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1

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 23 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric

2

Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 29 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumptiona

3

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma, 1960 - 2011 1960 33.9 902.0 1,118.9 0.0 NA 17.8 17.8 2,072.6 1961 26.1 976.9 1,119.9 0.0 NA 20.2 20 ...

4

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 589.7 1,771.0 (s) NA 270.2 270.2 2,630.9 1961 0.0 633.8 1,737.7 0.1 NA 248.2 ...

5

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.0 5.0 5.0 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.1 5.1 5.1

6

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas, 1960 - 2011 1960 26.4 6,610.7 5,379.4 0.0 NA 50.2 50.2 12,066.6 1961 26.5 6,690.2 5,447.3 0.0 NA 52.0 ...

7

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana, 1960 - 2011 1960 346.3 0.3 69.9 0.0 NA 24.6 24.6 441.1 1961 336.7 0.4 66.7 0.0 NA 24.2 24.2 428.0

8

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 190.5 190.5 190.5 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 188.9 188.9 188.9

9

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 36.2 36.2 36.7 1961 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 35.1 35.1 35.5

10

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

11

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

12

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 - 2011 1960 796.6 36.9 31.3 0.0 NA 37.0 37.0 901.9 1961 756.0 37.3 32.7 0.0 NA 36.4 36.4 862.4

13

Figure 91. Natural gas production by source, 1990-2040 (trillion ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 91. Natural gas production by source, 1990-2040 (trillion cubic feet) Alaska Coalbed Methane Lower 48 Offshore Lower 48 Onshore Conventional

14

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

15

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels

16

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

17

Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports

18

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

19

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year

20

Trillion Particles,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trillion Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned from a Hero I/O Run on Hopper Surendra Byna ∗ , Andrew Uselton ∗ , Prabhat ∗ , David Knaak † , and Yun (Helen) He ∗ ∗ Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA. Email: {sbyna, acuselton, prabhat, yhe}@lbl.gov † Cray Inc., USA. Email: knaak@cray.com Abstract-Modern petascale applications can present a variety of configuration, runtime, and data management challenges when run at scale. In this paper, we describe our experiences in running VPIC, a large-scale plasma physics simulation, on the NERSC production Cray XE6 system Hopper. The simulation ran on 120,000 cores using ∼80% of computing resources, 90% of the available memory on each node and 50% of the Lustre scratch file system. Over two trillion particles were simulated for 23,000 timesteps, and 10 one-trillion particle dumps, each ranging between

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... and electrical system energy losses. ... Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the Distr ...

22

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1963 54.3 228.1 837.6 0.0 na 10.6 10.6 1,130.6 ... 1976 562.9 339.4 778.1 0.0 na 12.5 12.5 1,692.9 ... 2010 7,658.3 2,521.3 r 308.8 r 0.0 0.9 43.5 r ...

23

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

24

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

25

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

26

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

27

"Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

28

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

29

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

30

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

31

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

32

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

33

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

34

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

35

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 19492012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 19492012

36

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

37

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

38

The Btu tax is dead, long live the Btu tax  

SciTech Connect

The energy industry is powerful. That is the only explanation for its ability to jettison a cornerstone of the Clinton Administration's proposed deficit reduction package, the Btu tax plan, expected to raise about $71.5 billion over a five-year period. Clinton had proposed a broad-based energy tax of 25.7 cents per million Btus, and a surcharge of 34.2 cents on petroleum products, to be phased in over three years starting July 1, 1994. House Democrats went along, agreeing to impose a tax of 26.8 cents per million Btus, along with the 34.2-cent petroleum surcharge, both effective July 1, 1994. But something happened on the way to the Senate. Their version of the deficit reduction package contains no broad-based energy tax. It does, however, include a 4.3 cents/gallon fuel tax. Clinton had backed down, and House Democrats were left feeling abandoned and angry. What happened has as much to do with politics-particularly the fourth branch of government, lobbyists-as with a President who wants to try to please everyone. It turns out that almost every lawmaker or lobbyist who sought an exemption from the Btu tax, in areas as diverse as farming or ship and jet fuel used in international commercial transportation, managed to get it without giving up much in return. In the end, the Btu tax was so riddled with exemptions that its effectiveness as a revenue-raiser was in doubt. Meanwhile, it turns out that the Btu tax is not dead. According to Budget Director Leon Panetta, the Administration has not given up on the Btu tax and will fight for it when the reconciliation bill goes to a joint House-Senate conference.

Burkhart, L.A.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

40

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

42

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

43

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

44

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

45

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

46

Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 4 6 8 10 0 50 100 150 200 250 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities 1930 1935 1940 1945 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1980 1985 1990 1995 1975 2000 Note: In 1996, consumption of natural gas for agricultural use is classified as industrial use. In 1995 and earlier years, agricultural use was classified as commercial use. Sources: 1930-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1996: Form EIA- 176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report." 23. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1930-1996 Figure

47

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

48

Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations April 15, 2011 - 5:31pm Addthis Blood flow visualization | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Blood flow visualization | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Argonne's supercomputer is using its superpowers to map the movement of red blood cells -- which will hopefully lead to better diagnoses and treatments for patients with blood flow complications. With the power of 500 trillion calculations per second, a team of scientists from the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Brown University are mapping the movement of red blood cells -- hoping this will lead to better diagnoses and treatments for patients with

49

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Trillions Served: Massive, Complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the number of burgers served has eclipsed the billion mark, while the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) will now serve up trillions of nucleotides of...

50

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

51

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

52

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

53

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

54

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

55

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

56

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

57

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

58

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

59

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

60

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 3 Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade

62

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

63

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather than air) is used for gasification, the resulting medium Btu gas could be economically transported by pipeline from the gasification sites to the Gulf coast. Technical, environmental, and economic aspects of implementing this technology are discussed.

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

65

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

66

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

67

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

68

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

69

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

70

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

71

Parallel I/O, analysis, and visualization of a trillion particle simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petascale plasma physics simulations have recently entered the regime of simulating trillions of particles. These unprecedented simulations generate massive amounts of data, posing significant challenges in storage, analysis, and visualization. In this ...

Surendra Byna; Jerry Chou; Oliver Rbel; Prabhat; Homa Karimabadi; William S. Daughton; Vadim Roytershteyn; E. Wes Bethel; Mark Howison; Ke-Jou Hsu; Kuan-Wu Lin; Arie Shoshani; Andrew Uselton; Kesheng Wu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

BTU convergence spawning gas market opportunities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called BTU convergence of US electric power and natural gas sectors is spawning a boom in market opportunities in the US Northeast that ensures the region will be North America`s fastest growing gas market. That`s the view of Catherine Good Abbott, CEO of Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., who told a Ziff Energy conference in Calgary that US Northeast gas demand is expected to increase to almost 10 bcfd in 2000 and more than 12 bcfd in 2010 from about 8 bcfd in 1995 and only 3 bcfd in 1985. The fastest growth will be in the US Northeast`s electrical sector, where demand for gas is expected to double to 4 bcfd in 2010 from about 2 bcfd in 1995. In other presentations at the Ziff Energy conference, speakers voiced concerns about the complexity and speed of the BTU convergence phenomenon and offered assurances about the adequacy of gas supplies in North American to meet demand growth propelled by the BTU convergence boom. The paper discusses the gas demand being driven by power utilities, the BTU convergence outlook, electric power demand, Canadian production and supply, and the US overview.

NONE

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

Transportation and Handling of Medium Btu Gas in Pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-derived medium btu gas can be safely transported by pipeline over moderate distances, according to this survey of current industrial pipeline practices. Although pipeline design criteria will be more stringent than for natural gas pipelines, the necessary technology is readily available.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high price of natural gas and fuel oil for steam/power generation has alerted industry's decision makers to potentially more economical ways to provide the needed energy. Low-Btu fuel gas produced from coal appears to be an attractive alternate that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification facility needs to address those items that are not only unique to the gasification process itself, but also items generic to conventional firing of coal. This paper will discuss the environmental data necessary for permitting a low-Btu gasification facility located in the State of Louisiana. An actual case study for a 500,000 lb/hr natural gas-fired process steam plant being converted to low Btu gas will be presented. Typical air, water and solid waste effluents that must be considered will also be described.

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

All Consumption Tables - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a

76

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

79

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

80

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

82

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

83

table2.3_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu....

84

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

85

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

86

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Production: Trade: Stock Change and Other 8: Consumption: Fossil Fuels 2

87

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

89

Figure 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.1. 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013

90

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

91

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils, the inability to utilize caking coals, and the inability to accept coal fines. Mansfield Carbon Products, Inc., a subsidiary of A.T. Massey Coal Company, has developed an atmospheric pressure, two-stage process that eliminates these three problems.

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

94

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 12.91: 15.20 ...

95

Parametric Analysis of a 6500-Btu/kWh Heat Rate Dispersed Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost and performance assessments of two alternative system designs for a 2-MW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant yielded encouraging results: a 6500-Btu/kWh heat rate and a total plant investment of $1200-$1300/kW. Differences between the two designs establish a permissible range of operating conditions for the fuel cell that will help guide its development.

1985-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

96

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source, 1949-2011 (Billion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil 3: NGPL 4: Total: Hydro-electric Power 6: Geothermal 7: Solar/PV 8: Wind 9: Biomass 10: Total: 1949. ... refuse recovery. See Table 7.1.

97

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Table A26. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)"...

99

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power

100

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown gasifiers could potentially replace the natural gas now used in process heaters. The technology is well established and requires less capital than the higher-btu process heaters. Low-btu gas has sufficient heating value and flame temperature to be acceptable fuel for most process heaters. Economics for gas production appear promising, but somewhat uncertain. Rough evaluations indicate rates of return of as much as 30-40%. However, the economics are very dependent on a number of site- specific considerations including: coal vs. natural gas prices, economic life of the gas-consuming facility, quantity of gas required, need for desulfurization, location of gasifiers in relation to gas users, existence of coal unloading and storage facilities, etc. Two of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis.

Nebeker, C. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

103

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 Federal Agency Progress Toward the Renewable Energy Goal (Trillion Btu) (1) Total Renewable Energy Usage DOD EPA (2) DOE GSA NASA DOI Others All Agencies Note(s): Source(s):...

104

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

105

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give the reader knowledge into utility marketing strategies, rates, and services. Although water is a utility service, this paper will concern itself with the energy utilities, gas and electric. Commonality and diversity exist in the strategies and rates of the gas and electric utilities. Both provide services at no charge which make energy operation for their customers easier, safer and more economical. It is important to become familiar with utility strategies, rates, and services because energy knowledge helps your business operate at the lowest energy cost ($/BTU).

Phillips, J. N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators. The effects of cofiring coal and DB have been studied in a 30 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) burner boiler facility. Experiments were performed with Texas Lignite coal (TXL) as a base line fuel. The combustion efficiency from co-firing is also addressed in the present work. Two forms of partially composted DB fuels were investigated: low ash separated solids and high ash soil surface. Two types of coal were investigated: TXL and Wyoming Powder River Basin coal (WYO). Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed on coal and DB. DB fuels have much higher nitrogen (kg/GJ) and ash content (kg/GJ) than coal. The HHV of TXL and WYO coal as received were 14,000 and 18,000 kJ/kg, while the HHV of the LA-PC-DBSepS and the HA-PC-DB-SoilS were 13,000 and 4,000 kJ/kg. The HHV based on stoichiometric air were 3,000 kJ/kg for both coals and LA-PC-DB-SepS and 2,900 kJ/kg for HA-PC-DB-SoilS. The nitrogen and sulfur loading for TXL and WYO ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 kg/GJ and from 0.33 to 2.67 for the DB fuels. TXL began pyrolysis at 640 K and the WYO at 660 K. The HA-PC-DB-SoilSs began pyrolysis at 530 K and the LA-PC-DB-SepS at 510 K. The maximum rate of volatile release occurred at 700 K for both coals and HA-PC-DB-SoilS and 750K for LA-PC-DB-SepS. The NOx emissions for equivalence ratio (?) varying from 0.9 to 1.2 ranged from 0.34 to 0.90 kg/GJ (0.79 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for pure TXL. They ranged from 0.35 to 0.7 kg/GJ (0.82 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for a 90:10 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend and from 0.32 to 0.5 kg/GJ (0.74 to 0.12 lb/mmBTU) for a 80:20 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend over the same range of ?. In a rich environment, DB:coal cofiring produced less NOx and CO than pure coal. This result is probably due to the fuel bound nitrogen in DB is mostly in the form of urea which reduces NOx to non-polluting gases such as nitrogen (N2).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Analysis of industrial markets for low and medium Btu coal gasification. [Forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Low- and medium-Btu gases (LBG and MBG) can be produced from coal with a variety of 13 existing and 25 emerging processes. Historical experience and previous studies indicate a large potential market for LBG and MBG coal gasification in the manufacturing industries for fuel and feedstocks. However, present use in the US is limited, and industry has not been making substantial moves to invest in the technology. Near-term (1979-1985) market activity for LBG and MBG is highly uncertain and is complicated by a myriad of pressures on industry for energy-related investments. To assist in planning its program to accelerate the commercialization of LBG and MBG, the Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Booz, Allen and Hamilton to characterize and forecast the 1985 industrial market for LBG and MBG coal gasification. The study draws five major conclusions: (1) There is a large technically feasible market potential in industry for commercially available equipment - exceeding 3 quadrillion Btu per year. (2) Early adopters will be principally steel, chemical, and brick companies in described areas. (3) With no additional Federal initiatives, industry commitments to LBG and MBG will increase only moderately. (4) The major barriers to further market penetration are lack of economic advantage, absence of significant operating experience in the US, uncertainty on government environmental policy, and limited credible engineering data for retrofitting industrial plants. (5) Within the context of generally accepted energy supply and price forecasts, selected government action can be a principal factor in accelerating market penetration. Each major conclusion is discussed briefly and key implications for DOE planning are identified.

1979-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

$1.7 Trillion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning in 2007 in California, reduction of vampire or standby losses This will save $10 Billion when finally implemented, nationwide Out of a total $700 Billion, a crude summary is that 1/3 is structural, 1/3 is from transportation, and 1/3 from buildings and industry. 3 Two Energy Agencies in California The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) was formed in 1890 to regulate natural monopolies, like railroads, and later electric and gas utilities. The California Energy Commission (CEC) was formed in 1974 to regulate the environmental side of energy production and use. Now the two agencies work very closely, particularly to delay climate change. The Investor-Owned Utilities, under the guidance of the CPUC, spend Public Goods Charge money (rate-payer money) to do everything they can that is cost effective to beat existing standards. The Publicly-Owned utilities (20 % of the power), under loose supervision by the CEC, do the same. Californias Energy Action Plan

U. C. Berkeley; Arthur H. Rosenfeld; Or Just Google art Rosenfeld

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if ``logical`` refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO{sub x}; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

119

Army Energy Initiatives Task Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Army Energy Initiatives Task Force Kathy Ahsing Director, Planning and Development UNCLASSIFIED 2 Perfect Storm UNCLASSIFIED 3 U.S. Army Energy Consumption, 2010 23% 77% 42% 58%  Facilities  Vehicles & Equipment (Tactical and Non-tactical) Sources: Energy Information Agency, 2010 Annual Energy Review; Agency Annual Energy Management Data Reports submitted to DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (Preliminary FY 2010) 32% 68% DoD 80% Army 21% Federal Gov 1% Federal Government United States Department of Defense U.S. = 98,079 Trillion Btu DoD = 889 Trillion Btu Fed Gov = 1,108 Trillion Btu U.S. Army = 189 Trillion Btu FY10 Highlights - $2.5+B Operational Energy Costs - $1.2 B Facility Energy Costs

120

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Analysis of medium-BTU gasification condensates, June 1985-June 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the final results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from biomass gasification systems which are part of the US Department of Energy Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The work described in detail in this report involves extensive analysis of condensates from four medium-BTU gasifiers. The analyses include elemental analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and Ames Assay. This work was an extension of a broader study earlier completed of the condensates of all the gasifers and pyrolyzers in the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recoverd in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. Future studies of the time/temperature relationship to tar composition and the effect of processing atmosphere should be undertaken. Further processing of the condensates either as wastewater treatment or upgrading of the organics to useful products is also recommended. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Table E3. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Due to rounding, data may not sum to totals. HVAC = Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Source: Energy Information Administration, ...

123

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

124

Table 8. U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil. (b) Wood and wood-derived fuels. (c) Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricultural byproducts, ...

125

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Carbon Emissions: Iron and Steel Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iron and Steel Industry Iron and Steel Industry Carbon Emissions in the Iron and Steel Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 3312) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 39.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 10.7% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 22.2 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 1,649 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 7.6% Nonfuel Use of Energy: 886 trillion Btu (53.7%) -- Coal: 858 trillion Btu (used to make coke) Carbon Intensity: 24.19 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 39.9 Coal 22.7

127

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 75,407 2 4 567 2 8 * 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 16,479 * * 119 Q 6 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

128

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

129

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

130

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

131

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

132

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

F14: Other Petroleum Products Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2011 State Consumption Prices Expenditures Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu...

134

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas distributed throughout the Marcellus black shale in northern Appalachia could boost proven U.S. gas reserves by trillions of cubic feet (see http://live.psu.edu/story/28116). A recent gas exploration and extraction. In return for lease rights, parties recovering gas customarily pay

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

135

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's). ~Butanol is safer to handle with a Reid Value of 0.33 psi is easily recovered, increasing the energy yield of a bushel of corn by an additional 18 percent over the energy yield of ethanol produced from the same quantity of corn. ~Current butanol prices as a chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

136

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

137

c13.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Expenditures Primary Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890...

138

c13a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Expenditures Primary Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings ... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559...

139

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890...

140

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings ... 4,617 70,181 15.2 10,746 3,559 1,043...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Released: February 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu...

142

Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

jets. Image by Oliver Rubel The team was able to accelerate FastQuery's indexing and query capabilities by implementing a hierarchical load-balancing strategy that involves a...

143

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

"MSN","YYYYMM","Value","Column_Order","Description","Unit" "BDFDBUS",200101,0.094,1,"Biodiesel Feedstock","Trillion Btu" ...

144

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Electricity

145

Table 2.1e Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1e Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Electricity

146

The Impact of Codes, Regulations, and Standards on Split-Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and Under  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes a framework for understanding the technology and regulation of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps 65,000 Btu/hr and under. The reporting framework is structured so that it can be added to in the future. This study is broken into six chapters:The basic components, refrigeration cycle, operation, and efficiency ratings of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps are covered for background information.Equipment efficiency ...

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Table 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

150

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources"

151

Table 1.2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

152

Table E1.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

153

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," "," ",,,," "," ",,," ",," ",," ",,"Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke and"," ",,"of Energy Sources"

154

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

155

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

156

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

157

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

158

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

159

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

160

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, ...

162

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Units & Calculators ... 2012. Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, ...

163

Table 1.12 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gasoline: 5.250 million Btu/barrel; electricity: 3,412 Btu/kilowatthour; and purchased steam: 1,000 Btu/pound.

164

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

165

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

167

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

168

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

169

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

170

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

171

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

172

Center for Green Building Jennifer Senick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Source, 1960-2008, in Trillion BTU 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Coal Natural Gas Petroleum; it is currently in pilot phase and is scheduled to be issued March 2012 #12;greenbuilding.rutgers.edu Green Market-553, 2009 . 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% VAV Economizer Maintenance EMCS 1992 Survey 2003

173

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

174

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 Btu/KWh, 10,173 Btu/KWh, and 9,919 Btu/KWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. and Monthly Energy Review November 2005, and September 2009 DOE/EIA-0035(2005, 2009),Table A6. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14

175

Table 7.5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." " ",," "," ",," "," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Factors" ,"Total United States"

176

Table N8.2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

177

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; " " Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

178

"Table E8.2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." " ",," "," ",," "," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Factors" ,"Total United States"

179

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;" .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," " " "," " ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",1328 "Natural Gas",5725 "Net Electricity",2437 " Purchases",2510 " Transfers In",33 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",7

180

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

182

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

183

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

184

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

185

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

186

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

187

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

188

Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6 0 * 1 Q 0 0 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 * * 1 * 0 0 * 3115 Dairy Products Q 0 * * * 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

189

table2.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * * 7 0 0 * * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 *

190

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

191

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

192

Human exposure to dioxin from combustion sources  

SciTech Connect

Because of their extreme toxicity, much concern and debate has arisen about the nature and extent of human exposure to dioxin. Since municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators are known to emit polychorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polycholorinated dibenzofurnas (PCDFs) many people who live near MSW incinerators fear that they will be exposed to high levels of dioxin and subsequently develop cancer. What is often overlooked in this debate, however, is the fact that the general population is continuously being exposed to trace amounts of dioxin as exemplified by the fact that virtually all human adipose tissue samples contain dioxin at levels of 3 parts per trillion (ppt) or greater. This paper provides a perspective on MSW incineration as a source of human exposure to dioxin by comparing this exposure source with exposure to background environmental contamination and evaluates some of the potential key sources of PCDD/PCDF input into the enviroment. 32 refs., 3 tabs.

Hattemer-Frey, H.A.; Travis, C.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Figure trillion cubic feet - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

September 2013 4 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Monthly 0.00 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.75 2.00 2.25 2.50

195

c33.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons)...

196

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Table 5.14a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption Estimates: Residential and Commercial Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Residential Sector Commercial...

197

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Table 3.8a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied...

198

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... Total Energy Consumption: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP: State: Trillion Btu:

199

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) SIC Code a...

200

District of Columbia - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table CT2. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960-2011, District of Columbia (Trillion Btu) ... Washington, DC 20585 About EIA Press Room Careers ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type and Fuel Type (trillion Btu) Light-Duty Consumption by Technology Type Conventional Vehicles 1/

202

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

203

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

204

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

205

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F23: Nuclear Energy Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2011 State Nuclear Electric Power Nuclear Fuel Consumption Prices Expenditures Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu...

206

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear

207

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of Petroleum Consumption Estimates: Transportation and Electric Power Sectors, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector 1 Aviation...

208

Word Pro - S10  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of data from 1949 through 2013, see the "Web Page" cited above. Table 10.2b Renewable Energy Consumption: Industrial and Transportation Sectors (Trillion Btu) Industrial Sector...

209

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) June 2010 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2008 2008 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2008 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural

210

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Total (trillion Btu) Residual Fuel Oil (1000 bbls) Distillate Fuel Oil b (1000 bbls) Natural Gas c...

211

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State: Jet Fuel a: Consumption : Prices : Expenditures: Thousand Barrels: Trillion Btu: Dollars per Million Btu: Million Dollars: Alabama: 2,355: 13.4: 22.77: 304.0 ...

212

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. - =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 6 Conventional hydroelectricity net generation (converted to Btu ...

213

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas from Local

214

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

215

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

216

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

217

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

218

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

219

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

220

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 BtuKWh, 10,173 BtuKWh, and 9,919 BtuKWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources:...

222

file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Btu) Note: 1. The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 BtuKWh, 10,173 BtuKWh, and 9,919 BtuKWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources:...

223

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

224

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

225

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)",,"NGL(d)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

226

Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

227

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

228

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009" August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars" "NAICS",,,,"Furnace/Coke",,,"Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Oven Gases","Waste Gas",,"Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

229

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

230

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

231

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food ................................................................................. 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products ..................................... 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107

232

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

233

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste" " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Oven Gases","Waste Gas","Coke","Black Liquor","Bark","Materials"

234

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

235

Table 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

236

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and"," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related"

237

Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related"

238

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

239

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

240

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

242

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

243

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

244

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 10 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.5 By Further Classification of "Other" Energy Sources XLS PDF Energy Used as a Nonfuel (Feedstock) Table 2.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF Table 2.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF Table 2.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category XLS PDF Energy Consumption as a Fuel Table 3.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF

245

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 2 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms all tables + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values RSE Table 1.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 1.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category & Region XLS PDF Table 1.4 Number of Establishments Using Energy Consumed for All Purpose XLSPDF Table 1.5 By Further Classification of "Other" Energy Sources XLS PDF Energy Used as a Nonfuel (Feedstock) Values RSE Table 2.1 By Mfg. Industry & Region (physical units) XLS PDF XLS Table 2.2 By Mfg. Industry & Region (trillion Btu) XLS PDF XLS Table 2.3 By Value of Shipments & Employment Size Category XLS PDF

246

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 10,079 * * 80 * * 0 1 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 226 17,545 1 1 141 * 0 0 12 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 107

247

"Table A25 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Dollars per Million Btu)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,0.8,1,2.8,1,0.7 20,"Food and Kindred Products",15.789,2.854,6.064,2.697,7.596,1.433,4.5

248

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

249

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

250

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

251

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

252

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

253

Table 3. Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011" Changes to proved reserves of wet natural gas by source, 2011" "trillion cubic feet" ,"Proved",,"Revisions &",,"Proved" ,"Reserves","Discoveries","Other Changes","Production","Reserves" "Source of Gas","Year-End 2010",2011,2011,2011,"Year-End 2011" "Coalbed Methane",17.5,0.7,0.4,-1.8,16.8 "Shale",97.4,33.7,8.5,-8,131.6 "Other (Conventional & Tight)" " Lower 48 Onshore",181.7,14.7,-3.5,-12.8,180.1 " Lower 48 Offshore",12.1,0.8,-0.4,-1.7,10.8 " Alaska",8.9,0,0.9,-0.3,9.5 "TOTAL",317.6,49.9,5.9,-24.6,348.8 "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-23, "Annual Survey of Domestic Oil and Gas Reserves."

254

Table N1.3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," " " "," ","RSE" ,"Total","Row" "Energy Source","First Use","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",1814,3 "Natural Gas",7426,1 "Net Electricity",3035,1 " Purchases",3044,1

255

Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," " " "," ","RSE" ,"Total","Row" "Energy Source","First Use","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",1959,10 "Natural Gas",6468,1.3 "Net Electricity",2840,1.4 " Purchases",2882,1.4

256

Released: October 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,"Total" "Energy Source","First Use" ,"Total United States" "Coal ",1433 "Natural Gas",5911 "Net Electricity",2851 " Purchases",2894 " Transfers In",20 " Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy",4 " Sales and Transfers Offsite",67

257

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

258

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

259

Sources - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help annotate Contents Next: References Up: RamanujanModular Equations, Previous: Ramanujan's sum. Sources. [Annotate] [Shownotes]. References [7]...

260

table7.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.5 0.9 1.5 0.8 0.6 1.1 311 Food 1,082 W 2 3 566 1 9 * 40 8.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 220 W * * 59 * 6 0 9 1.1 31131 Sugar 71 733 * * 22 * 2 * 3 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0 0 1 12.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8  

SciTech Connect

This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

263

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

264

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S. Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive 8 MECS Survey Data 2010 | 2006 | 2002 | 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Values SIC RSE Number of Establishments by First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Establishment Counts XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu XLS XLS XLS First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu XLS XLS

265

Ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal exec summary Executive Summary Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on existing coal-fired plants. EIA projects few new central-station coal-fired power plants, however, beyond those already under construction or supported by clean coal incentives. Generation from coal increases by 25 percent from 2009 to 2035, largely as a result of increased use of existing capacity; however, its share of the total generation mix falls from 45 percent to 43 percent as a result of more rapid increases in generation from natural gas and renewables over the same period. See more Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the

267

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Report on Competitive Sourcing Results Fiscal Year 2006 May 2007 Executive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ...................................................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................................................. 4 I. The big picture ......................................................................................... 4 II. How public-private competition was used in FY 2006 .................................... 6 A. Anticipated benefits from competition in FY 2006

268

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The energy consumption data is broken down by sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power) as well as source, and also provides total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

269

NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reconnection is the mechanism behind the aurora borealis (a.k.a. northern lights) and solar flares, as well as fractures in Earth's protective magnetic field-fractures that...

271

Table 3. Wet natural gas production and resources (trillion cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2013 EIA/ARI unproved wet shale gas technically recoverable resources (TRR) 2012 USGS conventional unproved wet natural gas TRR, including reserve

272

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) End-Use Categories Net Demand for Electricity a Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil and Diesel Fuel b Natural Gas c LPG Coal (excluding Coal Coke...

273

Summary of Prinicpal Building Activities in Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Age (years) Average Hours Open per Week Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Energy Expenditures (million dollars) All Commercial Buildings 30.5 62 5,321 69,618 Building...

274

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7: Solar Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Electric Power Residential a Commercial b Industrial b Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Alabama 0 0.2 0.0...

275

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Sector, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Hydroelectric Power 1 Geothermal 2 SolarPV 3 Wind 4 Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Total 1949 1,349 NA NA NA 6 NA 6...

276

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(All Sectors), Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.4b and 8.4c; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10...

277

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Total Electricity b Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil c Natural Gas d LPG Coal Coke and Breeze Other e RSE...

278

Buildings and Energy in the 1980's  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) SIC Code a Industry Groups and Industry Total Net Electricity b Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil c Natural Gas d LPG Coal Coke and Breeze Other e...

279

file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity 3 NA 185...

280

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Use by Mode and Type TEU000 (trillion Btu) ... TEU000:da_Rail Rail TEU000:da_Freight TEU000:da_Passenger Passenger ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

282

FEMP Year in Review 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

identifying and implementing energy saving projects, the 2003 award winners have created energy cost savings of more than 62 million and 3.4 trillion Btu in one year. Our winners...

283

Table A10. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Breeze)","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short...

284

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(million","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short...

285

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. P=Preliminary. =No data reported. (s)=Less than 0.5 trillion Btu. 4 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived ...

286

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Review 2011 125 2 123 5 9 7 112 Feedstock Losses and Production Imports Exports Stock Consumption 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Trillion Btu Change Co-Products 2 2001 2002 2003...

287

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Processing Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms Definition Extraction Loss The reduction in volume of natural gas due to the removal of natural gas liquid constituents such as ethane, propane, and butane at natural gas processing plants. Natural Gas Processed Natural gas that has gone through a processing plant. Natural Gas Processing Plant A facility designed to recover natural gas liquids from a stream of natural gas which may or may not have passed through lease separators and/or field separation facilities. These facilities also control the quality of the natural gas to be marketed. Cycling plants are classified as natural gas processing plants. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Natural Gas Processed, Total Liquids Extracted, and Extraction Loss Volume: Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production" . Estimated Heat Content of Extraction Loss: Estimated, assuming the makeup to total liquids production as reported on Form EIA-64A for each State was proportional to the components and products ultimately separated in the States as reported on the 12 monthly reports on Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," and applying the following conversion factors to the individual component and product production estimates (million Btu extraction loss per barrel of liquid produced): ethane - 3.082; propane - 3.836; normal butane - 4.326; isobutane - 3.974; pentanes plus - 4.620.

288

Hoosac tunnel geothermal heat source. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hoosac Rail Tunnel has been analyzed as a central element in a district heating system for the City of North Adams. The tunnel has been viewed as a collector of the earth's geothermal heat and a seasonal heat storage facility with heat piped to the tunnel in summer from existing facilities at a distance. Heated fluid would be transported in winter from the tunnel to users who would boost the temperature with individual heat pumps. It was concluded the tunnel is a poor source of geothermal heat. The maximum extractable energy is only 2200 million BTU (20000 gallons of oil) at 58/sup 0/F. The tunnel is a poor heat storage facility. The rock conductivity is so high that 75% of the heat injected would escape into the mountain before it could be recaptured for use. A low temperature system, with individual heat pumps for temperature boost could be economically attractive if a low cost fuel (byproduct, solid waste, cogeneration) or a cost effective seasonal heat storage were available.

Not Available

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

table5.5_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 0 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6 2,105 2 35 -- 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use -- 2,496 12 4 1,271 2 11 -- 5.6

290

table4.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 68,230 2 3 560 1 8 * 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 7,098 * * 59 * 5 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 733 * * 22 * 2 * 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0

291

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Sourcing Competitive Sourcing The Department of Energy's (DOE) Competitive Sourcing program is a management initiative aimed at improving DOE's performance and reducing the Department's operational costs. The program is governed by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A- 76, Performance of Commercial Activities, dated May 29, 2003. The commercial activities selected for review and competition include functions performed by government employees that are readily available in the private sector, and where the potential for efficiencies, regardless of the winning provider, are highly likely. The candidate functions are chosen from the Department's annual Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory and subjected to a feasibility review to determine if a prudent business case can be made to enter

292

Neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

Leland, W.T.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

295

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

296

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

297

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

299

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP MEETING PROCEEDINGS June 17, 2002 8:30 am - 11:00 am Room 5E-069 ATTENDEES John Gordon Robert Card Bruce Carnes Kathy Peery Brendan Danaher, AFGE Tony Lane Karen Evans Bill Sylvester Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Laurie Smith Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Rosalie Jordan Dennis O'Brien Mark Hively Robin Mudd Steven Apicella AGENDA 8:30 a.m. - 8:35 a.m. Opening Remarks 8:35a.m. - 8:55 a.m. Executive Steering Group roles and responsibilities, A-76 status, and talking points Team Briefings 8:55 a.m. - 9:20 a.m. Information Technology Study 9:20 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Financial Services Study

300

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

302

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

303

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

304

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 4, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

305

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New England New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

306

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

307

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

308

Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medium Btu methane gas is a naturally occurring byproduct of anaerobic digestion of landfilled municipal solid waste. The energy potential of landfill gas in New York State is estimated to be 61 trillion Btu's per year or the equivalent of 10% of the natural gas used annually in the state. The 18-month Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project conducted at the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, New York conclusively demonstrated that landfill gas is an acceptable fuel for producing electricity using an internal combustion engine/generator set. Landfill gas proved to be a reliable and consistent fuel source during a six-month field test program. Engine exhaust emissions were determined to be comparable to that of natural gas and no unusually high corrosion rates on standard pipeline material were found.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Application of thermal energy storage in the cement industry. Final report, September 1977--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the manufacture of cement, literally trillions of Btu's are rejected to the environment each year. The purpose of this feasibility study program was to determine whether thermal energy storage could be used to conserve or allow alternative uses of this rejected energy. This study identifies and quantifies the sources of rejected energy in the cement manufacturing process, establishes use of this energy, investigates various storage system concepts, and selects energy conservation systems for further study. Thermal performance and economic analyses are performed on candidate storage systems for four typical cement plants representing various methods of manufacturing cement. Through the use of thermal energy storage in conjunction with waste heat electric power generation units, an estimated 2.4 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year, or an equivalent of 4.0 x 10/sup 6/ barrels of oil per year, can be conserved. Attractive rates of return on investment of the proposed systems are an incentive for further development.

Jaegr, F.A.; Beshore, D.G.; Miller, F.M.; Gartner, E.M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor for fuel oil (BTU/ BTU) SFo: Source factor for otherOil Other fuels District Chilled water District hot water District steam Source

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2

312

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP Meeting Proceedings October 30, 2002 Room 6E-069, 10:30 - 12:00 Agenda Opening Remarks Bruce Carnes Competitive Sourcing Update Denny O'Brien Team Briefings Team Leads ESG Discussion/Wrap up Bruce Carnes Attendees Bruce Carnes, Acting Chair MaryAnn Shebek Robert Card Prentis Cook Ambassador Brooks Tony Lane Kyle McSlarrow Karen Evans Suzanne Brennan, NTEU Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Laurie Morman Denny O'Brien Travis McCrory Bill Pearce Jeff Dowl Mark Hively Steven Apicella Robin Mudd Bruce Carnes chaired the meeting and began with welcoming NTEU to the meeting. In regard to the OMB's Balanced Scorecard, the Department has achieved a Green on progress and we are close to achieving a yellow on status.

313

Radiation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

315

Overview of Commercial Buildings, 2003 - Trends  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Trends in Commercial Buildings Sector-1979 to 2003 Since the first CBECS in 1979, the commercial buildings sector has increased in size. From 1979 to 2003: The number of commercial buildings increased from 3.8 million to 4.9 million (Figure 3). The amount of commercial floorspace increased from 51 billion to 72 billion square feet (Figure 4). Total energy consumed increased from less than 5,900 trillion to more than 6,500 trillion Btu (Figure 5). Electricity and natural gas consumption, nearly equal in 1979, diverged; electricity increased to more than 3,500 trillion Btu by 2003 while natural gas declined to 2,100 trillion Btu. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003. Figure 3. The number of commercial buildings increased from 1979 to 2003.

316

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

317

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description http://en.openei.org/w/skins/openei/images/ui-bg_gloss_wave-medium_40_d6...); background-attachment: scroll; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: rgb(214, 235, 225); line-height: 17px; width: 650px; background-position: 50% 0%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat; ">This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 3, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

318

Source Selection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Source SelectionSource Selection Boards Source Evaluation Board (SEB) Monthly Status Reporting Requirement (pdf) Source Evaluation Board (SEB)...

319

Word Pro - S2.lwp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2 0.2 (s) Process Heating Machine Drive Facility HVAC² Process Cooling and Refrigeration Electrochemical Processes Facility Lighting Conventional Electricity Generation 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 Quadrillion Btu 5.5 2.9 1.0 0.3 0.1 0.1 Natural Gas Net Electricity Coal³ Residual Fuel Oil Distillate

320

Geothermal source potential and utilization for alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of using a potential geothermal source to drive a fuel grade alcohol plant. Test data from the well at the site indicated that the water temperature at approximately 8500 feet should approach 275/sup 0/F. However, no flow data was available, and so the volume of hot water that can be expected from a well at this site is unknown. Using the available data, numerous fuel alcohol production processes and various heat utilization schemes were investigated to determine the most cost effective system for using the geothermal resource. The study found the direct application of hot water for alcohol production based on atmospheric processes using low pressure steam to be most cost effective. The geothermal flow rates were determined for various sizes of alcohol production facility using 275/sup 0/F water, 235/sup 0/F maximum processing temperature, 31,000 and 53,000 Btu per gallon energy requirements, and appropriate process approach temperatures. It was determined that a 3 million gpy alcohol plant is the largest facility that can practically be powered by the flow from one large geothermal well. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared, operating costs were calculated, the economic feasibility of the propsed project was examined, and a sensitivity analysis was performed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency 1 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency Total and U.S. Department of Defense, Fiscal Years U.S. Department of Defense and Non-Defense Agencies, Fiscal Years 1975-2011 1975-2011 Non-Defense Agencies, Fiscal Year 2011 24 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 General Services Administration. 2 Health and Human Services. 3 National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 4 See Table 1.11 for list of agencies. Note: The U.S. Government's fiscal year was October 1 through September 30, except in 1975 and 1976 when it was July 1 through June 30. Source: Table 1.11. 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 Trillion Btu Non-Defense Non-Defense Defense 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 400 800 1,200 1,600 Trillion Btu Defense

322

Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,328 Natural Gas 5,725 Net Electricity 2,437 Purchases 2,510 Transfers In 33 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 7 Sales and Transfers Offsite 113 Coke and Breeze 374 Residual Fuel Oil 170 Distillate Fuel Oil 135 Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids 2,057 Other 7,381 Asphalt and Road Oil (a) 946 Lubricants (a) 386

323

table1.5_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; 5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. RSE Total Row Energy Source First Use Factors Total United States RSE Column Factor: 1.0 Coal 1,959 10.0 Natural Gas 6,468 1.3 Net Electricity 2,840 1.4 Purchases 2,882 1.4 Transfers In 35 2.6 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 8 1.5 Sales and Transfers Offsite 86 0.7 Coke and Breeze 385 1.7 Residual Fuel Oil 255 2.3 Distillate Fuel Oil 151 5.6 Liquefied Petroleum Gases and Natural Gas Liquids 3,070 0.6

324

Calibrated Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST designed a compliant source. ... needed for new purposes and as old sources decay ... The figure shows a reprentative energy spectrum from such ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

327

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

328

Source Selection Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide More Documents & Publications Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection...

329

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplemental Supplies Supplemental Supplies Definitions Key Terms Definition Biomass Gas A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. Blast-furnace Gas The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to metallic iron. It is commonly used as a fuel within steel works. British Thermal Unit (Btu) The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of liquid water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at the temperature at which water has its greatest density (approximately 39 degrees Fahrenheit). Coke-oven Gas The mixture of permanent gases produced by the carbonization of coal in a coke oven at temperatures in excess of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

330

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Coal NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) Total United States 311 Food 9.12 0.26 0.00 53.43 90.85 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6.30 0.29 0.00 51.34 50.47 311221 Wet Corn Milling 4.87 0.48 0.00 47.74 50.47 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 5.02 0.31 0.00 53.34 236.66 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9.78 0.27 0.00 90.59 0.00 3115 Dairy Products 11.21 0.10 0.00 103.12 0.00 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

331

Source Tree Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dividing software systems in components improves software reusability as well as software maintainability. Components live at several levels, we concentrate on the implementation level where components are formed by source files, divided over directory structures. Such source code components are usually strongly coupled in the directory structure of a software system. Their compilation is usually controlled by a single global build process. This entangling of source trees and build processes often makes reuse of source code components in different software systems difficult. It also makes software systems inflexible because integration of additional source code components in source trees and build processes is difficult. This paper's subject is to increase software reuse by decreasing coupling of source code components. It is achieved by automized assembly of software systems from reusable source code components and involves integration of source trees, build processes, and configuration processes. Application domains include generative programming, product-line architectures, and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software engineering.

Merijn De Jonge

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

333

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

334

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

335

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

336

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

337

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

338

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1997-Jan : 01/10 : 3.79 : ...

339

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

340

Table E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat requirement of the boiler feed water. Chart III shows potential steam energy savings and will be useful in estimating the steam energy savings of high pressure processes.

Vallery, S. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

British Thermal Units (Btu) - Energy Explained, Your Guide To ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

343

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: BTU QuickConverter | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program...

344

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuelsa Nuclear Electric Power Renew-able Energyb Total Imports Exports Net Importsc ... fuel ethanol stock change; and biodiesel stock change and balancing item.

345

POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

347

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

348

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

349

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

350

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

351

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

352

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

353

Next Generation Light Source  

Next Generation Light Source Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination High Entry Barrier 71 ...

354

Sources of Thermodynamic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The thermodynamic data summarized in Table 2 are collected from a variety of sources. The certainty with which

355

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

356

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

357

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential from Market Trends Residential from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

358

DC source assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ion Sources - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources Sources The 88-Inch Cyclotron is fed by three Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) high-charge-state ion sources, the ECR, the AECR, and VENUS, currently the most powerful ECR ion source in the world. Built to answer the demand for intense heavy ion beams, these high performance ion sources enable the 88-Inch Cyclotron to accelerate beams of ions from hydrogen to uranium. The ECR ion sources allow the efficient use of rare isotopes of stable elements, either from natural or enriched sources. A variety of metallic ion beams are routinely produced in our low temperature oven (up to 600°C) and our high temperature oven (up to 2100°C). Furthermore, the ability to produce "cocktails" (mixtures of beams) for the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility adds tremendously to the flexibility of the 88-Inch Cyclotron.

360

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

362

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)" "End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu

363

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

364

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

365

Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source Spallation Neutron Source Providing the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world... Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has passed another milestone on the way to completion this year--the commissioning of the proton accumulator ring. Brookhaven led the design and construction of the accumulator ring, which will allow an order of magnitude more beam power than any other facility in the world. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by the U.S. Department of Energy. The figure on the right shows a schematic of the accumulator ring and transport beam lines that are being designed and built by Brookhaven

366

Source and replica calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

Whalen, P.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dynamic radioactive particle source  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Locating Sources of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Guides and directories to sources of materials data and information...1993 The CD-ROM Directory 1993, TFPL Publishing, Washington, DC, 1993.

369

AnthroSources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... placed into the HANIM format (www.hanim.org) and existing animation sequences are applied. The original source of the animations comes from ...

370

Sources of Corrosion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Sources of corrosion information...Sci.chem.electrochem Newsgroup www.groups.google.com/groups?group=sci.chem..electrochem/...

371

Brochures | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) The Advanced Photon Source: Lighting the Way to a Better Tomorrow aps brochure The APS helps...

372

Publications | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compendium of information on results from research at the APS. It is the official source for listing APS-related journal articles, conference proceedings and papers,...

373

Divisions | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart Argonne Research Divisions APS Research Divisions In May 2002, The Advanced Photon Source was reorganized into three divisions: the Accelerator Systems Division...

374

Improved ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PORTABLE SOURCE OF RADIOACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable source for radiogiaphy or radiotherapy is described. It consists of a Tl/sup 170/ or Co/sup 60/ source mounted in a rotatable tungsten alloy plug. The plug rotates within a brass body to positions of safety or exposure. Provision is made for reloading and carrying the device safely. (T.R.H.)

Goertz, R.C.; Ferguson, K.R.; Rylander, E.W.; Safranski, L.M.

1959-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

377

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

379

Neutron sources and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

SNG process is a potential CO/sub 2/ source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hoffman single-step coal gasification process produces approximately equal quantities of high-Btu gas and CO/sub 2/. There is an increasing use of CO/sub 2/ for enhanced oil recovery and this potential market has added a new dimension to the economics of the gasification process.

Not Available

1982-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Microfabricated diffusion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial from Executive Summary Industrial from Executive Summary Natural gas consumption grows in industrial and electric power sectors as domestic production also serves an expanding export market figure data Relatively low natural gas prices, maintained by growing shale gas production, spur increased use in the industrial and electric power sectors, particularly over the next decade. In the Reference case, natural gas use in the industrial sector increases by 16 percent, from 6.8 trillion cubic feet per year in 2011 to 7.8 trillion cubic feet per year in 2025. After 2025, the growth of natural gas consumption in the industrial sector slows, while total U.S. consumption continues to grow (Figure 7). This additional growth is mostly for use in the electric power sector. Although natural gas continues to capture a growing share of total electricity

383

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial from Executive Summary Industrial from Executive Summary Natural gas consumption grows in industrial and electric power sectors as domestic production also serves an expanding export market figure data Relatively low natural gas prices, maintained by growing shale gas production, spur increased use in the industrial and electric power sectors, particularly over the next decade. In the Reference case, natural gas use in the industrial sector increases by 16 percent, from 6.8 trillion cubic feet per year in 2011 to 7.8 trillion cubic feet per year in 2025. After 2025, the growth of natural gas consumption in the industrial sector slows, while total U.S. consumption continues to grow (Figure 7). This additional growth is mostly for use in the electric power sector. Although natural gas continues to capture a growing share of total electricity

384

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

385

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of

386

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity 3 NA 185 175 Natural Gas NA 388 326 Coal NA 36 14 Residual Fuel NA 1 19 Coke and Breeze NA 313 186 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2.'Total' includes all energy sources listed below and all other energy that was purchased or transferred in. 3.'Electricity' consists of quantities of electricity that were purchased or transferred in, and is equivalent

387

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

388

Originally Released: August 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

August 2009 August 2009 Revised: October 2009 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Waste Blast Pulping Liquor Oils/Tars NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, and Waste Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Materials Total United States 311 Food 10 0 3 0 0 7 Q 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 7 0 1 0 0 6 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 5 0 * 0 0 4 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food Q 0 * 0 0 0 Q 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * 0 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 1 0 1 0 0 * * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products

389

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 5,8 Wind 5 Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Commercial Sector 10 1989 9 7 18 1 36 - 1 2 9 - - - 12 - - - 47 1990 9 6 28 1 45 - 1 2 15 - - - 18 - - - 63 1995 12 4 44 - 60 - 1 1 21 - - - 23 (s) - - 83 1996 14 4 44 (s) 62 - 1 1 31 - - - 33 (s) - - 95 1997 14 5 40 (s) 59 - 1 1 34 - - - 35 (s) - - 94 1998 11 5 42 (s) 57 - 1 1 32 - - - 34 - - - 91 1999 12 6 40 (s) 57 - 1 (s) 33 - - - 35 (s) - - 92 2000

390

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

391

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

392

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coal and Breeze Other(e) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products * 0 * 0 * 0 0 0 3121 Beverages * 0 * 0 0 0 0 0 3122 Tobacco * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0

393

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

394

Geopressured energy availability. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Near- and long-term prospects that geopressured/geothermal energy sources could become a viable alternative fuel for electric power generation were investigated. Technical questions of producibility and power generation were included, as well as economic and environmental considerations. The investigators relied heavily on the existing body of information, particularly in geotechnical areas. Statistical methods were used where possible to establish probable production values. Potentially productive geopressured sediments have been identified in twenty specific on-shore fairways in Louisiana and Texas. A total of 232 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of dissolved methane and 367 x 10/sup 15/ Btu (367 quads) of thermal energy may be contained in the water within the sandstone in these formations. Reasonable predictions of the significant reservoir parameters indicate that a maximum of 7.6 TCF methane and 12.6 quads of thermal energy may be producible from these potential reservoirs.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment addresses the proposed action by the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the facilities of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. The environmental effects of a No-Action Alternative as well as a Proposed Action are evaluated in the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet” link below leads to a one-page summary of the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment” link below leads to the whole 41-page

396

Alternative fuel information sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This short document contains a list of more than 200 US sources of information (Name, address, phone number, and sometimes contact) related to the use of alternative fuels in automobiles and trucks. Electric-powered cars are also included.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sources of Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Sources of error in damage tolerance analysis can be classified as: Uncertainty and assumptions in data input Uncertainty due to assumptions about flaws Interpretations of, and assumptions in, stress history Inaccuracies in stress intensity Computer...

398

Source Remediation vs. Plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This summary paper reviews just some of the extensive scientific literature from the past 20 years on the various aspects of contaminant source remediation and plume management. Some of the major findings of the numerous research projects are presented.

Management Critical Factors; G. Teutsch; H. Rgner; D. Zamfirescu; M. Finkel; M. Bittens

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

About | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Here you will find an introduction and tour of the facility, as well as information about the organizations and opportunities at...

400

Specific Sources of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Sources of materials data...ASM International, 1989, 1224 pp (C) NIST High Temperature Superconductors Database, Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Locating illicit radiological sources using gamma ray or neutron detection is a key challenge for both homeland security and nuclear nonproliferation. Localization methods using an array of detectors or a sequence of observations in time and space must provide rapid results while accounting for a dynamic attenuating environment. In the presence of significant attenuation and scatter, more extensive numerical transport calculations in place of the standard analytical approximations may be required to achieve accurate results. Numerical adjoints based on deterministic transport codes provide relatively efficient detector response calculations needed to determine the most likely location of a true source. Probabilistic representations account for uncertainty in the source location resulting from uncertainties in detector responses, the approximations that are used, and the potential for nonunique solutions. A Bayesian approach improves on previous likelihood methods for source localization by allowing the incorporation of all available information to help constrain solutions.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Spallation Neutron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D/gim D/gim Spallation Neutron Source SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam power of 1.4 MW, SNS will be eight times more powerful than today's best facility. It will give researchers more detailed snapshots of the smallest samples of physical and biological materials than ever before

404

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

Luce, J.S.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 3 Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 Total (All Sectors) by Source, 2011 By Sector, 1989-2011 By Sector, 2011 228 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Blast furnace gas, propane gas, and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste (municipal solid waste from non-biogenic sources, and tire-derived fuels). Sources: Tables 8.3a-8.3c. 543 522 296 103 37 36 16 Wood Natural Coal Other Waste Petroleum Other² 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Trillion Btu 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Quadrillion Btu Gases¹ 1.2 0.3 0.1 Industrial Electric Power Commercial 0.0 0.6

409

Inter-sourcing: alternative IT sourcing solutions using student interns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information Technology (IT) sourcing decisions are motivated by cost savings, skills acquisition, and staffing flexibility. The research in progress introduces a new alternative in sourcing, inter-sourcing. This practice incorporates the benefits of ... Keywords: inter-sourcing, it education, it internships, it sourcing

Mari W. Buche

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Designing, selecting and installing a residential ground-source heat pump system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's a compelling proposition: Use the near-constant-temperature heat underground to heat and cool your home and heat domestic water, slashing your energy bills. Yet despite studies demonstrating significant energy savings from ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems, their adoption has been hindered by high upfront costs. Fewer than 1% of US homes use a GSHP system. However, compared to a minimum-code-compliant conventional space-conditioning system, when properly designed and installed, a GSHP retrofit at current market prices offers simple payback of 4.3 years on national average, considering existing federal tax credits. Most people understand how air-source heat pumps work: they move heat from indoor air to outdoor air when cooling and from outdoor air to indoor air when heating. The ground-source heat pump operates on the same principle, except that it moves heat to or from the ground source instead of outdoor air. The ground source is usually a vertical or horiontal ground heat exchanger. Because the ground usually has a more favorable temperature than ambient air for the heating and cooling operation of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, GSHP sysems can operate with much higher energy efficiencies than air-source heat pump systems when properly designed and installed. A GSHP system used in a residual building typically provides space conditioning and hot water and comprises three major components: a water-source heat pump unit designed to operate at a wider range of entering fluid temperatures (typically from 30 F to 110 F, or 1 C to 43 C) than a conventional water-source heat pump unit; a ground heat exchanger (GHX); and distribution systems to deliver hot water to the storage tank and heating or cooling to the conditioned rooms. In most residual GSHP systems, the circulation pumps and associated valves are integrated with the heat pump to circulate the heat-carrier fluid (water or aqueous antifreeze solution) through the heat pump and the GHX. A recent assessment indicates that if 20% of US homes replaced their existing space-conditioning and water-heating systems with properly designed, installed and operated state-of-the-art GSHP systems, it would yield significant benefits each year. These include 0.8 quad British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy savings, 54.3 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} emission reductions, $10.4 billion in energy cost savings and 43.2 gigawatts of reduction in summer peak electrical demand.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Definitions Key Terms Definition British Thermal Unit (Btu) The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of liquid water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at the temperature at which water has its greatest density (approximately 39 degrees Fahrenheit). Delivered to Consumers (Heat Content) Heat content of residential, commercial, industrial, vehicle fuel and electric power deliveries to consumers. Electric Power (Heat Content) Heat content of natural gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Heat Content The amount of heat energy available to be released by the transformation or use of a specified physical unit of an energy form (e.g., a ton of coal, a barrel of oil, a kilowatthour of electricity, a cubic foot of natural gas, or a pound of steam). The amount of heat energy is commonly expressed in British thermal units (Btu). Note: Heat content of combustible energy forms can be expressed in terms of either gross heat content (higher or upper heating value) or net heat content (lower heating value), depending upon whether or not the available heat energy includes or excludes the energy used to vaporize water (contained in the original energy form or created during the combustion process). The Energy Information Administration typically uses gross heat content values.

412

Heat Source Lire,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Lire, Source Lire, (liayrICS-25 ) tooling Tulles (Ai 1,06:1) - 11 (31.118 Module Stack Thermoelectric Module:, (14) ltcal L/Mr r a it i lli tisli Block Mounting Interface MMRTG Design Housing (At 2219) Fin (At Go63) Thermal Insulation (Min-K & Microtherm) Space Radioisotope Power Systems Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator January 2008 What is a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator? Space exploration missions require safe, reliable, long-lived power systems to provide electricity and heat to spacecraft and their science instruments. A uniquely capable source of power is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) - essentially a nuclear battery that reliably converts heat into electricity. The Department of Energy and NASA are developing

413

Source Selection Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Overview This chapter provides guidance to the acquisition team on conducting source selection in accordance with Part 15 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). Background The mid 1990's was a time of significant change in many areas of procurement, particularly in the introduction of new tools and processes that help the procurement professional better meet the needs of demanding customers. The passage of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act in 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act in 1995 , coupled with Government-wide and Department of Energy (DOE) contract reform efforts not only changed traditional procurement processes but also changed the role of the procurement professional. No longer are procurement

414

ISG8-RF Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RF Sources - (WG3) RF Sources - (WG3) Orange Rm Yong Ho Chin, Christopher Nantista, and Sami G. Tantawi Parallel Sessions: Working Groups: WG1: Parameters, Design, Instrumentation and Tuning WG2: Damping Rings and ATF WG3: RF Sources WG4:Structures WG5: Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations Monday Morning 9:00-10:30 Plenary Coffee Break 11:00-12:00 Planning Session. Monday Afternoon 13:30-15:30 High Gradient Issues (Joint with working group 4) Coffee Break 16:00-16:30 The 8-Pack Project -- D. Atkinson 16:30-17:30 High Gradient Issues and Discussions Continued. Tuesday Morning 9:30-10:30 Klystrons 9:30-10:00 Status of PPM Klystron Development for JLC -- Y. H. Chin 10:00-10:30 Design of 150MW Multi-Beam Klystron -- S. Matsumoto Coffee Break 11:00-11:30 Klystron Development at SLAC -- G. Caryotakis

415

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

417

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

418

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEELs drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Surveys Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agencys Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEELs Source Water Assessment. Of the INEELs 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEELs public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Identifying PM10 Sources and Estimating Source Contributions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of ammonium nitric, secondary aerosol of ammonium sulfate, and incinerator and fuel oil burning sources. The source mass profiles derived by the PMF model well describe the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Poster: Passing the three trillion particle limit with an error-controlled fast multipole method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an error-controlled, highly scalable FMM implementation for long-range interactions of particle systems with open, 1D, 2D and 3D periodic boundary conditions. We highlight three aspects of fast summation codes not fully addressed in most articles; ... Keywords: FMM, error control, scalability

Ivo Kabadshow; Holger Dachsel; Jeff Hammond

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Figure 85. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2040 (trillion ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

$0.75 2017.00 $4.59 $3.32 $8.97 $8.43 $0.75 2018.00 $4.56 $3.31 $9.30 $8.30 $0.76 2019.00 $4.54 $3.32 $9.40 $8.27 $0.77 2020.00 $4.52 $3.32 $9.48 $8.23 $0.77 2021.00 ...

425

Strategic Sourcing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Sourcing Strategic Sourcing Strategic Sourcing Energy Wide Strategic Sourcing (EWSS) DOE leadership has recognized that benefits could be achieved at the federal level through an organized, systematic and collaborative approach to acquiring commonly used goods and services. The DOE strategic sourcing program builds upon historical accomplishments as well as establishes a more cohesive and disciplined program, consistent with OMB's direction, for the conduct of DOE future strategic sourcing efforts. The DOE and NNSA Senior Procurement Executives have created a strategic sourcing capability and organizational components to identify federal strategic sourcing opportunities and coordinate strategic thinking. To date, this program has identified a number of opportunities; particularly in the areas of

426

WIPP Opportunities - Procurement - Sources Sought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procurement Sources Sought This page displays a listing Sources Sought. If you are interested in submitting an outline, please contact the cognizant buyer to find out more. Please...

427

Book sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Linked Data Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Book sources Jump to: navigation, search Search for book sources ISBN: Go Retrieved from...

428

Book sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Linked Data Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Book sources Jump to: navigation, search Search for book sources ISBN: 9781603580304 Go...

429

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Learn more about Solar, Water, Biomass, Geothermal and Wind Energy. Read more Nuclear Learn more about how we use Nuclear Energy. Read more...

430

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Energy Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Learn more about Solar, Water, Biomass, Geothermal and Wind Energy. Read more Nuclear Learn more about how we...

431

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

432

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" A6. Total Inputs of Selected Byproduct Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," "," "," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","Pulping","Wood Chips,","And Waste","Row"

433

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

434

Word Pro - Untitled1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table 10.4 Biodiesel Overview, 2001-2011 Year Feedstock 1 Losses and Co-products 2 Production Trade Stocks, End of Year Stock Change 4 Balancing Item 5 Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports 3 Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Thousand Barrels Million Gallons Trillion Btu Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Million Gallons Trillion Btu 2001 1 (s) 204 9 1 78 39 39 NA NA NA 243 10 1 2002 1 (s) 250 10 1 191 56 135 NA NA NA 385 16 2 2003 2 (s) 338 14 2 94 110 -16 NA NA NA 322 14 2 2004 4 (s) 666 28 4 97 124 -26 NA NA NA 640 27 3 2005 12 (s) 2,162 91 12 207 206 1 NA NA NA 2,163 91 12 2006 32 (s) 5,963 250 32 1,069 828 242 NA NA NA 6,204 261 33 2007 63 1 11,662 490 62 3,342 6,477 -3,135 NA NA NA 8,528 358 46 2008 88 1 16,145 678 87 7,502 16,128 -8,626 NA NA NA 7,519

435

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

436

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar gains with highly insulating windows, which leads to windows with positive heating energy flows offsetting buildingBuilding Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Year Made Number of Buildings (Thousands, 1993) U Factor SHGC Window Window SolarSolar Window Cond Window Infiltration Non-Window Infiltration Other Loads Total Loads Total Loads Window Properties Total Building Heating

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

c10a.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Q 718 6,125 Q 95.1 78.8 96.4 63.5 Q Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zone a for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

438

New York State annual energy review: energy consumption, supply and price statistics, 1960-1981  

SciTech Connect

Since 1960, annual natural gas consumption in New York State rose from 419 billion CF to 762 billion in 1981, supplying 21% of the state's primary energy. Although total energy consumption peaked in 1973 and 4281.5 trillion Btu, gas usage dropped after 1972 and then rose steadily to a maximum of 782 trillion Btu in 1981. Statistics show that (1) residential gas consumption peaked in 1972 and declined 0.9%/yr thereafter, (2) commercial gas usage was the highest ever in 1981, (3) industrial sales also peaked in 1981, and (4) after a 1978 low of 1.3 trillion Btu of gas usage for power generation, utility consumption rose to 135.2 trillion Btu by 1981, reflecting efforts to cut oil usage. New York consumers spent $734 million on gas in 1970 and $3105 million in 1981. Of the natural gas consumed, only 2.5% was produced in New York; 51% came from fields offshore Louisiana.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

440

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

442

Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Overview: APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. Photo: Aerial Photo of APS Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose

443

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report 2001 Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source For the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 Introduction Science Highlights Year in Review Operations Publications Abstracts Nancye Wright & Lydia Rogers The National Synchrotron Light Source Department is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, Inc. Upton, New York 11973 Under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Mary Anne Corwin Steven N. Ehrlich & Lisa M. Miller Managing Editor Science Editors Production Assistants Cover images (clockwise from top left) 1. from Science Highlight by K.R. Rajashankar, M.R. Chance, S.K. Burley, J. Jiang, S.C. Almo, A. Bresnick, T. Dodatko, R. Huang, G. He,

444

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tomography Interest Group Contact: Robert Winarski, Center for Nanoscale Materials winarski@anl.gov Contact: Francesco De Carlo, Advanced Photon Source decarlo@aps.anl.gov The tomography special interest group of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has been created to promote awareness of the tomography facilities at the APS and to foster communications between the various research groups. Through this group, we believe we can build a strong user community for tomography. The following beamlines have active tomography research programs: 2-BM-B (XOR) http://www.aps.anl.gov/Xray_Science_Division/Xray_Microscopy_and_Imaging/Science_and_Research/Techniques/Tomography/index.html Information about the beamline: http://beam.aps.anl.gov/pls/apsweb/beamline_display_pkg.display_beamline?p_beamline_num_c=31

445

Posters | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Cart (0 Posters) Your Cart (0 Posters) Your cart is empty. checkout Subtotal: $0.00 update empty Posters Order a printed APS poster! 11 in. x 17 in. prints will be mailed in the order requests are received. 36 in. x 36 in. posters will be sent to school addresses once all orders are processed. The Advanced Photon Source Is The Advanced Photon Source Is Qty: 1 add to cart Technologies from Materials Science Technologies from Materials Science Qty: 1 add to cart Materials Under Extreme Pressure Materials Under Extreme Pressure Qty: 1 add to cart Biological Macromolecules in Action Biological Macromolecules in Action Qty: 1 add to cart Journey to the Center of the Earth Journey to the Center of the Earth Qty: 1 add to cart Earthshaking Monitor Earthshaking Monitor Qty: 1 add to cart Imaging with X-rays

446

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

447

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

448

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Group Members Accelerator Magnets Insertion Devices Facilities Presentations & Publications Internal Magnetic Devices Group The primary mission of the Magnetic Devices (MD) Group is to design, build, and maintain Insertion Devices (IDs) that are reliable and transparent to the electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The majority of IDs at the APS are conventional planar hybrid undulators, but an essential part of the mission is to develop novel IDs, such as short-period superconducting undulators and long-period electromagnetic undulators. The capabilities of APS IDs are matched to users' experimental needs. The mission also includes magnetic tuning of the IDs to ensure their near-ideal performance as x-ray sources and calculations to predict the radiation

449

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

450

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Advanced Photon Source 0 Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal Macromolecular Crystallographers Administrators Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Media Center Calendar of Events APS News User News Argonne/APS Press Releases Argonne/APS Feature Stories Argonne/APS In The News

451

Evaluated teletherapy source library  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45{degrees} to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

Open Source Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Source Physics (Brown, 2012; Christian, 2010; Esquembre, 2012; Hwang, 2010) empowers teachers and students to create and use these free tools with the associated intellectual property rights given to customise (Wee & Mak, 2009) the computer models/tools to suit their teaching and learning needs. Open Source Physics (OSP) focuses on design of computer models, such as Easy Java Simulations (EJS) and the use of video modeling and analysis (Tracker). They allow students to investigate, explore and analyse data which is either real or simulated. The OSP approach helps users overcome barriers in creating, using and scaling up meaningful ICT use in education. In Singapore, teachers and students have created or customised existing computer models to design and re-purpose EJS models to suit their context and learning needs. Tracker tools allow students to analyse different aspects of a physics phenomena to deepen their understanding of abstract physics concepts. Using Tracker, students record the motion of ob...

Wee, Loo Kang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Voltage controlled current source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

Casne, Gregory M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Comparisons with Other sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimates Compared with Other sources Estimates Compared with Other sources The following seven graphs were prepared to give a sense of the variation and confidence level of the EIA-914 estimates. Each graph shows the reported sample production (the starting point for making an estimate), the EIA-914 estimates, State reported data, HPDI reported data, and Lippman Consulting data for comparison. State data are obtained directly from the States usually via a State agency web site as a monthly total. HPDI is a commercial data vender. They acquire data from all the States and provide it to EIA in a single format and query system at the well or lease level. EIA then sums this data to the operator level and State level. HPDI data typically lag the State data by 1 or 2 months.

459

High current ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Compact superradiant Cerenkov source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economical, coherent, and widely tunable source does not exist spanning the far-infrared electromagnetic spectral range of 50-1000 {mu}m in wavelength. The Cerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) is a promising candidate. This report describes an experimental investigation of a compact CFEL driven by a high-quality low-energy electron beam. Cerenkov emission and strong gain but remarkably low output coupling were observed.

Owens, I.J.; Brownell, J.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-3528 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Open-Source GIS  

SciTech Connect

The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Burk, Thomas E [University of Minnesota; Lime, Steve [Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Improved negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, J.E.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

466

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency from Executive Summary Efficiency from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

467

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

468

Sources of tritium  

SciTech Connect

A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water.

Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

470

SOURCE TERMS IN THE TRANSIENT SEEPAGE EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equation; Pore Pressure Generation; Sources; Source Terms)In this paper, sources involving the generation of mass areincludes source terms for both fluid mass generation and

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Average Annual Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Various Functions Stock Refrigerator (1) kWh - Electricity Stock Electric Water Heater kWh - Electricity Stock Gas Water Heater million Btu - Natural Gas Stock Oil Water Heater million Btu - Fuel Oil Single-Family Home million Btu Mobile Home million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Large Building million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Small Building million Btu School Building million Btu Office Building million Btu Hospital, In-Patient million Btu Stock Vehicles Passenger Car gallons - Gasoline Van, Pickup Truck, or SUV gallons - Gasoline Heavy Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Tractor Trailer Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Note(s): Source(s): 10,749 95.8 211,312 1) Stock refrigerator consumption is per household refrigerator consumption, not per refrigerator.

472

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and will be updated as needed. Photon Sciences ESH Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) SOP No. Standard Operating Procedure for: LS-ES-0002 Procedure for Acid Etching of Silicon and Germanium Crystals LS-ESH-0004 NSLS Operations Group Chemical Spill and Gas Release Response LS-ESH-0010 VUV Injection Shutter LOTO LS-ESH-0012 LINAC LOTO LS-ESH-0013 Controlled Access to the VUV Ring LS-ESH-0014 Radiation Safety Interlocks at the National Synchrotron Light Source LS-ESH-0019 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements LS-ESH-0020 Biosafety Requirements at the NSLS LS-ESH-0021 Biosafety Level 2 work at the NSLS/ A Technical Basis LS-ESH-0022 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements

473

Welcome | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Aerial view of APS Aerial view of the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Whether you are a current or potential scientific user of our unique facility or are simply interested in learning more about the APS, we are delighted that you are visiting our website. The APS is funded by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy. We operate a National User Facility that is open to everyone who has a need for extremely brilliant x-ray photon beams. The APS is one of the most technologically complex machines in the world. This premier national research facility provides the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 (and growing) scientists from

474

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Multiple source heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Thulium-170 heat source  

SciTech Connect

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

1990-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

477

ILC Positron source simualtion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(DOE Review 2007) (DOE Review 2007) Wanming Liu, Haitao Wang, Sergey Antipov, Wei Gai, Kwang-Je Kim HEP, ANL 04/27/2007 Where we are making contribution * Undulator radiation modeling * Adiabatic Matching Device modeling * Keep alive source simulation * Thermal dynamic study on windows * Eddy current simulation * Laser compton scheme positron production simulation for KEK/CLIC Where we are making contributions Outline Undulator and e+ yield OMD/AMD modeling and designing Thermal dynamic of target chamber window Energy deposition profile of target Collaboration with KEK/CLIC Comparison of positron yield from different undulators High K Devices Low K Devices BCD UK I UK II UK III Cornell I Cornell II Cornell III Period (mm) 10.0 11.5 11.0 10.5 10.0 12.0 7 0.3 0.46 28 ~0.54 Yield(Low Pol, 500m drift) ~2.13

478

The Effect of Alternate Defrost Strategies on the Reverse-Cycle Defrost of an Air-Source Heat Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of alternate defrost strategies on the transient performance of the air-source heat pump during the reverse-cycle defrost was investigated. Tests of a base-case heat pump configuration and defrost strategy were completed to provide a basis for performance evaluations of the alternate defrost strategies. The compressor and indoor coil fan operated continuously in the base-case defrost strategy, and the outdoor coil fan was stopped. Alternate defrost strategies utilized variations in fan and compressor operation during and after the defrost. Pre-starting of the outdoor coil fan prior to termination of the reverse-cycle defrost reduced pressure spikes commonly seen at defrost termination in the base-case defrost strategy. A strategy in which the compressor was stopped and the outdoor coil was allowed to drain of melted frost during the last three minutes of the defrost improved overall cyclic performance. Strategies which involved stopping of the indoor fan during defrost or delaying the start of the outdoor fan following defrost termination had a negative impact on defrost performance. A final strategy involved down-sizing of the heat pump compressor from 3.0 tons (36,000 btu/hr) capacity to 2.5 tons capacity. This alternate configuration had a comparable overall performance with the base-case while having a reduced frequency of required defrost periods.

Schliesing, J. S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Interferometry using undulator sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography need to use optical components with subnanometer surface figure error tolerances to achieve diffraction-limited performance [M.D. Himel, in {ital Soft} {ital X}-{ital Ray} {ital Projection} {ital Lithography}, A.M. Hawryluk and R.H. Stulen, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1993), {bold 18}, 1089, and D. Attwood {ital et} {ital al}., Appl. Opt. {bold 32}, 7022 (1993)]. Also, multilayer-coated optics require at-wavelength wavefront measurement to characterize phase effects that cannot be measured by conventional optical interferometry. Furthermore, EUV optical systems will additionally require final testing and alignment at the operational wavelength for adjustment and reduction of the cumulative optical surface errors. Therefore, at-wavelength interferometric measurement of EUV optics will be the necessary metrology tool for the successful development of optics for EUV lithography. An EUV point diffraction interferometer (PDI) has been developed at the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO) and has been already in operation for a year [K. Goldberg {ital et} {ital al}., in {ital Extreme} {ital Ultra} {ital Lithography}, D.T. Attwood and F. Zernike, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1994), K. Goldberg {ital et} {ital al}., Proc. SPIE {bold 2437}, to be published, and K. Goldberg {ital et} {ital al}., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B {bold 13}, 2923 (1995)] using an undulator radiation source and coherent optics beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An overview of the PDI interferometer and some EUV wavefront measurements obtained with this instrument will be presented. In addition, future developments planned for EUV interferometry at CXRO towards the measurement of actual EUV lithography optics will be shown. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Beguiristain, R.; Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J.; Medecki, H.; Attwood, D.T.; Jackson, K. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 2-400, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trillion btu sources" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOURCES AND NOTES SOURCES AND NOTES Resources > Sources Below are the collected specific notes for the text and images used on the pages of this web site. For a discussion of the most important works on the Manhattan Project, see the "Suggested Readings." For a general discussion of the use of sources in this web site, see "A Note on Sources." To scan the sources and notes for various categories, choose from the list below. To view the sources and notes for a specific web page, see the footnote at the bottom of each page (exceptions include this page and the home page; the sources and notes for the home page are the first ones listed below). Home Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices

482

Sources - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help annotate Contents Next: References Up: RamanujanModular Equations, Previous: Ramanujan's sum. Sources. [Annotate] [Shownotes]. References [7]...

483

Tracking of Moving Radioactive Sources  

Devices that detect the sources of unsecured nuclear materials are currently limited in their capabilities, ... City halls, public streets, hospitals ...

484

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

485

Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Sources Directorate Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 ii | Vision and Mission Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan The VISION of the Light Sources Directorate is: to be a provider of choice for world-class photon science and facilities that deliver outstanding scientific productivity and impact, and to be recognized as a leader in developing innovative techniques and ap- plications of photon science Our MISSION is defined by the set of activities that are required to realize this vision: to advance scientific knowledge and to solve critical problems through the design, construction, operation, and use of premier photon science facilities | Table of Contents Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan

486

Constricted glow discharge plasma source  

SciTech Connect

A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Optically pumped polarized ion sources  

SciTech Connect

Polarization transfer collisions between protons, atomic hydrogen, or deuterium and optically pumped alkali-metal vapour are implemented in the high current optically pumped polarized ion source (OPPIS) and the laser driven source (LDS) of nuclear polarized atoms for target applications. The OPPIS technique overcomes the limitations on intensity of the conventional atomic beam source technique and meets the requirements of the new generation of polarization experiments at multi-GeV accelerators and colliders. 17 refs., 3 figs.

Zelenski, A.N.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion ...

489

ARC SNUBBERS NEUTRAL BEAM SOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformer cores near the source and route all of the powertransformer that transiently separates the energy in the capacitances of the power

Baker, W.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Landslide in the Upper Aleutian Forearc,' by G.J. Fryer,of the Source of the 1946 Aleutian 'Tsunami' Earthquake,"

Wiegel, Robert L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Relative risks of energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the risks associated with various energy sources in an attempt to demonstrate the relative safety of nuclear energy. (JEF)

Haire, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archives APS Brochure Annual Reports Posters Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) Now Playing: The Advanced Photon Source More videos:...

493

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Library Related Links: APS Colloquium APS Podcasts APS Today More videos: Introduction to the APS Physics of the Blues Now Playing: Building the Advanced Photon Source This...

494

CAT Communicator | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source News Archives CAT Communicator CAT Communicator was a newsletter intended to provide APS information to...

495

Organization Chart | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source (APS) organization comprises three divisions and one project office. Accelerator Systems Division (ASD) ASD provides engineering and physics support for the APS, and...

496

Media Center | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. Annual Reports Articles on Advanced Photon Source research and engineering highlights that are written for the interested...

497

Document Central | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Operations Manual APS QA Plan (obsolescence memo) APS Publications: APS Database APS Technical Publications Light Source Notes Technical Bulletins Safety Committee...

498

Information Technology | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source Information Technology Support Search APS ... Search Button About User Information News & Events Science & Education Beamlines Divisions Argonne Home >...

499

User Information | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information The Advanced Photon Source provides a variety of guides, resources, and information for prospective, new, and current users. In this section: For Prospective Users...

500

The status of the spallation neutron source ion source  

SciTech Connect

The ion source for the spallation neutron source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to deliver 45 mA of H2 to the SNS accelerator with a pulse length of 1 ms and repetition rate of 60 Hz. A total of three ion sources have been fabricated and commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and subsequently delivered to the SNS at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ion sources are currently being rotated between operation on the SNS accelerator, where they are involved in ongoing efforts to commission the SNS LINAC, and the hot spare stand (HSS), where high-current tests are in progress. Commissioning work involves operating the source in a low duty-factor mode (pulse width {approx}200 ms and repetition rate {approx}5 Hz) for extended periods of time while the high-current tests involve source operation at full duty-factor of 6 percent (1 ms/60 Hz). This report discusses routine performance of the source employed in the commissioning role as well as the initial results o f high-current tests performed on the HSS.

Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Keller, R.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z