator driven production of tritium: target and blanket design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tritium is an essential component of thermonuclear weapons in the US arsenal. Unfortunately, tritium is a radioactive form of hydrogen, and one-half of the inventory disappears through radioactive decay every 12 years; therefore, it must be replenished. Until a few years ago, the only way to accomplish the tritium production mission was to use fission reactors. Recently, thanks to the development of new accelerator technologies (SDI and SSC studies) and to the post cold war era (international treaties limiting the number of warheads and therefore the tritium requirements), accelerator-based production of tritium seems feasible and is being investigated. The production of tritium using accelerators is a two step process: the production of neutrons in the 'target' and the use of these neutrons in the 'blanket assembly'. The systems described in this thesis employ a linear accelerator (1 GeV protons, I 00 mA beam current), lead targets for the production of neutrons via spallation reactions, and tritium breeding regions (blankets containing '6Li in various mixtures). The high energy interactions and the particle transport were modeled with the LAHET computer code system. Heterogeneous and homogeneous spallation target/blanket systems were investigated. The target designs in the heterogeneous systems were 1 / liquid lead, and 2/ layers of solid lead plates cooled by heavy water. The tritium breeding blanket assemblies contained either lithium oxide or molten fluorine salt with or without UF4' The tritium production rates achieved were-1 5 tritium atoms per incident proton for the L'20 blanket,-1 6 tritium atoms per incident proton for the LiF BeF2ZrF4blanket, and-215 tritium atoms per incident proton for the LiF BeF2ZrF4UF4blanket. An homogeneous target/blanket system consisting of molten lithium lead eutectic (L',7Pb83) was also considered. This design was the most promising with-24 to-29 tritium atoms per incident proton, upgradable to-32 tritium atoms per incident proton.

Ragusa, Jean Concetto

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Spectroscopic diagnostics of tritium recycling in TFTR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors present the first spectroscopic measurements of tritium Balmer-alpha (T{sub {alpha}}) emission from a fusion plasma. A Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to measure the H{sub {alpha}}, D{sub {alpha}}, T{sub {alpha}} spectrum in the current D-T a experimental campaign on TFTR and the contributions of H, D and T are separated by spectral analysis. The T{sub {alpha}} line was measurable at concentrations T{sub {alpha}}/(H{sub {alpha}} + D{sub {alpha}} + T{sub {alpha}}) down to 2%.

Skinner, C.H.; Stotler, D.P.; Adler, H.; Ramsey, A.T.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fusion reactor high vacuum pumping: Charcoal cryosorber tritium exposure results  

SciTech Connect

Recent experiments, have shown the practically of using activated charcoal (coconut charcoal) at 4{degrees}K to pump helium and hydrogen isotopes for a fusion reactor. Both speed and capacity for deuterium/helium and tritium/helium-3 mixtures were shown to be satisfactory. The long term effects of tritium on the charcoal/cement system developed by Grumman and LLNL were not known and a program was undertaken to see what, if any, effect long term tritium exposure has on the cryosorber. Several charcoal on aluminum test samples were subjected to six months exposure of tritium at approximately 77{degrees}K. The tritium was scanned several times with a residual gas analyzer and the speed-capacity performance of the samples was measured before, approximately half way through and after the exposure. Modest effects were noted which would not seriously restrict charcoal's use as a cryosorber for fusion reactor high vacuum pumping applications. 4 refs., 8 figs.

Sedgley, D.W.; Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. (Grumman Aerospace Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Study of Tritium and Helium Release from Irradiated Lithium Ceramics Li2TiO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket and Breeder Materials / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

T. Kulsartov; I. Tazhibayeva; Yu. Gordienko; E. Chikhray; K. Tsuchiya; H. Kawamura; A. Kulsartova

260

Tritium Absorption of CO-Deposited Carbon Films, Graphite and Polycrystalline Tungsten  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interaction with Materials / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Y. Nobuta et al.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effect of Tritium Storage Vessel and Aluminum Secondary Container on Calorimeter Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

K.-M. Song et al.

262

Tritium In-Bed Accountability for a Passively Cooled, Electrically Heated Hydride (PACE) Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

J. E. Klein; P. J. Foster

263

Effect of Water Formation Reaction on Tritium Release Behavior from Li4SiO4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket and Breeder Materials / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

H. Yamasaki; K. Kashimura; T. Kanazawa; K. Katayama; N. Yamashita; S. Fukada; M. Nishikawa

264

Tritium Water Monitoring System Based on CaF2 Flow-Cell Detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

T. Kawano; T. Uda; T. Yamamoto; H. Ohashi

265

Matter Sampling, Tritium Removal, Inventory and Management with Versatile Embedded System Called LASK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contamination and Waste / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

C. Hernandez; M. Naiim Habib; L. Doceul

266

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

MEASUREMENT OF TRITIUM DURING VOLOXIDATION OF ZIRCALOY-2 FUEL HULLS  

SciTech Connect

A straightforward method to evaluate the tritium content of Zircaloy-2 cladding hulls via oxidation of the hull and capture of the volatilized tritium in liquids has been demonstrated. Hull samples were heated in air inside a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). The TGA was rapidly heated to 1000 C to oxidize the hulls and release absorbed tritium. To capture tritium, the TGA off-gas was bubbled through a series of liquid traps. The concentrations of tritium in bubbler solutions indicated that tritiated water vapor was captured nearly quantitatively. The average tritium content measured in the hulls was 19% of the amount of tritium produced by the fuel, according to ORIGEN2 isotope generation and depletion calculations. Published experimental data show that Zircaloy-2 oxidation follows an Arrhenius model, and that an initial, nonlinear oxidation rate is followed by a faster, linear rate after 'breakaway' of the oxide film. This study demonstrates that the linear oxidation rate of Zircaloy samples at 974 C is faster than predicted by the extrapolation of data from lower temperatures.

Crowder, M.; Laurinat, J.; Stillman, J.

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

268

Uptake of tritium by plants from atmosphere and soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uptake of tritiated water (HTO) by plants was examined under field conditions when tritium was available to leaves from only the atmosphere and when tritium was available from both the soil (root uptake) and the atmosphere. Maple, oak, and elm trees, planted in clean soil, were transported to a tritium-contaminated forest, where the atmospheric tritium concentration was elevated, to examine HTO uptake by tree leaves when the source was only in the atmosphere. The results partially agreed with a diffusion model of tritium uptake by plants. Discrepancies found between predicted and measured leaf HTO/air HTO ratios should be attributed to the existence of some isolated water, which is isolated from the transpiration stream in the leaves, that was not available for rapid turnover. The uptake of tritium by trees, when the source was both in the soil and atmosphere, was also examined using deciduous trees (maple and elm) resident to the tritium-contaminated forest. The results were in agreement with a prediction model.

Amano, H [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI); Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tritium activities in Canada supporting CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the various Canadian tritium research and operational activities supporting the development, refurbishment and operation of CANDU{sup R} nuclear power reactors is presented. These activities encompass tritium health and safety, tritium in the environment, tritium interaction with materials, and tritium processing, and relate to both supporting R and D advances as well as operational best practices. The collective results of these activities contribute to our goals of improving worker and public safety, and operational efficiency. (authors)

Miller, J. M. [AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium-contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

Anderson, D.F.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

271

Apparatus for monitoring tritium in tritium contaminating environments using a modified Kanne chamber  

SciTech Connect

A conventional Kanne tritium monitor has been redesigned to reduce its sensitivity to such contaminants as tritiated water vapor and tritiated oil. The high voltage electrode has been replaced by a wire cylinder and the collector electrode has been reduced in diameter. The area sensitive to contamination has thereby been reduced by about a factor of forty while the overall apparatus sensitivity and operation has not been affected. The design allows for in situ decontamination of the chambers, if necessary.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios.

Jung, J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. In order to prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this paper examines the root causes and potential solutions for the production of this radionuclide, including materials selection and inert gas sparging. A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750°C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for one steadystate value of tritium production in the reactor.

Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Recommendations for Tritium Science and Technology Research and Development in Support of the Tritium Readiness Campaign, TTP-7-084  

SciTech Connect

Between 2006 and 2012 the Tritium Readiness Campaign Development and Testing Program produced significant advances in the understanding of in-reactor TPBAR performance. Incorporating these data into existing TPBAR performance models has improved permeation predictions, and the discrepancy between predicted and observed tritium permeation in the WBN1 coolant has been decreased by about 30%. However, important differences between predicted and observed permeation still remain, and there are significant knowledge gaps that hinder the ability to reliably predict other aspects of TPBAR performance such as tritium distribution, component integrity, and performance margins. Based on recommendations from recent Tritium Readiness Campaign workshops and reviews coupled with technical and programmatic priorities, high-priority activities were identified to address knowledge gaps in the near- (3-5 year), middle- (5-10 year), and long-term (10+ year) time horizons. It is important to note that there are many aspects to a well-integrated research and development program. The intent is not to focus exclusively on one aspect or another, but to approach the program in a holistic fashion. Thus, in addition to small-scale tritium science studies, ex-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMED, and large-scale in-reactor tritium technology experiments such as TMIST, a well-rounded research and development program must also include continued analysis of WBN1 performance data and post-irradiation examination of TPBARs and lead use assemblies to evaluate model improvements and compare separate-effects and integral component behavior.

Senor, David J.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

HEAT TRANSFER AND TRITIUM PRODUCING SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention related to a circulating lithium-containing blanket system in a neution source hav'ing a magnetic field associated therewith. The blanket serves simultaneously and efficiently as a heat transfer mediunm and as a source of tritium. The blanket is composed of a lithium-6-enriched fused salt selected from the group consisting of lithium nitrite, lithium nitrate, a mixture of said salts, a mixture of each of said salts with lithium oxide, and a mixture of said salts with each other and with lithium oxide. The moderator, which is contained within the blanket in a separate conduit, can be water. A stellarator is one of the neutron sources which can be used in this invention. (AEC)

Johnson, E.F.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

277

On-line tritium production monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scintillation optical fiber system for the on-line monitoring of nuclear reactions in an event-by-event manner is described. In the measurement of tritium production one or more optical fibers are coated with enriched .sup.6 Li and connected to standard scintillation counter circuitry. A neutron generated .sup.6 Li(n )T reaction occurs in the coated surface of .sup.6 Li-coated fiber to produce energetic alpha and triton particles one of which enters the optical fiber and scintillates light through the fiber to the counting circuit. The coated optical fibers can be provided with position sensitivity by placing a mirror at the free end of the fibers or by using pulse counting circuits at both ends of the fibers.

Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Numerical Studies of Tritium and Helium-3 in the Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of circulation and lateral mixing on the distributions of tritium and heliurn-3 in the thermocline are investigated using a two-dimensional numerical model. The gyre circulation was approximated by a steady flow with closed ...

David L. Musgrave

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Tritium permeation and wall loading in the TFTR vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect

The problems of tritium permeation through and loading of the TFTR vacuum vessel wall structural components are considered. A general analytical solution to the time dependent diffusion equation which takes into account the boundary conditions arising from the tritium filling gas as well as the source function associated with implanted energetic charge exchange tritium is presented. Expressions are derived for two quantities of interest: (1) the total amount of tritium leaving the outer surface of a particular vessel component as a function of time, and (2) the amount retained as a function of time. These quantities are evaluated for specific TFTR operating scenarios and outgassing modes. The results are that permeation through the vessel is important only for the bellows during discharge cleaning if the wall temperature rises above approximately 150/sup 0/C. At 250/sup 0/C, after 72 hours of discharge cleaning 195 Ci would be lost.

Cecchi, J.L.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings ... Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 Posted By Office of Public Affairs

282

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings ... Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings goals for FY13 Posted By Office of Public Affairs

283

Assessment of tritium in the Savannah River Site environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the first revision to a series of reports on radionuclides inn the SRS environment. Tritium was chosen as the first radionuclide in the series because the calculations used to assess the dose to the offsite population from SRS releases indicate that the dose due to tritium, through of small consequence, is one of the most important the radionuclides. This was recognized early in the site operation, and extensive measurements of tritium in the atmosphere, surface water, and ground water exist due to the effort of the Environmental Monitoring Section. In addition, research into the transport and fate of tritium in the environment has been supported at the SRS by both the local Department of Energy (DOE) Office and DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research.

Carlton, W.H.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Control of tritium permeation through fusion reactor strucural materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intention of this paper is to provide a brief synopsis of the status of understanding and technology pertaining to the dissolution and permeation of tritium in fusion reactor materials. The following sections of this paper attempt to develop a simple perspective for understanding the consequences of these phenomena and the nature of the technical methodology being contemplated to control their impact on fusion reactor operation. Considered in order are: (1) the occurrence of tritium in the fusion fuel cycle, (2) a set of tentative criteria to guide the analysis of tritium containment and control strategies, (3) the basic mechanisms by which tritium may be released from a fusion plant, and (4) the methods currently under development to control the permeation-related release mechanisms. To provide background and support for these considerations, existing solubility and permeation data for the hydrogen isotopes are compared and correlated under conditions to be expected in fusion reactor systems.

Maroni, V.A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fixation of tritium in a highly stable polymer form  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the fixation of tritium comprising reacting tritiated water with calcium carbide to produce calcium hydroxide and tritiated acetylene, polymerizing the acetylene, and then incorporating the polymer in a solidifying matrix.

Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY); Colombo, Peter (Patchogue, NY); Pruzansky, Jacob (E. Islip, NY)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Plasma Fueling, Pumping, and Tritium Handling Considerations for FIRE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium pellet injection will be utilized on the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) for efficient tritium fueling and to optimize the density profile for high fusion power. Conventional pneumatic pellet injectors, coupled with a guidetube system to launch pellets into the plasma from the high, field side, low field side, and vertically, will be provided for fueling along with gas puffing for plasma edge density control. About 0.1 g of tritium must be injected during each 10-s pulse. The tritium and deuterium will be exhausted into the divertor. The double null divertor will have 16 cryogenic pumps located near the divertor chamber to provide the required high pumping speed of 200 torr-L/s.

Fisher, P.W.; Foster, C.A.; Gentile, C.A.; Gouge, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

288

Program on Technology Innovation: Assessment of Tritium Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium is produced during nuclear power plant operation, with the majority of production stemming from a reaction with boron in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in which neutrons from the plant’s chain reaction are absorbed. This report reviews separation technology development for the removal of tritium from wastewaters to meet environmental release limits.BackgroundThe designation “tritiated water” refers to water in which ...

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Confinement and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tomamak Fusion Test reactor has performed initial high-power experiments with the plasma fueled with nominally equal densities of deuterium and tritium. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas, the energy stored in the electron and ions increased by [similar to]20%. These increases indicate improvements in confinement associated with the use of tritium and possibly heating of electrons by [alpha] particles created by the D-T fusion reactions.

Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Ashcroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bretz, N.L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.Z.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Darrow, D.S.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Gentile, C.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kugel, H.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Loughlin, M.J.; LeBlanc, B.; Leonard, M.; Levinton, F.M.; Machuzak, J.; Mansfield, D.K.; Martin, A.; Mazzucato, E.; Majeski, R.; Marmar, E.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Muelle

1994-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Corrections for Measurements of Tritium in Subterranean Vapor using Silica Gel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hazardous contaminants buried within vadose zones can accumulate in soil gas. The concentrations and spatial extent of these contaminants are measured to evaluate potential transport to ground water for public risk evaluation. Tritium is an important contaminant found in and monitored for in vadose zones across numerous sites within the United States nuclear weapons complex, including Los Alamos National Laboratory. The extraction, collection, and laboratory analysis of tritium from subterranean soil gas presents numerous technical challenges that have not been fully studied. Particularly, the lack of soil moisture in the soil gas in the vadose zone makes it difficult to obtain enough sample moisture (e.g., > 5 g) to provide for the required sensitivity, and often, only small amounts of moisture can be collected. Further, although silica gel has high affinity for water vapor and is prebaked prior to sampling, there is still sufficient residual moisture in the prebaked gel to dilute the relatively small amount of sampled moisture; thereby, significantly lowering the 'true' tritium concentration in the soil gas. This paper provides an evaluation of the magnitude of the bias from dilution, provides methods to correct past measurements by applying a correction factor (CF), and evaluates the uncertainty of the CF values. For this, ten-thousand Monte Carlo calculations were perfonned and distribution parameters of CF values were detennined and evaluated. The mean and standard deviation of the distribution of CF values were 1.53 {+-} 0.36, and the minimum, median, and maximum values were 1.14, 1.43, and 5.27, respectively.

Whicker, Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

292

Low-energy beta spectroscopy using pin diodes to monitor tritium surface contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that tritium betas emitted from a surface can be counted using a pin photodiode as a solid state charged particle detector. Furthermore, we show that the range of tritium betas through air is sufficient to allow measurement of tritium on samples in air by this method. These two findings make possible a new method to survey tritium surface contamination which has advantages over existing methods. We have built and tested several prototype instruments which use this method to measure tritium surface contamination, including a compact portable unit. The design of these instruments and results from tests and calibrations are described. Potential applications of this new method to monitor tritium are discussed.

Wampler, W.R.; Doyle, B.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Savannah River Tritium Enterprise exceeds productivity savings...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

month. Among the 28 CI projects validated in FY13 were: The development of a calibration process that will maintain the Measuring and Test Equipment tools for facility operations,...

294

Theoretical Study of the Reactivity of Mixed Manganese and Silver Oxides on Hydrogen Simulating Tritium for the Limitation of Outgassing from Waste Drums  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental and Organically Bound Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

X. Lefebvre; K. Liger; M. Troulay; N. Ghirelli; C. Perrais

295

Successful Experimental Verification of the Tokamak Exhaust Processing Concept of ITER with the CAPER Facility  

SciTech Connect

One of the design targets for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing (TEP) system of ITER is not to lose more than 10{sup -5}gh{sup -1} into the Normal Vent Detritiation system of the Tritium Plant. The plasma exhaust gas therefore needs to be processed in a way that a tritium removal efficiency of about 10{sup 8} with respect to the flow rate is achieved. Expressed in terms of tritium concentrations this corresponds to a decontamination from about 130 gm{sup -3} down to about 10{sup -4} gm{sup -3} (about 1 Cim{sup -3} = 3.7*10{sup 10} Bqm{sup -3}). The three step reference process for the TEP system of ITER is called CAPER and has been developed and realized at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). After the successful commissioning of the PERMCAT reactor as the key component of the third step detailed parametric tritium testing of the 3 steps involving the processing of more than 300 g tritium has been carried out and decontamination factors beyond the design requirements have been demonstrated for each process step and for the process as a whole. Not only the decontamination factor of 10{sup 8} as required by ITER, but also the operational mode of TEP as a waste dump for gases from diverse sources has been experimentally validated with the CAPER facility.

Bornschein, B.; Glugla, M.; Guenther, K.; Le, T.L.; Simon, K.H.; Welte, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Comparison of Process Characteristics for the Recovery of Tritium from Heavy Water and Light Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Processing / Proceedings of the Third Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Toronto, Ontario, Canada, May 1-6, 1988)

K.M. Kalyanam; S.K. Sood

297

Tritium Effects on Fracture Toughness of Stainless Steel Weldments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L and Type 21-6-9 stainless steel weldments were measured. Weldments were tritium-charged-and-aged and then tested in order to measure the effect of the increasing decay helium content on toughness. The results were compared to uncharged and hydrogen-charged samples. For unexposed weldments having 8-12 volume percent retained delta ferrite, fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. At higher levels of weld ferrite, the fracture toughness decreased to values below that of the base metal. Hydrogen-charged and tritium-charged weldments had lower toughness values than similarly charged base metals and toughness decreased further with increasing weld ferrite content. The effect of decay helium content was inconclusive because of tritium off-gassing losses during handling, storage and testing. Fracture modes were dominated by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed weldments. In hydrogen and tritium-exposed weldments, the fracture modes depended on the weld ferrite content. At high ferrite contents, hydrogen-induced transgranular fracture of the weld ferrite phase was observed.

MORGAN, MICHAEL; CHAPMAN, G. K.; TOSTEN, M. H.; WEST, S. L.

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

298

TRENTA Facility for Trade-Off Studies Between Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange and Cryogenic Distillation Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

I. Cristescu et al.

299

EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water 8-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0288-S1: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR) Tritium Readiness Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement Summary This Supplemental EIS updates the environmental analyses in DOE's 1999 EIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS). The CLWR EIS addressed the production of tritium in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors in Tennessee using tritium-producing burnable absorber rods. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities at this time. Documents Available for Download September 28, 2011 EIS-0288-S1: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplemental Environmental

300

Continuous production of tritium in an isotope-production reactor with a separate circulation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium is allowed to flow through the reactor in separate loops in order to facilitate the production and removal of tritium.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Modeling Tritium Transport in PbLi Breeder Blankets Under Steady State  

SciTech Connect

Tritium behavior in the breeder/coolant plays a crucial role in keeping the tritium loss under an allowable limit and realizing high tritium recovery efficiency. In this paper, progress toward the development of a comprehensive 3D predictive capability is discussed and presented. The sequence of transport processes leading to tritium release includes diffusion and convection through the PbLi, transfer across the liquid/solid interface, diffusion of atomic tritium through the structure, and dissolution-recombination at the solid/gas interface. Numerical simulation of the coupled individual physics phenomena of tritium transport is performed for DCLL/HCLL type breeder blankets under realistic reactor-like conditions in this paper. Tritium concentration and permeation are presented and the MHD effects are evaluated. Preliminary results shows that the MHD velocity profile has the significant effect in preventing tritium permeation due to the higher convection effects near the wall.

H. Zhang; A. Ying; M. Abdou; B. Merrill

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Performance Characterization of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange and Recombination Catalysts for Tritium Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

S. Suppiah; D. Ryland; K. Marcinkowska; H. Boniface; A. Everatt

303

Behavior of Tritium in the Mouse Body After Oral Intake and Estimation of the Absorbed Dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biology / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Masahiro Saito

304

Estimation of Internal Dose by Blood Analyses for Exposure to Tritium in Various Chemical Forms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biology / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Hiroshi Takeda; Shoichi Fuma; Kiriko Miyamoto; Kei Yanagisawa; Nobuyoshi Ishii; Noriko Kuroda

305

Review of Methods and Tools for Estimating Atmospheric Deposition of Tritium at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a groundwater protection program, nuclear power plant operators must understand the sources and concentrations of tritium in on-site groundwater. Low levels of tritium from gaseous effluents and evaporating liquid effluents held in on-site impoundments or ponds can impact the tritium concentration in groundwater through rain washout. This report reviews the methods and tools necessary to quantify the impact of such atmospherically deposited tritium in groundwater.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Estimation of DTRF Operational Tritium Inventory Using Cryogenic Distillation Column Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

J. W. Kim; T. C. W. Wong; F. K. W. Tang; A. Reid

307

TRITIUM EFFECTS ON DYNAMIC MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynamic mechanical analysis has been used to characterize the effects of tritium gas (initially 1 atm. pressure, ambient temperature) exposure over times up to 2.3 years on several thermoplastics-ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide, and on several formulations of elastomers based on ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM). Tritium exposure stiffened the elastic modulus of UHMW-PE up to about 1 year and then softened it, and reduced the viscous response monotonically with time. PTFE initially stiffened, however the samples became too weak to handle after nine months exposure. The dynamic properties of Vespel{reg_sign} were not affected. The glass transition temperature of the EPDM formulations increased approximately 4 C. following three months tritium exposure.

Clark, E

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Uncertainty assessment and analysis of ITER in-VV tritium inventory determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking of tritium inventories on ITER will be essential to ensure that the safety limits established for the mobilizable tritium inventory in the vacuum vessel are not violated. Tritium will be delivered to the ITER site from outside suppliers. Staring with the tritium imports the value of tritium inventory at ITER site will be known with a certain error that will propagate in time. During plasma operation, shot by shot measurements of the tritium delivered to the Torus and recovered will allow the amount of tritium trapped in the Torus to be computed at the end of the day. A case study for different measuring techniques and several measuring points for the tritium recovered from Torus have been done. An alternative method is to measure overnight the variation in the inventory of the storage and delivery system and the associated error when this method will be employed are presented. In order to reduce the errors on the tritium trapped in-vessel, at certain time intervals a method of global tritium inventory will be performed. The method envisages the transfer of all the mobilizable tritium from the plant and measurement of this inventory in the self-assay beds from the storage and delivery system. Evaluation of the most important sources of error for the tritium trapped in-vessel and means of minimization are eventually presented. (authors)

Cristescu, I. R.; Cristescu, I.; Glugla, M. [FzK, Tritium Laboratory, POBox 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Murdoch, D. [EFDA CSU, MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Ciattaglia, S. [ITER IT, CEA Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950 C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm) - three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Tritium Permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor and its high-temperature components requires information regarding the permeation of fission generated tritium and hydrogen product through candidate heat exchanger alloys. Release of fission-generated tritium to the environment and the potential contamination of the helium coolant by permeation of product hydrogen into the coolant system represent safety basis and product contamination issues. Of the three potential candidates for high-temperature components of the NGNP reactor design, only permeability for Incoloy 800H has been well documented. Hydrogen permeability data have been published for Inconel 617, but only in two literature reports and for partial pressures of hydrogen greater than one atmosphere, far higher than anticipated in the NGNP reactor. To support engineering design of the NGNP reactor components, the tritium permeability of Inconel 617 and Incoloy 800H was determined using a measurement system designed and fabricated at Idaho National Laboratory. The tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617, was measured in the temperature range 650 to 950°C and at primary concentrations of 1.5 to 6 parts per million volume tritium in helium. (partial pressures of 10-6 atm)—three orders of magnitude lower partial pressures than used in the hydrogen permeation testing. The measured tritium permeability of Incoloy 800H and Inconel 617 deviated substantially from the values measured for hydrogen. This may be due to instrument offset, system absorption, presence of competing quantities of hydrogen, surface oxides, or other phenomena. Due to the challenge of determining the chemical composition of a mixture with such a low hydrogen isotope concentration, no categorical explanation of this offset has been developed.

Philip Winston; Pattrick Calderoni; Paul Humrickhouse

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Deuterium-tritium experiments on TFTR  

SciTech Connect

A peak fusion power production of 9.3{plus_minus}0.7 MW has been achieved on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) in deuterium plasmas heated by co and counter injected deuterium and tritium neutral beams with a total power of 33.7 MW. The ratio of fusion power output to heating power input is 0.27. At the time of the highest neutron flux the plasma conditions are: {ital T}{sub {ital e}}(0)=11.5 keV, {ital T}{sub {ital i}}(0)=44 keV, {ital n}{sub {ital e}}(0)=8.5{times}10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}3}, and {l_angle}{ital Z}{sub eff}{r_angle}=2.2 giving {tau}{sub {ital E}}=0.24 s. These conditions are similar to those found in the highest confinement deuterium plasmas. The measured D-T neutron yield is within 7% of computer code estimates based on profile measurements and within experimental uncertainties. These plasmas have an inferred central fusion alpha fraction of 0.2% and central fusion power density of 2 MW/m{sup 3} similar to that expected in a fusion reactor. Even though the alpha velocity exceeds the Alfven velocity throughout the time of high neutron output in most high power plasmas, MHD activity is similar to that in comparable deuterium plasmas and Alfven wave activity is low. The measured loss rate of energetic alpha particles is about 3% of the total as expected from alphas which are born on unconfined orbits. Compared to pure deuterium plasmas with similar externally applied conditions, the stored energy in electrons and ions is about 25% higher indicating improvements in confinement associated with D-T plasmas and consistent with modest electron heating expected from alpha particles. ICRF heating of D-T plasmas using up to 5.5 MW has resulted in 10 keV increases in central ion and 2.5 keV increases in central electron temperatures in relatively good agreement with code predictions. In these cases heating on the magnetic axis at 2{Omega}{sub {ital T}} gave up to 80% of the ICRF energy to ions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

Bretz, N.L.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batha, S.; Bateman, G.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Cauffman, S.; Chang, Z.; Cheng, C.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Dorland, W.; Dudek, L.; Duong, H.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Evensen, H.; Fisch, N.; Fisher, R.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, R.; Fu, G.; Fujita, T.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gilbert, J.; Giola, J.; Gorelenkov, N.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Hawryluk, R.J.; Heidbrink, W.; Herrmann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hosea, J.; Hsuan, H.; Hughes, M.; Hulse, R.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Jobes, F.C.; Johnson, D.W.; Johnson, L.C.; Kalish, M.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kesner, J.; Kugel, H.; Labik, G.; Lam, N.T.; LaMarche, P.H.; Lawson, E.; LeBlanc, B.; Levine, J.; Levinton, F.M.; Loesser, D.; Long, D.; Loughlin, M.J.; Machuzak, J.; Majeski, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Marmar, E.; Marsala, R.; Martin, A.; Martin, G.; Mauel, M.; Mazzucato, E.; McCarthy, M.P.; McChesney, J.; McCormack, B.; McCune, D.C.; McGuire, K.M.; McKee, G.; Meade, D.M.; Medley, S.S.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Mirnov, S.V.; Mueller, D.; Murakami, M.; Murphy, J.A.; Nagy, A.; Navratil, G.A.; Nazikian, R.; Newman, R.; Norris, M.; OConnor, T.; Oldaker, M.; Ongena, J.; Osakabe, M.; Owens, D.K.; Park, H.; Park, W.; Parks, P.; Paul, S.F.; Pearson, G.; Perry, E.; Persing, R.; Petrov, M.; Phillips, C.K.; Phillips, M.; Pitcher, S.; Pysher, R.; Qualls, A.L.; Raftapoulos, S.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Ramsey, A.; Rasmunsen, D.A.; Redi, M.H.; Renda, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Roberts, D.; Rogers, J.; Rossmassler, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Ruskov, E.; Sabbaugh, S.A.; Sasao, M.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scillia, R.; Scott, S.D.; Semenov, I.; Senko, T.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Application of Tritium Tracer Technique to Determination of Hydrogen Diffusion Coefficients and Permeation Rate near Room Temperature for Tungsten  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interaction with Materials / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

T. Ikeda; T. Otsuka; T. Tanabe

313

Observed and Modelled Tritium in the Wetland Ecosystem in Duke Swamp near a Nuclear Waste Management Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

S. B. Kim; S. L. Chouhan; P. A. Davis

314

Design Implications for Laser Raman Measurement Systems for Tritium Sample-Analysis, Accountancy or Process-Control Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement, Monitoring, and Accountancy / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology

M. Schlösser; S. Fischer; M. Sturm; B. Bornschein; R. J. Lewis; H. H. Telle

315

A Ruggedized Ultrasensitive Field Air Sampler for Differentially Determining Tritium Oxide and Gas in Ambient Air Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The instrument described is an operational, practical, ruggedized, ultrasensitive, tritium field air sampler assembled for the simultaneous, differential sampling of the environmental air for tritium oxide and elemental tritium. The system uses hardware assembled and packaged in such manner as to facilitate use in the field as well as in the laboratory. The sampling system occupies relatively small space and is simple to operate. The detection sensitivity approaches tritium background levels and is achieved by high volume sampling, efficient removal of tritium oxide and elemental tritium ("tritium gas"), and counting the recovered fractions by liquid scintillation spectrometry.

Brown, R.; Meyer, H. E.; Robinson, B.; Sheehan, W. E.

1971-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

EIS-0270: Accelerator Production of Tritium at the Savannah River Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0270: Accelerator Production of Tritium at the Savannah River EIS-0270: Accelerator Production of Tritium at the Savannah River Site EIS-0270: Accelerator Production of Tritium at the Savannah River Site Summary This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impact of a proposal to construct and operate an Accelerator for the Production of Tritium at the Savannah River Site. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download May 14, 1999 EIS-0288: Consolidated Record of Decision (EIS-0270 & EIS-0271) Tritium Supply and Recycling March 1, 1999 EIS-0270: Final Environmental Impact Statement Accelerator Production of Tritium at the Savannah River Site September 5, 1996 EIS-0270: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of an Accelerator for the Production of Tritium

317

The Penetration of Tritium into the Tropical Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The persistence of subsurface tritium maxima coincident with the Equatorial Currents is used to show that advection along isopycnals by the mean wind-driven circulation is the dominant process in the at most 14-year time scale for the penetration ...

Rana A. Fine; William H. Peterson; H. Gote Ostlund

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A New Technique for Microautoradiography and Tritium Profiling  

SciTech Connect

A new technique has been developed for high magnification examination of autoradiographic emulsions. The technique enables a relatively quick examination of autoradiographic emulsions from large areas of metallographically prepared samples at magnifications of up to 50,000X. The technique also allows for profiling of the tritium distribution with the promise of quantitative profiling, all on a microscale.

Downs, G. L.

1967-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Conditioning Matrices of Liquid Scintillation Cocktails Contaminated with Tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a viable solidification technology to convert the liquid scintillation cocktail into a stable form which minimizes the probability to release tritium in the environment.This radioactive waste type is generated by the radio-chemical analysis lab of a CANDU nuclear power plant.

Dianu, Magdalena [Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm/sup -2/, and at 35 to 90/sup 0/C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm/sup -2/ have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 90/sup 0/C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H/sub 2/O at 0.2 A cm/sup -2/ and 5.0 kwh/kg H/sub 2/O at 0.5 A cm/sup -2/ current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H/sub 2/O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values.

Ramey, D.W.; Petek, M.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.; Ramey, J.; Sampson, C.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A Tritium Box Model of the North Atlantic Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A box model of 1972 tritium observations on isopycnal surface in the main thermocline of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre is used to estimate the time scales and volume of exchange of the thermocline with respect to surface waters. The flux of ...

J. L. Sarmiento

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Recent Developments in Magnetically Coupled Vane Pumps for Tritium Service  

SciTech Connect

Despite advances in shaft sealing, a totally reliable shaft seal for two-stage vane pumps has never been developed. Therefore, the magnetically coupled vane pump drive was developed to solve the critical problem of tritium leakage at the shaft seals of vane pumps. As a result, radioactive contamination of the work area and loss of valuable material can now be prevented.

Capuder, F. C.; Quigley, L. T.; Baker, C. K.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Extraction Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Extraction Report Apple iPhone (Physical) Summary Connection Type Cable No. 110 Extraction start date/time 10/23/2012 3:21:58 PM ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Plutonium and tritium produced in the Hanford Site production reactors  

SciTech Connect

In a news release on December 7, 1993, the Secretary of Energy announced declassification action that included totals for plutonium and tritium production in the Hanford Site production reactors. This information was reported as being preliminary because it was not fully supported by documentation. Subsequently, production data were made available from the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) records that indicated an increase of about one and one-half metric tons in total plutonium production. The Westinghouse Hanford Company was tasked by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office to substantiate production figures and DOE-HQ data and to provide a defensible report of weapons- (6 wt% {sup 240}Pu) and nonweapons- (fuels-)grade (nominally 9 wt% or higher {sup 240}Pu) plutonium and tritium production in the Hanford Site production reactors. The task was divided into three parts. The first part was to determine plutonium and tritium production based on available reported accountability records. The second part was to determine plutonium production independently by calculational checks based on reactor thermal power generation and plutonium conversion factors representing the various reactor fuels. The third part was to resolve differences, if they occurred, in the reported and calculational results. In summary, the DOE-HQ-reported accountability records of plutonium and tritium production were determined to be the most defensible record of Hanford Site reactor production. The DOE-HQ records were consistently supported by the independent calculational checks and the records of operational data. Total production quantities are 67.4 MT total plutonium, which includes 12.9 MT of nonweapons-grade plutonium. The total tritium production was 10.6 kg.

Roblyer, S.P.

1994-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

325

Topical report on a preconceptual design for the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC) target for the accelerator production of tritium (APT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preconceptual design of the APT Li-Al target system, also referred to as the Spallation-Induced Lithium Conversion (SILC), target system, is summarized in this report. The system has been designed to produce a ``3/8 Goal`` quantity of tritium using the 200-mA, 1.0 GeV proton beam emerging from the LANL-designed LINAC. The SILC target system consists of a beam expander, a heavy-water-cooled lead spallation neutron source assembly surrounded by light-water-cooled Li-Al blankets, a target window, heat removal systems, and related safety systems. The preconceptual design of each of these major components is described. Descriptions are also provided for the target fabrication, tritium extraction, and waste-steam processes. Performance characteristics are presented and discussed.

Van Tuyle, G.J.; Cokinos, D.M.; Czajkowski, C.; Franz, E.M.; Kroeger, P.; Todosow, M.; Youngblood, R.; Zucker, M.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Briefing Book 1 Summary  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of evaluations preformed during 1997 to determine what, if an, future role the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) might have in support of the Department of Energy’s tritium productions strategy. An evaluation was also conducted to assess the potential for the FFTF to produce medical isotopes. No safety, environmental, or technical issues associated with producing 1.5 kilograms of tritium per year in the FFTF have been identified that would change the previous evaluations by the Department of Energy, the JASON panel, or Putnam, Hayes & Bartlett. The FFTF can be refitted and restated by July 2002 for a total expenditure of $371 million, with an additional $64 million of startup expense necessary to incorporate the production of medical isotopes. Therapeutic and diagnostic applications of reactor-generated medical isotopes will increase dramatically over the next decade. Essential medical isotopes can be produced in the FFTF simultaneously with tritium production, and while a stand-alone medical isotope mission for the facility cannot be economically justified given current marker conditions, conservative estimates based on a report by Frost &Sullivan indicate that 60% of the annual operational costs (reactor and fuel supply) could be offset by revenues from medical isotope production within 10 yeas of restart. The recommendation of the report is for the Department of Energy to continue to maintain the FFTF in standby and proceed with preparation of appropriate Nations Environmental Policy Act documentation in full consultation with the public to consider the FFTF as an interim tritium production option (1.5 kilograms/year) with a secondary mission of producing medical isotopes.

WJ Apley

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Scoping Analyses on Tritium Permeation to VHTR Integarted Industrial Application Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium permeation is a very important current issue in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) because tritium is easily permeated through high temperature metallic surfaces. Tritium permeations in the VHTR-integrated systems were investigated in this study using the tritium permeation analysis code (TPAC) that was developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL TPAC is a numerical tool that is based on the mass balance equations of tritium containing species and hydrogen (i.e. HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, TI) coupled with a variety of tritium sources, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and thermal neutron caption reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of tritium and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including high temperature electrolysis (HTSE) and sulfur-iodine processes.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

329

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2004 Facility News ARM Climate Research Facility Achieves User Milestone Three Months Ahead of Schedule Bookmark and Share Summary of the ARM Climate Research Facility User...

330

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News Future of User Facility Discussed at Fall Workshop As a national user facility, ARM is accessible to scientists around the globe for...

331

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

332

Development and Improvement of Devices for Hydrogen Generation and Oxidation in Water Detritiation Facility Based on CECE Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

M. Rozenkevich et al.

333

Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) standby plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FFTF Standby Plan, Revision 0, provides changes to the major elements and project baselines to maintain the FFTF plant in a standby condition and to continue washing sodium from irradiated reactor fuel. The Plan is consistent with the Memorandum of Decision approved by the Secretary of Energy on January 17, 1997, which directed that FFTF be maintained in a standby condition to permit the Department to make a decision on whether the facility should play a future role in the Department of Energy`s dual track tritium production strategy. This decision would be made in parallel with the intended December 1998 decision on the selection of the primary, long- term source of tritium. This also allows the Department to review the economic and technical feasibility of using the FFTF to produce isotopes for the medical community. Formal direction has been received from DOE-RL and Fluor 2020 Daniel Hanford to implement the FFTF standby decision. The objective of the Plan is maintain the condition of the FFTF systems, equipment and personnel to preserve the option for plant restart within three and one-half years of a decision to restart, while continuing deactivation work which is consistent with the standby mode.

Hulvey, R.K.

1997-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Evaluation of Technologies to Complement/Replace Mass Spectrometers in the Tritium Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work is to determine the suitability of the Infraran sensor for use in the Palladium Membrane Reactor. This application presents a challenge for the sensor, since the process temperature exceeds its designed operating range. We have demonstrated that large baseline offsets, comparable to the sensor response to the analyte, are obtained if cool air is blown across the sensor. We have also shown that there is a strong environmental component to the noise. However, the current arrangement does not utilize a reference detector. The strong correlation between the CO and H{sub 2}O sensor responses to environmental changes indicate that a reference detector can greatly reduce the environmental sensitivity. In fact, incorporation of a reference detector is essential for the sensor to work in this application. We have also shown that the two sensor responses are adequately independent. Still, there are several small corrections which must to be made to the sensor response to accommodate chemical and physical effects. Interactions between the two analytes will alter the relationship between number density and pressure. Temperature and pressure broadening will alter the relationship between absorbance and number density. The individual effects are small--on the order of a few percent or less--but cumulatively significant. Still, corrections may be made if temperature and total pressure are independently measured and incorporated into a post-analysis routine. Such corrections are easily programmed and automated and do not represent a significant burden for installation. The measurements and simulations described above indicate that with appropriate corrections, the Infraran sensor can approach the 1-1.5% measurement accuracy required for effective PMR process control. It is also worth noting that the Infraran may be suitable for other gas sensing applications, especially those that do not need to be made in a high-temperature environment. Any gas with an infrared absorption (methane, ammonia, etc.) may be detected so long as an appropriate bandpass filter can be manufactured. Note that homonuclear diatomic molecules (hydrogen and its isotopes, nitrogen, oxygen) do not have infrared absorptions. We have shown that the sensor response may be adequately predicted using commercially available software. Measurement of trace concentrations is limited by the broad spectral bandpass, since the total signal includes non-absorbed frequencies. However, cells with longer pathlengths can be designed to address this problem.

Tovo, L. L.; Lascola, R. J.; Spencer, W. A.; McWhorter, C. S.; Zeigler, K. E.

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Fuel provision for nonbreeding deuterium-tritium fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Nonbreeding D-T reactors have decisive advantages in minimum size, unit cost, variety of applications, and ease of heat removal over reactors using any other fusion cycle, and significant advantages in environmental and safety characteristics over breeding D-T reactors. Considerations of relative energy production demonstrate that the most favorable source of tritium for a widely deployed system of nonbreeding D-T reactors is the very large (approx. 10 GW thermal) semi-catalyzed-deuterium (SCD), or sub-SCD reactor, where none of the escaping /sup 3/He (> 95%) or tritium (< 25%) is reinjected for burn-up. Feasibility of the ignited SCD tokamak reactor requires spatially averaged betas of 15 to 20% with a magnetic field at the TF coils of 12 to 13 Tesla.

Jassby, D.L.; Katsurai, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The Bulk Tritium Shipping Package was designed by Savannah River National Laboratory. This package will be used to transport tritium. As part of the requirements for certification, the package must be shown to meet the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 71 (10CFR71). The conditions include a sequential 30-foot drop event, 30-foot dynamic crush event, and a 40-inch puncture event. Finite Element analyses were performed to support and expand upon prototype testing. Cases similar to the tests were evaluated. Additional temperatures and orientations were also examined to determine their impact on the results. The peak stress on the package was shown to be acceptable. In addition, the strain on the outer drum as well as the inner containment boundary was shown to be acceptable. In conjunction with the prototype tests, the package was shown to meet its confinement requirements.

Jordan, J.

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Steps taken to reduce the amount of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steps taken to reduce the amount of tritium Steps taken to reduce the amount of tritium Actions taken in response to the detection of low levels of tritium in surface and sewer water in November 2005 What did we detect in November 2005? In November 2005, for the first time in the then-35-year history of our environmental monitoring program at Fermilab, we detected low levels of tritium in a stream leaving the Fermilab site, and in the sanitary sewers that pump water to the Batavia Wastewater Treatment Plant. The levels detected were far lower than the federal water standards that Fermilab is required to meet, and pose no threat to human health or the environment. (Our Frequently Asked Questions page provides more general information about tritium.) How much tritium did we find? Very little. Samples of Indian Creek, taken just inside the Fermilab

338

EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor 288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor EIS-0288: Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor SUMMARY This Environmental Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR EIS) evaluates the environmental impacts associated with producing tritium at one or more of the following five CLWRs: (1) Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Spring City, Tennessee); (2) Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Soddy Daisy, Tennessee); (3) Sequoyah Nuclear Plant Unit 2 (Soddy Daisy, Tennessee); (4) Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unit 1 (Hollywood, Alabama); and (5) Bellefonte Nuclear Plant Unit 2 (Hollywood, Alabama). Specifically, this EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with fabricating tritium-producing

339

from Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC NEWS Savannah River Tritium Enterprise Achieves High Marks for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tritium Enterprise Achieves High Marks for Tritium Enterprise Achieves High Marks for Support to Nation's Security Fiscal Year 2012 Performance Prepares Enterprise for Continued Service AIKEN, S.C. (February 7, 2013) - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has rated the Savannah River Tritium Enterprise's overall Fiscal Year 2012 performance as "excel- lent," meaning that the Savannah River Site's tritium-related work has once again success- fully met and exceeded NNSA's Defense Programs goals. The Savannah River Tritium Enterprise (SRTE), which is managed for NNSA by Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), earned the rating for its successful performance of the four missions it carries out in support of the nation's security: tritium supply, nuclear stockpile maintenance,

340

The Determination of Deuterium and Tritium in Effluent Wastewater by Pulsed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

A pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) procedure was developed for the quantitative determination of deuterium and tritium in radioactive, effluent, wastewater to aid in the design of an efficient combined electrolytic/catalytic exchange system for the recovery of these hydrogen isotopes. The deuterium and tritium NMR signals were observed at 9.210 and 45.7 MHz, respectively. Ten different effluent water samples were analyzed for deuterium and tritium to establish base-line data for the preparation of standard reference samples. The hydrogen isotope concentrations ranged from 0.11 to 2.40 g deuterium and from 2.0 to 21.0 mg tritium per liter of processed sample. The standard deviation of the hydrogen isotope determinations is +- 0.017 g deuterium and +- 0.06 mg tritium per liter of processed effluent water. In the future, the effectiveness of specially prepared and analyzed (calorimetry) effluent samples as tritium standards will be investigated.

Attalla, A.; Birkbeck, J. C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research Facilities and Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Research Facilities and Programs ... to universities, corporations, and other facilities involved in magnesium research, 0, 1025 ...

342

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility. Summary: ... Cf irradiation facility (Photograph by: Neutron Physics Group). Lead Organizational Unit: pml. Staff: ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility. ... NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

IN-LINE CHEMICAL SENSOR DEPLOYMENT IN A TRITIUM PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Tritium Plant (TP) relies on well understood but aging sensor technology for process gas analysis. Though new sensor technologies have been brought to various readiness levels, the TP has been reluctant to install technologies that have not been tested in tritium service. This gap between sensor technology development and incorporating new technologies into practical applications demonstrates fundamental challenges that exist when transitioning from status quo to state-of-the-art in an extreme environment such as a tritium plant. These challenges stem from three root obstacles: 1) The need for a comprehensive assessment of process sensing needs and requirements; 2) The lack of a pick-list of process-compatible sensor technologies; and 3) The need to test technologies in a tritium-contaminated process environment without risking production. At Savannah River, these issues are being addressed in a two phase project. In the first phase, TP sensing requirements were determined by a team of process experts. Meanwhile, Savannah River National Laboratory sensor experts identified candidate technologies and related them to the TP processing requirements. The resulting roadmap links the candidate technologies to actual plant needs. To provide accurate assessments of how a candidate sensor technology would perform in a contaminated process environment, an instrument demonstration station was established within a TP glove box. This station was fabricated to TP process requirements and designed to handle high activity samples. The combination of roadmap and demonstration station provides the following assets: ? Creates a partnership between the process engineers and researchers for sensor selection, maturation, and insertion, ? Selects the right sensors for process conditions ? Provides a means for safely inserting new sensor technology into the process without risking production, and ? Provides a means to evaluate off normal occurrences where and when they occur. This paper discusses the process to identify and demonstrate new sensor technologies for the Savannah River TP.

Tovo, L.; Wright, J.; Torres, R.; Peters, B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

345

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

346

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

347

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

348

Research Facility,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

349

Experimental studies of tritium barrier concepts for fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Ongoing experimental studies at ANL aimed at the development of methods to reduce tritium migration in fusion reactor systems currently include (1) work on the development of multilayered metal composites and impurity-coated refractory metals as barriers to tritium permeation in elevated temperature (greater than 300$sup 0$C) structures and (2) investigations of the kinetics of tritium trapping reactions in inert gas purge streams under conditions that emulate fusion reactor environments. Significant results obtained thus far are (1) demonstration of greater than 50-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of stainless steel structures by using stainless steel-clad composites containing an intermediate layer of a selected copper alloy and (2) verification that surface-oxide coatings lead to greater than 100-fold reductions in the hydrogen permeability of vanadium, but that severe oxygen penetration and embrittlement of the vanadium occur at temperatures in the range from 300 to 800$sup 0$C and under conditions of extremely low oxygen potential. Other considerations pertaining to the large-scale use of metal composites in fusion reactors are discussed, and progress in efforts to demonstrate the fabricability of metal composites is reviewed. Also presented are results of studies of the efficiencies of (1) CuO and CuO-MnO$sub 2$ beds in converting HT to HTO and (2) magnesium metal beds in converting HTO to HT. (auth)

Maroni, V.A.; Van Deventer, E.H.; Renner, T.A.; Pelto, R.H.; Wierdak, C.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Facility automation for retail facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article will focus on retail chain stores with areas of 22,000 to 75,000 sq ft, but much of the article will apply to all retail stores independent of size. Typically, a store is serviced by 5 to 15 rooftop HVAC units with a total cooling capacity of 50 to 150 tons, depending on the floor area and geographic location. The interior lighting represents a load of 80 to 300 KW with three lighting levels--retail, stocking, and security or night. Most stores are located in strip centers, and therefore, the parking lot lighting is provided by the landlord, but each store does control and service its own sign lighting. Generally, the total load controlled by an FAS represents 130 to 450 KW with corresponding annual energy costs ranging from $65,000 to $200,000 (natural gas and electricity), depending on the size of the store and the local unit costs of energy. Historical utility data, electrical and mechanical drawings, site surveys, significant analyses of data, and most importantly, discussions with corporate facilities management personnel and store operations personnel provide the source for the development theory and sequence of operation of the design of the facility automation systems for retail stores. The three main goals of an FAS are: reduce utility operating costs, maintain comfort levels during occupied hours, reduce HVAC maintenance costs.

Ameduri, G. (Roth Bros., Inc., Youngstown, OH (United States). Facilities Automation Division)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matrix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium. 2 figs.

Jensen, G.A.; Nelson, D.A.; Molton, P.M.

1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

Radioluminescent light sources, tritium containing polymers, and methods for producing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioluminescent light source comprises a solid mixture of a phosphorescent substance and a tritiated polymer. The solid mixture forms a solid mass having length, width, and thickness dimensions, and is capable of self-support. In one aspect of the invention, the phosphorescent substance comprises solid phosphor particles supported or surrounded within a solid matix by a tritium containing polymer. The tritium containing polymer comprises a polymer backbone which is essentially void of tritium.

Jensen, George A. (Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA); Molton, Peter M. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A tritium-compatible piezoelectric valve for the tokamak fusion test reactor  

SciTech Connect

This work describes modifications made to a commercial piezoelectric valve to make it sufficiently tritium compatible for the TFTR trritium injection scenario. The results of testing the valve for leakage and performance following a series of progressively more severe tritium exposures are also presented. Finally, a proposal for a totally radiation-compatible piezoelectric valve, suitable for tritium-burning fusion machines of the future, is decribed. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Coffin, D.O.; Cole, S.P.; Wilhelm, R.C.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Report on the evaluation of the tritium producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the design and fabrication requirements for a tritium-producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly and evaluates the safety issues associated with tritium-producing burnable absorber rod irradiation on the operation of a commercial light water reactor. The report provides an evaluation of the tritium-producing burnable absorber rod design and concludes that irradiation can be performed within U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations applicable to a commercial pressurized light water reactor.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Tritium Fuel Cycle for Muon-Catalyzed Intense Neutron Source (MC INS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design and Model / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

Arkadiy A. Yukhimchuk; Vladimyr A. Arkhangel'sky

356

Tritium removal from contaminated water via infrared laser multiple-photon dissociation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Isotope separation by means of infrared-laser multiple-photon dissociation offers an efficient way to recover tritium from contaminated light or heavy water found in fission and fusion reactors. For tritium recovery from heavy water, chemical exchange of tritium into deuterated chloroform is followed by selective laser dissociation of tritiated chloroform and removal of the tritiated photoproduct, TCl. The single-step separation factor is at least 2700 and is probably greater than 5000. Here we present a description of the tritium recovery process, along with recent accomplishments in photochemical studies and engineering analysis of a recovery system.

Maienschein, J.L.; Magnotta, F.; Herman, I.P.; Aldridge, F.T.; Hsiao, P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Research and Development in Tritium Technology at the Institute of Radiochemistry, Nuclear Research Center Karlsruhe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and Development / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

Prof. Dr. H. J. Ache

358

Development of Large Oil-Free Roughing Pump for Tritium Service  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material and Tritium / Proceedings of the Ninth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Oak Brook, Illinois, October 7-11, 1990)

T. Hayashi; S. Konishi; M. Yamada; Y. Matsuda; M. Inoue; T. Nakamura; T; Takanaga; Y. Naruse; K. Okuyama

359

Reaction Rates for the Formation of Deuterium Tritide from Deuterium and Tritium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and Development / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

G. T. McConville; D. A. Menke; R. E. Ellefson

360

Predicted Effects of Tritium Exposure on Fast-Acting Piezoelectric Valves for Gas Fueling at TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket and Process Engineering / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

J. T. Gill; C. W. Pierce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Study of Catalytic Oxidation and Oxide Adsorption for the Removal of Tritium from Air  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and procedure were developed for studying the containment of tritium using catalytic conversion to the oxide followed by oxide adsorption. Data were obtained on the catalytic oxidation of elemental tritium and tritiated volatile hydrocarbons from pump oils between 23 and 538 degrees C. Oxidation efficiencies as high as 99.99997% (decontamination factor = 3.3 million) were obtained for total tritium levels of 1 ppm and a tritiated hydrocarbon level of approximately 0.2 ppb. In addition, a mathematical study was made to derive equations for the conceptual design of an "Emergency Containment System" for containment of tritium following an accidental release to room air.

Bixel, John C.; Kershner, Carl J.

1972-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Interaction of Polyethylene and Tritium Gas as Monitored by Raman Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material Interaction / Proceedings of the Second National Topical Meeting on Tritium Technology in Fission, Fusion and Isotopic Applications (Dayton, Ohio, April 30 to May 2, 1985)

J. T. Gill

363

SEIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

SEIS for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation...

364

Letter Report for Analytical Results for five Swipe Samples from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility, Muskegon Michigan  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received five swipe samples on December 10, 2013 from the Northern Biomedical Research Facility in Norton Shores, Michigan. The samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14 according to the NRC Form 303 supplied with the samples. The sample identification numbers are presented in Table 1 and the tritium and carbon-14 results are provided in Table 2. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

Ivey, Wade

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

365

Concentration and removal of tritium and/or deuterium from water contaminated with tritium and/or deuterium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Concentration of tritium and/or deuterium that is a contaminant in H.sub.2 O, followed by separation of the concentrate from the H.sub.2 O. Employed are certain metal oxo complexes, preferably with a metal from Group VIII. For instance, [Ru.sup.IV (2,2',6',2"-terpyridine)(2,2'-bipyridine)(O)](ClO.sub.4).sub.2 is very suitable.

Meyer, Thomas J. (Chapel Hill, NC); Narula, Poonam M. (Carrboro, NC)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

South Carolina | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Construction and Operation of a Proposed Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) January 28, 1998 EIS-0268:...

367

EIS-0271: Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Construction and Operation of a Tritium Extraction Facility at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE)...

368

CX-000547: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-000547: Categorical Exclusion Determination Transmission Electron Microscopy of Tritium Extraction Facility Pipe Residue CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11...

369

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

DNA Extraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Extraction DNA Extraction Being able to extract deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is important for a number of reasons. By studying DNA, scientists can identify genetic disorders or diseases, and they can also possibly find cures for them by manipulating or experimenting with this DNA. At the Laboratory, researchers have studied DNA to detect biothreat agents in environmental and forensic samples. Scientists also are studying how human DNA may be destroyed by certain types of electromagnetic waves at certain frequencies. Classroom Activity: This activity is about the extraction of DNA from strawberries. Strawberries are a great fruit to use for this lesson because each student can work on his or her own. Strawberries are recommended because they yield more DNA than any other fruit. Strawberries are octoploid, which means that they have eight copies of each

373

Information Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic extraction of information from unstructured sources has opened up new avenues for querying, organizing, and analyzing data by drawing upon the clean semantics of structured databases and the abundance of unstructured data. The field of ...

Sunita Sarawagi

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Routine Releases from LLNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95% confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Groups of the International Atomic Energy Agency's programs, Biosphere Modeling and Assessment and Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

Peterson, S R

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Relesed to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Chronic Releases from LLNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95th percentile confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Biosphere Modeling and Assessment Programme. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

Peterson, S

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Basinwide Estimate of Vertical Mixing in the Upper Pycnocline: Spreading of Bomb Tritium in the North Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical diffusivity KV in the upper half-kilometer of the North Pacific subtropical pycnocline is estimated from observations of the spreading rate of anthropogenic tritium. The calculation is based on approximately 300 ocean tritium ...

Dan E. Kelley; Kim A. Van Scoy

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Method and apparatus for extracting tritium and preparing radioactive waste for disposal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for heating an object such as a nuclear target bundle to release and recover hydrogen and contain the disposable residue for disposal. The apparatus comprises an inverted furnace, a sleeve/crucible assembly for holding and enclosing the bundle, conveying equipment for placing the sleeve onto the crucible and loading the bundle into the sleeve/crucible, a lift for raising the enclosed bundle into the furnace, and hydrogen recovery equipment including a trap and strippers, all housed in a containment having negative internal pressure. The crucible/sleeve assembly has an internal volume that is sufficient to enclose and hold the bundle before heating; the crucible's internal volume is sufficient by itself to hold and enclose the bundle's volume after heating. The crucible can then be covered and disposed of; the sleeve, on the other hand, can be reused. 4 figures.

Heung, L.K.

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Development of Tritium Recovery by Flowing O2 + Ar Gases at Steam Generator in Fast Breeder Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detritiation and Isotope Separation / Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology (Part 2)

Yasuhisa Oya; Takuji Oda; Satoru Tanaka; Kenji Okuno

380

Enhancement of Accident Consequence Assessment Model for Tritium UFOTRI to Include a Wider Variety of Human Foodstuffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tritium Science and Technology Tsukuba, Japan November 12-16, 2001

W. Raskob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

382

Office of Nuclear Facility Basis & Facility Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design(HS-31) Reports to the Office of Nuclear Safety About Us The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety...

383

Lithium aluminate/zirconium material useful in the production of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is described useful in the production of tritium in a nuclear reactor. Lithium aluminate particles are dispersed in a matrix of zirconium. Tritium produced by the reactor of neutrons with the lithium are absorbed by the zirconium, thereby decreasing gas pressure within capsules carrying the material.

Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Lithium aluminate/zirconium material useful in the production of tritium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is described useful in the production of tritium in a nuclear eactor. Lithium aluminate particles are dispersed in a matrix of zirconium. Tritium produced by the reactor of neutrons with the lithium are absorbed by the zirconium, thereby decreasing gas pressure within capsules carrying the material.

Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA); Trapp, Turner J. (Richland, WA)

1984-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

TRITIUM MOVEMENT AND ACCUMULATION IN THE NGNP SYSTEM INTERFACE AND HYDROGEN PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium movement and accumulation in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) employing either a high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) process or a thermochemical water-splitting Sulfur-Iodine (SI) process to produce hydrogen is estimated by a numerical code, THYTAN, as a function of design, operational and material parameters. Estimated tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product and in the process chemicals of the hydrogen plant using the HTE process are slightly higher than the limit in drinking water defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and in effluent at the boundary of an unrestricted area defined by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), respectively. Estimated tritium concentrations in the NGNP using the SI hydrogen production process are significantly higher, and are largely affected by undetermined parameters (i.e., tritium permeability of heat exchanger materials, hydrogen concentration in the helium energy transport fluids, equilibrium constant of the tritium isotope exchange reaction between HT and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). These parameters should be measured or estimated in the near future, as should the tritium generation and release rate from the NGNP nuclear reactor core. Decreasing the tritium permeation rate between the primary and secondary heat transport circuits is an effective measure to decrease the tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product, hydrogen plant process chemicals, and the tertiary heat transport fluid.

Sherman, S

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

386

Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. [bold 21], 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert[sup TM] system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of [approx]10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of [alpha]-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined [alpha] particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed.

Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Ja

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

McGuire, K.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hot muonic deuterium and tritium from cold targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments are described which use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to study the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation.

Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M.; Pippitt, B. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik; Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Collection and control of tritium bioassay samples at Pantex  

SciTech Connect

Pantex is the final assembly/disassembly point for US nuclear weapons. The Pantex internal dosimetry section monitors radiation workers once a month for tritium exposure. In order to manage collection and control of the bioassay specimens efficiently, a bar code system for collection of samples was developed and implemented to speed up the process and decrease the number of errors probable when transferring data. In the past, all the bioassay data from samples were entered manually into a computer database. Transferring the bioassay data from the liquid scintillation counter to each individual`s dosimetry record required as much as two weeks of concentrated effort.

Fairrow, N.L.; Ivie, W.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hot muonic deuterium and tritium from cold targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments are described which use a solid hydrogen layer to form muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from protium to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections, and may be emitted from the surface of the layer. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes. A target has been constructed which exploits muonic atom emission in order to study the energy dependence of transfer and muon molecular formation.

Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L. (TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M.; Pippitt, B. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. (Fribourg U

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ACUTRI a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: i...

Yokoyama, S; Noguchi, H; Ryufuku, S; Sasaki, T

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than any other quarter on record-961 The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual...

393

In-Situ Measurement of Tritium Permeation Through Stainless Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Material Science Advances Using Test Reactor Facilities. Presentation Title ...

394

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility News Data Collection from Mobile Facility on Gan Island Suspended Local weather balloon launch volunteers pose with the AMF team on Gan Island after completing their...

395

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

396

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 22,500 square kilometers, or the approximate area of a modern climate model grid cell. Centered around the SGP Central Facility, these extended facilities are...

397

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

398

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility...

399

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, comparison with previously required safeguard design features may not be...

400

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

User Facility Agreement Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. Which Argonne user facility will be hosting you? * Advanced Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne Tandem Linear...

402

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

403

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2008 Facility News National User Facility Organization Meets to Discuss Progress and Ideas In late April, the ARM Technical Director attended an annual meeting of the...

404

Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site or other appropriate disposal facility. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) operated...

405

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany Researchers will study severe precipitation events that occurred in August and October...

406

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

407

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

408

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

409

Techniques and Facilities for Handling and Packaging Tritiated Liquid Wastes for Burial  

SciTech Connect

Methods and facilities have been developed for the collection, storage, measurement, assay, solidification, and packaging of tritiated liquid wastes (concentrations up to 5 Ci/ml) for disposal by land burial. Tritium losses to the environment from these operations are less than 1 ppm. All operations are performed in an inert gas-purged glovebox system vented to an effluent removal system which permits nearly complete removal of tritium from the exhaust gases prior to their dischardge to the environment. Waste oil and water from tritium processing areas are vacuum-transferred to glovebox storage tanks through double-walled lines. Accommodations are also available for emptying portable liquid waste containers and for removing tritiated water from molecular sieve beds with heat and vacuum. The tritium concentration of the collected liquids is measured by an in-line calorimeter. A low-volume metering pump is used to transfer liquids from holding tanks to heavy walled polyethylene drums filled with an absorbent or cement for solidification. Final packaging of the sealed polyethylene drums is in either an asphalt-filled combination 30- and 55- gallon metal drum package or a 30-gallon welded stainless steel container.

Rhinehammer, T. B.; Mershad, E. A.

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Tritium Specific Adsorption Simulation Utilizing the OSPREY Model  

SciTech Connect

During the processing of used nuclear fuel, volatile radionuclides will be discharged to the atmosphere if no recovery processes are in place to limit their release. The volatile radionuclides of concern are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Methods are being developed, via adsorption and absorption unit operations, to capture these radionuclides. It is necessary to model these unit operations to aid in the evaluation of technologies and in the future development of an advanced used nuclear fuel processing plant. A collaboration between Fuel Cycle Research and Development Offgas Sigma Team member INL and a NEUP grant including ORNL, Syracuse University, and Georgia Institute of Technology has been formed to develop off gas models and support off gas research. This report is discusses the development of a tritium specific adsorption model. Using the OSPREY model and integrating it with a fundamental level isotherm model developed under and experimental data provided by the NEUP grant, the tritium specific adsorption model was developed.

Veronica Rutledge; Lawrence Tavlarides; Ronghong Lin; Austin Ladshaw

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Accelerator Production of Tritium project process waste assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE has made a commitment to compliance with all applicable environmental regulatory requirements. In this respect, it is important to consider and design all tritium supply alternatives so that they can comply with these requirements. The management of waste is an integral part of this activity and it is therefore necessary to estimate the quantities and specific wastes that will be generated by all tritium supply alternatives. A thorough assessment of waste streams includes waste characterization, quantification, and the identification of treatment and disposal options. The waste assessment for APT has been covered in two reports. The first report was a process waste assessment (PWA) that identified and quantified waste streams associated with both target designs and fulfilled the requirements of APT Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Item 5.5.2.1. This second report is an expanded version of the first that includes all of the data of the first report, plus an assessment of treatment and disposal options for each waste stream identified in the initial report. The latter information was initially planned to be issued as a separate Waste Treatment and Disposal Options Assessment Report (WBS Item 5.5.2.2).

Carson, S.D.; Peterson, P.K.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Development and Verification of Tritium Analyses Code for a Very High Temperature Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in the VHTR systems including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used for development of the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and a various form of hydrogen (i.e., HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, and TI) coupled with a variety of tritium source, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of HT and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were importantly considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including both high-temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. The TPAC has unlimited flexibility for the system configurations, and provides easy drag-and-drops for making models by adopting a graphical user interface. Verification of the code has been performed by comparisons with the analytical solutions and the experimental data based on the Peach Bottom reactor design. The preliminary results calculated with a former tritium analyses code, THYTAN which was developed in Japan and adopted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency were also compared with the TPAC solutions. This report contains descriptions of the basic tritium pathways, theory, simple user guide, verifications, sensitivity studies, sample cases, and code tutorials. Tritium behaviors in a very high temperature reactor/high temperature steam electrolysis system have been analyzed by the TPAC based on the reference indirect parallel configuration proposed by Oh et al. (2007). This analysis showed that only 0.4% of tritium released from the core is transferred to the product hydrogen. The amount of tritium in the product hydrogen was estimated to be approximately an order less than the gaseous effluent limit for tritium.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

RECOMMENDED TRITIUM OXIDE DEPOSITION VELOCITY FOR USE IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SAFETY ANALYSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has recently questioned the appropriate value for tritium deposition velocity used in the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System Ver. 2 (Chanin and Young 1998) code when estimating bounding dose (95th percentile) for safety analysis (DNFSB 2011). The purpose of this paper is to provide appropriate, defensible values of the tritium deposition velocity for use in Savannah River Site (SRS) safety analyses. To accomplish this, consideration must be given to the re-emission of tritium after deposition. Approximately 85% of the surface area of the SRS is forested. The majority of the forests are pine plantations, 68%. The remaining forest area is 6% mixed pine and hardwood and 26% swamp hardwood. Most of the path from potential release points to the site boundary is through forested land. A search of published studies indicate daylight, tritiated water (HTO) vapor deposition velocities in forest vegetation can range from 0.07 to 2.8 cm/s. Analysis of the results of studies done on an SRS pine plantation and climatological data from the SRS meteorological network indicate that the average deposition velocity during daylight periods is around 0.42 cm/s. The minimum deposition velocity was determined to be about 0.1 cm/s, which is the recommended bounding value. Deposition velocity and residence time (half-life) of HTO in vegetation are related by the leaf area and leaf water volume in the forest. For the characteristics of the pine plantation at SRS the residence time corresponding to the average, daylight deposition velocity is 0.4 hours. The residence time corresponding to the night-time deposition velocity of 0.1 cm/s is around 2 hours. A simple dispersion model which accounts for deposition and re-emission of HTO vapor was used to evaluate the impact on exposure to the maximally exposed offsite individual (MOI) at the SRS boundary (Viner 2012). Under conditions that produce the bounding, 95th percentile MOI exposure, i.e., low wind speed, weak turbulence, night, low deposition velocity, the effect of deposition and re-emission on MOI exposure was found to be very small. The exposure over the two hour period following arrival of the plume was found to be decreased by less than 0.05 %. Furthermore the sensitivity to deposition velocity was low. Increasing deposition velocity to 0.5 cm/s reduced exposure to 0.3 %. After a 24 hour period, an MOI would have been exposed to all of the released material. Based on the low sensitivity of MOI exposure to the value of deposition velocity when re-emission is considered, it is appropriately conservative to use a 0.0 cm/s effective deposition velocity for safety analysis in the MACCS2 code.

Lee, P.; Murphy, C.; Viner, B.; Hunter, C.; Jannik, T.

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Results of tritium experiments on ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium diffusers for application to fusion reactor fuel cleanup systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly have demonstrated that ceramic electrolysis cells and palladium alloy diffuser developed in Japan are possible components for a fusion reactor fuel cleanup system. Both components have been successfully operated with tritium for over a year. A failure of the first electrolysis cell was most likely the result of an over voltage on the ceramic. A simple circuit was developed to eliminate this mode of failure. The palladium diffusers tubes exhibited some degradation of mechanical properties as a result of the build up of helium from the tritium decay, after 450 days of operation with tritium, however the effects were not significant enough to affect the performance. New models of the diffuser and electrolysis cell, providing higher flow rates and more tritium compatible designs are currently being tested with tritium. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

417

TRITIUM AGING EFFECTS ON THE FRACTURE TOUGHNESS PROPERTIES OF FORGED STAINLESS STEEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fracture toughness properties of Type 21-6-9 stainless steel were measured for forgings in the unexposed, hydrogen-exposed, and tritium-exposed-and-aged conditions. Fracture toughness samples were cut from conventionally-forged and high-energy-rate-forged forward-extruded cylinders and mechanically tested at room temperature using ASTM fracture-toughness testing procedures. Some of the samples were exposed to either hydrogen or tritium gas (340 MPa, 623 K) prior to testing. Tritium-exposed samples were aged for up to seven years and tested periodically in order to measure the effect on fracture toughness of {sup 3}He from radioactive tritium decay. The results show that hydrogen-exposed and tritium-exposed samples had lower fracture- toughness values than unexposed samples and that fracture toughness decreased with increasing decay {sup 3}He content. Forged steels were more resistant to the embrittling effects of tritium and decay {sup 3}He than annealed steels, although their fracture-toughness properties depended on the degree of sensitization that occurred during processing. The fracture process was dominated by microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence; however, the size and spacing of microvoids on the fracture surfaces were affected by hydrogen and tritium with the lowest-toughness samples having the smallest microvoids and finest spacing.

Morgan, M

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

419

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

420

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The transport, dispersion, and cycling of tritium in the environment. [Contains Bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The processes which determine transport, dispersion, and cycling of tritium are identified for atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and groundwater systems. The processes are discussed in terms of the storage capacity for tritium in each component of each system and ranges of residence times are derived. The residence times of each component of the systems are discussed in terms of the residence time of the whole system for transient releases of tritium into different components of the systems. The role of the ocean as a sink for tritium is described. The concentration of tritium in the system at steady state is described in terms of the inputs and outputs to the components of the systems. The analysis indicates that the key residence time for a specific release of tritium into the environment is dependent on both the residence time of the components and the means of introduction into the environment. The initial concentration ad residence time of tritium in the terrestrial system after an exposure to tritiated water vapor are determined by the atmospheric and vegetative conditions at the time of the release. The dominant residence time is that of the vegetation. On the other hand, the initial concentration and residence time of tritium in the terrestrial system after an exposure to tritiated hydrogen are determined by the atmospheric and soil conditions at the time of the release. The dominant residence time is that of the soil. The initial concentration and residence time after a liquid release to the soil surface are determined by the diluting soil water content and the residence time for water in the rooting zone of the soil. Little tritium enters the organic fraction of terrestrial systems from transient releases of gases or liquid water. 102 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Facility Representative Program: 2008 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sherman Chao, LSO Conduct of Operations Improvements at K Basins Dennis Humphreys, RL Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility lessons learned Charlie Wright, ORO...

423

Facility Representative Program: 2005 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing of Good Practices and Lessons Learned (4) Inadvertent Startup of Electric Centrifuge at the Weapon Evaluation Test Lab Joyce Arviso-Benally, SSO Facility Rep...

424

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

425

Laser-induced synthesis and decay of Tritium under exposure of solid targets in heavy water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The processes of laser-assisted synthesis of Tritium nuclei and their laser-induced decay in cold plasma in the vicinity of solid targets (Au, Ti, Se, etc.) immersed into heavy water are experimentally realized at peak laser intensity of 10E10-10E13 Watts per square centimeter. Initial stages of Tritium synthesis and their laser-induced beta-decay are interpreted on the basis of non-elastic interaction of plasma electrons having kinetic energy of 5-10 eV with nuclei of Deuterium and Tritium, respectively.

E. V. Barmina; P. G. Kuzmin; S. F. Timashev; G. A. Shafeev

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

An Estimate of the History of Tritium Inventory in Wood Following Irrigation with Tritiated Water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the groundwater and surface water at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is contaminated with tritium as a legacy of nuclear materials production. An analysis of tritium remediation alternatives suggests that the most practical remediation alternative is to change in the path of tritium exposure to the public. Calculations based on many years of experience at the Savannah River Site indicate that a 40 percent reduction in dose can be achieved by releasing tritiated water to the atmosphere, as water vapor, as opposed to allowing it to flow off site in surface water streams.

Murphy, C.E.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Volatilized tritiated water vapor in the vicinity of exposed tritium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

Water vapor tritium concentrations in air above a known source of tritiated water can be estimated. Estimates should account for the mechanisms of evaporation and condensation at the water surface and water species exchange, and are typically applicable under a broad range of wind, temperature and humidity conditions. An estimate of volatilized tritium water vapor was made for a known outcropping of tritium contaminated groundwater at the Savannah River Site (SRS) old F-Area effluent stream. In order to validate this estimate and the associated dose calculation, sampling equipment was fabricated, tested, and installed at the effluent stream. The estimate and the dose calculation were confirmed using data from samples collected.

Dunn, D.L.; Carlton, B.; Hunter, C.; McAdams, T.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Measurement of the electron antineutrino mass in tritium beta decay in the Troitsk nu-mass experiment  

SciTech Connect

The results obtained in the Troitsk nu-mass experiment by measuring the electron-antineutrino mass in tritium beta decay are presented. The facility used consists of a gaseous windowless tritium source and an electrostatic electron spectrometer involving an adiabatic magnetic collimation. Runs in which measurement conditions were reliably established were thoroughly selected in analyzing data obtained from 1994 to 2004. All known systematic effects were taken into account. For the square of the electron-antineutrino mass, the treatment of measured spectra yielded the following result: m{sub {nu}}{sup 2} = -0.67 {+-} 1.89{sub stat.} {+-} 1.68{sub syst.} eV{sup 2}. The use of the Bayesian method and the Feldman-Cousins unified approach made it possible to obtain the following upper limits on the mass: m{sub {nu}} < 2.12 eV (at a 95% C.L.; Bayesian method) and m{sub {nu}} < 2.05 eV (at a 95% C.L., Feldman-Cousins method). At the same time, an estimation of the sensitivity limit without allowance for negative values of the square of the mass leads to m{sub {nu}} < 2.2 eV (at a 95% C.L.). Measured spectra were analyzed for the possible existence of an additional structure (step) in the electron spectrum near the boundary energy. The conclusion drawn from this analysis was that, within the existing statistical errors, there are no reasons for introducing such a feature.

Aseev, V. N.; Belesev, A. I.; Berlev, A. I.; Geraskin, E. V.; Golubev, A. A.; Lihovid, N. A.; Lobashev, V. M.; Nozik, A. A.; Pantuev, V. S.; Parfenov, V. I.; Skasyrskaya, A. K.; Tkachov, F. V.; Zadorozhny, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hydrogen storage-bed design for tritium systems test assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed the design of a hydrogen storage bed for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). Our objective is to store hydrogen isotopes as uranium hydrides and recover them by dehydriding. The specific use of the storage bed is to store DT gas as U(D,T)/sub 3/ when it is required for the TSTA. The hydrogen storage bed consists of a primary container in which uranium powder is stored and a secondary container for a second level of safety in gas confinement. The primary container, inlet and outlet gas lines, cartridge heaters, and instrumentation are assembled in the secondary container. The design of the hydrogen storage bed is presented, along with the modeling and analysis of the bed behavior during hydriding-dehydriding cycles.

Cullingford, H.S.; Wheeler, M.G.; McMullen, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Tritium Isotope Separation Using Adsorption-Distillation Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to miniaturize the height of a distillation tower for the detritiation of waste water from fusion reactors, two experiments were conducted: (1) liquid frontal chromatography of tritium water eluting through an adsorption column and (2) water distillation using a column packed with adsorbent particles. The height of the distillation tower depends on the height equivalent to a theoretical plate, HETP, and the equilibrium isotope separation factor, {alpha}{sub H-T}{sup equi}. The adsorption action improved not only HETP but also {alpha}{sub H-T}{sup equi}. Since the adsorption-distillation method proposed here can shorten the tower height with keeping advantages of the distillation, it may bring an excellent way for miniaturizing the distillation tower to detritiate a large amount of waste water from fusion reactors.

Fukada, Satoshi [Kyushu University (Japan)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's world-class research facilities provide the venue for innovative advances in photovoltaic technologies and applications. These facilities within the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) serve both multi-use and dedicated-use functions. We encourage our research colleagues in industry, universities, and other laboratories to pursue opportunities in working with our staff in these facilities. Dedicated-Use Facilities Photo of a red-hot coil glowing inside a round machine. Research within these facilities focuses on targeted areas of interest that require specific tools, techniques, or unique capabilities. Our two main dedicated-use facilities are the following: Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) OTF researchers study and evaluate advanced or emerging PV technologies

433

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

434

The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogen separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)

Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.; Bidica, N.; Balteanu, O.; Bucur, C. [INC-DTCI, ICSIRm. Valcea, Uzinei Street 4, Rm. Valcea (Romania)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

User Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USER PORTAL USER PORTAL BTRICBuilding Technologies Research Integration Center CNMSCenter for Nanophase Materials Sciences CSMBCenter for Structural Molecular Biology CFTFCarbon Fiber Technology Facility HFIRHigh Flux Isotope Reactor MDF Manufacturing Demonstration Facility NTRCNational Transportation Research Center OLCFOak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility SNSSpallation Neutron Source Keeping it fresh at the Spallation Neutron Source Nanophase material sciences' nanotech toolbox Home | User Facilities SHARE ORNL User Facilities ORNL is home to a number of highly sophisticated experimental user facilities that provide unmatched capabilities to the broader scientific community, including a growing user community from universities, industry, and other laboratories research institutions, as well as to ORNL

436

TRITIUM PERMEATION AND TRANSPORT IN THE GASOLINE PRODUCTION SYSTEM COUPLED WITH HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS (HTGRS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes scoping analyses on tritium behaviors in the HTGR-integrated gasoline production system, which is based on a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) plant. In this system, the HTGR transfers heat and electricity to the MTG system. This system was analyzed using the TPAC code, which was recently developed by Idaho National Laboratory. The global sensitivity analyses were performed to understand and characterize tritium behaviors in the coupled HTGR/MTG system. This Monte Carlo based random sampling method was used to evaluate maximum 17,408 numbers of samples with different input values. According to the analyses, the average tritium concentration in the product gasoline is about 3.05×10-3 Bq/cm3, and 62 % cases are within the tritium effluent limit (= 3.7x10-3 Bq/cm3[STP]). About 0.19% of released tritium is finally transported from the core to the gasoline product through permeations. This study also identified that the following four parameters are important concerning tritium behaviors in the HTGR/MTG system: (1) tritium source, (2) wall thickness of process heat exchanger, (3) operating temperature, and (4) tritium permeation coefficient of process heat exchanger. These four parameters contribute about 95 % of the total output uncertainties. This study strongly recommends focusing our future research on these four parameters to improve modeling accuracy and to mitigate tritium permeation into the gasol ine product. If the permeation barrier is included in the future study, the tritium concentration will be significantly reduced.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Mike Patterson

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Dynamical Interpretation of the Tritium Maximum in the Central Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical tritium distribution between 1974 and 1981 is characterized by a maximum along the equator centered between 125° and 145°W. It signifies that this region has received the maximum input of high northern latitude water. A dynamical ...

Michael J. McPhaden; Rana A. Fine

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Selection of a Tritium Dose Model: Defensibility and Reasonableness for DOE Authorization Basis Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the logic used to select a dispersion/consequence methodology, describes the collection of tritium models contained in the suite of analysis options (the `tool kit`), and provides application examples.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); O`Kula, K.R.; East, J.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Potential Emissions of Tritium in Air from Wells on the Nevada National Security Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide-show discusses the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and tritium in the groundwater. It describes the wells and boreholes and potential airflow from these sources. Monitoring of selected wells is discussed and preliminary results are presented.

Warren, R.

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Control technology for radioactive emissions to the atmosphere at US Department of Energy facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide information to the US Environmental Protection agency (EPA) on existing technology for the control of radionuclide emissions into the air from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, and to provide EPA with information on possible additional control technologies that could be used to further reduce these emissions. Included in this report are generic discussions of emission control technologies for particulates, iodine, rare gases, and tritium. Also included are specific discussions of existing emission control technologies at 25 DOE facilities. Potential additional emission control technologies are discussed for 14 of these facilities. The facilities discussed were selected by EPA on the basis of preliminary radiation pathway analyses. 170 references, 131 figures, 104 tables.

Moore, E.B.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 15, 2005 [Facility News] October 15, 2005 [Facility News] Room to Share-New Guest Facility Ready for Users at North Slope of Alaska Bookmark and Share In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. To alleviate crowded conditions at its research facilities on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, ARM operations staff recently completed the installation of a new Guest Instrument Facility. Similar to the platform at the Atqasuk site, the facility consists of two insulated shipping containers mounted on pilings, with a mezzanine to accommodate

442

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

443

FACET User Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content

444

Government Facilities Segment Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal, state, and local governments own or lease an estimated 1.2 million buildings and facilities in the United States. These facilities are an important -- and often overlooked -- customer segment for all energy and energy service providers.

1998-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

445

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Tritium generation and neutron measurements in Pd-Si under high deuterium gas pressure  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes some of the methods applicable for low level tritium detection needed in the search for anomalous fusion in metal hydrides. It is also intended to further detail our tritium and neutron results that have been obtained with the Pd-Si-D system, originally presented at earlier workshops. A measure of reproducibility that was not evident in our previous work has been achieved partially due to the better detection sensitivity afforded by the use of low tritium deuterium and partially from the fact that the foil-wafer cells can be made with nearly identical electrical characteristics. This reproducibility has allowed us to narrow the optimum conditions for the experiment. While this experiment is rather different from the standard'' electrolytic cell or the Ti gas hydride experiment, similarities exist in that non equilibrium conditions are sought and the tritium generation levels are low and neutron emission is extremely weak. In contrast to many electrochemical cell experiments, the system used in these experiments is completely sealed during operation and uses no electrolyte. The major improvements to the experiment have been the use of vary low tritium deuterium for the hydriding and the replacement of the aluminum neutron counter tubes with ones of stainless steel. These changes have resulted in pronounced improvements to the detection systems since the background tritium level in the gas has been reduced by a factor of 300 and the neutron background has been decreased by a factor of 14. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Claytor, T.N.; Tuggle, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The requirements for processing tritium recovered from liquid lithium blankets: The blanket interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have initiated a study to define a blanket processing mockup for Tritium Systems Test Assembly. Initial evaluation of the requirements of the blanket processing system have been started. The first step of the work is to define the condition of the gaseous tritium stream from the blanket tritium recovery system. This report summarizes this part of the work for one particular blanket concept, i.e., a self-cooled lithium blanket. The total gas throughput, the hydrogen to tritium ratio, the corrosive chemicals, and the radionuclides are defined. The key discoveries are: the throughput of the blanket gas stream (including the helium carrier gas) is about two orders of magnitude higher than the plasma exhaust stream;the protium to tritium ratio is about 1, the deuterium to tritium ratio is about 0.003;the corrosion chemicals are dominated by halides;the radionuclides are dominated by C-14, P-32, and S-35;their is high level of nitrogen contamination in the blanket stream. 77 refs., 6 figs., 13 tabs.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Grimm, T.L.; Sze, D.K.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Determination of tritium permeation rate through T-22 in GCFR helium environment  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were made on tritium permeation rates through T-22 tubular samples in the temperature range of 300/sup 0/ to 550/sup 0/C. The tritium source consists of tritium in helium containing hydrogen at 6 vol % and sufficient water vapor to maintain a hydrogen-to-water-pressure ratio of 10, the total pressure being 1.01 x 10/sup 5/ Pa (1 atm). Two tritium sources at specific activities of 2.6 x 10/sup -3/ and 3.1 x 10/sup -2/ ..mu..Ci/std cc, respectively, were used for determining how the permeation rate varies with tritium concentration. The T-22 tubular samples have a wall thickness of 0.437 x 10/sup -2/ m (0.172 in.), and two samples are used for checking the reproducibility of the results. During the measurements, the tritium diffusing through the wall of the sample is swept out with a helium-steam mixture by bubbling helium at atmospheric pressure through a water reservoir maintained at 90/sup 0/C.

Yang, L.; Baugh, W.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

PROJECTIZING AN OPERATING NUCLEAR FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss the evolution of an operations-based organization to a project-based organization to facilitate successful deactivation of a major nuclear facility. It will describe the plan used for scope definition, staff reorganization, method estimation, baseline schedule development, project management training, and results of this transformation. It is a story of leadership and teamwork, pride and success. Workers at the Savannah River Site's (SRS) F Canyon Complex (FCC) started with a challenge--take all the hazardous byproducts from nearly 50 years of operations in a major, first-of-its-kind nuclear complex and safely get rid of them, leaving the facility cold, dark, dry and ready for whatever end state is ultimately determined by the United States Department of Energy (DOE). And do it in four years, with a constantly changing workforce and steadily declining funding. The goal was to reduce the overall operating staff by 93% and budget by 94%. The facilities, F Canyon and its adjoined sister, FB Line, are located at SRS, a 310-square-mile nuclear reservation near Aiken, S.C., owned by DOE and managed by Washington Group International subsidiary Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC). These facilities were supported by more than 50 surrounding buildings, whose purpose was to provide support services during operations. The radiological, chemical and industrial hazards inventory in the old buildings was significant. The historical mission at F Canyon was to extract plutonium-239 and uranium-238 from irradiated spent nuclear fuel through chemical processing. FB Line's mission included conversion of plutonium solutions into metal, characterization, stabilization and packaging, and storage of both metal and oxide forms. The plutonium metal was sent to another DOE site for use in weapons. Deactivation in F Canyon began when chemical separations activities were completed in 2002, and a cross-functional project team concept was implemented to successfully accomplish deactivation. This concept had to allow for continued operations in FB Line until 2005, while providing distinct task-oriented teams for deactivation of the FCC. Facility workers, always the most knowledgeable about any facility, were integral parts of the project team. The team defined the scope, developed a bottoms-up estimate, reorganized personnel to designated project teams, and developed a baseline schedule with about 12,000 activities. Training was implemented to prepare the facility workers to use project management tools and concepts, which were to execute the project, coordinate activities and track progress. The project budget was estimated at $579 million. The team completed F Canyon and FB Line deactivation in August 2006, four months ahead of schedule and under budget.

Adams, N

2007-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

450

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Systems Infrastructure High Performance Storage Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Facilities and Capabilities...

451

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

452

MML Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MML Electron Microscopy Facility consists of three transmission electron microscopes (TEM), three scanning electron microscopes (SEM), a ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

453

Photon Sciences | Navigation | Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities NSLS About NSLS Accelerator Activity Report Experimental Systems Machine Status & History Operations & Engineering Operating Schedules Ring Parameters NSLS Ops:...

454

Facilities and Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The EL Facilities listed here are available for cooperative or independent research, typically on a cost reimbursable basis. ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

455

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASAÂ’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

456

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

457

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Break 10:00 a.m. - Making Your Observations CountLeading Indicators - Mike Weis, Rocky Flats Field Office 10:45 a.m. - Facility Representative PanelQuestions and Answers (Ben...

458

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

459

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

460

Facility Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus Coordinates D Metals D Metals D Metals Definition Small Scale Wind Valley City OH MW Northern Power Systems In Service AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Definition Commercial Scale Wind Coram Energy AB Energy Southern California Edison Co Tehachapi CA MW Vestas In Service AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines Definition Commercial Scale Wind AFCEE Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment Distributed generation net metered Camp Edwards Sandwich MA MW GE Energy In Service AG Land AG Land AG Land Definition Community Wind AG Land Energy LLC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tritium extraction facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 22, 2007 [Facility News] March 22, 2007 [Facility News] GEWEX News Features Dust Data from ARM Mobile Facility Deployment Bookmark and Share Data from the recent deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility are featured in the February issue of GEWEX News. Data from the recent deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility are featured in the February issue of GEWEX News. The February 2007 issue (Vol. 17, No. 1) of GEWEX News features early results from special observing periods of the African Monsoon Mutidisciplinary Analysis, including data obtained by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF). The AMF was stationed in the central Sahel from January through December 2006, with the primary facility at the Niamey airport, and an ancillary site in Banizoumbou. The AMF recorded a major dust storm that passed through the area in March, and combined with simultaneous satellite

462

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 16, 2005 [Facility News] February 16, 2005 [Facility News] Mobile Facility Arrives Safe and Sound in Point Reyes Bookmark and Share Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Safe and sound at Point Reyes, the ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is set up on the roof of a shelter until a fence is installed to keep out the curious local cattle. On February 9, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) withstood an accident on the way to its deployment location at Point Reyes, California. About an hour from its destination, the truck carrying the two AMF shelters packed with instrumentation and associated equipment swerved to avoid another vehicle and slid off the road and down a steep embankment. Emergency personnel soon

463

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2011 [Facility News] 22, 2011 [Facility News] Request for Proposals Now Open Bookmark and Share The ARM Climate Research Facility is now accepting applications for use of an ARM mobile facility (AMF), the ARM aerial facility (AAF), and fixed sites. Proposals are welcome from all members of the scientific community for conducting field campaigns and scientific research using the ARM Facility, with availability as follows: AMF2 available December 2013 AMF1 available March 2015 AAF available between June and October 2013 Fixed sites available FY2013 Priority will be given to proposals that make comprehensive use of the ARM facilities and focus on long-term goals of the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Successful proposals will be supplied all operational and logistical resources (provided at no cost to the principal

464

Tritium distribution in the environment in the vicinity of a chronic atmospheric source-assessment of the steady state hypothesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major radionuclide production center. Tritium has been released to the atmosphere over the 36 year period of operation. The tritiated water concentration of the atmosphere, rain, vegetation and food have been routinely monitored during this period. Special studies have been made of tritium in soils and in the organic fractions of these same materials. The available data suggest that the average tritium concentration in the components of the terrestrial environment have approached a steady state with the two main sources of tritium, rainfall and atmospheric water vapor.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Zeigler, C.C.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

Tritium distribution in the environment in the vicinity of a chronic atmospheric source-assessment of the steady state hypothesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a major radionuclide production center. Tritium has been released to the atmosphere over the 36 year period of operation. The tritiated water concentration of the atmosphere, rain, vegetation and food have been routinely monitored during this period. Special studies have been made of tritium in soils and in the organic fractions of these same materials. The available data suggest that the average tritium concentration in the components of the terrestrial environment have approached a steady state with the two main sources of tritium, rainfall and atmospheric water vapor.

Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Zeigler, C.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Secondary Startup Neutron Sources as a Source of Tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS)  

SciTech Connect

The hypothesis of this paper is that the Zircaloy clad fuel source is minimal and that secondary startup neutron sources are the significant contributors of the tritium in the RCS that was previously assigned to release from fuel. Currently there are large uncertainties in the attribution of tritium in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Reactor Coolant System (RCS). The measured amount of tritium in the coolant cannot be separated out empirically into its individual sources. Therefore, to quantify individual contributors, all sources of tritium in the RCS of a PWR must be understood theoretically and verified by the sum of the individual components equaling the measured values.

Shaver, Mark W.; Lanning, Donald D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Discharges in 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents radioactive discharges from the TA50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities (RLWTF) during calendar 2011. During 2011, three pathways were available for the discharge of treated water to the environment: discharge as water through NPDES Outfall 051 into Mortandad Canyon, evaporation via the TA50 cooling towers, and evaporation using the newly-installed natural-gas effluent evaporator at TA50. Only one of these pathways was used; all treated water (3,352,890 liters) was fed to the effluent evaporator. The quality of treated water was established by collecting a weekly grab sample of water being fed to the effluent evaporator. Forty weekly samples were collected; each was analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Weekly samples were also composited at the end of each month. These flow-weighted composite samples were then analyzed for 37 radioisotopes: nine alpha-emitting isotopes, 27 beta emitters, and tritium. These monthly analyses were used to estimate the radioactive content of treated water fed to the effluent evaporator. Table 1 summarizes this information. The concentrations and quantities of radioactivity in Table 1 are for treated water fed to the evaporator. Amounts of radioactivity discharged to the environment through the evaporator stack were likely smaller since only entrained materials would exit via the evaporator stack.

Del Signore, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

468

Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore, comparability to the true ambient concentrations of tritium.

Eberhart, C.F.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Tritium Movement and Accumulation in the NGNP System Interface and Hydrogen Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium movement and accumulation in a Next Generation Nuclear Plant with a hydrogen plant using a high temperature electrolysis process and a thermochemical water splitting sulfur iodine process are estimated by the numerical code THYTAN as a function of design, operational, and material parameters. Estimated tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product and in process chemicals in the hydrogen plant of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the high temperature electrolysis process are slightly higher than the drinking water limit defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the limit in the effluent at the boundary of an unrestricted area of a nuclear plant as defined by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, these concentrations can be reduced to within the limits through use of some designs and modified operations. Tritium concentrations in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant using the Sulfur-Iodine Process are significantly higher as calculated and are affected by parameters with large uncertainties (i.e., tritium permeability of the process heat exchanger, the hydrogen concentration in the heat transfer and process fluids, the equilibrium constant of the isotope exchange reaction between HT and H2SO4). These parameters, including tritium generation and the release rate in the reactor core, should be more accurately estimated in the near future to improve the calculations for the NGNP using the Sulfur-Iodine Process. Decreasing the tritium permeation through the heat exchanger between the primary and secondary circuits may be an an effective measure for decreasing tritium concentrations in the hydrogen product, the hydrogen plant, and the tertiary coolant.

Hirofumi Ohashi; Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Depth profiling of tritium by neutron time-of-flight  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed to measure the depth profile of tritium implanted or absorbed in materials. The sample to be analyzed is bombarded with a pulsed proton beam and the energy of neutrons produced by the T(p,n) reaction is measured by the time-of-flight technique. From the neutron energy the depth in the target of the T atoms may be inferred. A sensitivity of 0.1 at. percent T or greater is possible. The technique is non-destructive and may be used with thick or radioactive host materials. Samples up to 20 $mu$m in thickness may be profiled with resolution limited by straggling of the proton beam for depths greater than 1 $mu$m. Deuterium depth profiling has been demonstrated using the D(d,n) reaction. The technique has been used to observe the behavior of an implantation spike of T produced by a 400 keV T$sup +$ beam stopping at a depth of 3 $mu$m in 11 $mu$m thick layers of Ti and TiH. The presence of H in the Ti lattice is observed to inhibit the diffusion of T through the lattice. Effects of the total hydrogen concentration (H + T) being forced above stoichiometry at the implantation site are suggested by the shapes of the implanation spikes. (auth)

Davis, J.C.; Anderson, J.D.; Lefevre, H.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Segmentation strategies for the irradiated and tritium contaminated PPPL TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is scheduled to complete its final experiments in the Fall of 1995. As a result, the TFTR will be activated and tritium contaminated. After the experiments are complete, the TFTR will undergo Shutdown and Removal (S and R). The space vacated by the TFTR will be used for a new test reactor, the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Remote methods may be required to remove components and to segment the Vacuum Vessel. The TFTR has been studied to determine alternatives for the segmentation of the Vacuum Vessel from the inside (In-Vessel). The methodology to determine suitable strategies to segment the Vacuum Vessel from In-Vessel included several areas of concentration. These areas were segmentation locations, cutting/removal technologies, pros and cons, and cutting/removal technology delivery systems. The segmentation locations for easiest implementation and minimal steps in cutting and removal have been identified. Each of these will also achieve the baseline for packaging and shipment. The methods for cutting and removal of components were determined. In addition, the delivery systems were conceptualized.

Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Litka, T.J. [Advanced Consulting Group, Inc., Chicago, IL (United States); Spampinato, P.T. [RHD Consultants, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

472

NREL: Technology Transfer - Research Facilities  

NREL's Solar Energy Research Facility is one of many world-class facilities available to public and private agencies.

473

Quantum Electrical Metrology Division Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microfabrication Facility Our facilities for fabrication of integrated circuits are essential to nearly all of the work in the Group. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

474

Policies and Procedures - Accessing Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Facilities Use Agreements: Description of the facilities use agreements ... Criteria: Guidance for applicants describing essential information about ...

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

475

Stockpile Stewardship and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Since the completion of the construction project in March 2009, NIF has completed nearly 150 target experiments for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), High Energy Density Stewardship Science (HEDSS) in the areas of radiation transport, material dynamics at high pressure in the solid state, as well as fundamental science and other national security missions. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with over 50 X-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. NIF is now qualified for use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high yield experiments and classified experiments. DT implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 4.5 x 10{sup 14} neutrons have been achieved. A series of 43 experiments were successfully executed over a 27-day period, demonstrating the ability to perform precise experiments in new regimes of interest to HEDSS. This talk will provide an update of the progress on the NIF capabilities, NIC accomplishments, as well as HEDSS and fundamental science experimental results and an update of the experimental plans for the coming year.

Moses, E

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

476

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 [Facility News] 8, 2010 [Facility News] Europeans Keen to Hear About Effects of Dust Using Data from Africa Bookmark and Share In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. Researcher Xiaohong Liu from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was

477

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 30, 2008 [Facility News] April 30, 2008 [Facility News] Team Scouts Graciosa Island for 2009 Mobile Facility Deployment Site Bookmark and Share A location near the airport on the northern end of Graciosa Island was identified as an excellent location for operating the ARM Mobile Facility. Image source: Luis Miguens A location near the airport on the northern end of Graciosa Island was identified as an excellent location for operating the ARM Mobile Facility. Image source: Luis Miguens Indications from a scouting trip by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) science and operations management team are that an excellent site for the 2009 deployment may have been found. From April 8 through April 16, the team traveled to Graciosa Island in the Azores to scout sites for the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field

478

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 31, 2009 [Facility News] July 31, 2009 [Facility News] President of the Regional Government Speaks at Opening Ceremony for Mobile Facility in the Azores Bookmark and Share Highlighting the opening ceremony for the ARM Mobile Facility on Graciosa Island, Carlos César, President of the Regional Government of the Azores, signs a weather balloon while local media record the event. Photo by Mike Alsop. Highlighting the opening ceremony for the ARM Mobile Facility on Grac