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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Fact #612: March 1, 2010 The Distance of Trips to Work  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The recently released Nationwide Household Travel Survey shows that nearly 60% of work trips are 10 miles or less in distance. Only 9% of work trips are over 30 miles. The average work trip...

2

A New Years Trip A New Years Trip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Years Trip A New Years Trip December 26, 2003 - January 3, 2004 By Saul Wilson #12;A New Years Trip 7 INTRODUCTION #12;A New Years Trip 8 rom December 26, 2003 to January 3, 2004 my dad and I

Wilson, W. Stephen

3

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

4

School Trips in Autumn  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Autumn in Autumn Nature Bulletin No. 465-A October 7, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SCHOOL TRIPS IN AUTUMN Autumn is an ideal season for classrooms out-of-doors, when teachers and their pupils enjoy and learn from trips to convenient natural areas such as our forest preserves. The days are usually sunny, the air is cool and invigorating, the fields and woodlands are clothed with tapestries of rich colors, the birds are flocking southward, and it is harvest time in all the land. Field trips, now or at any time in the school year, make real and vivid those subjects studied in the classroom and its textbooks. On field trips, teachers and youngsters explore and discover together. They employ all five senses: they see, hear, smell, taste and feel. Such learning, by the most natural and enjoyable process, is rapid and sticks with them. Inevitably, a field trip will yield a fund of unforgettable experiences and a wealth of specimens for the classroom or pupils' own collections.

5

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

6

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

7

Groceries trip triclosan switch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Triclosan interferes with an enzyme crucial to the growth of bacteria. But it also trips ... host of unwanted chemicals. "It's a bacterium's vomit response," explains Gilbert. Triclosan opponents such as Levy are unconvinced. "I don't see a health relevance to ...

Tom Clarke

2001-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

8

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

9

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

10

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

11

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

12

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

13

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

14

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

15

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

16

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

17

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

18

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

19

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

20

Gobble Up Fuel Savings on Your Next Road Trip with My Trip Calculator...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Gobble Up Fuel Savings on Your Next Road Trip with My Trip Calculator Gobble Up Fuel Savings on Your Next Road Trip with My Trip Calculator November 19, 2012 - 9:51am Addthis Save...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Trip rate comparison of workplace and household surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Available vs. Trip Rate) 14 El Paso Household Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 15 El Paso Workplace Survey (Household Income vs. Trip Rate) . 52 52 53 53 54 54 16 BPA Household Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 17 BPA Workplace... Survey (Household Size vs. Trip Rate) . . 56 56 18 BPA Household Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 19 BPA Workplace Survey (No. of Employees vs. Trip Rate) . . 20 BPA Household Survey (Vehicles Available vs. Trip Rate) . . 21 BPA Workplace...

Endres, Stephen Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Student Groups Abroad: Trip Leader Handbook Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;1 Student Groups Abroad: Trip Leader Handbook Introduction This handbook is intended undergraduate and graduate students. The guidelines included in this handbook also apply to such trips. Examples Student club/organization events If you are leading a trip that does not fit any of the above models

23

Seeking Mountains Field Trip Jasper National Park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seeking Mountains Field Trip Jasper National Park December 14-15, 2012 Jasper National Park of Jasper is one of only four communities located in a Canadian national park. We have arranged a special. The field trip includes as follows: a welcome reception at the Jasper Yellowhead Museum and Archives

MacMillan, Andrew

24

Workshops and Field Trips for Teachers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshops and Field Trips for Teachers Workshops and Field Trips for Teachers Nature Bulletin No. 534-A Septmeber 7, 1974 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WORKSHOPS AND FIELD TRIPS FOR TEACHERS The Forest Preserve District, as a part of the educational program conducted by its Department of Conservation, again is offering a series of three-day workshops and another of one-day field trips, during this school year, for teachers in the schools of Chicago and suburban Cook County. Only a few decades ago, most Illinois people resided on farms or in small towns. They lived close to the soil. From childhood they had been so familiar with the out-of-doors that special schooling in ecology, plant life, wildlife and land management seemed superfluous.

25

My Trip to Mongolia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

My Trip to Mongolia My Trip to Mongolia My Trip to Mongolia September 29, 2010 - 10:37am Addthis Deputy Secretary Poneman meets with Mongolia’s Foreign Minister to discuss energy issues. Deputy Secretary Poneman meets with Mongolia's Foreign Minister to discuss energy issues. Daniel B. Poneman Daniel B. Poneman Deputy Secretary of Energy Last week, I traveled to Mongolia to discuss our shared energy challenges and our shared energy opportunities. The United States and Mongolia enjoy a warm friendship and deepening ties in a number of areas, including energy. The United States is committed to supporting the government and people of Mongolia as they continue to democratize. Although half a world apart, the United States and Mongolia share some common energy features: both our

26

PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) More Documents & Publications PIA - INL PeopleSoft - Human Resource System Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho...

27

Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

According to the latest National Household Travel Survey, the average trip length grew to over 10 miles in 2009, just slightly over the 9.9 mile average in 2001. Trips to work in 2009 increased to...

28

September 17, 2010 SLIPS, TRIPS, FALLS PREVENTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in an effort to reduce slips, trips and falls we offer the following "best practices" to consider: Be aware Environmental Services for immediate assistance Routinely check for loose power cords and cables; make Environmental Health and Safety 734-3673 Environmental Services 734-3425 Employee Health Services 734

Leistikow, Bruce N.

29

Hunton Group core workshop and field trip  

SciTech Connect

The Late Ordovician-Silurian-Devonian Hunton Group is a moderately thick sequence of shallow-marine carbonates deposited on the south edge of the North American craton. This rock unit is a major target for petroleum exploration and reservoir development in the southern Midcontinent. The workshop described here was held to display cores, outcrop samples, and other reservoir-characterization studies of the Hunton Group and equivalent strata throughout the region. A field trip was organized to complement the workshop by allowing examination of excellent outcrops of the Hunton Group of the Arbuckle Mountains.

Johnson, K.S. [ed.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

School Trips & Projects in Spring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Projects in Spring & Projects in Spring Nature Bulletin No. 484 March 9, 1957 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SCHOOL TRIPS & PROJECTS IN SPRINg Spring is the morning of the year when nature reawakens. The days become noticeably longer and warmer. We feel an urge to get out-of- doors and see green growing plants, early wildflowers, and swelling buds on trees and shrubs; see and hear birds returning from their winter homes; hear the mating songs of frogs and toads. The nearest forest preserve, park, meadow or hedgerow -- even a city street or weedy vacant lot -- will have a wealth of plant and animal life. March is a chancy month for field trips but spring can be perking in a classroom before many signs of it appear outdoors. One twig of a forsythia bush, placed in a bottle of water, will soon display its yellow flowers; willow and aspen twigs will develop fat fuzzy catkins; the end of branches from cottonwood, soft maple and elm trees will reveal how some of their winter buds produce flowers and others burst into leaves. The long reddish catkins on a male cottonwood are showy but the small flowers of a maple or an elm are no less beautiful, although seldom noticed on the trees.

31

Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The average trip length (one-way) is 9.7 miles according to the 2009 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey. Trip lengths vary by the purpose of the trip. Shopping and family/personal business...

32

Northwest Geological Society Society Field Trips in Pacific Northwest Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the Western Channeled Scablands June 21-22 2008 Bruce Bjornstad #12;This field trip guide has been - 22 2008 Bruce Bjornstad Dry Falls and the Lower Grand Coulee #12;Introduction Ice Age floods were Age flood features is repro- duced from a previous field trips (Bjornstad 2004; Kiver and Bjornstad

33

Dynamic Traffic Assignment Incorporating Commuters Trip Chaining Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT INCORPORATING COMMUTERS TRIP CHAINING BEHAVIOR A Thesis by WEN WANG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2011 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Dynamic Traffic Assignment Incorporating Commuters Trip Chaining Behavior Copyright 2011 Wen Wang DYNAMIC TRAFFIC ASSIGNMENT...

Wang, Wen

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

34

China Trip Report May 7-21, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 China Trip Report May 7-21, 2012 Dr. Cathy Meschievitz Director, Office of International Programs Dean of College of A&L) toured China on university business for two weeks May 7-21, 2012. The trip had three main purposes: (1) Visit selected universities and colleges in China to explore partnership

Fernandez, Eduardo

35

A novel fast distance relay for long transmission lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The measuring accuracy and the measurement stability of conventional distance relay will be influenced by complex and remarkable harmonic components due to the large capacitance of the line when it is used for a long line. Correspondingly, the tripping speed will be delayed to some extent. To solve this problem, a fast distance relay for long transmission lines is presented, which is on the basis of the differential equation algorithm using ? transmission line model and the theory of Equal Transfer Process of Transmission Lines (ETPTL). The shortcomings of ? model differential equation algorithm due to the impact of high frequency components can be overcome by using a low-pass filter. The problem resulting from the difference between the transfer feature of the voltages used by the distance protection and that of the currents due to the transient characteristic of coupling capacitor voltage transformers (CCVT) can be solved by using virtual digital CCVT. Then, the new distance relay can trip quickly by re-structuring the voltage at the fault point and iterative calculations. A variety of ATP simulation tests show that the new relay has fast tripping speed and high reliability when applied to the long transmission lines.

Minghao Wen; Deshu Chen; Xianggen Yin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Tacticycle A Tactile Display for Supporting Tourists on a Bicycle Trip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tacticycle ­ A Tactile Display for Supporting Tourists on a Bicycle Trip Benjamin Poppinga, Martin, tourists, exploration, bicycle 1. BACKGROUND AND MOTIVATION Going on a bicycle trip is a common leisure for bicycles used in touristic trips. Figure 1: A group of tourists on a bicycle trip on an island. In order

Boll, Susanne

37

Energy Secretary Chu Trip to Kokomo, Indiana Cancelled | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kokomo, Indiana Cancelled Energy Secretary Chu Trip to Kokomo, Indiana Cancelled July 16, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington D.C. - The event today on Friday, July 16 with Energy...

38

Join HERO for an overnight trip to Portland Oregon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

no later than March 7. The discount code is HER for the HERO Basketball Trip Guestroom Block. Call or e-mail Fred Kelm, 372-1947or FredieRKelm@rl.gov to reserve and pay...

39

Causal models of trip replanning in TravTek  

SciTech Connect

The TravTek operational field test was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of route planning, route guidance and various navigational aiding modalities for Advanced Traveler Information Systems in ground vehicles. A causal network was constructed in order to achieve a better understanding of the dependencies among variables implicated in the replanning process. Causal inferences were modeled using path analysis techniques. The original Yoked Driver study reported that addition of real-time navigation planning did not increase trip efficiency during initial trip planning. Data mining of the relatively complete database revealed that the incidence of dynamic trip replanning was only 0.51% or 1 out of every 198 trips. Nevertheless, the replanning acceptance rate was 92.8%, suggesting that less conservative criteria might have been acceptable to drivers. Several points can be made based upon the path analysis techniques. Drivers who rejected better route offers were more likely to be male renters; rejected routes were apparently offered at earlier times with a lower predicted time savings and fewer maneuvers. Failure to accept a better route also apparently resulted in fewer wrong-turn deviations. Contrary to expectations, wrong-turn count and time loss appeared as semi-independent hubs in the resultant causal network. Implications of the path analysis are discussed. Proposals for in-vehicle information systems are formulated to increase driver participation as co-planner, and increase the likelihood that trip replanning will positively impact trip efficiency.

Schryver, J.C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

UVM Outing Club Trip Logistics Planner All leadership teams taking out Outing Club trips need to complete this form. This is a working  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UVM Outing Club Trip Logistics Planner All leadership teams taking out Outing Club trips need. Completed and detailed trip logistics planner 2. Copies of all participant AND leader medical forms 3? Copies of medical forms nad logistics planner? Picked up Purchase Orders, Gas Card, and Petty Cash? Food

Hayden, Nancy J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: March 22, 5: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length on AddThis.com... Fact #615: March 22, 2010 Average Vehicle Trip Length According to the latest National Household Travel Survey, the average trip

42

7Tracking a Sea Turtle from a Satellite Day Number Latitude Longitude Distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7Tracking a Sea Turtle from a Satellite Day Number Latitude Longitude Distance (km) 1 0 +5o North in the table above to track the sea turtle from the start of its journey to its end. Use your map to answer these questions: Question 1 - In what part of the world did it begin its trip? Question 2 - Where did the turtle

Christian, Eric

43

Gov. Granholm, Administration Officials to Preview the President's Trip to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gov. Granholm, Administration Officials to Preview the President's Gov. Granholm, Administration Officials to Preview the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan Gov. Granholm, Administration Officials to Preview the President's Trip to Holland, Michigan July 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON- Today at 4:00 p.m. EDT, Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm, White House Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer, and Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Energy Secretary Chu, will hold a press conference call ahead of the President's trip to Holland, MI, for the official groundbreaking of the new Compact Power plant. As part of the call, they will preview a new Department of Energy report to be released on Thursday that details how Recovery Act investments are creating jobs and helping to build the domestic advanced battery and electric vehicle industry from the ground

44

Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February 25 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February 25 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February 25 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February 25 February 25, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Today, Secretary Chu was in Doha, Qatar, where he began the day by signing a Memorandum of Understanding on Renewable and Alternative Energy with Deputy Prime Minister and Energy & Industry Minister Abdullah bin Hamad Al-Attiyah. The agreement provides a framework for bilateral cooperation with the Ministry and other Qatari institutions on clean energy innovation. He then met with Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani. In the afternoon, the Secretary participated in a roundtable focused on renewable energy, hosted by the Qatar National Food Security Program. He then traveled to the Qatar Science and Technology Park (QSTP) where he

45

Assess Employee Awareness of Alternative Commuting and Trip-Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assess Employee Awareness of Alternative Commuting and Assess Employee Awareness of Alternative Commuting and Trip-Reduction Programs for Greenhouse Gas Profile Assess Employee Awareness of Alternative Commuting and Trip-Reduction Programs for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 2:19pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, success can be measured by employee awareness and use of commuting alternatives and trip-reduction efforts. Efforts include guaranteed ride home programs, and showers for walkers and bicyclists. Low use or awareness of an option, combined with a high willingness to use an option, such as teleworking, may suggest the need to improve communications about available alternatives. Next Steps For evaluating a GHG emissions profile for employee commuting, also learn

46

Logistic regression models for predicting trip reporting accuracy in GPS-enhanced household travel surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology for conducting logistic regression modeling of trip and household information obtained from household travel surveys and vehicle trip information obtained from global positioning systems (GPS) to better understand...

Forrest, Timothy Lee

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Computational-based Approach for the Design of Trip Steels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to optimize the chemical composition as well as the heat treatment for improving the mechanical performance of the TRIP steel by employing the theoretical models. TRIP steel consists of the microstructure with ferrite...

Li, Sheng-Yen

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts May 21, 2010 - 12:00am...

49

SWAMP Project Trip report Quantification of Carbon Stocks and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SWAMP Project Trip report Quantification of Carbon Stocks and Emissions from the Mangrove Forests University Corvallis, Oregon, USA. #12;2 1. Introduction Funding for this project came from a grant, Washington DC. This intensive study is part of the Sustainable Wetlands Adaptation and Mitigation Program

Tullos, Desiree

50

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Permit holder name/address Permit / N MMSI No. Y / N Present? Usage Water capacity (m3): Fuel capacity: m3 / tonnes Other: Other: Kw all that apply & note types of materials for each) Capacity: Usage Incinerator: Net mensuration Y / N

51

Usage Codes Observer code Vessel code Trip ID  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Codes 1 5 2 6 3 7 4 8 Sonar Observer code Vessel code Trip ID Additional Information KHz: RPM / Other _______________Global Registry ID:MMSI No. Permit expiration (dd-mm- yy): Y / N Present? Usage contact Diver / dive equipment Usage Manufacturer Hull mounted / towed Catch Y / N Other: Y / N Y / NOther

52

FALL 2012 TRIPS SEPT. 8 (Saturday) HIKE & SPLASH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County. We have reserved the whole campground, so it should be a fun time. We will get there in time (Saturday) ( Beginner ­ Advanced) CLIMBING Kings Bluff, TN $22 Sign-up by: Friday, Sept. 14 Pre-Trip Meeting: Wednesday, 9/19 at 5:00 PM Wall climbers, it's time to try the "real thing"! Kings Bluff is a great location

Bordenstein, Seth

53

SAFETY TRIP REPORT ON US-JAPAN EXCHANGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAFETY TRIP REPORT ON US-JAPAN EXCHANGE PROGRAM (FuY 2007) #12;Report on the 12th Meeting of the Joint Working Group of the U.S.-Japan Coordinating Committee of Fusion Energy on Safety in Inter-Institutional Collaborations (U.S.-Japan Safety Monitoring Program) Meeting in Japan, March 9-22, 2008 #12;A. PURPOSE

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

54

Control #15421 In this paper we present a method of optimally scheduling trips travelling down  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control #15421 SUMMARY In this paper we present a method of optimally scheduling trips travelling of trips as parameters and generates a schedule that maximizes the number of trips and determines when each schedule in which human interactions are minimized. Starting with a mathematically derived upper bound

Morrow, James A.

55

Understanding tourists on a bicycle trip "in the wild" Martin Pielot, Benjamin Poppinga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding tourists on a bicycle trip "in the wild" Martin Pielot, Benjamin Poppinga OFFIS the requirements analysis by con- ducting a survey and a field study to understand tourists on a bicycle trip. Both work we designed a pervasive navigation aid for tourists on a bicycle trip. At first, we aimed

Boll, Susanne

56

Toxics Release Inventory Expansion Rule Phase 3 (TRI-P3)  

SciTech Connect

The ORR [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Y-12 Plant, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] is considered a single facility for reporting by the DOE prime contractors. The processing, manufacturing, or "otherwise use" Section313 chemicals are combined to determine TRI reportability. Such is the case with lead metal, which is one of two chemicals for which reportin~ forms were prepared in this pilot study (Task 2;1. The lead shop at ORNL exceeded the reporting threshold, causing a lead activity at a Y-1 2 machine shop and lead in waste at ETTP to be reportable. TRI-P3 report preparation time for lead totaled 36.5 hours. The second chemical investigated and reported (chromium) also required nearly a man-week for report preparation and documentation by experienced TRI personnel. The ORR TRI report typically includes about six chemicals, so an estimate of the TRI-P3 incremental reporting burden for ORR would be six weeks for experienced personnel axI d two/three man-months for first-time ORR preparers.

Evans, R.A.; Saunders, A.D.; Worley, G.G.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Design of Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (TRIP)A Global River Channel Network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a first step toward designing a comprehensive model for validating land surface hydrology and river flow in Earth system models, a global river channel network has been prepared at 1 latitude 1 longitude resolution. The end product is the ...

Taikan Oki; Y. C. Sud

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: May 21, 2012 8: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #728: May 21, 2012 Average Trip Length is Less Than Ten Miles on AddThis.com...

59

EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 231 Number of trips 676,414 Total distance traveled (mi) 5,753,009 Avg trip distance (mi) 8.3 Avg distance traveled per day...

60

EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuel economy (mpg) 155 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 242 Number of trips 147,886 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,184,265 Avg trip distance (mi) 8.0 Avg distance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EV Project Nissan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 through March 2011 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 3,364 Total distance traveled (mi) 21,706 Avg trip distance (mi) 5.8 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

62

EV Project Nissan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

through September 2012 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 813,430 Total distance traveled (mi) 5,837,173 Avg trip distance (mi) 7.2 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

63

EV Project Nissan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 through June 2012 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 787,895 Total distance traveled (mi) 5,666,469 Avg trip distance (mi) 7.2 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

64

EV Project Nissan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

through December 2012 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 969,853 Total distance traveled (mi) 6,724,952 Avg trip distance (mi) 6.9 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

65

EV Project NIssan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report-Reporting period...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

through September 2011 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 536,548 Total distance traveled (mi) 3,718,272 Avg trip distance (mi) 6.9 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

66

EV Project NIssan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 through March 2012 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 773,602 Total distance traveled (mi) 5,558,155 Avg trip distance (mi) 7.2 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

67

EV Project NIssan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

through December 2011 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 707,330 Total distance traveled (mi) 4,878,735 Avg trip distance (mi) 6.9 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

68

EV Project NIssan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011 through June 2011 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 160,588 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,077,931 Avg trip distance (mi) 6.7 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was...

69

EV Project Nissan Leaf Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40 Reporting period: January 2013 through March 2013 Vehicle Usage Number of trips 1,075,251 Total distance traveled (mi) 7,563,354 Avg trip distance (mi) 7.0 Avg distance...

70

Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Trip with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Trip with Visit to Russian 'Los Alamos' Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Trip with Visit to Russian 'Los Alamos' June 10, 2011 - 2:05pm Addthis Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Secretary Chu wrapped up his week-long visit in Russia today with a special visit to the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Many consider it to be the Russian equivalent of our Los Alamos National Laboratory. VNIIEF, located in Sarov, has a long scientific tradition in Russia, beginning when it was established in 1946 to design nuclear weapons. It's also where the first Soviet nuclear bomb, the "RDS-1," was created.

71

Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Trip with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Trip with Visit to Russian 'Los Alamos' Focus on International Cooperation Continues, Secretary Chu Ends Trip with Visit to Russian 'Los Alamos' June 10, 2011 - 2:05pm Addthis Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Secretary Chu wrapped up his week-long visit in Russia today with a special visit to the All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). Many consider it to be the Russian equivalent of our Los Alamos National Laboratory. VNIIEF, located in Sarov, has a long scientific tradition in Russia, beginning when it was established in 1946 to design nuclear weapons. It's also where the first Soviet nuclear bomb, the "RDS-1," was created.

72

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

73

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

74

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 45 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 29 Total number of trips 1,839 Total distance traveled (mi) 21,089 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 61 Number of trips 654 Percent of trips city | highway 66% | 34% Distance traveled (mi) 5,717 Percent of total distance traveled 27% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 38 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 57 Number of trips 117 Percent of trips city | highway 39% | 62% Distance traveled (mi) 3,683 Percent of total distance traveled 17% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 33 Number of trips 1,068 Percent of trips city | highway 71% | 30% Distance traveled (mi)

75

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36 36 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 18 Total number of trips 1,290 Total distance traveled (mi) 13,023 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 58 Number of trips 432 Percent of trips city | highway 75% | 25% Distance traveled (mi) 2,835 Percent of total distance traveled 22% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 48 Number of trips 52 Percent of trips city | highway 31% | 69% Distance traveled (mi) 1,613 Percent of total distance traveled 12% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 Number of trips 806 Percent of trips city | highway 73% | 27% Distance traveled (mi)

76

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

49 49 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 27 Total number of trips 927 Total distance traveled (mi) 9,301 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 66 Number of trips 313 Percent of trips city | highway 68% | 32% Distance traveled (mi) 2,138 Percent of total distance traveled 23% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 63 Number of trips 46 Percent of trips city | highway 30% | 70% Distance traveled (mi) 1,462 Percent of total distance traveled 16% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 Number of trips 568 Percent of trips city | highway 75% | 25% Distance traveled (mi)

77

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50 50 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 22 Total number of trips 730 Total distance traveled (mi) 9,164 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 40 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 61 Number of trips 225 Percent of trips city | highway 68% | 32% Distance traveled (mi) 1,768 Percent of total distance traveled 19% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 53 Number of trips 40 Percent of trips city | highway 23% | 78% Distance traveled (mi) 1,638 Percent of total distance traveled 18% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35 Number of trips 465 Percent of trips city | highway 70% | 30% Distance traveled (mi)

78

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

53 53 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 34 Total number of trips 1,515 Total distance traveled (mi) 15,617 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 37 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 65 Number of trips 739 Percent of trips city | highway 74% | 26% Distance traveled (mi) 4,915 Percent of total distance traveled 31% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 38 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 58 Number of trips 93 Percent of trips city | highway 38% | 62% Distance traveled (mi) 2,842 Percent of total distance traveled 18% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 33 Number of trips 683 Percent of trips city | highway 72% | 28% Distance traveled (mi)

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - america field trip Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tour 2012 You have heard of the immense biodiversity of Central America... banding and ecotourism activities. After travel to Nicaragua, the trip will start off in Finca de...

80

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Trip Prediction and Route-Based Vehicle Energy Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about trip prediction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect foraging-trip duration Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with mean foraging... ;Thompson et al. 1045 1998 NRC Canada foraging-trip duration (Boyd et al. 1994), it is not clear whether... foraging within traditional foraging areas....

82

IMPROVING THE ROBUSTNESS OF FUZZY LOGIC ATM ABR RATE CONTROL FOR LARGE ROUND TRIP TIMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVING THE ROBUSTNESS OF FUZZY LOGIC ATM ABR RATE CONTROL FOR LARGE ROUND TRIP TIMES Lachlan L in the presence of a large round trip time (RTT). A simple fuzzy logic controller was recently shown to perform. In recent years, fuzzy logic [4,5] has shown promise in the control of complex systems, and several fuzzy

Andrew, Lachlan

83

Danyi Wang and Dr. Lance Sherry 1 Trend Analysis of Airline Passenger Trip Delays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metrics. Researchers have shown that flight-based metrics do not accurately reflect the passenger trip by a combination of different factors such as traffic volume and weather condition, disruptions (flight delays shown that flight-based performance metrics do not accurately reflect the passenger trip experience [3

84

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Learn more about the summer course which includes a 3 week trip to South Africa. The program an introduction to the historical and the con- temporary South Africa as well as at least one post trip meeting@binghamton.edu or Josephine Allen at jaallen@binghamton.edu. Destination South Africa - Summer Course 2012 February 28th

Suzuki, Masatsugu

85

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

74 74 Number of trips 399 Distance traveled (mi) 148 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 73% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 6.3 Average Stops per mile 35.5 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 11% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 423 Number of trips 27 Distance traveled (mi) 54 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 27% Average Trip Distance (mi) 2.0 Average Driving Speed (mph) 20.7 Average Stops per mile 3.5 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 0 Number of trips 0 Distance traveled (mi) 0 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 0% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.0 Average Driving Speed (mph)

86

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Number of trips 493 Distance traveled (mi) 189 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 38% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 4.9 Average Stops per mile 28.7 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 377 Number of trips 67 Distance traveled (mi) 275 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 56% Average Trip Distance (mi) 4.1 Average Driving Speed (mph) 17.9 Average Stops per mile 3.7 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 438 Number of trips 1 Distance traveled (mi) 29 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 6% Average Trip Distance (mi) 28.7 Average Driving Speed (mph)

87

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

505 505 Number of trips 601 Distance traveled (mi) 245 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 62% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 5.4 Average Stops per mile 34.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 373 Number of trips 35 Distance traveled (mi) 124 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 31% Average Trip Distance (mi) 3.5 Average Driving Speed (mph) 23.0 Average Stops per mile 3.7 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 319 Number of trips 3 Distance traveled (mi) 25 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 6% Average Trip Distance (mi) 8.5 Average Driving Speed (mph)

88

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

613 613 Number of trips 89 Distance traveled (mi) 9 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 30% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.1 Average Driving Speed (mph) 7.0 Average Stops per mile 44.5 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 9% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 487 Number of trips 8 Distance traveled (mi) 5 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 16% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.6 Average Driving Speed (mph) 25.0 Average Stops per mile 3.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 6% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 487 Number of trips 7 Distance traveled (mi) 16 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 54% Average Trip Distance (mi) 2.3 Average Driving Speed (mph)

89

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Number of trips 1,610 Distance traveled (mi) 372 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 72% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.2 Average Driving Speed (mph) 5.2 Average Stops per mile 32.1 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 383 Number of trips 114 Distance traveled (mi) 144 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 28% Average Trip Distance (mi) 1.3 Average Driving Speed (mph) 18.3 Average Stops per mile 3.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 16% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 549 Number of trips 5 Distance traveled (mi) 2 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 0% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph)

90

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

530 530 Number of trips 1,308 Distance traveled (mi) 495 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 69% Average Trip Distance (mi) 0.4 Average Driving Speed (mph) 5.6 Average Stops per mile 31.4 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 15% City Trips ( < 5 stops/mile & <37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 471 Number of trips 91 Distance traveled (mi) 175 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 24% Average Trip Distance (mi) 1.9 Average Driving Speed (mph) 16.6 Average Stops per mile 3.8 Percent of Regen Braking Energy Recovery (%) 13% Highway Trips ( 37 mph avg) DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 357 Number of trips 2 Distance traveled (mi) 49 Percent of total distance traveled (%) 7% Average Trip Distance (mi) 24.7 Average Driving Speed (mph)

91

Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February 25 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thursday, February 25 Thursday, February 25 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Thursday, February 25 February 25, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Today, Secretary Chu was in Doha, Qatar, where he began the day by signing a Memorandum of Understanding on Renewable and Alternative Energy with Deputy Prime Minister and Energy & Industry Minister Abdullah bin Hamad Al-Attiyah. The agreement provides a framework for bilateral cooperation with the Ministry and other Qatari institutions on clean energy innovation. He then met with Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber Al Thani. In the afternoon, the Secretary participated in a roundtable focused on renewable energy, hosted by the Qatar National Food Security Program. He then traveled to the Qatar Science and Technology Park (QSTP) where he

92

Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Tuesday, February 23 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tuesday, February 23 Tuesday, February 23 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Tuesday, February 23 February 23, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Today, Secretary Chu visited King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia, on the Red Sea coast near Jeddah. His host was Saudi Minister of Petroleum and Minerals Ali Al Naimi, who is Chair of the KAUST Board of Trustees. KAUST is an international, graduate-level research university dedicated to science and technology that opened in September of 2009. The Secretary received a briefing on scientific work underway at the university from Professor Choon Fong Shih, President of KAUST, faculty members and students. Secretary Chu emphasized the Administration's commitment to science and to the development of renewable sources of energy. He quizzed members of the

93

Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Wednesday, February 24 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wednesday, February 24 Wednesday, February 24 Readout of Secretary Chu's Middle East trip: Wednesday, February 24 February 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Today, Secretary Chu was in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates, where he affirmed the commitment of the United States to building a close relationship with the UAE on clean energy issues. He began the day with a meeting with the Minister of Energy for UAE, Mohammed bin Dha'en el Hamili. He then signed an Implementing Agreement on nuclear energy and nonproliferation with UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Dr. Anwar Gargash. The Secretary traveled to the offices of the Masdar Initiative to discuss the work the initiative is doing to diversify the UAE economy and develop global leadership in alternative energy. He was hosted by Dr.

94

Visibility Distance of Pedestrians  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... actual experiment the distance at which the driver of a motor vehicle can see a pedestrian who is walking along the side of a highway at night. The tests are ... Inst., March). The principal conclusions arrived at are that the visibility of a pedestrian walking along a highway at night is increased by roughly 50 per cent by showing ...

1935-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Early embryonic lethality caused by targeted disruption of the TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) gene  

SciTech Connect

Tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR)-associated factors (TRAFs) are key adaptor molecules in the TNFR-signaling complexes that promote a wide variety of signaling cascades including cell proliferation, activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. TRAF-interacting protein (TRIP) is required for the inhibitory regulation of TNF-induced NF-{kappa}B signaling via the TNFR/TRAF-signaling complexes in vitro. TRIP also directly interacts with the familial cylindromatosis tumor suppressor gene (CYLD) and negatively regulates NF-{kappa}B activation in vitro. However, although there appears to be a relationship between TRIP, the TRAFs and also CYLD as modulators of NF-{kappa}B signaling in vitro, the functional role of TRIP in vivo is still unclear. To identify the role of TRIP in vivo, we have generated TRIP-deficient mice. Homozygous mouse embryos were found to die shortly after implantation due to proliferation defects and excessive cell death. These results indicate that TRIP is an essential factor during early mouse embryonic development in vivo.

Park, Eui-Soon; Choi, Seunga [Department of Microbiology and BK21 BioBC, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); RCTCP, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin-Man [Department of Pathology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yongsu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang-Sik [RCTCP, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yongwon [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Rho, Jaerang [Department of Microbiology and BK21 BioBC, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); RCTCP, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jrrho@cnu.ac.kr

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 148 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 104 Total number of trips 1,212 Total distance traveled (mi) 11,846 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 58 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 160 Number of trips 823 Percent of trips city | highway 81% | 19% Distance traveled (mi) 5,559 Percent of total distance traveled 47% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 46 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 85 Number of trips 195 Percent of trips city | highway 40% | 61% Distance traveled (mi) 4,217 Percent of total distance traveled 36% Trips in Charge Sustaining (CS) mode Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 Number of trips

97

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 64 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 31 Total number of trips 831 Total distance traveled (mi) 7,559 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 54 Number of trips 541 Percent of trips city | highway 79% | 21% Distance traveled (mi) 3,402 Percent of total distance traveled 45%

98

_MainReportPerVehicle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 45 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 22 Total number of trips 1,585 Total distance traveled (mi) 14,910 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 49 Number of trips 883 Percent of trips city | highway 81% | 19% Distance traveled (mi) 4,778 Percent of total distance traveled 32%

99

DOE Solar Decathlon: Tuskegee University: Going the Distance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuskegee University house on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., during Solar Decathlon 2002. Tuskegee University house on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., during Solar Decathlon 2002. Enlarge image The Tuskegee Solar Decathlon team got its inspiration from traditional Southern architecture, which relies on passive cooling strategies such as the dogtrot, a central shaded breezeway that runs through the house. (Credit: Paul Norton/U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon) Who: Tuskegee University What: Solar house Where: Tuskegee University 1200 W. Montgomery Road Tuskegee, AL 36088 Map This House Public tours: Not available Solar Decathlon 2002 Tuskegee University: Going the Distance Tuskegee University students successfully overcame funding and time limitations to make the trip to Washington, D.C., for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2002. Now, with time back on its side, the

100

Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts Secretary Chu Postpones China Trip to Continue Work on BP Oil Spill Response Efforts May 21, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington DC -- Energy Secretary Steven Chu will postpone a trip to China, scheduled for next week, at the request of President Obama and stay in the country to continue his work on response efforts to the BP oil spill. "Finding a solution to this crisis is a matter of national importance," Secretary Chu said. "I want to continue to play a role in assisting in the efforts and stopping this leak as soon as possible." Secretary Chu was originally scheduled to visit Beijing and Shanghai and discuss further progress on bilateral clean energy cooperation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip U.S. Energy Secretary Bodman Completes Middle East Trip November 20, 2005 - 2:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman concluded his four-nation swing through the Middle East this weekend, by attending the inauguration of the New Permanent Headquarter Office Building of the International Energy Forum (IEF) Secretariat and participating in a number of bilateral meetings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. "This trip allowed me to meet face-to-face with leaders of energy-producing nations and discuss with them the energy goals and needs of the United States," Secretary Bodman said. "Especially in the aftermath of the hurricanes in the Gulf of Mexico this year, we recognize how important it

102

Microstructure-Based Computational Modeling of TRIP Steels with Dispersed Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this study. The ideas surrounding the behavior of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels and particle reinforced composites are combined and investigated. A finite element model (FEM) is created to investigate the effects of dispersed ceramic...

Diaz, Sara Cristina

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

DISTANCES TO DARK CLOUDS: COMPARING EXTINCTION DISTANCES TO MASER PARALLAX DISTANCES  

SciTech Connect

We test two different methods of using near-infrared extinction to estimate distances to dark clouds in the first quadrant of the Galaxy using large near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey) surveys. Very long baseline interferometry parallax measurements of masers around massive young stars provide the most direct and bias-free measurement of the distance to these dark clouds. We compare the extinction distance estimates to these maser parallax distances. We also compare these distances to kinematic distances, including recent re-calibrations of the Galactic rotation curve. The extinction distance methods agree with the maser parallax distances (within the errors) between 66% and 100% of the time (depending on method and input survey) and between 85% and 100% of the time outside of the crowded Galactic center. Although the sample size is small, extinction distance methods reproduce maser parallax distances better than kinematic distances; furthermore, extinction distance methods do not suffer from the kinematic distance ambiguity. This validation gives us confidence that these extinction methods may be extended to additional dark clouds where maser parallaxes are not available.

Foster, Jonathan B.; Jackson, James M. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Stead, Joseph J.; Hoare, Melvin G. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Benjamin, Robert A., E-mail: jbfoster@bu.edu, E-mail: jackson@bu.edu, E-mail: J.J.Stead@leeds.ac.uk, E-mail: mgh@ast.leeds.ac.uk, E-mail: benjamin@astro.wisc.edu [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin Whitewater, Whitewater, WI 53190 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

106

U.S. Secretary of Energy Concludes Successful Trip to Trinidad and Tobago |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successful Trip to Trinidad and Successful Trip to Trinidad and Tobago U.S. Secretary of Energy Concludes Successful Trip to Trinidad and Tobago May 13, 2008 - 12:00pm Addthis Visit continues bilateral efforts to advance energy security WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today concluded a visit to the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago focused on strengthening and expanding the two nations' strategic energy and economic relationship. The United States is Trinidad and Tobago's largest market for liquefied natural gas (LNG), importing nearly 60 percent of the LNG exported from the country. As such, the country plays an integral role in advancing the Bush Administration's strategy to ensure safe, reliable, clean and diverse energy supplies in the United States. "The United States is proud of its relationship with a strong and open

107

Secretary Chu to Visit Google Headquarters During Trip to San Francisco |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Google Headquarters During Trip to San Google Headquarters During Trip to San Francisco Secretary Chu to Visit Google Headquarters During Trip to San Francisco October 21, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - During a visit to San Francisco tomorrow, Friday, Oct. 22, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit Google, Inc. headquarters to participate in a fireside chat with company employees to discuss the Obama Administration's vision for a clean and renewable energy economy. While at Google, Secretary Chu will also participate in a series of briefings with company researchers and scientists to learn more about the company's innovative ventures in the energy sector. WHAT: U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to participate in fireside chat at Google, Inc. WHEN: Friday, October 22, 2010

108

Google+ virtual field trip: "Vehicle Electrification" (11/18/13) | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Google+ virtual field trip: "Vehicle Electrification" (11/18/13) Google+ virtual field trip: "Vehicle Electrification" (11/18/13) Share Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Electric drive technology Browse By - Any - Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Powertrain research --Building design ---Construction --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Solar energy --Fossil fuels ---Natural Gas --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ---Reactors -Energy usage --Energy storage ---Batteries ----Lithium-ion batteries ----Lithium-air batteries --Electricity transmission --Smart Grid Environment -Biology --Computational biology --Environmental biology

109

Climbing the cosmological distance ladder  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......knowledge of cosmological distance - towards redshift 1000! Humankind's efforts to measure the distances of the planets, stars...the epoch when matter and radiation finally decoupled at the end of the hot Big Bang phase. Apparently we have reached a precision......

Michael Rowan-Robinson

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

2008 ITE Data Collection Project Proposal Project Type: Outdoor Sport Field Trip and Parking Generation Data Collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 ITE Data Collection Project Proposal Project Type: Outdoor Sport Field Trip and Parking Generation Data Collection The Portland State University ITE Chapter proposes to collect multimodal trip and parking generation data for an outdoor school sport field. This effort is intended to complement

Bertini, Robert L.

111

EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2011 Vehicle Usage Overall fuel economy (mpg) 131 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 271 Number of trips 13,819 Total distance traveled (mi) 108,115 Avg trip...

112

PORT LIONS RURAL TRIP 2010, A. KAILING & L. WOOD Who are you? We are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PORT LIONS RURAL TRIP 2010, A. KAILING & L. WOOD Who are you? We are graduate students to and accommodate them. What did you learn? We learned that the Native population in Port Lions are Alutiiq visited Port Lions, a small village on the Northwest coast of Kodiak Island. What did you do? Amanda

Pantaleone, Jim

113

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1" Bill Bottom 2 Alex Young 3 of conventional thermal (fossil fuel and nuclear), geo- thermal, wind and solar power plants. There are several be dependent on conventional thermal power plants to generate electricity. These power plants are powered

Standiford, Richard B.

114

Performance of Fuzzy Logic ABR Rate Control with Large Round Trip Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Fuzzy Logic ABR Rate Control with Large Round Trip Times KUAN Su-Hsien and Lachlan L hip times (R`ITs), which can cause instability in control algorithms. A brief review of fuzzy logic of B recently pm- posed funy logic controller for ABR with a simple thresholdbased scheme in this case

Andrew, Lachlan

115

Field Trips Biosphere 2 ~ Where Science Lives! (9:30--4:00)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and their impacts on carbon, water, and energy cycling. The trip will continue to Oracle State Park (http, and sustainable ecosystem function provide additional topics for discussion. Traveling by van, our stops include), locations associated with the `virtual fence' SBInet, and the U.S. / Mexico border wall. We will also talk

116

Acceptance test procedure for removal of CS1K circuit switcher block and trip schemes  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document provides a detailed process to test the functions of the circuit switcher, protective relays, alarms, SCADA and 125VDC control logic of 115kV and 13.8kV systems at B3S4 substation following the removal of trip and blocking schemes to Transformer No.1 Circuit Switcher B594.

HACHE, J.M.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Google+ Virtual Field Trip on Vehicle Electrification at Argonne National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Don't miss this exclusive peek into the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. Attendees will meet three researchers who will explain a different phase of vehicle electrification research. This field trip is very similar to the tou

118

Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the public for so long the narrative of his trips to the Gaboon and the Congo. Moreover, as he says himself, Africa moves so slowly, that ten years makes ... the region with which it is concerned; the German African Society have taken up the Congo district as a point de dpart for the interior, and although the expedition sent ...

1875-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sambhav Nepal On this trip, we will be working with Sambhav Nepal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sambhav Nepal On this trip, we will be working with Sambhav Nepal. Their current mission is to achieve grassroots reforms in educational and health infrastructure in the villages of Gorkha, Nepal, so is a government-run secondary school where you might be running classes. Sambhav Nepal has been running some

Blennerhassett, Peter

120

Flow Distances on Open Flow Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks, are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. Flow distances (first-passage or total) between any given two nodes $i$ and $j$ are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from $i$ to $j$ under some conditions. They apparently deviate from the conventional random walk distance on a closed directed graph because they consider the openness of the flow network. Flow distances are explicitly expressed by underlying Markov matrix of a flow system in this paper. With this novel theoretical conception, we can visualize open flow networks, calculating centrality of each node, and clustering nodes into groups. We apply fl...

Guo, Liangzhu; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 111 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 71 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Wh/mi) 61 Total number of trips 1,135 Total distance traveled (mi) 4,408 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 22 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 296 Number of trips 264 Percent of trips city | highway 100% | 0% Distance traveled (mi) 781 Percent of total distance traveled 18% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 19 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 141 Number of trips 44 Percent of trips city | highway 96% | 4% Distance traveled CD | CS (mi) 333 | 389 Percent of total distance traveled CD | CS

122

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi)¹ 93 Overall DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi)² 71 Overall DC electrical energy captured from regenerative braking (DC Wh/mi) 40 Total number of trips 11,047 Total distance traveled (mi) 119,879 Trips in Charge Depleting (CD) mode³ Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 25 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 208 Number of trips 4,491 Percent of trips city | highway 92% | 8% Distance traveled (mi) 30,376 Percent of total distance traveled 25% Trips in both Charge Depleting & Charge Sustaining (CD/CS) modes Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 22 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Wh/mi) 71 Number of trips 1,352 Percent of trips city | highway 69% | 31% Distance traveled CD | CS (mi) 12,772 | 20,001 Percent of total distance traveled CD | CS

123

Commute trip reduction in Washington: Base year worksite characteristics and programs  

SciTech Connect

Employers in Washington`s eight most populous counties are engaged in an effort to reduce their employees` use of single occupant automobiles for commuting. This report documents the status of those employers at the beginning of the Commute Trip Reduction (CTR) program as a basis for evaluating the impacts of the program. The first section provides a brief exploration of the Washington CTR Law and a history of the first steps in its implementation. The second section presents a summary of the characteristics of the worksites affected by the law. The CTR Law calls for reductions in single occupant vehicle (SOV) commuting and in vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The third section of this report presents baseline measurements of SOV and VMT and goals for reducing them. The fourth section provides summary information on the first year of programs employers planned to implement. The final section very briefly outlines actions the Commute Trip Reduction law calls for between 1995 and 1999.

Dodds, D.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PAYMENT INFORMATION There are several fees that are part of participating in the DOC First Year Trips Program for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, provide organic cotton t-shirts for our participants, and use bio-diesel fuel for busses during Trips organic food during the program, provide organic cotton t-shirts for our participants, and use bio-diesel

Lotko, William

125

Revealing cyclic hardening mechanism of a TRIP steel by real-time in situ neutron diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Real-time in situ neutron diffraction was performed on a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel under cyclic loading at room temperature. By Rietveld refinement and single peak analysis, the volume fraction and average stress estimates as well as dislocation density of individual phases (austenite and martensite phase) were derived. The results reveal that the volume fraction of martensite phase, instead of individual phase strengthening, should be accounted for the remarkable secondary cyclic hardening.

Yu, Dunji [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Chen, Yan [ORNL; Chen, Xu [Tianjin UNiversity, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Assess Employee Awareness of Alternative Commuting and Trip-Reduction Programs for Greenhouse Gas Profile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

For evaluating a greenhouse gas (GHG) profile, success can be measured by employee awareness and use of commuting alternatives and trip-reduction efforts. Efforts include guaranteed ride home programs, and showers for walkers and bicyclists. Low use or awareness of an option, combined with a high willingness to use an option, such as teleworking, may suggest the need to improve communications about available alternatives.

127

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locatingdominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater[186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locatingtotal dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

129

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

130

Trip Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Department of Energy 2013 Annual Inspection - Piqua, OH, Decommissioned Reactor Site Department of Energy 2013 Annual Inspection - Piqua, OH, Decommissioned Reactor Site June 2013 Page 1 2013 Annual Inspection and Radiological Survey Results for the Piqua, Ohio, Decommissioned Reactor Site Summary The former Piqua Nuclear Power Facility (PNPF), a decommissioned nuclear power demonstration facility, was inspected on April 18, 2013. The site, located on the east bank of the Great Miami River in Piqua, Ohio, is in good physical condition. There is no requirement for a

131

Trip Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois May 2013 Page 1 2013 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Summary Site A/Plot M was inspected on April 10, 2013. The site, located within a county forest preserve with significant tree and grass cover, was in good condition. No cause for a follow-up inspection was identified. Erosion on top of the grass covered mound at Plot M continues to be a concern. Bike traffic produces ruts which if left unfixed grow and threaten the protectiveness of the soil cover on top of the mound. In 2010 ANL personnel repaired two areas at Plot M by filling in the ruts with clean top soil and re-seeding. In 2012, additional repairs were made by ANL personnel. Three-

132

Trip Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

to be used to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of site maintenance activities. Oil and gas exploration activity around the site continues to increase. A new drilling pad...

133

The jet kinetic power, distance and inclination of GRS 1915+105  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a recently developed technique of calculating the minimum jet kinetic power to the major mass ejections of the black-hole binary GRS 1915+105 observed in radio wavelengths in 1994 and 1997. We derive for them the distance-dependent minimum power, the mass flow rate, the total energy content and the total mass. We find that a very fast increase of the jet power with the increasing distance combined with a known relation between the jet kinetic power and luminosity imply the source distance is 9 kpc.

Zdziarski, Andrzej A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

21 briefing pages total  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

135

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

136

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

137

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

139

"Climate change in Massachusetts: What would Henry say?" A field trip-based course for Fall 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Syllabus "Climate change in Massachusetts: What would Henry say?" A field trip-based course and animals of Massachusetts, and his records are now being used to document the reality of climate change. If Thoreau were alive today, he could readily observe the impacts of climate change and other human

Guenther, Frank

140

Engineering Student YouTube Contest! Enter to win a trip to Ottawa to meet the leaders of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clearly: "Why I want to be a Consulting Engineer". Creativity and presentation skills will be taken1 Engineering Student YouTube Contest! Enter to win a trip to Ottawa to meet the leaders of the Canadian consulting engineering industry! How It Works 1. Become a fan of the Association of Consulting

Thompson, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Scattering theory without large-distance asymptotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In conventional scattering theory, to obtain an explicit result, one imposes a precondition that the distance between target and observer is infinite. With the help of this precondition, one can asymptotically replace the Hankel function and the Bessel function with the sine functions so that one can achieve an explicit result. Nevertheless, after such a treatment, the information of the distance between target and observer is inevitably lost. In this paper, we show that such a precondition is not necessary: without losing any information of distance, one can still obtain an explicit result of a scattering rigorously. In other words, we give an rigorous explicit scattering result which contains the information of distance between target and observer. We show that at a finite distance, a modification factor --- the Bessel polynomial --- appears in the scattering amplitude, and, consequently, the cross section depends on the distance, the outgoing wave-front surface is no longer a sphere, and, besides the phase...

Liu, Tong; Dai, Wu-Sheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Optical distance measurement device and method thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method of efficiently obtaining distance measurements of a target. A modulated optical beam may be used to determine the distance to the target. A first beam splitter may be used to split the optical beam and a second beam splitter may be used to recombine a reference beam with a return ranging beam. An optical mixing detector may be used in a receiver to efficiently detect distance measurement information.

Bowers, Mark W. (Patterson, CA)

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8.2 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 157 Average Trip Distance 12.3 Total distance traveled (mi) 407,245 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 67.9 Electric...

145

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

70.1 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 169 Average Trip Distance 12.3 Total distance traveled (mi) 2,817,365 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 62.4 Electric...

146

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

147

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

148

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

149

11-08-10 7:28 AMSouth Africa trip gives students hope -Canstar Page 1 of 3http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?expire=&title=South+Afric...es%2Fsouwester%2FSouth-Africa-trip-gives-students-hope-127332108.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11-08-10 7:28 AMSouth Africa trip gives students hope - Canstar Page 1 of 3http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?expire=&title=South right) are among the students pictured during a recent visit to South Africa. A police officer's desire for social justice!prompted a recent trip to South Africa to learn about racial segregation and living

Martin, Jeff

150

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

151

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

153

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

154

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

155

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

Scattering theory without large-distance asymptotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In conventional scattering theory, to obtain an explicit result, one imposes a precondition that the distance between target and observer is infinite. With the help of this precondition, one can asymptotically replace the Hankel function and the Bessel function with the sine functions so that one can achieve an explicit result. Nevertheless, after such a treatment, the information of the distance between target and observer is inevitably lost. In this paper, we show that such a precondition is not necessary: without losing any information of distance, one can still obtain an explicit result of a scattering rigorously. In other words, we give an rigorous explicit scattering result which contains the information of distance between target and observer. We show that at a finite distance, a modification factor --- the Bessel polynomial --- appears in the scattering amplitude, and, consequently, the cross section depends on the distance, the outgoing wave-front surface is no longer a sphere, and, besides the phase shift, there is an additional phase (the argument of the Bessel polynomial) appears in the scattering wave function.

Tong Liu; Wen-Du Li; Wu-Sheng Dai

2014-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

158

Distance transforms on anisotropic surfaces for surface roughness measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Distance Transform on Curved Space (DTOCS) calculates distances along a gray-level height map surface In this article, the DTOCS is generalized for surfaces represented as real altitude data in an anisotropic grid The distance transform combined ...

Leena Ikonen; Toni Kuparinen; Eduardo Villanueva; Pekka Toivanen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

160

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geodesic distances in Liouville quantum gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to study the quantum geometry of random surfaces in Liouville gravity, we propose a definition of geodesic distance associated to a Gaussian free field on a regular lattice. This geodesic distance is used to numerically determine the Hausdorff dimension associated to shortest cycles of 2d quantum gravity on the torus coupled to conformal matter fields, showing agreement with a conjectured formula by Y. Watabiki. Finally, the numerical tools are put to test by quantitatively comparing the distribution of lengths of shortest cycles to the corresponding distribution in large random triangulations.

Jan Ambjorn; Timothy Budd

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Luminosity Distance in Perturbed FLRW Spacetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive an expression for the luminosity distance in FLRW spacetimes affected by scalar perturbations. Our expression is complete to linear order and is expressed entirely in terms of standard cosmological parameters and observational quantities. We illustrate the result by calculating the RMS scatter in the usual luminosity distance in flat (Omega_m,Omega_Lambda) = (1.0,0.0) and (0.3,0.7) cosmologies. In both cases the scatter is appreciable at high redshifts, and rises above 11% at z = 2, where it may be the dominant noise term in the Hubble diagram based on SN Ia.

Ted Pyne; Mark Birkinshaw

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

163

Distances toDistances to HVCsHVCs usingusing blue horizontal branch starsblue horizontal branch stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

)(Wisconsin) ElseElse StarkenburgStarkenburg ((KapteynKapteyn Lab)Lab) Lucy Frey (Case)Lucy Frey (Case) andand)Mario Mateo (Michigan) Heather Morrison (Case)Heather Morrison (Case) John Norris (MSSSO)John Norris (MSSSODan OravetzOravetz, Lucy Frey (Case), Lucy Frey (Case) #12;Distances are important:Distances are important

Peletier, Reynier

164

TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND ALTRUISM: ROLE OF POWER DISTANCE IN A HIGH POWER DISTANCE CULTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a sample of 105 manager-subordinate dyads from a high power distance culture, the effects of power distance and transformational leadership on follower altruism were studied. Findings show a significant positive relationship between power distance and transformational leadership and between transformational leadership and follower altruism. The dimensions on which cultures differ have been identified earlier (Hofstede, 1980). The objective of this study is to look at the effect of a dimension on other variables, in a culture that is high on that dimension. Our contention is that in cultures that score high on the power distance dimension of Hofstede (1980) model, if managers maintain a high power distance between themselves and their followers, their transformational leadership would be enhanced, and transformational leadership in turn will enhance altruistic behavior of followers. Merely knowing the dimensions on which cultures differ is not enough. That knowledge has to be used to predict how an alignment with that dimension would affect other variables.

Ankush Punj; Venkat R. Krishnan

165

The Protection of Pharmaceutical Patents and Data under TRIPS and US-Jordan FTA: Exploring the Limits of Obligations and Flexibilities: A Study of the Impacts on the Pharmaceutical Sector in Jordan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 2000, Jordan signed the Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (the TRIPS Agreement) and a free trade agreement with the US (USJFTA). (more)

Abughanm, Saad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

167

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

168

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

169

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

170

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

171

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

172

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

173

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

174

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

175

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

176

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

177

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

178

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

179

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

180

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

182

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

183

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

184

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

185

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

186

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

187

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

188

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

189

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

190

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

191

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

192

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

193

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

194

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

195

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

196

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

197

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

198

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

199

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

200

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

202

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

203

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

204

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

205

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

206

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

207

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

208

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

209

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

210

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

211

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

212

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

213

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

214

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

215

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

216

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

217

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

218

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

219

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

220

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

222

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

223

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

224

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

225

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

226

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

227

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

228

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

229

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

230

Sensor Network Localization, Euclidean Distance Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paper is to view SNL as a (nearest) Euclidean Distance Matrix, EDM, completion problem that ... simply corresponds to a given fixed clique for the graph of the EDM problem. We next ...... The tests were done using MATLAB 7.4. The method for...

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nucleon - Nucleon Interactions at Short Distances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite the progress made in understanding the NN interactions at long distances based on effective field theories, the understanding of the dynamics of short range NN interactions remains as elusive as ever. One of the most fascinating properties of short range interaction is its repulsive nature which is responsible for the stability of strongly interacting matter. The relevant distances, $\\le 0.5$ fm, in this case are such that one expects the onset of quark-gluon degrees of freedom with interaction being dominated by QCD dynamics. We review the current status of the understanding of the QCD dynamics of NN interactions at short distances, highlight outstanding questions and outline the theoretical foundation of QCD description of hard NN processes. We present examples of how the study of the hard elastic NN interaction can reveal the symmetry structure of valence quark component of the nucleon wave function and how the onset of pQCD regime is correlated with the onset of color transparency phenomena in hard $pp$ scattering in the nuclear medium. The discussions show how the new experimental facilities can help to advance the knowledge about the QCD nature of nuclear forces at short distances.

Misak M Sargsian

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fuzzy prototype model and semantic distance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a challenge to provide an intelligent product suggestion for these new customers without previous shopping records in the supermarket application. To solve such a problem, we design a hybrid fuzzy expert system for recommendation using the improved ... Keywords: Fuzzy c means, Fuzzy decision tree, Fuzzy prototype, Recommendation system, Semantic coordinate, Semantic distance

Dong (Walter) Xie; Jim F. Baldwin

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Earth Mover's Distance Based Local Discriminant Basis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth Mover's Distance Based Local Discriminant Basis Bradley Marchand and Naoki Saito Abstract in time and frequency. Its goal, given Bradley Marchand Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division, e-mail: bradley.marchand@navy.mil Naoki Saito Department of Mathematics, University of California

Saito, Naoki

234

EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE MATRIX COMPLETION PROBLEMS June ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 6, 2010 ... This is sometimes called the energy function (e.g., [6, 7]). Note that ... the specified entries are from the measurement of interatomic distances, mostly the ..... If hij = 1 for i, j = 1,...,n (i.e., unit weights), then (5.3) simplifies to n. ?.

2010-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Distance Education Graduate Program in Environmental Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management, related to water quality, climate change, ecosystem restoration, and public health. Research Remediation 3) Carbon Dynamics and Ecosystem Services 4) Wetlands and Aquatic Ecosystems 5) Landscape Analysis, range lands, urban lands, wetlands or aquatic systems. This distance education track is designed

Ma, Lena

236

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 175 Average Trip Distance 12.2 Total distance traveled (mi) 272,366 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 54.1 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 368 Distance traveled (mi) 129,389 Percent of total distance traveled 47.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 75% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.0 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 142,977 Percent of total distance traveled 52.4% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 77% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 65.1% 31.1% Percent Number of trips 85.5% 14.5% Average trip distance (mi)

237

MonthlyReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4.8 4.8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 185 Average Trip Distance 13.1 Total distance traveled (mi) 208,165 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 77.6 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 369 Distance traveled (mi) 104,687 Percent of total distance traveled 50.3% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 87% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 37.2 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 103,478 Percent of total distance traveled 49.7% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 82% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 69.8% 33.9% Percent Number of trips 85.0% 15.0% Average trip distance (mi)

238

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.5 2.5 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 166 Average Trip Distance 12.1 Total distance traveled (mi) 385,849 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 78.2 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 332 Distance traveled (mi) 193,336 Percent of total distance traveled 50.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 85% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.2 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 192,512 Percent of total distance traveled 49.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 79% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 67.2% 31.5% Percent Number of trips 86.7% 13.3% Average trip distance (mi)

239

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7.8 7.8 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 180 Average Trip Distance 12.8 Total distance traveled (mi) 346,409 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 51.5 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 384 Distance traveled (mi) 161,982 Percent of total distance traveled 46.8% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 74% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.1 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 184,427 Percent of total distance traveled 53.2% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 76% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 63.8% 28.4% Percent Number of trips 85.7% 14.3% Average trip distance (mi)

240

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 174 Average Trip Distance 12.6 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,243,988 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 63.2 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 352 Distance traveled (mi) 615,161 Percent of total distance traveled 49.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 80% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.4 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 628,828 Percent of total distance traveled 50.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 78% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 66.8% 31.7% Percent Number of trips 85.5% 14.5% Average trip distance (mi)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

71.0 71.0 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 169 Average Trip Distance 12.5 Total distance traveled (mi) 1,661,080 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 67.1 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 340 Distance traveled (mi) 826,775 Percent of total distance traveled 49.8% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 81% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.7 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 834,306 Percent of total distance traveled 50.2% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 78% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 66.9% 31.6% Percent Number of trips 85.8% 14.2% Average trip distance (mi)

242

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 170 Average Trip Distance 12.4 Total distance traveled (mi) 2,041,556 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 64.4 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 345 Distance traveled (mi) 1,002,495 Percent of total distance traveled 49.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 80% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.9 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 1,039,061 Percent of total distance traveled 50.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 78% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 66.2% 31.0% Percent Number of trips 86.0% 14.0% Average trip distance (mi)

243

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1.1 1.1 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 182 Average Trip Distance 11.8 Total distance traveled (mi) 355,058 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 46.0 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 416 Distance traveled (mi) 155,080 Percent of total distance traveled 43.7% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 69% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 34.4 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 199,978 Percent of total distance traveled 56.3% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 74% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 60.5% 27.0% Percent Number of trips 86.3% 13.7% Average trip distance (mi)

244

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.6 6.6 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 171 Average Trip Distance 11.9 Total distance traveled (mi) 370,316 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 53.8 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 371 Distance traveled (mi) 170,860 Percent of total distance traveled 46.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 75% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 35.9 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 199,456 Percent of total distance traveled 53.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 77% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 63.2% 28.1% Percent Number of trips 86.7% 13.3% Average trip distance (mi)

245

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 157 Average Trip Distance 12.3 Total distance traveled (mi) 407,245 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 67.9 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 338 Distance traveled (mi) 189,426 Percent of total distance traveled 46.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 82% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.5 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 217,819 Percent of total distance traveled 53.5% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 79% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 65.2% 28.3% Percent Number of trips 86.5% 13.5% Average trip distance (mi)

246

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73.7 73.7 Overall AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 170 Average Trip Distance 12.6 Total distance traveled (mi) 370,987 Average Ambient Temperature (deg F) 71.0 Electric Vehicle mode operation (EV) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) No Fuel Used AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 341 Distance traveled (mi) 185,282 Percent of total distance traveled 49.9% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 83% Extended Range mode operation (ERM) Gasoline fuel economy (mpg) 36.9 AC electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) No Elec. Used Distance traveled (mi) 185,705 Percent of total distance traveled 50.1% Average driving style efficiency (distance weighted)¹ 79% City³ Highway³ Percent of miles in EV operation (%) 68.0% 32.4% Percent Number of trips 85.4% 14.6% Average trip distance (mi)

247

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

248

Long working distance incoherent interference microscope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A full-field imaging, long working distance, incoherent interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. A long working distance greater than 10 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-dimensional height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer while being actively probed, and, optionally, through a transparent window. An optically identical pair of sample and reference arm objectives is not required, which reduces the overall system cost, and also the cost and time required to change sample magnifications. Using a LED source, high magnification (e.g., 50.times.) can be obtained having excellent image quality, straight fringes, and high fringe contrast.

Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); De Boer, Maarten P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cosmic equation of state from combined angular diameter distances: Does the tension with luminosity distances exist?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a relatively complete observational data concerning four angular diameter distance (ADD) measurements and %synthetic combined SN+GRB observations representing current luminosity distance (LD) data, this paper investigates the %tension between compatibility of these two cosmological distances considering three classes of dark energy equation of state (EoS) reconstruction. In particular, we use strongly gravitationally lensed systems from various large systematic gravitational lens surveys and galaxy clusters, which yield the Hubble constant independent ratio between two angular diameter distances $D_{ls}/D_s$ data. Our results demonstrate that, with more general categories of standard ruler data, ADD and LD data are compatible at $1\\sigma$ level. Secondly, we note that consistency between ADD and LD data %are blind is maintained irrespective of the EoS parameterizations: there is a good match between the universally explored CPL model and other formulations of cosmic equation of state. Especially for the...

Cao, Shuo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

OFA2013_Storage@Distance.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC Storage Systems Group NERSC Storage Systems Group Storage at a Distance --- 1 --- Open F abrics A lliance U ser D ay What is storage at a distance? * Data i s n ot l ocal t o t he u ser/resource * Processing a nd w orkflow n eeds a re n ear r eal---7me - Don't w ant t o w ait u n9l d ata t ransfer i s c omplete - Need t o s ee r esults, m ake a djustments, a nd t ry a gain * Network w ill b ecome p art o f t he i nstruments - Telescopes a nd t heir d ata - Sequencers a nd t heir g enome d ata - Light s ources a nd t heir d ata * Is t here a n a rchitecture/protocol t hat i s n ecessary today for successfully providing storage at a distance? - Ethernet v s. I B - ROCE v s. R DMA v s. I P --- 2 --- Open F abrics A lliance U ser D ay Use case 1: Instruments (beam lines) * ShiB w ork ( 24hr c overage) - Scien9sts fl y i n a nd u se t he i nstrument

251

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

_MainReport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage Usage Overall fuel economy (mpg) 139 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Wh/mi) 293 Number of trips¹ 76,425 Total distance traveled (mi) 609,737 Avg trip distance (mi) 8.0 Avg distance traveled per day when the vehicle was driven (mi) 36.4 Avg number of trips between charging events 3.0 Avg distance traveled between charging events (mi) 24.1 Avg number of charging events per day when the vehicle was driven 1.5

253

Rank Distance Bicodes and their Generalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This book has four chapters. In chapter one we just recall the notion of RD codes, MRD codes, circulant rank codes and constant rank codes and describe their properties. In chapter two we introduce few new classes of codes and study some of their properties. In this chapter we introduce the notion of fuzzy RD codes and fuzzy RD bicodes. Rank distance m-codes are introduced in chapter three and the property of m-covering radius is analysed. Chapter four indicates some applications of these new classes of codes.

W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache; N. Suresh Babu; R. S. Selvaraj

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

254

Trip report to Stockholm, Sweden, 1-3 September 2008 Background. Sweden has a rich tradition of military and technological (for instance, one  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trip report to Stockholm, Sweden, 1-3 September 2008 Background. Sweden has a rich tradition and execution of peacekeeping and other non classified operations (indeed, Sweden has troops in Afghanistan and The Congo today; they lead the Baltic MDA effort). Sweden's relatively small size makes them forward leaning

255

SUMMER FUN & DAY TRIP IDEAS (2011 VERSION) SUMMER in New Haven is a great season with festivals, concerts, events on the Green,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, concerts, events on the Green, sports, outdoor activities and day trip opportunities in the area. Here and ticketed events, family events; ask for student tix discounts. Music on the New Haven Green bring a blanket & picnic for Free big name concerts on the Green.Saturday nights. Performers TBA in July. Norfolk Summer

256

EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Vehicle Usage Overall fuel economy (mpg) 136 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 222 Number of trips 286,682 Total distance traveled (mi) 2,392,509 Avg...

257

EV Project Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2012 Vehicle Usage Overall fuel economy (mpg) 139 Overall electrical energy consumption (AC Whmi) 293 Number of trips 76,425 Total distance traveled (mi) 609,737 Avg...

258

Preliminaries Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline Preliminaries Results Conclusion Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes.Rizzi@unitn.it August the 16th Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12 Guillaume Blin, Romeo Rizzi Conserved Interval Distance between Non-trivial Genomes #12;Outline

Blin, Guillaume

259

GEODESIC FRCHET DISTANCE WITH POLYGONAL OBSTACLES Atlas F. Cook IV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEODESIC FR?CHET DISTANCE WITH POLYGONAL OBSTACLES Atlas F. Cook IV Carola Wenk Abstract We present the first algorithm to compute the geodesic Fréchet distance between two polygonal curves in a plane of from a point source). This shortest path map supports geodesic distance queries from any point s ab

Texas at San Antonio, University of

260

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

262

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

263

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

264

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

265

Testing the consistency between cosmological measurements of distance and age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model independent method to test the consistency between cosmological measurements of distance and age, assuming the distance duality relation. We use type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations, and observational Hubble data, to reconstruct the luminosity distance D_L(z), the angle averaged distance D_V(z) and the Hubble rate H(z), using Gaussian processes regression technique. We obtain estimate of the distance duality relation in the redshift range 0.1

Nair, Remya; Jain, Deepak

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A NEW COSMOLOGICAL DISTANCE MEASURE USING ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect

Accurate distances to celestial objects are key to establishing the age and energy density of the universe and the nature of dark energy. A distance measure using active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been sought for more than 40 years, as they are extremely luminous and can be observed at very large distances. We report here the discovery of an accurate luminosity distance measure using AGNs. We use the tight relationship between the luminosity of an AGN and the radius of its broad-line region established via reverberation mapping to determine the luminosity distances to a sample of 38 AGNs. All reliable distance measures up to now have been limited to moderate redshift-AGNs will, for the first time, allow distances to be estimated to z {approx} 4, where variations of dark energy and alternate gravity theories can be probed.

Watson, D.; Denney, K. D.; Vestergaard, M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Oe (Denmark); Davis, T. M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

268

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

270

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

271

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sensitivity analysis on the effect of software-induced common cause failure probability in the computer-based reactor trip system unavailability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactor trip system has been digitized in advanced nuclear power plants, since the programmable nature of computer based systems has a number of advantages over non-programmable systems. However, software is still vulnerable to common cause failure (CCF). Residual software faults represent a CCF concern, which threat the implemented achievements. This study attempts to assess the effectiveness of so-called defensive strategies against software CCF with respect to reliability. Sensitivity analysis has been performed by re-quantifying the models upon changing the software failure probability. Importance measures then have been estimated in order to reveal the specific contribution of software CCF in the trip failure probability. The results reveal the importance and effectiveness of signal and software diversity as applicable strategies to ameliorate inefficiencies due to software CCF in the reactor trip system (RTS). No significant change has been observed in the rate of RTS failure probability for the basic software CCF greater than 1נ10?4. However, the related FussellVesley has been greater than 0.005, for the lower values. The study concludes that consideration of risk associated with the software based systems is a multi-variant function which requires compromising among them in more precise and comprehensive studies.

Shahabeddin Kamyab; Mohammadreza Nematollahi; Golnoush Shafiee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste

275

Geodesic Distance in Fisher Information Space and Holographic Entropy Formula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this short note, we examine geodesic distance in Fisher information space in which the metric is defined by the entanglement entropy in CFT_(1+1). It is obvious in this case that the geodesic distance at a constant time is a function of the entropy data embedded into the information space. In a special case, the geodesic equation can be solved analytically, and we find that the distance agrees well with the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Then, we can understand how the distance looks at the embeded quantum information. The result suggests that the Fisher metric is an efficient tool for constructing the holographic spacetime.

Hiroaki Matsueda

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geodesic Distance in Planar Graphs: An Integrable Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the enumeration of planar graphs using bijections with suitably decorated trees, which allow for keeping track of the geodesic distances between faces of the graph. The corresponding generating functions obey non-linear recursion relations on the geodesic distance. These are solved by use of stationary multi-soliton tau-functions of suitable reductions of the KP hierarchy. We obtain a unified formulation of the (multi-) critical continuum limit describing large graphs with marked points at large geodesic distances, and obtain integrable differential equations for the corresponding scaling functions. This provides a continuum formulation of two-dimensional quantum gravity, in terms of the geodesic distance.

P. Di Francesco

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Distance and overcurrent protection of feeders at distribution substation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ???Distance and Overcurrent Protection of Feeders at Distribution Substation??? report will discuss protection of distribution feeders at a substation. The paper will discuss the (more)

Chedid, Youssef Pierre

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

279

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

280

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

WIPP site and vicinity geological field trip. A report of a field trip to the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant project in Southeastern New Mexico, June 16 to 18, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Evaluation Group is conducting an assessment of the radiological health risks to people from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. As a part of this work, EEG is making an effort to improve the understanding of those geological issues concerning the WIPP site which may affect the radiological consequences of the proposed repository. One of the important geological issues to be resolved is the timing and the nature of the dissolution processes which may have affected the WIPP site. EEG organized a two-day conference of geological scientists, on January 17-18, 1980. On the basis of the January conference and the June field trip, EEG has formed the following conclusions: (1) it has not been clearly established that the site or the surrounding area has been attacked by deep dissolution to render it unsuitable for the nuclear waste pilot repository; (2) the existence of an isolated breccia pipe at the site unaccompanied by a deep dissolution wedge, is a very remote possibility; (3) more specific information about the origin and the nature of the brine reservoirs is needed. An important question that should be resolved is whether each encounter with artesian brine represents a separate pocket or whether these occurrences are interconnected; (4) Anderson has postulated a major tectonic fault or a fracture system at the Basin margin along the San Simon Swale; (5) the area in the northern part of the WIPP site, identified from geophysical and bore hole data as the disturbed zone, should be further investigated to cleary understand the nature and significance of this structural anomaly; and (6) a major drawback encountered during the discussions of geological issues related to the WIPP site is the absence of published material that brings together all the known information related to a particular issue.

Chaturvedi, L.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

283

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PLANETARY NEBULAE IN THE ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4649 (M 60): KINEMATICS AND DISTANCE REDETERMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Using a slitless spectroscopy method with (1) the 8.2 m Subaru telescope and its FOCAS Cassegrain spectrograph and (2) the ESO Very Large Telescope unit 1 (Antu) and its FORS2 Cassegrain spectrograph, we have detected 326 planetary nebulae (PNs) in the giant Virgo elliptical galaxy NGC 4649 (M 60) and measured their radial velocities. After rejecting some PNs more likely to belong to the companion galaxy NGC 4647, we have built a catalog with kinematic information for 298 PNs in M 60. Using these radial velocities, we have concluded that they support the presence of a dark matter halo around M 60. Based on an isotropic, two-component Hernquist model, we estimate the dark matter halo mass within 3R{sub e} to be 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, which is almost one-half of the total mass of about 10{sup 12} M{sub sun} within 3R{sub e}. This total mass is similar to that estimated from globular cluster, XMM-Newton, and Chandra observations. The dark matter becomes dominant outside. More detailed dynamical modeling of the PN data is being published in a companion paper. We have also measured the m(5007) magnitudes of many of these PNs and built a statistically complete sample of 218 PNs. The resulting PN luminosity function (PNLF) was used to estimate a distance modulus of 30.7 {+-} 0.2 mag, equivalent to 14 {+-} 1 Mpc. This confirms an earlier PNLF distance measurement based on a much smaller sample. The PNLF distance modulus remains smaller than the surface brightness fluctuation distance modulus by 0.4 mag.

Teodorescu, A. M.; Mendez, R. H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Bernardi, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 5, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Thomas, J.; Das, P.; Gerhard, O., E-mail: ana@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: mendez@ifa.hawaii.edu [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, P.O. Box 1603, D-85740 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Introduction The median problem for the reversal distance in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genomes E. Ohlebusch, M.I. Abouelhoda, K. Hockel, J. Stallkamp University of Ulm, Germany CPM 2005 The median problem for the reversal distance in circular bacterial genomes #12;Introduction Methods Conclusion General Problem Distances Specific Problem Median Problem Given 3 genomes G1, G2, and G3, find

Lonardi, Stefano

287

Estimating Distances Using Least Cost Path Algorithms Rodney J. Dyer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating Distances Using Least Cost Path Algorithms Rodney J. Dyer February 27, 2012 Overview This vignette covers the methods necessary to take a raster and estimate the least cost path distance between points. In doing so, this will cover: 1. Load in a 'raster blank' 2. Modify the raster to change relative

Dyer, Rodney J.

288

Ris-R-1518(EN) The necessary distance between large  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-R-1518(EN) The necessary distance between large wind farms offshore - study Sten Frandsen. As it is often the need for offshore wind farms, the model handles a regular array-geometry with straight rows distance between large wind farms in the offshore environment. The main results are given in Section 1

289

How to project `circular' manifolds using geodesic distances?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How to project `circular' manifolds using geodesic distances? John Aldo Lee, Michel Verleysen,verleysen}@dice.ucl.ac.be Abstract. Recent papers have clearly shown the advantage of using the geodesic distance instead strongly crumpled manifolds have to be un- folded. Nevertheless, neither the Euclidean nor the geodesic

Verleysen, Michel

290

Parallel algorithms for approximation of distance maps on parametric surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results demonstrate up to four orders of magnitude improvement in execution time compared to the state(n) numerical algorithm for first-order approximation of geodesic distances on geometry images, where n charts, parallel algorithms, GPU, SIMD 1. INTRODUCTION Approximation of geodesic distances on curved

Kimmel, Ron

291

RESEARCH NOTE DISTANCE CHEMORECEPTION AND THE DETECTION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH NOTE DISTANCE CHEMORECEPTION AND THE DETECTION OF CONSPECIFICS IN OCTOPUS BIMACULOIDES. They detect odours on contact using chemosensory cells on their lips and suckers (Budelmann, 1996). They can also detect water-borne odours (distance chemoreception) using receptors in their olfactory organs

Boal, Jean

292

Keep Your Enemies Close: Distance Bounding Against Smartcard Relay Attacks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keep Your Enemies Close: Distance Bounding Against Smartcard Relay Attacks Saar Drimer and Steven J by an implementation of the relay attack that has been tested on live systems. Once designers appreciate the risk to the smartcard standard, based on a distance bounding protocol, which provides adequate resistance to the relay

Xu, Wenyuan

293

Determination of the linkage relationships and the gene-centromere genetic distances for endopeptidase structural genes in hexaploid wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

357307 contribute to band 4 Calculation of gene-centromere genet 'c distance for 7BI. using region I (RI) recombinant progeny Genetic distance bet~~een EP-Bly and Ep-Blz and the frequency of region II (RII) cro. over progeny LIST OF FIGURES... ram Phenot e Total ChrolQo some Co~st. it ut ion 42 43 41 41+telo 42+telo 40+telo and/or not ~f ~1* 8 IU VI IX Chromosome ?BL 42. 17 Centromere ~Ey-El Kp-Blz Chromosome 7AL K -Alz 6. 67 3 90 RII ~E-Alx l0. 67 Figure 8. Linkage...

McMillin, David Edwin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Going the Distance Going the Distance Solar Decathlon 2013: Going the Distance September 17, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Toggle Routes on/off Return to map → Solar Decathlon Journeys Visualizing the distances that each Solar Decathlon house travelled Click competitors to toggle their journeys on and off. All routes and distances are approximate. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Solar Decathlon 2013: In our new blog series, we're going behind the scenes to show you what it takes to compete in the Solar Decathlon. First up: Meet the teams competing this year and learn how they were selected. Part two looks at how the teams must master the art of fundraising. What does it take to design an energy-efficient, solar-powered house? Part three looks at creating a winning design.

295

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

296

Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH) Distance Estimates For Search 1 / 40 Using Distance Estimates In Heuristic Search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH) Distance Estimates For Search ­ 1 / 40 Using Distance Estimates In Heuristic Search Jordan T. Thayer and Wheeler Ruml jtd7, ruml at cs.unh.edu slides at: http Search Bounded Suboptimal Anytime Search Summary Backup Slides Jordan Thayer and Wheeler Ruml (UNH

Ruml, Wheeler

297

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

298

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

300

A Constraint on the Distance Scale to Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If ?-ray bursts are cosmological in origin, the sources are expected to trace the large-scale structure of luminous matter in the universe. I use a new likelihood method that compares the counts-in-cells distribution of ?-ray bursts in the BATSE 3B catalog with that expected from the known large-scale structure of the universe, in order to place a constraint on the distance scale to cosmological bursts. I find, at the 95% confidence level, that the comoving distance to the "edge" of the burst distribution is greater than 630 h-1 Mpc (z > 0.25), and that the nearest burst is farther than 40 h-1 Mpc. The median distance to the nearest burst is 170 h-1 Mpc, implying that the total energy released in ?-rays during a burst event is of order 3 ? 1051 h-2 ergs. None of the bursts that have been observed by BATSE are in nearby galaxies, nor is a signature from the Coma Cluster or the "Great Wall" likely to be seen in the data at present.

Jean

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Image Segmentation Using Active Contours and Evidential Distance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We proposed a new segmentation based on Active Contours (AC) for vector-valued image that incorporates evidential distance. The proposed method combine both Belief Functions (BFs) and probability functions in ...

Foued Derraz; Antonio Pinti

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Verification of speckle contrast measurement interrelation with observation distance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The speckle contrasts of two types of laser projectors were measured at various observation distances and observation lens pinhole diameters using a quantitative measurement technique. We found that the speckl...

Koji Suzuki; Tatsuo Fukui; Shigeo Kubota; Yasunori Furukawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cepheid Variables and their Application to the Cosmological Distance Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current era of precision cosmology, measuring the expansion rate of the Universe (Hubble constant, or H0) more accurately and precisely helps to better constrain the properties of dark energy. Cepheid-based distances are a critical step...

Hoffmann, Samantha L

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

304

TOWARD THE MINIMUM INNER EDGE DISTANCE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the minimum distance from a host star where an exoplanet could potentially be habitable in order not to discard close-in rocky exoplanets for follow-up observations. We find that the inner edge of the Habitable ...

Zsom, Andras

305

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

306

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

307

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

308

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

309

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

310

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

311

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

312

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

313

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

314

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

315

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

316

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

317

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

318

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

319

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

320

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

322

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

323

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

324

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

325

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

326

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

327

A Trip to Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... her way to-a finishing school in London, said ' Don't you think the electric cars in Ottawa are better than anywhere else?' Of course they are, one cannot ... they are, one cannot but reply, quite bond-fide. Would not she brighten an electric car, wherever she was?"

1898-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Propagation of Audio-Frequency Radio Waves to Great Distances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... distances from the source clearly showed that the main concentration of energy lay in the audio-frequency band below 10 kc./s. and that the higher-frequency components moved forward ... selective absorption, which, together with the low attenuation at the extreme ends of the audio-frequency range, accounts for the observed long-distance propagation characteristics of atmospherics1. As is ...

F. W. CHAPMAN; R. C. V. MACARIO

1956-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

329

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

330

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

331

Minimizing the total cost of hen allocation to poultry farms using hybrid Growing Neural Gas approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper a decision support system to solve the problem of hen allocation to hen houses with the aim of minimizing the total cost is described. The total cost consists of farm utilization cost, hen transportation cost, and loss from mixing hens at different ages in the same hen houses. Clustering of hen houses using the traditional Growing Neural Gas (GNG) was first determined to allocate hens to the hen houses effectively. However, the traditional GNG often solves the clustering problem by considering distance only. Therefore the hybrid Growing Neural Gas (hGNG) considering both the distance from the centroids of the clusters to the hen houses and the weights of hen house sizes was proposed to solve the problem. In the second phase, allocating and determining routes to allocate hens to the hen houses using the nearest neighbor approach were carried out in order to minimize the total distance. The performance of the algorithm was measured using the relative improvement (RI), which compares the total costs of the hGNG and GNG algorithms and the current practice. The results obtained from this study show that the hGNG algorithm provides better total cost values than the firms current practice from 7.92% to 20.83%, and from 5.90% to 17.91% better than the traditional GNG algorithm. The results also demonstrate that the proposed method is useful not only for reducing the total cost, but also for efficient management of a poultry production system. Furthermore, the method used in this research should prove beneficial to other similar agro-food sectors in Thailand and around the world.

Atiwat Boonmee; Kanchana Sethanan; Banchar Arnonkijpanich; Somnuk Theerakulpisut

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

The location of two-hand trip devices on full revolution mechanical power presses with regard to operator safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, , Point of operation. Flywheel dl ive and single geared trans- m1 8'-' lo l 12 Accepted safe openings between the bottom edg of. a guard and feed table at various distances from the point of operation. . . . . . . 21 Timing arrangemen't used by Lobl...' cal presses I s I, h(l conversion of rotary motion of a flywheel to rcl i J)F oca. ? ting motion of the pre. , s ram by means of an eccentric. The most common form of eccentricity used on mech;)ni. cal 2 presses is the crankshaf*. Other forms...

Masters, Randall Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

333

THE ARAUCARIA PROJECT. A DISTANCE DETERMINATION TO THE LOCAL GROUP SPIRAL M33 FROM NEAR-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY OF CEPHEID VARIABLES  

SciTech Connect

Motivated by an amazing range of reported distances to the nearby Local Group spiral galaxy M33, we have obtained deep near-infrared photometry for 26 long-period Cepheids in this galaxy with the ESO Very Large Telescope. From the data, we constructed period-luminosity relations in the J and K bands which together with previous optical VI photometry for the Cepheids by Macri et al. were used to determine the true distance modulus of M33, and the mean reddening affecting the Cepheid sample with the multiwavelength fit method developed in the Araucaria Project. We find a true distance modulus of 24.62 for M33, with a total uncertainty of {+-}0.07 mag which is dominated by the uncertainty on the photometric zero points in our photometry. The reddening is determined as E(B - V) = 0.19 {+-} 0.02, in agreement with the value used by the Hubble Space Telescope Key Project of Freedman et al. but in some discrepancy with other recent determinations based on blue supergiant spectroscopy and an O-type eclipsing binary which yielded lower reddening values. Our derived M33 distance modulus is extremely insensitive to the adopted reddening law. We show that the possible effects of metallicity and crowding on our present distance determination are both at the 1%-2% level and therefore minor contributors to the total uncertainty of our distance result for M33.

Gieren, Wolfgang; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Graczyk, Dariusz, E-mail: wgieren@astro-udec.cl, E-mail: pietrzyn@hubble.cfm.udec.cl [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warsaw (Poland); and others

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

335

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

336

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

337

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

338

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

339

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

340

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

342

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

343

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

344

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

345

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

346

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

347

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

348

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

349

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

350

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

351

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

352

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

353

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Name FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Address 2890 Cherokee Lane Place Riverwoods, Illinois Zip 60015 Sector Vehicles Product Distance Measuring Instrument Year founded 2008 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number (888) 876-6050 Website http://www.fast-measure.com Coordinates 42.181686°, -87.898862° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.181686,"lon":-87.898862,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

354

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

355

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

356

CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar CAKE Goes 'The Distance' with Solar February 2, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs CAKE. Whether it takes the form of cupcakes, birthday cake, the ever-popular cheesecake or even gluten-free - it unfailingly brightens up almost anyone's day. CAKE the band, however, has taken the sweetness to another level with their newest album Showroom of Compassion, which was produced using 100 percent solar energy. The group formed in 1991 and took the Northern California music scene by storm in the mid-nineties. Since then, they've become internationally renowned headliners. Earlier this month, CAKE released their sixth album, recorded in a studio in Sacramento powered entirely by solar power.

357

Determination of the Solar Galactocentric distance from masers kinemics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have determined the Galactic rotation parameters and the solar Galactocentric distance $R_0$ by simultaneously solving Bottlinger's kinematic equations using data on masers with known line-of-sight velocities and highly accurate trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions measured by VLBI. Our sample includes 93 masers spanning the range of Galactocentric distances R from 3 to 15 kpc. The solutions found are \\Omega_0 = 29.7+/-0.5 km s^{-1} kpc^{-1}, \\Omega'_0 = -4.20+/-0.11 km s^{-1} kpc^{-2}, \\Omega"_0 =0.730+/-0.029 km s^{-1} kpc^{-3}, and R_0=8.03+/-0.12 kpc. In this case, the linear rotation velocity at the solar distance R_0 is V_0=238+/-6 km s^{-1}.

Bajkova, A T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Choosing good distance metrics and local planners for probabilistic roadmap motion planning methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, particularly probabilistic roadmap methods. Our study of distance metrics showed that the importance of the translational distance increased relative to the rotational distance as the environment become more crowded. We find that each local planner makes some...

Bayazit, Osman Burchan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Evidence against correlations between nuclear decay rates and Earth-Sun distance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distance of the source to the Sun. This work was supportedNuclear Decay Rates and Earth-Sun Distance Eric B. Normanand 241 Am and the Earth-Sun distance. We find no evidence

Norman, Eric B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Small distance expansion for radiative heat transfer between curved objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a small distance expansion for the radiative heat transfer between gently curved objects, in terms of the ratio of distance to radius of curvature. A gradient expansion allows us to go beyond the lowest order proximity transfer approximation. The range of validity of such expansion depends on temperature as well as material properties. Generally, the expansion converges faster for the derivative of the transfer than for the transfer itself, which we use by introducing a near-field adjusted plot. For the case of a sphere and a plate, the logarithmic correction to the leading term has a very small prefactor for all materials investigated.

Vladyslav A. Golyk; Matthias Krger; Alexander P. McCauley; Mehran Kardar

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Distance relay application testing using a digital simulator  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on distance relay application testing using simulated transient waveforms. Power system modeling and test procedure for using modern digital simulators are presented. Extensive study of five commercial relays comparing the application for a 345kV transmission line is carried out by performing thousands of one-terminal and synchronized two-terminal transient tests. The approach using digital simulators has proved to be an efficient technique. This paper presents a methodology for evaluating distance relay transient performance based on extensive laboratory testing. Important issues regarding application testing, such as CT and CCVT effects and selection of prefault waveform length, are also addressed and investigated in this paper.

Kezunovic, M.; Xia, Y.Q.; Guo, Y. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Fromen, C.W.; Sevcik, D.R. [Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)] [Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of the table of initial isolation distances and protective action distances for the 2004 emergency response guidebook.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides technical documentation for values in the Table of Initial Isolation and Protective Action Distances (PADs) in the 2004 Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG2004). The objective for choosing the PADs specified in the ERG2004 is to balance the need to adequately protect the public from exposure to potentially harmful substances against the risks and expenses that could result from overreacting to a spill. To quantify this balance, a statistical approach is adopted, whereby the best available information is used to conduct an accident scenario analysis and develop a set of up to 1,000,000 hypothetical incidents. The set accounts for differences in containers types, incident types, accident severity (i.e., amounts released), locations, times of day, times of year, and meteorological conditions. Each scenario is analyzed using detailed emission rate and atmospheric dispersion models to calculate the downwind chemical concentrations from which a 'safe distance' is determined. The safe distance is defined as the distance downwind from the source at which the chemical concentration falls below health protection criteria. The American Industrial Hygiene Association's Emergency Response Planning Guideline Level 2 (ERPG-2) or equivalent is the health criteria used. The statistical sample of safe distance values for all incidents considered in the analysis are separated into four categories: small spill/daytime release, small spill/nighttime release, large spill/daytime release, and large spill/nighttime release. The 90th-percentile safe distance values for each of these groups became the PADs that appear in the ERG2004.

Brown, D. F.; Freeman, W. A.; Carhart, R. A.; Krumpolc, M.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Exemplar Breakpoint Distance for nontrivial genomes cannot be approximated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Exemplar Breakpoint Distance for non­trivial genomes cannot be approximated Guillaume Blin 1 ­ France guillaume.fertin@univ­nantes.fr Abstract. A promising and active field of comparative genomics con­ sists in comparing two genomes by establishing a one­to­one correspon­ dence (i.e., a matching) between

Fertin, Guillaume

364

Of mice and men: Algorithms for evolutionary distances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of mice and men: Algorithms for evolutionary distances between genomes with translocation \\Lambda is combinatorial algorithms for genome rear­ rangement. In the course of its evolution, the genome of an organism is to determine the minimum number of such events that transform one genome to another. This number is called

Kececioglu, John

365

A Formal Approach to Distance-Bounding RFID Protocols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kasper2 Cristina Onete1 1 Darmstadt University of Technology & CASED, Germany www.minicrypt.de 2 Fraunhofer Institute for Secure Information Technology (SIT) and CASED, Germany Abstract. Distance one or two such threats, but no rigorous cryptographic security models --nor clean security proofs

366

Labeling trees with a condition at distance two  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For positive integers j ? k, an L(j, k)-labeling of graph G is an integer labeling of V(G) such that adjacent vertices receive labels which differ by at least j, and vertices that are distance two apart receive ... Keywords: ?j,k-labeling, infinite regular tree, vertex labeling

John P. Georges; David W. Mauro

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Defense from a distance ORNL robotics sensors detect underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SCIENCE Defense from a distance ORNL robotics sensors detect underwater explosive ordnance Modern of the future are not human oriented, but robotics oriented. For robots to perform their mission of safety at the forefront of robotics design, these are the droids we are looking for. ­Dylan Platz Karnowski analyzes

Pennycook, Steve

368

SMART DISTANCE KEEPING: MODELING AND PERSPECTIVES FOR EMBEDDED DIAGNOSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a Renault-Volvo Trucks vehicle. One of the main differences between this new system, which is called is the distance between the vehicle (with the ACC or the SDK system) and the front obstacle (which may of a detection and isolation strategy for some of the possible faults that may be produced on the system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

369

1 Introduction The Euclidean distance map (EDM) of a black  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the near­ est black pixel. The EDM plays an important role in machine vision, pattern recognitionTitle page 1 #12; 1 Introduction The Euclidean distance map (EDM) of a black and white n 2 n binary, and robotics[9]. Many algorithms have been proposed for com­ puting the EDM. Yamada[10] presented an EDM

Fujiwara, Akihiro

370

GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE Distance Education Sections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is and what it can do. Work with and create GIS maps in ArcMap. Access and query a GIS database. Describe a dataset. Query and analyze GIS data. Create presentation-quality maps and graphs DELIVERY MODE: · CourseSWS 4720C GIS IN SOIL & WATER SCIENCE Distance Education Sections Fall 2013 Instructor Susan Curry

Ma, Lena

371

Computing the edit-distance between unrooted ordered trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In B, contract the edge x, and then change labels u; v; w;y; z to f; h; a; c; e. On the topComputing the edit-distance between unrooted ordered trees Philip N. Klein ? Department of Computer

Klein, Philip N.

372

Native 10Gigabit Ethernet experiments over long distances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current solutions for transmitting data over Wide Area Networks (WANs) are expensive and require protocol translation at layer 1. The IEEE recently standardized the 10Gigabit Ethernet (10GE) WAN PHY as a native gateway from the Local Area Networks ... Keywords: 10Gigabit Ethernet, Long-distance TCP, SONET/SDH, WAN PHY

Catalin Meirosu; Piotr Golonka; Andreas Hirstius; Stefan Stancu; Bob Dobinson; Erik Radius; Antony Antony; Freek Dijkstra; Johan Blom; Cees de Laat

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Weierstrass Pairs and Minimum Distance of Goppa Codes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We prove that elements of the Weierstrass gap set of a pair of points may be used to define a geometric Goppa code which has minimum distance greater than the usual lower bound. We determine the Weierstrass gap set of a pair of any two Weierstrass ... Keywords: Hermitian code, Weierstrass pair, Weierstrass point

Gretchen L. Matthews

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Enhanced Learning and Distance Learning February 21, 2008 Call for Nominations: Provost's Prize for Teaching with Technology Eligibility: Candidates must be a tenure-track or non's Prize for Teaching with Technology will be awarded to up to two recipients. Each recipient will receive

Southern California, University of

375

Collaborative Distance Education: The Iowa Chemistry Education Alliance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Collaborative Distance Education: The Iowa Chemistry Education Alliance ... The Iowa Chemistry Education Alliance is a consortium of four chemistry instructors from central Iowa high schools, several members of the Iowa State University faculty, and consultants from an Iowa Area Education Agency. ...

K. A. Burke; Thomas J. Greenbowe

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Modelling long-distance seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes.  

SciTech Connect

1. Long-distance seed dispersal is difficult to measure, yet key to understanding plant population dynamics and community composition. 2. We used a spatially explicit model to predict the distribution of seeds dispersed long distances by birds into habitat patches of different shapes. All patches were the same type of habitat and size, but varied in shape. They occurred in eight experimental landscapes, each with five patches of four different shapes, 150 m apart in a matrix of mature forest. The model was parameterized with smallscale movement data collected from field observations of birds. In a previous study we validated the model by testing its predictions against observed patterns of seed dispersal in real landscapes with the same types and spatial configuration of patches as in the model. 3. Here we apply the model more broadly, examining how patch shape influences the probability of seed deposition by birds into patches, how dispersal kernels (distributions of dispersal distances) vary with patch shape and starting location, and how movement of seeds between patches is affected by patch shape. 4. The model predicts that patches with corridors or other narrow extensions receive higher numbers of seeds than patches without corridors or extensions. This pattern is explained by edgefollowing behaviour of birds. Dispersal distances are generally shorter in heterogeneous landscapes (containing patchy habitat) than in homogeneous landscapes, suggesting that patches divert the movement of seed dispersers, holding them long enough to increase the probability of seed defecation in the patches. Dispersal kernels for seeds in homogeneous landscapes were smooth, whereas those in heterogenous landscapes were irregular. In both cases, long-distance (> 150 m) dispersal was surprisingly common, usually comprising approximately 50% of all dispersal events. 5. Synthesis . Landscape heterogeneity has a large influence on patterns of long-distance seed dispersal. Our results suggest that long-distance dispersal events can be predicted using spatially explicit modelling to scale-up local movements, placing them in a landscape context. Similar techniques are commonly used by landscape ecologists to model other types of movement; they offer much promise to the study of seed dispersal.

Levey, Douglas, J.; Tewlsbury, Joshua, J.; Bolker, Benjamin, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

378

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

379

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

380

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

382

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

383

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

384

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

385

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

386

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

387

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

388

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

389

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

390

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

391

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

392

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

393

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

394

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

395

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

396

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

397

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

398

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

399

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

400

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

402

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

403

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

404

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

405

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

406

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

407

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

408

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

409

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

410

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

413

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

414

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

415

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

416

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

417

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

418

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

419

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

420

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

422

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

423

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

424

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.

425

THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD. XXIII. CCD PHOTOMETRIC DISTANCE ESTIMATES OF SCR TARGETS-77 M DWARF SYSTEMS WITHIN 25 pc  

SciTech Connect

We present CCD photometric distance estimates of 100 SCR (SuperCOSMOS RECONS) systems with {mu} {>=} 0.''18 yr{sup -1}, 29 of which are new discoveries previously unpublished in this series of papers. These distances are estimated using a combination of new VRI photometry acquired at CTIO and JHK magnitudes extracted from 2MASS. The estimates are improvements over those determined using photographic plate BRI magnitudes from SuperCOSMOS plus JHK, as presented in the original discovery papers. In total, 77 of the 100 systems investigated are predicted to be within 25 pc. If all 77 systems are confirmed to have {pi}{sub trig} {>=} 40 mas, this sample would represent a 23% increase in M dwarf systems nearer than 25 pc in the southern sky.

Winters, Jennifer G.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30302-4106 (United States); Subasavage, John P. [Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Finch, Charlie T. [United States Naval Observatory, Washington, DC 20392-5420 (United States); Hambly, Nigel C., E-mail: winters@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: thenry@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jao@chara.gsu.edu, E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu, E-mail: finch@usno.navy.mil, E-mail: nch@roe.ac.uk [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute of Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

427

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

428

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

429

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

Distance-dependent electron transfer in DNA hairpins  

SciTech Connect

The distance dependence of photoinduced electron transfer in duplex DNA was determined for a family of synthetic DNA hairpins in which a stilbene dicarboxamide forms a bridge connecting two oligonucleotide arms. Investigation of the fluorescence and transient absorption spectra of these hairpins established that no photoinduced electron transfer occurs for a hairpin that has six deoxyadenosine-deoxythymidine base pairs. However, the introduction of a single deoxyguanosine-deoxycytidine base pair resulted in distance-dependent fluorescence quenching and the formation of the stilbene anion radical. Kinetic analysis suggests that duplex DNA is somewhat more effective than proteins as a medium for electron transfer but that it does not function as a molecular wire.

Lewis, F.D.; Wu, T.; Zhang, Y. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)] [and others] [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Distance-redshift relations in an anisotropic cosmological model  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we study an anisotropic model generated from a particular Bianchi type-III metric, which is a generalization of Gdel's metric and an exact solution of Einstein's field equations. We analyse type Ia supernova data, namely the SDSS sample calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and we verify in which ranges of distances and redshifts the anisotropy could be observed. We also consider, in a joint analysis, the position of the first peak in the CMB anisotropy spectrum, as well as current observational constraints on the Hubble constant. We conclude that a small anisotropy is permitted by the data, and that more accurate measurements of supernova distances above z = 2 might indicate the existence of such anisotropy in the universe.

Menezes, R. S. Jr. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Pigozzo, C.; Carneiro, S., E-mail: rsmjr@ifba.edu.br, E-mail: cpigozzo@ufba.br, E-mail: saulo.carneiro.ufba@gmail.com [Instituto de Fsica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Long-distance distribution of genuine energy-time entanglement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any practical realization of entanglement-based quantum communication must be intrinsically secure and able to span long distances avoiding the need of a straight line between the communicating parties. The violation of Bell's inequality offers a method for the certification of quantum links without knowing the inner workings of the devices. Energy-time entanglement quantum communication satisfies all these requirements. However, currently there is a fundamental obstacle with the standard configuration adopted: an intrinsic geometrical loophole that can be exploited to break the security of the communication, in addition to other loopholes. Here we show the first experimental Bell violation with energy-time entanglement distributed over 1 km of optical fibers that is free of this geometrical loophole. This is achieved by adopting a new experimental design, and by using an actively stabilized fiber-based long interferometer. Our results represent an important step towards long-distance secure quantum communication in optical fibers.

A. Cuevas; G. Carvacho; G. Saavedra; J. Carie; W. A. T. Nogueira; M. Figueroa; A. Cabello; P. Mataloni; G. Lima; G. B. Xavier

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

433

Application of Mutual Information Methods in Time-Distance Helioseismology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply a new technique, the mutual information (MI) from information theory, to time-distance helioseismology, and demonstrate that it can successfully reproduce several classic results based on the widely used cross-covariance method. MI quantifies the deviation of two random variables from complete independence, and represents a more general method for detecting dependencies in time series than the cross-covariance function, which only detects linear relationships. We provide a brief description of the MI-based technique and discuss the results of the application of MI to derive the solar differential profile, a travel-time deviation map for a sunspot and a time-distance diagram from quiet Sun measurements.

Keys, Dustin; Pevtsov, Alexei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Electrical probe diagnostics for the laminar flame quenching distance  

SciTech Connect

A simplified theory, previously developed for the general case of weakly ionized gas flow, is used to predict electrical probe response when the flame is quenched on the probe surface. This theory is based on the planar model of space charge sheaths around the measuring electrode. For the flame quenching case, by assuming that the sheath thickness is comparable with the thermal boundary layer thickness, probe current can be related to flame quenching distance. The theoretical assumptions made to obtain the analytical formulation of probe current were experimentally proved by using direct visualization and high-frequency PIV. The direct visualization method was also used to validate the results of flame quenching distance values obtained with electrical probe. The electrical probe diagnostics have been verified for both head-on and sidewall flame quenching regimes and for stoichiometric methane/air and propane/air mixtures in a pressure range of 0.05-0.6 MPa. (author)

Karrer, Maxime; Makarov, Maxime [Renault Technocentre, 78288 Guyancourt Cedex (France); Bellenoue, Marc; Labuda, Sergei; Sotton, Julien [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, CNRS, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Type Ia Supernovae Yielding Distances with 3-4% Precision  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The luminosities of Type Ia supernovae (SN), the thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars, vary systematically with their intrinsic color and light-curve decline rate. These relationships have been used to calibrate their luminosities to within ~0.14-0.20 mag from broadband optical light curves, yielding individual distances accurate to ~7-10%. Here we identify a subset of SN Ia that erupt in environments having high ultraviolet surface brightness and star-formation surface density. When we apply a steep model extinction law, these SN can be calibrated to within ~0.065-0.075 mag, corresponding to ~3-4% in distance -- the best yet with SN Ia by a substantial margin. The small scatter suggests that variations in only one or two progenitor properties account for their light-curve-width/color/luminosity relation.

Kelly, Patrick L; Burke, David L; Hicken, Malcolm; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Zheng, Weikang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Curvature dark energy reconstruction through different cosmographic distance definitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of $f(\\mathcal{R})$ gravity, dark energy is a geometrical fluid with negative equation of state. Since the function $f(\\mathcal{R})$ is not known \\emph{a priori}, the need of a model independent reconstruction of its shape represents a relevant technique to determine which $f(\\mathcal{R})$ model is really favored with respect to others. To this aim, we relate cosmography to a generic $f(\\mathcal R)$ and its derivatives in order to provide a model independent investigation at redshift $z \\sim 0$. Our analysis is based on the use of three different cosmological distance definitions, in order to alleviate the duality problem, i.e. the problem of which cosmological distance to use with specific cosmic data sets. We therefore consider the luminosity, $d_L$, flux, $d_F$, and angular, $d_A$, distances and we find numerical constraints by the Union 2.1 supernovae compilation and measurement of baryonic acoustic oscillations, at $z_{BAO}=0.35$. We notice that all distances reduce to the same expression, i.e. $d_{L;F;A}\\sim\\frac{1}{\\mathcal H_0}z$, at first order. Thus, to fix the cosmographic series of observables, we impose the initial value of $H_0$ by fitting $\\mathcal H_0$ through supernovae only, in the redshift regime $ztheoretical bounds, while its variation, namely the jerk parameter, is compatible with $j_0>1$. Finally, we infer the functional form of $f(\\mathcal{R})$ by means of a truncated polynomial approximation, in terms of fourth order scale factor $a(t)$.

Salvatore Capozziello; Mariafelicia De Laurentis; Orlando Luongo

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

437

Time, Distance, Velocity, Redshift: a personal guided tour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An attempt to answer the question 'Can we observe galaxies that recede faster than light ?' led to a re-examination of the notions of time, distance, velocity and redshift as they occur in newtonian physics, special relativity, general relativity and cosmology. A number of misconceptions were uncovered. It was found that, once freed of special relativity preconceptions, the above question is easily and unequivocally answered

T. Kiang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

440

An Improved Method to Test the Distance-Duality Relation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many researchers have performed cosmological-model-independent tests for the distance-duality (DD) relation. Theoretical work has been conducted based on the results of these tests. However, we find that almost all of these tests were perhaps not cosmological-model-independent after all, because the distance moduli taken from a given type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) compilation are dependent on a given cosmological model and Hubble constant. In this Letter, we overcome these defects and by creating a new cosmological-model-independent test for the DD relation. We use the original data from the Union2 SNe Ia compilation and the angular diameter distances from two galaxy cluster samples compiled by De Filippis et al. and Bonamente et al. to test the DD relation. Our results suggest that the DD relation is compatible with observations, and the spherical model is slightly better than the elliptical model at describing the intrinsic shape of galaxy clusters if the DD relation is valid. However, these results are different from those of previous work.

Xi Yang; Hao-Ran Yu; Zhi-Song Zhang; Tong-Jie Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A quantum theory of distance along a curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a quantum theory of distances along a curve, based on a linear line element that is equal to the operator square root of the quadratic metric of Riemannian geometry. Since the linear line element is an operator, we treat it according to the rules of quantum mechanics and interpret its eigenvalues as physically observable distances; the distance eigenvalues are naturally quantized. There are both positive and negative eigenvalues, which requires interpretation. Multi-element curves are defined as direct sums of line elements, and behave much like systems of spin half electrons in a magnetic field. For a curve of many elements an entropy and energy and temperature are quite naturally defined, leading via standard statistical thermodynamics to a relation between the most probable curve length and temperature. That relation may be viewed as a universal heat-shrinking property of curves. At this stage of the theory we do not include bodies or particles in the mix, do not suggest field equations for the quantum geometry, and questions of interpretation remain. The theory might conceivably be testable using observations of the early Universe, when the temperature of space was presumably quite high. In particular cosmogenesis may be thought of as time stopping at an infinite temperature as we go backwards in time to the beginning.

Ronald J. Adler

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Leica TCRA1105 Reflectorless Total Station  

SciTech Connect

This poster provides an overview of SLAC's TCRA1105 reflectorless total station for the Alignment Engineering Group. This instrument has shown itself to be very useful for planning new construction and providing quick measurements to difficult to reach or inaccessible surfaces.

Gaudreault, F.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S?RENSEN in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback been built and the experiments verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation

Skogestad, Sigurd

444

Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 12 Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their Phenomenological Effect on Climate. Phenomenological solar signature on climate 310 9. Conclusion 312 1. INTRODUCTION A contiguoustotal solar from each other, in particular about whether the TSI minimum during solar Cycles 22e23 (1995

Scafetta, Nicola

445

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

446

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

447

Total Neutron Scattering in Vitreous Silica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of Corning superpure vitreous silica glass has been investigated with neutrons. A new method of analysis using variable neutron wavelengths and the measurement of total scattering cross sections from transmission experiments is developed and the results are compared with those from differential x-ray scattering. The total neutron scattering method permits a simple and direct structure analysis with resolution apparently superior to x-rays. The preliminary results compare well in a first approximation analysis with the basic structure model of Warren and others and in addition the neutron-determined atomic radial distribution curve exhibits some finer details than the x-ray results. Thermal inelastic scattering of neutrons was corrected for in an approximate way.

R. J. Breen; R. M. Delaney; P. J. Persiani; A. H. Weber

1957-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

449

Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Improved selection in totally monotone arrays  

SciTech Connect

This paper's main result is an O(({radical}{bar m}lgm)(n lg n) + mlg n)-time algorithm for computing the kth smallest entry in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array. (A two-dimensional A = a(i,j) is totally monotone if for all i{sub 1} < i{sub 2} and j{sub 1} < j{sup 2}, < a(i{sub 1},j{sub 2}) implies a(i{sub 2},j{sub 1})). For large values of k (in particular, for k=(n/2)), this algorithm is significantly faster than the O(k(m+n))-time algorithm for the same problem due to Kravets and Park. An immediate consequence of this result is an O(n{sup 3/2} lg{sup 2}n)-time algorithm for computing the kth nearest neighbor of each vertex of a convex n-gon. In addition to the main result, we also give an O(n lg m)-time algorithm for computing an approximate median in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array; this approximate median is an entry whose rank in its row lies between (n/4) and (3n/4) {minus} 1. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Mansour, Y. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Aiken Computation Lab.); Park, J.K. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Schieber, B. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Sen, S. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

A Hybrid Long-Distance Entanglement Distribution Protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a hybrid (continuous-discrete variable) quantum repeater protocol for distribution of entanglement over long distances. Starting from entangled states created by means of single-photon detection, we show how entangled coherent state superpositions, also known as `Schr\\"odinger cat states', can be generated by means of homodyne detection of light. We show that near-deterministic entanglement swapping with such states is possible using only linear optics and homodyne detectors, and we evaluate the performance of our protocol combining these elements.

Jonatan B. Brask; Ioannes Rigas; Eugene S. Polzik; Ulrik L. Andersen; Anders S. Sorensen

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Gamma ray burst distances and the timescape cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamma ray bursts can potentially be used as distance indicators, providing the possibility of extending the Hubble diagram to redshifts ~7. Here we follow the analysis of Schaefer (2007), with the aim of distinguishing the timescape cosmological model from the \\LambdaCDM model by means of the additional leverage provided by GRBs in the range 2 < z < 7. We find that the timescape model fits the GRB sample slightly better than the \\LambdaCDM model, but that the systematic uncertainties are still too little understood to distinguish the models.

Peter R. Smale

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

454

An advanced method for testing of distance relay operating characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a test method for distance relays using an advanced open-loop digital simulator. Derivation of test signals during prefault and fault, and test procedure are introduced. It is demonstrated that the method of generating test signals and the procedure of applying them to a relay under test directly affect test results. Prefault voltage and current are also a very important factor. The decaying dc offset is considered as well. Test results for five different relays using this new method are presented in this paper. The results demonstrate practical benefits of the test method.

Kezunovic, M.; Xia, Y.Q. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Fromen, C.W.; Sevcik, D.R. [Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)] [Houston Lighting and Power Co., TX (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Investigation of main coolant pump trip problem in case of SB LOCA for Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant, WWER-440/V230  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the results of thermal-hydraulic calculation of accident scenarios that involve the trip of main coolant pump (MCP) in case of Small break loss of coolant accident (SB LOCA) for WWER-440/V230 units at Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP), done in support of the development of Symptom Based Emergency Operating Procedures (SB EOPs) for this plant. The main purpose of these analyses is to show how the different time of MCP switching off results in primary inventory depletion in case of SB LOCA and it is reflect on peak cladding temperature. According to this, the SB LOCA scenario is regarded from the point of view of an inadequate core cooling. Therefore, the primary concern is Critical Safety Function (CSF) Core cooling and Primary inventory. High core residual heat, minimal safety injection flow and other initial conditions challenging the mentioned \\{CSFs\\} are the main particularities of the accepted scenarios. The RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer code has been used to perform the analyses in a WWER-440 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) model. A model of WWER-440 based on Unit 4 of Kozloduy NPP has been developed for the systems thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5/MOD3.2 at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (INRNE-BAS), Sofia.

Pavlin Groudev; Marina Andreeva; Malinka Pavlova

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

457

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d,n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.5040.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Research article Effects of patch attributes, barriers, and distance between patches on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Effects of patch attributes, barriers, and distance between patches, Isolation, Lagidium, Matrix, Metapopulation, Mountain vizcacha, Patagonia, Patch size Abstract We tested whether size of habitat patches and distance between patches are sufficient to predict the distribution

Branch, Lyn C.

460

Prediction of the Proton-to-Total Turbulent Heating in the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper employs a recent turbulent heating prescription to predict the ratio of proton-to-total heating due to the kinetic dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence as a function of heliocentric distance. Comparing to a recent empirical estimate for this turbulent heating ratio in the high-speed solar wind, the prediction shows good agreement with the empirical estimate for R >~ 0.8 AU, but predicts less ion heating than the empirical estimate at smaller heliocentric radii. At these smaller radii, the turbulent heating prescription, calculated in the gyrokinetic limit, fails because the turbulent cascade is predicted to reach the proton cyclotron frequency before Landau damping terminates the cascade. These findings suggest that the turbulent cascade can reach the proton cyclotron frequency at R ~ 0.8 AU, this turbulent heating prescription contains all of the necessary physical mechanisms needed to reproduce the empirically estimated proton-to-total heating ratio.

Howes, G G

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 10,706,479 8,341,552 6,908,028 7,233,765 6,358,120 6,022,115 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 5,527,235 4,043,975 2,972,575 2,994,245 2,397,932 2,019,294 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 614,965 435,262 281,895 218,926 150,462 101,957 1984-2012 Connecticut 88,053 33,494 31,508 41,686 6,534 5,540 1984-2012 Maine 152,082 110,648 129,181 92,567 83,603 49,235 1984-2012 Massachusetts 300,530 230,057 59,627 52,228 34,862 30,474 1984-2012

463

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

464

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

465

Total assessment audits (TAA) in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, energy, waste reduction and productivity audits are performed for a manufacturing facility independent of one another. Auditors generally deliver recommendations for improvement based on their specialized expertise (energy, waste reduction, productivity, etc.) without regard to how those recommendations may impact other, sometimes less obvious, subsystems or processes within the facility. The audits are typically performed in isolation from the plant upper management and commonly without adequate knowledge of how inherent interrelated operational constraints may directly or indirectly influence the success of audit recommendations. The Total Assessment Audit (TAA) concept originated from the belief that a manufacturing facility is better served using a holistic approach to problem solving rather than the more conventional isolated approach. The total assessment audit methodology partners the upper management team of a company with a multi-disciplined team of industry-specific specialists to collectively ascertain the core opportunities for improvement in the company and then to formulate a company oriented continuous improvement plan. Productivity, waste reduction, and energy efficiency objectives are seamlessly integrated into a single service delivery with the TAA approach. Nontraditional audit objectives that influence profitability and competitiveness such as business management practices, employee training, human resource issues, etc. are also subject to evaluation in a TAA. The underlying premise of this approach is that the objectives are interrelated and that simultaneous evaluation will province synergistic results. Ultimately, it is believed that the TAA approach can motivate a manufacturer to implement improvements it might not otherwise pursue if it were focused only on singular objectives.

Haman, W.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Accurate Computation of Geodesic Distance Fields for Polygonal Curves on Triangle Meshes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate Computation of Geodesic Distance Fields for Polygonal Curves on Triangle Meshes David,kobbelt}@cs.rwth-aachen.de Abstract We present an algorithm for the efficient and accu- rate computation of geodesic distance fields the original algorithm is able to compute geodesic distances to isolated points on the mesh only, our

Frey, Pascal

467

Does Distance Still Matter? Revisiting the CSCW Fundamentals on Distributed Collaboration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Does distance still matter? Reporting on a comparative analysis of four ethnographic studies of global software development, this article analyzes the fundamental aspects of distance as depicted in the famous paper Distance Matters. ... Keywords: Common ground, closely coupled work, collaboration readiness, collaboration technology readiness, coupling of work

Pernille Bjrn, Morten Esbensen, Rasmus Eskild Jensen, Stina Matthiesen

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Modelling Ad hoc On-demand Distance Vector (AODV) Protocol with Timed Automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

protocols using Ad hoc On-demand Distance Vector AODV [DPR02] as our test protocol. AODV is one of mobile adModelling Ad hoc On-demand Distance Vector (AODV) Protocol with Timed Automata Sibusisiwe Chiyangwa On-demand Distance Vector protocol (AODV). Keywords: automatic veri#12;cation, model checking, real

Oxford, University of

469

Variability Analysis of Complex Networks Measures based on Stochastic Distances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex networks can model the structure and dynamics of different types of systems. It has been shown that they are characterized by a set of measures. In this work, we evaluate the variability of complex networks measures face to perturbations and, for this purpose, we impose controlled perturbations and quantify their effect. We analyze theoretical models (random, small-world and scale-free) and real networks (a collaboration network and a metabolic networks) along with the shortest path length, vertex degree, local cluster coefficient and betweenness centrality measures. In such analysis, we propose the use of three stochastic quantifiers: the Kullback-Leibler divergence and the Jensen-Shannon and Hellinger distances. The sensitivity of these measures was analyzed with respect to the following perturbations: edge addition, edge removal, edge rewiring and node removal, all of them applied at different intensities. The results reveal that the evaluated measures are influenced by these perturbations. Additio...

Cabral, Raquel; Ramrez, Jaime

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

upwelling irradiance upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments RAD-AIR : Airborne Radiometers

471

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NFOV : Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer

472

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

473

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution 10 4 * 1,914 1,550 364 15 6 3 2,871 2,326 545 20 8 4 3,828 3,101 727 25 10 5 4,785 3,876 909 30 12,752 1,818 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total,742 4,651 1,091 75 30 5 4,785 3,876 909 80 32 4 3,828 3,101 727 85 34 3 2,871 2,326 545 90 36 3 2,871 2

Kay, Mark A.

474

Serck standard packages for total energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the principle of combined heat and power generation is attractive, practical problems have hindered its application. In the U.K. the scope for small scale combined heat and power (total energy) systems has been improved markedly by the introduction of new Electricity Board regulations which allow the operation of small a.c. generators in parallel with the mains low voltage supply. Following this change, Serck have developed a standard total energy unit, the CG100, based on the 2.25 1 Land Rover gas engine with full engine (coolant and exhaust gas) heat recovery. The unit incorporates an asynchronous generator, which utilising mains power for its magnetising current and speed control, offers a very simple means of generating electricity in parallel with the mains supply, without the need for expensive synchronising controls. Nominal output is 15 kW 47 kW heat; heat is available as hot water at temperatures up to 85C, allowing the heat output to be utilised directly in low pressure hot water systems. The CG100 unit can be used in any application where an appropriate demand exists for heat and electricity, and the annual utilisation will give an acceptable return on capital cost; it produces base load heat and electricity, with LPHW boilers and the mains supply providing top-up/stand-by requirements. Applications include residential use (hospitals, hotels, boarding schools, etc.), swimming pools and industrial process systems. The unit also operates on digester gas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic waste. A larger unit based on a six cylinder Ford engine (45 kWe output) is now available.

R. Kelcher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Enantioselective total syntheses of acylfulvene, irofulven, and the agelastatins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (-)-Acylfulvene, and (-)-Irofulven We report the enantioselective total synthesis of (-)-acylfulvene and (-)-irofulven, which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of ...

Siegel, Dustin S. (Dustin Scott), 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

477

Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

-- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

478

California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

479

Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity...

480

Exploring Total Power Saving from High Temperature of Server Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Temperature Total system power (%) Cooling power (%)Total system power (%) Cooling power (%) JunctionTo simulate the cooling power consumption at different

Lai, Liangzhen; Chang, Chia-Hao; Gupta, Puneet

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trips total distance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the...

482

Spectro-photometric distances to stars: a general-purpose Bayesian approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a procedure that estimates distances to stars using measured spectroscopic and photometric quantities. It employs a Bayesian approach to build the probability distribution function over stellar evolutionary models given the data, delivering estimates of expected distance for each star individually. Our method provides several alternative distance estimates for each star in the output, along with their associated uncertainties. The code was first tested on simulations, successfully recovering input distances to mock stars with errors that scale with the uncertainties in the adopted spectro-photometric parameters, as expected. The code was then validated by comparing our distance estimates to parallax measurements from the Hipparcos mission for nearby stars (< 60 pc), to asteroseismic distances of CoRoT red giant stars, and to known distances of well-studied open and globular clusters. The photometric data of these reference samples cover both the optical and near infra-red wavelengths. The...

Santiago, Baslio X; Anders, Friedrich; Chiappini, Cristina; Girardi, Lo; Rocha-Pinto, Helio J; Balbinot, Eduardo; da Costa, Luiz N; Maia, Marcio A G; Schultheis, Mathias; Steinmetz, Matthias; Miglio, Andrea; Montalbn, Josefina; Schneider, Donald P; Beers, Timothy C; Frinchaboy, Peter M; Lee, Young Sun; Zasowski, Gail

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Distance measurements from supernovae and dark energy constraints  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Constraints on dark energy from current observational data are sensitive to how distances are measured from TypeIa supernova (SNIa) data. We find that flux averaging of SNeIa can be used to test the presence of unknown systematic uncertainties, and yield more robust distance measurements from SNeIa. We have applied this approach to the nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST set of 288 SNeIa, and the Constitution set of 397 SNeIa. Combining the SNIa data with cosmic microwave background anisotropy data from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5yr observations, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, the data of 69 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) , and the Hubble constant measurement from the Hubble Space Telescope project SHOES, we measure the dark energy density function X(z)??X(z)/?X(0) as a free function of redshift (assumed to be a constant at z>1 or z>1.5). Without the flux averaging of SNeIa, the combined data using the Constitution set of SNeIa seem to indicate a deviation from a cosmological constant at ?95% confidence level at 0?z?0.8; they are consistent with a cosmological constant at ?68% confidence level when SNeIa are flux averaged. The combined data using the nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST data set of SNeIa are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% confidence level with or without flux averaging of SNeIa, and give dark energy constraints that are significantly more stringent than that using the Constitution set of SNeIa. Assuming a flat Universe, dark energy is detected at >98% confidence level for z?0.75 using the combined data with 288 SNeIa from nearby+SDSS+ESSENCE+SNLS+HST, independent of the assumptions about X(z?1). We quantify dark energy constraints without assuming a flat Universe using the dark energy figure of merit for both X(z) and a dark energy equation-of-state linear in the cosmic scale factor.

Yun Wang

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

484

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 01 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400 $4,871,000 $6,177,902 October 2000 - September 2012 Minimum Fee $0 Fee Available EM Contractor Fee Site: Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Contract Name: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations March 2013 $13,196,690 $9,262,042 $10,064,940 $14,828,770 $12,348,558 $12,204,247 $17,590,414 $17,856,774

485

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

486

Fast Transients at Cosmological Distances with the SKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impulsive radio bursts that are detectable across cosmological distances constitute extremely powerful probes of the ionized Inter-Galactic Medium (IGM), intergalactic magnetic fields, and the properties of space-time itself. Their dispersion measures (DMs) will enable us to detect the "missing" baryons in the low-redshift Universe and make the first measurements of the mean galaxy halo profile, a key parameter in models of galaxy formation and feedback. Impulsive bursts can be used as cosmic rulers at redshifts exceeding 2, and constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, $w(z)$ at redshifts beyond those readily accessible by Type Ia SNe. Both of these goals are realisable with a sample of $\\sim 10^4$ fast radio bursts (FRBs) whose positions are localized to within one arcsecond, sufficient to obtain host galaxy redshifts via optical follow-up. It is also hypothesised that gravitational wave events may emit coherent emission at frequencies probed by SKA1-LOW, and the localization of such events at ...

Macquart, J -P; Grainge, K; McQuinn, M; Fender, R P; Hessels, J; Deller, A; Bhat, R; Breton, R; Chatterjee, S; Law, C; Lorimer, D; Ofek, E O; Pietka, M; Spitler, L; Stappers, B; Trott, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Open Cluster Distance Scale: A New Empirical Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new BVRI photometry for a sample of 54 local G and K stars with accurate Hipparcos parallaxes in the metallicity range -0.4 solar abundance determined from spectroscopy, we find significant disagreement at a level similar to that found by other MS-fitting studies. However, the colour-colour relationship for both these clusters suggests that their metallicity is significantly subsolar. Since the MS-fitting method relies on matching the cluster colours to a template MS, we argue that, when applying this method, the appropriate metallicity to adopt is the photometric subsolar one, not the solar abundance indicated by spectroscopy. Adopting photometric metallicities for all 4 clusters, we find complete agreement with the Hipparcos results and hence we conclude that the mismatch between the spectroscopic and photometric abundances for the Pleiades and NGC 2516 is responsible for the discrepancies in distance estimates found by previous studies. The origin of this mismatch in abundance scales remains an unsolved problem and some possible causes are discussed.

Susan M. Percival; Maurizio Salaris; David Kilkenny

2003-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

488

DISTANCE AND KINEMATICS OF THE TW HYDRAE ASSOCIATION FROM PARALLAXES  

SciTech Connect

From common proper motion and signatures of youth, researchers have identified about 30 members of a putative TW Hydrae Association. Only four of these had parallactic distances from Hipparcos. We have measured parallaxes and proper motions for 14 primary members. We combine these with literature values of radial velocities to show that the Galactic space motions of the stars, with the exception of TWA 9 and 22, are parallel and do not indicate convergence at a common formation point sometime in the last few million years. The space motions of TWA 9 and 22 do not agree with the others and indicate that they are not TWA members. The median parallax is 18 mas or 56 pc. We further analyze the stars' absolute magnitudes on pre-main-sequence evolutionary tracks and find a range of ages with a median of 10.1 Myr and no correlation between age and Galactic location. The TWA stars may have formed from an extended and filamentary molecular cloud but are not necessarily precisely coeval.

Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)] [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Anglada-Escude, Guillem, E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)] [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Universitaet Goettingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Hubble constant and dark energy from cosmological distance measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how the determination of the Hubble constant from cosmological distance measures is affected by models of dark energy and vice versa. For this purpose, constraints on the Hubble constant and dark energy are investigated using the cosmological observations of cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillations and type Ia suprenovae. When one investigates dark energy, the Hubble constant is often a nuisance parameter, thus it is usually marginalized over. On the other hand, when one focuses on the Hubble constant, simple dark energy models such as a cosmological constant and a constant equation of state are usually assumed. Since we do not know the nature of dark energy yet, it is interesting to investigate the Hubble constant assuming some types of dark energy and see to what extent the constraint on the Hubble constant is affected by the assumption concerning dark energy. We show that the constraint on the Hubble constant is not affected much by the assumption for dark energy. We furthermore show that this holds true even if we remove the assumption that the universe is flat. We also discuss how the prior on the Hubble constant affects the constraints on dark energy and/or the curvature of the universe.

Kazuhide Ichikawa; Tomo Takahashi

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

490

A Test of Tully-Fisher Distance Estimates Using Cepheids and Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update and extend the results of Shanks (1997, MNRAS, 290, L77) by making a direct test of Tully-Fisher distance estimates to thirteen spiral galaxies with HST Cepheid distances and to ten spiral galaxies with Type Ia supernova (SNIa) distances. The results show that the Tully-Fisher distance moduli are too short with respect to the Cepheid distances by 0.46+-0.11mag and too short with respect to the SNIa distances by 0.49+-0.18mag. Combining the HST Cepheid and the best SNIa data suggests that, overall, previous Tully-Fisher distances at v~1000 kms-1 were too short by 0.43+-0.09mag, a result which is significant at the 4.6 sigma level. These data therefore indicate that previous Tully-Fisher distances should be revised upwards by 22+-5% implying, for example, a Virgo distance of 19.0+-1.8Mpc. The value of Ho from Tully-Fisher estimates is correspondingly revised downwards from Ho=84+-10kms-1Mpc-1 to Ho=69+-8kms-1Mpc-1. There is evidence that the Tully-Fisher relation at large distances is affected by Malmquist bias. In this case, we argue that Ho<50kms-1Mpc-1 cannot be ruled out by Tully-Fisher considerations.

T. Shanks

1999-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

491

Error compensation in distance relays caused by wind power plants in the power grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents the Prony method as a filtering technique for distance relays. First, the effect of non-filtered frequency components generated by wind power plants in distance relays is evaluated in a simplified model of a doubly fed induction generator, resulting in an error of apparent impedance measurement. Then, the effects of non-filtered frequency components for typical distance relay are presented. The error in apparent impedance measurement is evaluated in reach and operation time of the relay; a distorted characteristic of the mho distance relay is shown in the impedance plane. Finally, Prony method as a filtering technique is implemented as a solution of the apparent impedance measurement error, and the simulated case and a real fault event are evaluated to validate the proposed distance relay algorithm. Thus the asynchronous frequency components of voltage and current signals are identified and filtered, as a result the performance of the distance relay is enhanced.

L.A. Trujillo Guajardo; A. Conde Enrquez; Z. Leonowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

High-precision absolute distance and vibration measurement with frequency scanned interferometry  

SciTech Connect

We report high-precision absolute distance and vibration measurements performed with frequency scanned interferometry using a pair of single-mode optical fibers. Absolute distance was determined by counting the interference fringes produced while scanning the laser frequency. A high-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to determine frequency changes during scanning. Two multiple-distance-measurement analysis techniques were developed to improve distance precision and to extract the amplitude and frequency of vibrations. Under laboratory conditions, measurement precision of {approx}50 nm was achieved for absolute distances ranging from 0.1 to 0.7 m by use of the first multiple-distance-measurement technique. The second analysis technique has the capability to measure vibration frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 100 Hz with an amplitude as small as a few nanometers without a priori knowledge.

Yang, H.-J.; Deibel, Jason; Nyberg, Sven; Riles, Keith

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Locating-total domination in claw-free cubic graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices of a graph G is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . A claw-free graph is a graph that does not contain K 1 , 3 as an induced subgraph. We show that the locating-total domination number of a claw-free cubic graph is at most one-half its order and we characterize the graphs achieving this bound.

Michael A. Henning; Christian Lwenstein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Long distance symmetries for nuclear forces and the similarity renormalization group  

SciTech Connect

In this work we study the emergence of long distance symmetries for nuclear forces within the framework of the similarity renormalization group approach.

Szpigel, S. [Faculdade de Computacao e Informatica, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, 01302-907, Sao Paulo - SP (Brazil); Timoteo, V. S. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13484-332, Limeira - SP (Brazil); Arriola, E. R. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear and Instituto Carlos I de Fisica Teorica y Computacional, Universidad de Granada, E-18071, Granada (Spain)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

495

Long distance transmission of SC-FDMA signals by directly-modulated OIL-VCSEL  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate the long distance transmission of single-carrier frequency division multiple address signals by directly-modulated optically injection-locked ...

Guo, Peng; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Juhao; Yang, Weijian; Parekh, Devang; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J; Hu, Weiwei; Xu, Anshi; Chen, Zhangyuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Electronics Based Innovation In A Niche Market: Distances Measured By The Speed Of Light.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to document the development of an accurate, affordable, reliable machine to perform the relatively long distance measurements routinely made (more)

Murphy, James S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Trips in planning: January 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: A Photographic Adventure September 1­9, 2011 (9 days) Study leader: Dr. David Foster Price: $5,550 · Single

Wood, Robert

498

Inhibition of total oxygen uptake by silica nanoparticles in activated sludge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanoparticle toxicity to biological activities in activated sludge is largely unknown. Among the widely used nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles (SNP) have a limited number of studies associated with inhibition to the activated sludge process (ASP). We demonstrated SNP inhibition of activated sludge respiration through oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurement. Based on the percentage inhibition of total oxygen consumption (IT), we observed that smaller \\{SNPs\\} (12nm, IT=333%; 151nm, IT=232%) were stronger inhibitors than larger \\{SNPs\\} (442 and 683nm, IT=51%). Transmission electron micrographs showed that some of the \\{SNPs\\} were adsorbed on and/or apparently embedded somewhere in the microbial cell membrane. Whether \\{SNPs\\} are directly associated with the inhibition of total oxygen uptake warrants further studies. However, it is clear that \\{SNPs\\} statistically significantly altered the composition of microbial membrane lipids, which was more clearly described by principal component analysis and weighted Euclidian distance (PCA-ED) of the fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) data. This study suggests that \\{SNPs\\} potentially affect the biological activity in activated sludge through the inhibition of total oxygen uptake.

Mark Sibag; Byeong-Gyu Choi; Changwon Suh; Kwan Hyung Lee; Jae Woo Lee; Sung Kyu Maeng; Jinwoo Cho

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Complete Embedded Minimal Surfaces of Finite Total David Hoffman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complete Embedded Minimal Surfaces of Finite Total Curvature David Hoffman Department-5300 Bonn, Germany July 18, 1994 Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Basic theory and the global Weierstrass representation 4 2.1 Finite total curvature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2

500

Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...