Sample records for trillion btu number

  1. Trillion Particles,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Z Site MapTrends,TUNLTribalTrillion

  2. Accurate BTU Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosseini, S.; Rusnak, J. J.

    1 represents a typical arrangement in which heat is supplied to, or absorbed by the difference in temperatures of a working fluid, generally water. (See Ref. 1). Supply (TIl- Supply (Tl1 E E Heat (BTU) He.' ~ Exchange Exchange Relurn (T2... rate (BTU/unit time) ? m Mass flow rate (lb/unit time) hI' h2 = Specific enthalpy of supply and return liquid (BTU/lb) BTU C p - Average specific heat (--~----) IboF Equations 1, 2 are instantaneous values for heat flow or energy transferred...

  3. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trillion particle cosmological simulation completed A team of astrophysicists and computer scientists has created high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. December 3, 2014...

  4. 7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-20 7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed/h. Then noting that each available air conditioner provides 4,000 Btu/h cooling, the number of air- conditioners

  5. BTU Accounting for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redd, R. O.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , salesmen cars, over the highway trucks, facilities startup, waste used as fuel and fuels received for storage. This is a first step in the DOE's effort to establish usage guidelines for large industrial users and, we note, it requires BTU usage data...-generated electricity, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, in-plant transportation, ore hauling, raw material storage and finished product warehousing. Categories which are excluded are corporate and divisional offices, basic research, distribution centers...

  6. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget »TraveleBooks FindFirst ProofFirst trillion

  7. Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number JumpAnnualGenBtuYrCapacityBtuHr

  8. Trillion-atom molecular dynamics becomes a reality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By utilizing the molecular dynamics code SPaSM on Livermore's BlueGene/L architecture, consisting of 212 992 IBM PowerPC440 700 MHz processors, a molecular dynamics simulation was run with one trillion atoms. To demonstrate the practicality and future potential of such ultra large-scale simulations, the onset of the mechanical shear instability occurring in a system of Lennard-Jones particles arranged in a simple cubic lattice was simulated. The evolution of the instability was analyzed on-the-fly using the in-house developed massively parallel graphical object-rendering code MD{_}render.

  9. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number JumpAnnualGenBtuYr Jump to:

  10. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

  11. Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

  12. Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

  13. EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

  14. BTU International DUK International JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP ScreeningBLMBSABTBTR NewBTU

  15. Quantifying the Effect of the Principal-Agent Problem on US Residential Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy – 9,860 trillion Btu (9,840 PJ) b Residential totalenergy – 17, 600 trillion Btu (17,100 PJ) In addition tototaled over 3,400 trillion Btu, equal to 35% of the site

  16. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Total BuildingCooling Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Non. Wind Infilt SHGC Wind.Energy Consumption (Trillion BTU/yr) Area, Window Window

  17. High Btu gas from peat. Existing social and economic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High Btu Gas from Peat. The proposed study was designed to assess the overall viability of the design, construction and operation of a commercial facility for the production of high-Btu substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. In order to complete the study, Minnegasco assembled an experienced project team with the wide range of expertise required. In addition, the State of Minnesota agreed to participate in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Ertec (The Earth Technology Corporation) was selected to conduct the site evaluation and environmental assessment portions of the feasibility study. The site evaluation was completed in March of 1981 with the submittal of the first of several reports to Minnegasco. This report describes the existing social and economic conditions of the proposed project area in northern Minnesota. The baseline data presented will be used to assess the significance of potential project impacts in subsequent phases of the feasibility study. Wherever possible, the data base was established using 1980 Bureau of Census statistics. However, where the 1980 data were not yet available, the most recent information is presented. 11 figures, 46 tables.

  18. The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

  19. Location Efficiency as the Missing Piece of The Energy Puzzle: How Smart Growth Can Unlock Trillion Dollar Consumer Cost Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Location Efficiency as the Missing Piece of The Energy Puzzle: How Smart Growth Can Unlock Trillion. In the analysis the energy efficiency potential of smart growth developments (the type that are occurring in the US) are estimated using location efficiency research findings. The results show energy savings

  20. Vol. 30 no. 14 2014, pages 20912092 BIOINFORMATICS MESSAGE FROM THE ISCB doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu117

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radivojac, Predrag

    .1093/bioinformatics/btu117 Advance Access publication March 3, 2014 The automated function prediction SIG looks back

  1. Subtask 3.16 - Low-BTU Field Gas Application to Microturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren Schmidt; Benjamin Oster

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy gas at oil production sites presents an environmental challenge to the sites owners. Typically, the gas is managed in flares. Microturbines are an effective alternative to flaring and provide on-site electricity. Microturbines release 10 times fewer NOx emissions than flaring, on a methane fuel basis. The limited acceptable fuel range of microturbines has prevented their application to low-Btu gases. The challenge of this project was to modify a microturbine to operate on gases lower than 350 Btu/scf (the manufacturer's lower limit). The Energy & Environmental Research Center successfully operated a Capstone C30 microturbine firing gases between 100-300 Btu/scf. The microturbine operated at full power firing gases as low as 200 Btu/scf. A power derating was experienced firing gases below 200 Btu/scf. As fuel energy content decreased, NO{sub x} emissions decreased, CO emissions increased, and unburned hydrocarbons remained less than 0.2 ppm. The turbine was self-started on gases as low as 200 Btu/scf. These results are promising for oil production facilities managing low-Btu gases. The modified microturbine provides an emission solution while returning valuable electricity to the oilfield.

  2. The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils...

  3. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  4. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  5. Vol. 30 ISMB 2014, pages i9i18 BIOINFORMATICS doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu259

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moret, Bernard

    Vol. 30 ISMB 2014, pages i9­i18 BIOINFORMATICS doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu259 Evaluating synteny

  6. An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Christopher Mark

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to identify and determine the effect of jet burner operating variables that influence combustion of low-BTU gases. This was done by simulating the combustion of a low-BTU fuel in a jet flame and predicting...

  7. An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Christopher Mark

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to identify and determine the effect of jet burner operating variables that influence combustion of low-BTU gases. This was done by simulating the combustion of a low-BTU fuel in a jet flame and predicting...

  8. An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebeker, C. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown...

  9. Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blacksmith, James Richard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A86YI University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis by JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH...

  10. Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

  11. Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J. N.

    . The lower the energy rating (KW/Ton or KW/HP or KW/BTU) the more efficient the equipment and the less demand draw on the electric power plants, thereby reducing the need to build new power plants. To encourage DSM, utilities give rebates for high...: Bob Allwein, Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. Dick Landry, Gulf States Utility. Curtis Williford, Entex Gas Company. Bret McCants, Central Power and Light Company. Frank Tanner, Southern Union. Patric Coon, West Texas utilities. ESL-IE-93...

  12. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15(BTU perper

  13. Federal Energy Management Program FY14 Budget At-a-Glance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    UESCs (utility energy service contracts)from the FY 20112012 baseline. Achieve lifecycle Btu Savings of 57 trillion Btu from FY 2014 program activities. The program's...

  14. High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

  15. Markets for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification: an analysis of 13 site specific studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978 the US Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Resource Applications, developed a commercialization plan for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. Several initial steps have been taken in that process, including a comprehensive study of industrial markets, issuance of a Notice of Program Interest, and funding of proposals under the Alternate Fuels Legislation (P.L. 96-126). To assist it in the further development and administration of the commercialization plan, the Office of Resource Applications has asked Booz, Allen and Hamilton to assess the market prospects for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. This report covers the detailed findings of the study. Following the introduction which discusses the purpose of the study, approach used for the assignment and current market attitudes on coal gasification, there are three chapters on: systems configurations and applications; economic and finanical attractiveness; and summary of management decisions based on feasibility study results. The final chapter briefly assesses the management decisions. The general consensus seems to be that coal gasification is a technology that will be attractive in the future but is marginal now. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  16. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  17. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  18. The World Energy situation andThe World Energy situation and the Role of Renewable Energy Sources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    is generated by fossil fuels ­ CO2 emission is increasing at an alarming rate Oil supplies are dwindling (electricity ~ $1 trillion / yr)­ World energy market ~ $3 trillion / yr (electricity ~ $1 trillion / yr,028 Btu 1 short ton of coal = 20,169,000 Btu 1 kilowatthour of electricity = 3,412 Btu 8 #12;Energy Use

  19. Part-Per-Trillion Level SF6 Detection Using a Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy-Based Sensor with Single-Mode Fiber-Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 ”m and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-infrared fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor . The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and micro-resonator tubes. SF6 was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7x10-10 W•cm-1/Hz1/2.

  20. The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, William Russell

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... time when I was in need. Finally, the Center for Energy and Mineral Resources and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station for support related to this research. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES V1...

  1. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W. [Zurn/NEPCO, South Portland, MA (United States); Paisley, M. [Battelle Laboratories, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  2. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by ERC, is 448.3 trillion Btu (TBtu). The total CaliforniaBecause the cost of an electrical Btu is roughly 4 timesthat of a source fuel Btu, industrial categories that use

  3. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Year 2025 Annual Energy~ 10 Btu Heat Electricity Fuels orBalance Distributed Cases (trillion Btu) A ! -feat >350! lPfor California Industry (10 12 Btu): Scenario B Process Heat

  4. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  5. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

  6. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  7. Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so quickly, many scientists fear that soon they will not be able to keep up with the deluge. "These instruments are capable of answering some of our most fundamental scientific...

  8. Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne's supercomputer is using its superpowers to map the movement of red blood cells -- which will hopefully lead to better diagnoses and treatments for patients with blood flow complications.

  9. Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3 Outlook for Gulf of

  10. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  11. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  12. Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

  13. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197 14,1978. Number

  14. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)ThousandNumber andCrudeTemperature Maps andDecadeCubic

  15. 4-1-09_Final_Testimony_(Gruenspecht).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about 1,142 trillion British thermal units (Btu), more than 1 percent of total U.S. energy consumption of 101.9 quadrillion Btu. The components of farm energy consumption are...

  16. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Total Building Energy Consumption (Trillion BTU/yr) Area,

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  18. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  19. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  20. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  1. Meet the trillions of tiny allies that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    & A n WALKABLE TOWNS n IS GLUTEN-FREE FOR ME? MAGA ZINE OF THE GER ALD J. AND DOROTHY R. FRIEDMAN SCHOOL- cer and exercise study, for example, took several years and entailed developing a complicated search any good? By Julie Flaherty 14 If You Build It, They Will Walk Thoughtful town planning can get

  2. Contemplating 10 Trillion Digits of π

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |Contact UsContactsContemplating 10

  3. Building Name: ____________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ Completed by: ___________________________________________ Date: ______________ File Number: ___________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s Rated Btu input Condition s Combustion air: is there at least one square inch free area per 2,000 Btu input? s Fuel or combustion odors Cooling Tower s Clean? no leaks or overflow? Slime or algae growth? s Waste oil and refrigerant properly stored and disposed of? #12;Building Name

  4. Permanent Home Number: Residential Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viglas, Anastasios

    Permanent Home Number: Residential Number: Mobile: Please update my contact details. Signature nominated correspondence address as indicated below. Permanent Home Adress Residential Address Other Address (Must not be a PO Box) Residential Address (Must not be a PO Box) Other - Postal/Optional Address

  5. UNIT NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

  6. First BTU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County, Minnesota:Island, NewFirmGreen

  7. BTU LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP ScreeningBLMBSABTBTR

  8. How Much Energy Does Your State Produce? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How Much Energy Does Your State Produce? November 10, 2014 - 2:52pm Addthis Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it...

  9. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity 3 NA 185 175...

  10. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8 Table 6. Sales of fossil fuel production from federal and Indian lands by statearea, FY 2003-13 trillion Btu State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Alabama...

  11. 1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington`s industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state`s total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state`s energy needs.

  12. 1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

  13. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamos LaboratoryCertified Reference6-02-01Change Number

  14. Introduction to Benchmarking: Starting a Benchmarking Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    plant Btu per pound of product Manufacturer Btu per pound of product processed Refinery Btu per number of beds occupied Hotel or hospital Kilowatt-hours per square foot...

  15. Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HDF5 is an IO library used by more than 150 institutions worldwide. The HDF5 Group at University of Illinois Research Park is currently maintaining the library to ensure...

  16. Afghanistan and Iraq--$2 Trillion Dollar Graveyards of Armies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Vladimir

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the projection of violent direct action in the case of Iraq and Afghanistan since 2007 through May 2011. Machine-coded events data from the free, publicly available, on-line Reuters archives was fitted to both regressor and time...

  17. Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliancesTrending:Schedule FY 2015

  18. Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

  19. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  20. Production of low BTU gas from biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on gasification as far back as the 1930's. Some of the early work was done using fixed bed gasifiers with wood as the feed mate- In the 1960's, coal was proposed as another possible feed material. Most of the coal gasification was done using moving bed... of downdraft fixed bed, updraft fixed bed or moving bed gasifiers. Most of the work on fluidized bed opera- tion has been concentrated on catalytic cracking units. However, several researchers have used fluidized bed reactors for the gasification process...

  1. Production of low BTU gas from biomass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for combustion is simple relative to the gasification or pyrolysis and construc- tion and operation of the necessary equipment should also be easier. However, the final product of com- bustion, steam energy, cannot be stored for long periods of time.... Lee, B. S. , Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. G. Anthony An experimental study was conducted to examine the gasification of agricultural residues as an alter- nate energy source. The agricultural residues...

  2. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  3. BTU International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003 Jump to: JumpBPL Global JumpBSST LLCBTMBTU

  4. Texas Rice, Volume II, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    creates 25 million jobs, which represents 17% of the US workforce, and produces $3.5 trillion in output each year, accounting for 15% of US gross domestic annual output (2002 House Agriculture Committee Report). US agriculture insures a safe and secure... food supply. The cost of food in the US is the lowest of any country in the world. Given the rela- tively high economic contribution of the agriculture sector to US society (15% of US GNP), the money continued on page 4 U.S. families spend a little more...

  5. Multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnad, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of hypergeometric 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for weighted Hurwitz numbers is extended to multispecies families. Both the enumerative geometrical significance of multispecies weighted Hurwitz numbers as weighted enumerations of branched coverings of the Riemann sphere and their combinatorial significance in terms of weighted paths in the Cayley graph of $S_n$ are derived. The particular case of multispecies quantum weighted Hurwitz numbers is studied in detail.

  6. Curvature and Tachibana numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stepanov, Sergey E [Finance Academy under the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to define the rth Tachibana number t{sub r} of an n-dimensional compact oriented Riemannian manifold as the dimension of the space of conformally Killing r-forms, for r=1,2,...,n-1. We also describe properties of these numbers, by analogy with properties of the Betti numbers b{sub r} of a compact oriented Riemannian manifold. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  7. Definitions Numbered Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    Definitions · Numbered Space ­ a single space marked with a number and reserved for a single permit 24/7 · Unnumbered Space ­ a space which can be used by any customer allowed to park in that lot. High Low Average Question 4: If I buy a staff permit for an UNNUMBERED* space in a non-gated surface

  8. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  9. A number of organizations,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    installed solar electric systems on a number of the city's buildings, including the Chicago Center for Green Technology shown here. CityofChicago Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy SOLAR TODAY Aggregated Purchasing--A Clean Energy Strategy by Lori A. Bird and Edward A. Holt #12;November/December 2002 35 Power

  10. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  11. Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

  12. New Technology Provides Cost-Effective Emissions Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reciprocating engines have been the preferred prime mover for combined heat and power (CHP-500-2010-FS-020RDD 129 REV. 7/1/11 levels, based on laboratory tests and field data tons (MMT) and natural gas consumption of 23 trillion BTU in 2029. The California

  13. Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Food Processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, N.; Milmoe, P. H.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The food processing industry is the fourth largest consumer of energy in the US industrial sector. Food processors use nearly 1,200 trillion Btu of energy per year. The industry is comprised of more than 21,000 processing plants. Total production...

  14. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota PriusNSR Key Number Retrieval Pease

  15. Grant Application Package CFDA Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Grant Application Package CFDA Number: Opportunity Title: Offering Agency: Agency Contact: Opportunity Open Date: Opportunity Close Date: CFDA Description: Opportunity Number: Competition ID

  16. Grant Title: KNOWLEDGE DISSEMINATION CONFERENCE GRANTS PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENT Funding Opportunity Number: CFDA Number(s) -93.243; Funding Opportunity Number -OA-08-002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: CFDA Number(s) - 93.243; Funding Opportunity Number - OA-08-002. Agency/Department: Department

  17. EIA and CHP: What is going on?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Roop, Joseph M.; Fowler, Richard A.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December, 2002, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) released its Annual Energy Review, 2001 (hereafter AER01; the document is available at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/aer/contents.html), with extensive revisions to both the electricity data and the categories under which the data are reported. The basics of these revisions are explained in Appendix H of AER01, ''Estimating and Presenting Power Sector Fuel Use in EIA Publications and Analyses'' (which can be downloaded from the ''Appendices and Glossary'' link). This revision was timely and eliminated the growing ''adjustments'' that reconciled the discrepancy between the sum of fuels consumed by the four end-use sectors and the electricity sector with the total energy consumed by the four end-use sectors (i.e., with electricity losses allocated back to the four end-use sectors). This adjustment jumped from almost nothing in 1988 to 128 trillion Btu (TBtu) in 1989 and grew to a half-quadrillion British thermal unit (quad) by 199 8. In 1999 it was -3.2 quad and in 2000, as reported in the AER 2000, it was -4.3 quad. After revisions, the adjustment nearly disappears, with the largest adjustment over the period 1989-2001 at 10 trillion Btu (TBtu). Even with these revisions, however, there are still some very strange numbers. This paper explains these revisions and accounting techniques, and tries to reconcile some of the data via an appeal to the detailed Independent Power Producer survey, EIA Form 860b, for 1998 and 1999.

  18. The concrete theory of numbers: initial numbers and wonderful properties of numbers repunit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Tarasov

    2007-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work initial numbers and repunit numbers have been studied. All numbers have been considered in a decimal notation. The problem of simplicity of initial numbers has been studied. Interesting properties of numbers repunit are proved: $gcd(R_a, R_b) = R_{gcd(a,b)}$; $R_{ab}/(R_aR_b)$ is an integer only if $gcd(a,b) = 1$, where $a\\geq1$, $b\\geq1$ are integers. Dividers of numbers repunit, are researched by a degree of prime number.

  19. Data Compression with Prime Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

  20. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  1. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +New York, New

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0057 01 Effective: Page 1 of 9 06 Chris Weilandics Signature on file Department ES&H Approval printed name Signature Date Lori Stiegler Signature on file #12;Number: PS-ESH-0057 Revision: 01 Effective: 06/08/12 Page 2 of 9 The only official

  3. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  4. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  5. The Jacobi-Stirling Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, George E; Gawronski, Wolfgang; Littlejohn, Lance L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jacobi-Stirling numbers were discovered as a result of a problem involving the spectral theory of powers of the classical second-order Jacobi differential expression. Specifically, these numbers are the coefficients of integral composite powers of the Jacobi expression in Lagrangian symmetric form. Quite remarkably, they share many properties with the classical Stirling numbers of the second kind which, as shown in LW, are the coefficients of integral powers of the Laguerre differential expression. In this paper, we establish several properties of the Jacobi-Stirling numbers and its companions including combinatorial interpretations thereby extending and supplementing known contributions to the literature of Andrews-Littlejohn, Andrews-Gawronski-Littlejohn, Egge, Gelineau-Zeng, and Mongelli.

  6. Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallery, S. J.

    Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between...

  7. POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

  8. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table Home

  9. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table HomeYear Jan

  10. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table HomeYear

  11. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0YearThousand

  12. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0YearThousandYear Jan

  13. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68 4.50

  14. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68 4.50Week

  15. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68

  16. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996)Nov-14Year Jan

  17. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996)Nov-14YearYear

  18. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  19. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW

  20. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3

  1. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilotDataGlossary AWeek Of

  2. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010 2011 2012

  3. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010 2011

  4. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010 2011Decade

  5. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010

  6. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010Decade Year-0

  7. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010Decade

  8. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. If youEIA-906 &Stocks

  9. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthrough 1996)

  10. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthrough 1996)Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 WeekYear

  11. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthrough 1996)Year-Month Week 1 Week 2DecadeYear

  12. Report/Product Number(s) DOE/ER/64701 DOE Award/Contract Number(s)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Report/Product Number(s)

  13. On Normal Numbers Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueira, Santiago

    ends with all zeros; hence, q is not simply normal to base b. 3/23 #12;The problem is still open Theorem (Borel 1909) Almost all real numbers are absolutely normal. Problem (Borel 1909) Give an example transducers. Huffman 1959 calls them lossless compressors. A direct proof of the above theorem Becher

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) This document defines OPERATIONS Operation Maintenance Service Specific Operation (specify) #12;Number: PS-ESH-0083 Revision: 01 the safety management program for the laser system(s) listed below. All American National Standard Institute

  15. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 07,755,432Commercial Consumers (Number

  16. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  17. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet)Commercial Consumers (Number of

  18. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessAprilResidential Consumers (Number of

  19. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1Residential Consumers (Number

  20. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090Industrial Consumers (Number

  1. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

  2. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreasesCommercial Consumers (Number of

  3. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear JanPriceIndustrial Consumers (Number of

  4. Annual Running Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Energyh Inut:ę 4,500,000 tons of coal 19 tons enriche'd Uranium tewn _____________ _ 350,000 barrels of oil 250,000 ltons of coal Pollution: ( 9,400,000 tons of carbon * 6 tons of spent fuel none operation)I eraion) dioxide e Emissions of highly radioactive * 270,000 tons of scrubber gases (400,000 Curies of Kr-85, sludge and ash for disposal 18,000 Curies of tritium) * 800,000 tons of Uranium ore 12,000 tons of sulfur tailings dioxide, nitrous oxides and * 37 tons of depleted Uranium mercury * 500,000 tons of greenhouse gas * 100 trillion BTU's of heat 0 100 trillion BTU's • of heat Water required: 10 billion galons 13 billion jgalions none ę0.5%).

  5. Awarded ESPC Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since the inception of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) in 1998, 325 DOE ESPC projects have been awarded. More than $3.41 billion has been invested in Federal energy efficiency and renewable energy improvements. These improvements have resulted in more than 398 trillion Btu life cycle energy savings and more than $8.53 billion of cumulative energy cost savings for the Federal Government.

  6. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a project whose goal is to commercialize a production process for propylene and acrylic acid from propane using a catalytic auto-thermal oxydehydrogenation process operating at short contact times. Auto-thermal oxidation for conversion of propane to propylene and acrylic acid promises energy savings of 20 trillion Btu per year by 2020. In addition to reducing energy consumption, this technology can reduce manufacturing costs by up to 25 percent, and reduce a variety of greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

  8. Random number stride in Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo radiation transport codes use a sequence of pseudorandom numbers to sample from probability distributions. A common practice is to start each source particle a predetermined number of random numbers up the pseudorandom number sequence. This number of random numbers skipped between each source particles the random number stride, S. Consequently, the jth source particle always starts with the j{center dot}Sth random number providing correlated sampling'' between similar calculations. A new machine-portable random number generator has been written for the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP providing user's control of the random number stride. First the new MCNP random number generator algorithm will be described and then the effects of varying the stride will be presented. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Device Independent Random Number Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mataj Pivoluska; Martin Plesch

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomness is an invaluable resource in today's life with a broad use reaching from numerical simulations through randomized algorithms to cryptography. However, on the classical level no true randomness is available and even the use of simple quantum devices in a prepare-measure setting suffers from lack of stability and controllability. This gave rise to a group of quantum protocols that provide randomness certified by classical statistical tests -- Device Independent Quantum Random Number Generators. In this paper we review the most relevant results in this field, which allow the production of almost perfect randomness with help of quantum devices, supplemented with an arbitrary weak source of additional randomness. This is in fact the best one could hope for to achieve, as with no starting randomness (corresponding to no free will in a different concept) even a quantum world would have a fully deterministic description.

  10. On q-deformed Stirling numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz Simsek

    2007-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this article is to introduce q-deformed Stirling numbers of the first and second kinds. Relations between these numbers, Riemann zeta function and q-Bernoulli numbers of higher order are given. Some relations related to the classical Stirling numbers and Bernoulli numbers of higher order are found. By using derivative operator to the generating function of the q-deformed Stirling numbers of the second kinds, a new function is defined which interpolates the q-deformed Stirling numbers of the second kinds at negative integers. The recurrence relations of the Stirling numbers of the first and second kind are given. In addition, relation between q-deformed Stirling numbers and q-Bell numbers is obtained.

  11. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  12. Grant Title: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EXPERIENCES FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS (ITEST) Funding Opportunity Number: NSF 12-597. CFDA Number(s): 47.076.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: NSF 12-597. CFDA Number(s): 47.076. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation

  13. Prime number generation and factor elimination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vineet Kumar

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

  14. RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

  15. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  16. High speed optical quantum random number generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinfurter, Harald

    .3351 (2009). 6. I. Reidler, Y. Aviad, M. Rosenbluh, and I. Kanter, "Ultrahigh-speed random number generation

  17. Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons Sandi KlavĆžzar a,# , Petra Ćž Zigert a , Ivan hydrocarbon: CL is equal to the minimum number of straight lines required to intersect all hexagons theory; Clar formula; Clar number; Resonance graph; Benzenoid hydrocarbons 1. Introduction Within

  18. Optimizing Energy Savings from Direct-DC in U.S. Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbesi, Karina; Vossos, Vagelis; Sanstad, Alan; Burch, Gabriel

    2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of energy efficient appliances operate on direct current (DC) internally, offering the potential to use DC from renewable energy systems directly and avoiding the losses inherent in converting power to alternating current (AC) and back. This paper investigates that potential for net-metered residences with on-site photovoltaics (PV) by modeling the net power draw of the ‘direct-DC house’ with respect to today’s typical configuration, assuming identical DC-internal loads. Power draws were modeled for houses in 14 U.S. cities, using hourly, simulated PV-system output and residential loads. The latter were adjusted to reflect a 33% load reduction, representative of the most efficient DC-internal technology, based on an analysis of 32 electricity end-uses. The model tested the effect of climate, electric vehicle (EV) loads, electricity storage, and load shifting on electricity savings; a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine how future changes in the efficiencies of power system components might affect savings potential. Based on this work, we estimate that net-metered PV residences could save 5% of their total electricity load for houses without storage and 14% for houses with storage. Based on residential PV penetration projections for year 2035 obtained from the National Energy Modeling System (2.7% for the reference case and 11.2% for the extended policy case), direct-DC could save the nation 10 trillion Btu (without storage) or 40 trillion Btu (with storage). Shifting the cooling load by two hours earlier in the day (pre-cooling) has negligible benefits for energy savings. Direct-DC provides no energy savings benefits for EV charging, to the extent that charging occurs at night. However, if charging occurred during the day, for example with employees charging while at work, the benefits would be large. Direct-DC energy savings are sensitive to power system and appliance conversion efficiencies but are not significantly influenced by climate. While direct-DC for residential applications will most likely arise as a spin-off of developments in the commercial sector—because of lower barriers to market entry and larger energy benefits resulting from the higher coincidence between load and insolation—this paper demonstrates that there are substantial benefits in the residential sector as well. Among residential applications, space cooling derives the largest energy savings from being delivered by a direct-DC system. It is the largest load for the average residence on a national basis and is particularly so in high-load regions. It is also the load with highest solar coincidence.

  19. Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeniyi Lawal

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by ‘numbering up’ the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

  20. Nanocoatings for High-Efficiency Industrial Hydraulic and Tooling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifton B. Higdon III

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial manufacturing in the U.S. accounts for roughly one third of the 98 quadrillion Btu total energy consumption. Motor system losses amount to 1.3 quadrillion Btu, which represents the largest proportional loss of any end-use category, while pumps alone represent over 574 trillion BTU (TBTU) of energy loss each year. The efficiency of machines with moving components is a function of the amount of energy lost to heat because of friction between contacting surfaces. The friction between these interfaces also contributes to downtime and the loss of productivity through component wear and subsequent repair. The production of new replacement parts requires additional energy. Among efforts to reduce energy losses, wear-resistant, low-friction coatings on rotating and sliding components offer a promising approach that is fully compatible with existing equipment and processes. In addition to lubrication, one of the most desirable solutions is to apply a protective coating or surface treatment to rotating or sliding components to reduce their friction coefficients, thereby leading to reduced wear. Historically, a number of materials such as diamond-like carbon (DLC), titanium nitride (TiN), titanium aluminum nitride (TiAlN), and tungsten carbide (WC) have been examined as tribological coatings. The primary objective of this project was the development of a variety of thin film nanocoatings, derived from the AlMgB14 system, with a focus on reducing wear and friction in both industrial hydraulics and cutting tool applications. Proof-of-concept studies leading up to this project had shown that the constituent phases, AlMgB14 and TiB2, were capable of producing low-friction coatings by pulsed laser deposition. These coatings combine high hardness with a low friction coefficient, and were shown to substantially reduce wear in laboratory tribology tests. Selection of the two applications was based largely on the concept of improved mechanical interface efficiencies for energy conservation. In mobile hydraulic systems, efficiency gains through low friction would translate into improved fuel economy and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. Stationary hydraulic systems, accordingly, would consume less electrical power. Reduced tooling wear in machining operations would translate to greater operating yields, while lowering the energy consumed during processing. The AlMgB14 nanocoatings technology progressed beyond baseline laboratory tests into measurable energy savings and enhancements to product durability. Three key hydraulic markets were identified over the course of the project that will benefit from implementation: industrial vane pumps, orbiting valve-in-star hydraulic motors, and variable displacement piston pumps. In the vane pump application, the overall product efficiency was improved by as much as 11%. Similar results were observed with the hydraulic motors tested, where efficiency gains of over 10% were noted. For variable displacement piston pumps, overall efficiency was improved by 5%. For cutting tools, the most significant gains in productivity (and, accordingly, the efficiency of the machining process as a whole) were associated with the roughing and finishing of titanium components for aerospace systems. Use of the AlMgB14 nanocoating in customer field tests has shown that the coated tools were able to withstand machining rates as high as 500sfm (limited only by the substrate material), with relatively low flank wear when compared to other industrial offerings. AlMgB14 coated tools exhibited a 60% improvement over similarly applied TiAlN thin films. Furthermore, AlMgB14-based coatings in these particular tests lasted twice as long than their TiAlN counterparts at the 500sfm feed rates. Full implementation of the technology into the industrial hydraulic and cutting tool markets equates to a worldwide energy savings of 46 trillion BTU/year by 2030. U.S.-based GHG emissions associated with the markets identified would fall accordingly, dropping by as much as 50,000 tonnes annually.

  1. Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    Tip sheet: Expanded Library of Congress Call Number Classification system Call Number Subject R: Medicine T: Technology U: Military Science Z: Bibliography. Library Science. Information

  2. Relativistic theory of tidal Love numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Binnington; Eric Poisson

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In Newtonian gravitational theory, a tidal Love number relates the mass multipole moment created by tidal forces on a spherical body to the applied tidal field. The Love number is dimensionless, and it encodes information about the body's internal structure. We present a relativistic theory of Love numbers, which applies to compact bodies with strong internal gravities; the theory extends and completes a recent work by Flanagan and Hinderer, which revealed that the tidal Love number of a neutron star can be measured by Earth-based gravitational-wave detectors. We consider a spherical body deformed by an external tidal field, and provide precise and meaningful definitions for electric-type and magnetic-type Love numbers; and these are computed for polytropic equations of state. The theory applies to black holes as well, and we find that the relativistic Love numbers of a nonrotating black hole are all zero.

  3. Predicting landfalling hurricane numbers from basin hurricane numbers: basic statistical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laepple, T; Penzer, J; Bellone, E; Nzerem, K; Laepple, Thomas; Jewson, Stephen; Penzer, Jeremy; Bellone, Enrica; Nzerem, Kechi

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One possible method for predicting landfalling hurricane numbers is to first predict the number of hurricanes in the basin and then convert that prediction to a prediction of landfalling hurricane numbers using an estimated proportion. Should this work better than just predicting landfalling hurricane numbers directly? We perform a basic statistical analysis of this question in the context of a simple abstract model.

  4. REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 6, 2011 ... Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.5) a bound on the number of semi- ... then using Smith inequality, have been used before in several different ...

  5. Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantum number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL- 57239 Harmonic resolution as a holographic quantumhep-th/0310223 UCB-PTH-03/26 Harmonic resolution as aquantum number, the harmonic resolution K. The Bekenstein

  6. On Conformal Field Theory and Number Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, An

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frontiers in Number Theory, Physics, and Ge- ometry II. (Witten, Quantum Field Theory, Crassmannians, and AlgebraicJ. Polchinski, String Theory, Vol. 1, Cambridge Univ.

  7. Grant Title: NIDCD PHASE I/II PRELIMINARY CLINICAL TRIALS IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-123. CFDA Number(s): 93.173.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-123. CFDA Number(s): 93.173. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH

  8. Grant Title: AHRQ HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH DEMONSTRATION AND DISSEMINATION GRANTS Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-13-046. CFDA Number(s): 93.226. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  9. Grant Title: INTELLECTUAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES RESEARCH CENTERS (P30) Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-HD-13-002. CFDA Number(s): 93.865.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: RFA-HD-13-002. CFDA Number(s): 93.865. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

  10. Grant Title: RESEARCH ON PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES (R01) Funding Opportunity Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: PA-12-219. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services

  11. Grant Title: MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH DISSERTATION GRANT TO INCREASE DIVERSITY (R36) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-103. CFDA Number(s): 93.242. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  12. Grant Title: RESEARCH GRANTS FOR PREVENTING VIOLENCE AND VIOLENCE-RELATED INJURY Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-CE-14-006. CFDA Number(s): 93.136.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: RFA-CE-14-006. CFDA Number(s): 93.136. Agency/Department: Centers for Disease Control

  13. Grant Title: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE TRACK AWARD FOR RAPID TRANSITION (B/START) (R03) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PAR-12-251. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human

  14. Grant Title: ARTS IN EDUCATION MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND DISSEMINATION PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: ED-GRANTS-022013-001. CFDA Number(s): 84.351D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Number: ED-GRANTS-022013-001. CFDA Number(s): 84.351D. Agency/Department: Department of Education, Office

  15. PERFORMANCE OF AN EXPERIMENTAL SOLAR-DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONER--ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1975-SEPT. 1976

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. THW . In T HW out TSS Q UW (Btu/hr) LiT m U IllWS (Ibs/OF) (OF) (OF) (OF) (OF) (Btu/hr ft2.F 20A 20C 19A lIS 17BU Run number m HW (1bs/hr) (Btu/hr- ft2_F) mS == ! z(nlWS+

  16. 2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES Zone Numbers & Detailed Definitions #12;2001 TRAFFIC ZONE BOUNDARIES of Toronto Joint Program in Transportation January 2003 #12;PREFACE This report presents the 2001 traffic zone numbers by local municipalities in the 2001 TTS survey area. The second part presents detailed

  17. Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, JĂ©rĂŽme

    Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real numbers (extended abstract) J and space are continuous and accumulations can be devised to unlimitedly accelerate a computation with rational numbers for coordinates and speeds, the time of any accumulation is a c.e. (compu- tably

  18. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION Academic Year 2014­2015 *FA552-A* Please recycle. DIRECTIONS--You must verify your name and Social Security number for processing of your 2014­2015 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to continue. Please attach a legible copy of your Social Security

  19. SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER AND NAME VERIFICATION Academic Year 2013­2014 *FA552-A* Please recycle. DIRECTIONS--You must verify your name and Social Security number for processing of your 2013­2014 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to continue. Please attach a legible copy of your Social Security

  20. Search for lepton-family-number nonconservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, C.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the status of lepton-family-number nonconservation is given. After a brief historical and theoretical discussion, a description of how experimental searches for lepton-family-number nonconservation are performed is presented. Finally, a summary of the results from past experiments and prospects for future experiments is given.

  1. Protocol Number: (IBC office use only)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asaithambi, Asai

    Protocol Number: (IBC office use only) 1 UNF Registration of Biosafety Level 2 (BSL-2) A-2 Form", describe the methods of inactivation. #12;Protocol Number: (IBC office use only) 2 10. Describe the mechanism for decontaminating lab waste prior to disposal. Yes No If "Yes", describe the methods

  2. A Thermodynamic Classification of Real Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Garrity

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new classification scheme for real numbers is given, motivated by ideas from statistical mechanics in general and work of Knauf and of Fiala and Kleban in particular. Critical for this classification of a real number will be the Diophantine properties of its continued fraction expansion.

  3. enter part number BNC / RP-BNC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    enter part number Products 7/16 1.0/2.3 1.6/5.6 AFI AMC BNC / RP-BNC C FAKRA SMB FME HN MCX Mini ------- Product Search ------- Inventory Search Search Results for: 31-10152-RFX Results: 1 - 1 of 1 Part Number. All rights reserved. Copyright | Terms & Conditions | RF E-Mail Client | Contact Us | Amphenol

  4. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

  5. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

  6. Experimental Number Theory Part I : Tower Arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Experimental Number Theory Part I : Tower Arithmetic by Edinah K. Gnang January 15, 2011 1 rooted trees, which we shall here refer to as towers. The bijection between numbers and towers provides by XXX = (xk)1kn , (1) a tower expansion ( or simply a tower ) over XXX is a finite product of iterated

  7. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

  8. Grant Title: DECISION, RISK AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES (DRMS) Funding Opportunity Number: PD-98-1321. CFDA Number(s): 47.075.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -1321. CFDA Number(s): 47.075. Agency/Department: National Science Foundation. Area of Research: Research

  9. Grant Title: NIH DIRECTOR'S EARLY INDEPENDENCE AWARDS (DP5) Funding Opportunity Number: RFA-RM-12-018. CFDA Number(s): 93.310.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -018. CFDA Number(s): 93.310. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Strategic

  10. Grant Title: NIDCD CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER GRANT (P50) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-13-277. CFDA Number(s): 93.173.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -277. CFDA Number(s): 93.173. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute

  11. Grant Title: ACADEMIC-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP CONFERENCE SERIES (R13) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-12-102. CFDA Number(s): 93.865.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -12-102. CFDA Number(s): 93.865. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, National

  12. Grant Title: ALCOHOL RESEARCH EDUCATION PROJECT GRANTS (R25) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR -11-205. CFDA Number(s) 93.273.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -205. CFDA Number(s) 93.273. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), National

  13. Grant Title: NIDA CORE CENTER OF EXCELLENCE GRANT PROGRAM (P30) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-10-220. CFDA Number(s): 93.279.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    -220. CFDA Number(s): 93.279. Agency/Department: Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes

  14. Grant Title: INITIATIVE FOR MAXIMIZING STUDENT DEVELOPMENT (IMSD) (R25) Funding Opportunity Number: PAR-13-082. CFDA Number(s): 93.859.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    : PAR-13-082. CFDA Number(s): 93.859. Agency/Department: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National

  15. ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomerance, Carl

    ON THE PROBLEM OF UNIQUENESS FOR THE MAXIMUM STIRLING NUMBER(S) OF THE SECOND KIND E. Rodney Say that an integer n is exceptional if the maximum Stirling number of the second kind S(n, k) occurs or equal to x is O(x3/5+ ), for any > 0. 1. Introduction Let S(n, k) be the Stirling number of the second

  16. OMB Control Number: 1910-5165

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OMB Control Number: 1910-5165 Expires: xxxx201x SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT Please submit this Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report to your site DOENNSA...

  17. Estimating visitor and visit numbers to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................ 24 4.5 Monitoring and Evaluating Quality of Life for CRS'07 .......................................25 4.6 Quality of experience visitor, visit and total numbers of visits to woodlands. This document builds on guidance on visitor

  18. REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 6, 2011 ... closure imply using the well-known Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.4) a bound on the number of semi-algebraically connected components of ...

  19. Libraries Reference Document Number: 253262-002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    Intelź Fortran Libraries Reference Document Number: 253262-002 World Wide Web: http PROPERTY RIGHT. Intel products are not intended for use in medical, life saving, or life sustain- ing.................................................................................... xxiv Chapter 1 Overview of the Libraries Portability Routines

  20. THE NEW ELEMENT BERKELIUM (ATOMIC NUMBER 97)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, S.G.; Ghiorso, A.; Seaborg, G.T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NUMBER 97) Stanley G. Thompson, Albert Ghiorso, and Glenn T.Rev Eventually 5 S • G. Thompson, Physo Revo 76, 319 (1949)0~'Street, Ghiorso, and Thompson, unpublished work. UCRL-669

  1. CORAL Name: STS 1 Model Number: ICP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    CORAL Name: STS 1 Model Number: ICP Location: TRL What it does: Deep Silicon Etch Introduction prior to use and to ENGAGE MACHINE prior to starting your process in CORAL. Venting and Loading a Wafer

  2. Contributions to Metric Number Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dent, Alexander W.

    Contributions to Metric Number Theory Paul Rowe Technical Report RHUL­MA­2002­2 5 December 2002, Professor Glyn Harman, for sug- gestions of problems to attempt, helpful advice on methods and help

  3. Elastic tail propulsion at low Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Tony S. (Tony Sheung)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple way to generate propulsion at low Reynolds number is to periodically oscillate a passive flexible filament. Here we present a macroscopic experimental investigation of such a propulsive mechanism. A robotic swimmer ...

  4. ARE Update Volume 6, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Colin A.; Just, David; Zilberman, David; Karp, Larry

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in California, the major GM crop is cotton. However, biotechor impossible if the GM crop is highly pro- internationala small number of authorized GM crops in the EU. Partly in

  5. The concrete theory of numbers : Problem of simplicity of Fermat number-twins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boris V. Tarasov

    2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of simplicity of Fermat number-twins $f_{n}^{\\pm}=2^{2^n}\\pm3$ is studied. The question for what $n$ numbers $f_{n}^{\\pm}$ are composite is investigated. The factor-identities for numbers of a kind $x^2 \\pm k $ are found.

  6. Sequence and Series of Real Numbers 1.1 Sequence of Real Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, M.Thamban

    1 Sequence and Series of Real Numbers 1.1 Sequence of Real Numbers Suppose for each positive a sequence, and this ordered list is usually written as (a1, a2, . . . , . . .) or (an) or {an}. More precisely, we define a sequence as follows: Definition 1.1 A sequence of real numbers is a function from

  7. SESAME equation of state number 7740: Polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettger, J.C.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An equation of state (EOS) for polycarbonate (a widely used polymer) has been generated with the computer code GRIZZLY and will be added to the SESAME library as material number 7740. Although a number of the input parameter used in the calculations are based on rough estimates. 7740 provides a good match to experimental Hugoniot data and should be reliable on or near the principal Hugoniot. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Dynamical real numbers and living systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhurjati Prasad Datta

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently uncovered second derivative discontinuous solutions of the simplest linear ordinary differential equation define not only an nonstandard extension of the framework of the ordinary calculus, but also provide a dynamical representation of the ordinary real number system. Every real number can be visualized as a living cell -like structure, endowed with a definite evolutionary arrow. We discuss the relevance of this extended calculus in the study of living systems. We also present an intelligent version of the Newton's first law of motion.

  9. True random numbers from amplified quantum vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jofre; M. Curty; F. Steinlechner; G. Anzolin; J. P. Torres; M. W. Mitchell; V. Pruneri

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Random numbers are essential for applications ranging from secure communications to numerical simulation and quantitative finance. Algorithms can rapidly produce pseudo-random outcomes, series of numbers that mimic most properties of true random numbers while quantum random number generators (QRNGs) exploit intrinsic quantum randomness to produce true random numbers. Single-photon QRNGs are conceptually simple but produce few random bits per detection. In contrast, vacuum fluctuations are a vast resource for QRNGs: they are broad-band and thus can encode many random bits per second. Direct recording of vacuum fluctuations is possible, but requires shot-noise-limited detectors, at the cost of bandwidth. We demonstrate efficient conversion of vacuum fluctuations to true random bits using optical amplification of vacuum and interferometry. Using commercially-available optical components we demonstrate a QRNG at a bit rate of 1.11 Gbps. The proposed scheme has the potential to be extended to 10 Gbps and even up to 100 Gbps by taking advantage of high speed modulation sources and detectors for optical fiber telecommunication devices.

  10. Grant Title: CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-AFRI-004156. CFDA Number(s): 10.310.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Grant Title: CHILDHOOD OBESITY PREVENTION Funding Opportunity Number: USDA-NIFA-AFRI-004156. CFDA, including food environment, that influence childhood obesity and use this information to develop and obesity and promoting healthy behaviors in children and adolescents. Release and Expiration: Release Date

  11. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  12. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4 Relative2.4942

  13. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4 Relative2.49422

  14. Ramanujan's Harmonic Number Expansion into Negative Powers of a Triangular Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark B. Villarino

    2007-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An algebraic transformation of the DeTemple-Wang half-integer approximation to the harmonic series produces the general formula and error estimate for the Ramanujan expansion for the nth harmonic number into negative powers of the nth triangular number. We also discuss the history of the Ramanujan expansion for the nth harmonic number as well as sharp estimates of its accuracy, with complete proofs, and we compare it with other approximative formulas.

  15. Customer Service Specialist Job Number: 54844874

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Customer Service Specialist Job Number: 54844874 Company Name: Baxter International, Inc Job to the customer and/or the sales team including any corrective actions needed to prevent the failure in the future: Medical Information, Distribution Centers, Planning and Deployment, Credit and Collections, Customer

  16. Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klavzar, Sandi

    Clar number of catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbons Sandi Klavzara, , Petra Zigerta , Ivan Gutmanb sextets in any of the Clar formulae) of a catacondensed benzenoid hydrocarbon: CL is equal to the minimum; Resonance graph; Benzenoid hydrocarbons 1. Introduction Within the theory that was formulated [1, 2

  17. Preferential Path Profiling: Compactly Numbering Interesting Paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilimbi, Trishul

    preferential path profiling (PPP), that reduces the overhead of path profiling. PPP leverages the observation that most consumers of path profiles are only inter- ested in a subset of all program paths. PPP achieves produced by PPP. This compact path numbering enables our PPP implementation to record path information

  18. Building Grassmann Numbers from PI-Algebras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo M. Bentin; Sergio Mota

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This works deals with the formal mathematical structure of so called Grassmann Numbers applied to Theoretical Physics, which is a basic concept on Berezin integration. To achieve this purpose we make use of some constructions from relative modern Polynomial Identity Algebras (PI-Algebras) applied to the special case of the Grassmann algebra.

  19. Volume 89 number 44 28 october 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Volume 89 number 44 28 october 2008 pages 433­444 Eos, Vol. 89, No. 44, 28 October 2008 EOS, Tran.Mahoney Geoneutrino Measurements and Models Investigate Deep Earth PAGES 433­434 #12;Eos, Vol. 89, No. 44, 28 October 2008 uranium-238, thorium-232, and potassium- 40. Neutrinos and their antiparticles, anti- neutrinos

  20. Policy Title: Policy Number: Facilities and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    been supported by the federal government since that time. Indirect costs are also called "Facilities and Administrative" or F&A costs. These costs include facilities costs such as electricity, heating and airPolicy Title: Policy Number: Facilities and Administrative Distribution 2.1.11 Category: Financial

  1. Master Project Assessment Form Student: ID number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Master Project Assessment Form Student: ID number: Master Program: Graduation supervisor Graduation presentation Defense Execution of the project Grade Signature of supervisor Date * Hand in at the student administration (MF 3.068) together with an official result form (uitslagbon) #12;"Master Project

  2. March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Tamsin A.

    March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS) As part of the government's global strategy. This POSTnote discusses the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a method of carbon sequestration2 and will be included in the forthcoming Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) Carbon Abatement Technology Strategy

  3. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  4. Mass-induced transition in fermion number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragao de Carvalho, C.; Pureza, J. M.

    1989-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that if we increase the mass of fermions in interaction with a topological (kink) scalar background in 1+1 dimensions, the fractional fermion number of the system will eventually vanish. The transition is sharp and corresponds to the disappearance of localized states from the spectrum of a Dirac operator which is exactly solvable. Possible applications to different physical systems are discussed.

  5. Fast K System Generators of Pseudorandom Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, N Z; Nersessian, A B; Savvidy, G K; Greiner, W

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest fast algorithm for the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers based on Kolmogorov-Anosov K systems which has been earliar proposed in \\cite{savvidy1,akopov1}. This algorithm reduces $N^{2}$ operation of the matrix generator to $NlnN$ and essentially reduces the generation time. It also clarifies the algebraic structure of this type of K system generators.

  6. Fast K System Generators of Pseudorandom Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Z. Akopov; E. M. Madounts; A. B. Nersesian; G. K. Savvidy; W. Greiner

    1993-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest fast algorithm for the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers based on Kolmogorov-Anosov K systems which has been earliar proposed in \\cite{savvidy1,akopov1}. This algorithm reduces $N^{2}$ operation of the matrix generator to $NlnN$ and essentially reduces the generation time. It also clarifies the algebraic structure of this type of K system generators.

  7. Write your extension number on this card.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and slide it down. Press here to remove the stand. 1 Use the key hole slots on the stand to mark Press here jack. illustrations. for a secure fit. T7100 Telephone User Card 1-800-4 NORTEL www of your display. 1. Press ·. 2. Press / to · to select a contrast level. The higher the number the higher

  8. Policy Title: Policy Number: Federal Student Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, John

    . All such officials shall further distribute the Code to their direct and indirect reports who havePolicy Title: Policy Number: Federal Student Aid Code of Conduct 1.3.3 Category: Administrative Office of the Bursar University of Cincinnati Federal Student Aid Code of Conduct, page 1 of 5 Background

  9. NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For the purposes of this Code, the term "University Official" is inclusive of "Faculty Member" as defined in IV 1530 1 NUMBER: 1530 TITLE: Code of Student Conduct APPROVED: August 27, 1970; Revised June 14, 2012 I. BASIS AND RATIONALE FOR A CODE OF STUDENT CONDUCT Old Dominion University

  10. CORAL Name: STS 2 Model Number: ICP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    CORAL Name: STS 2 Model Number: ICP Location: TRL Introduction: The ST Systems Multiplex ICP tool prior to starting your process in CORAL. Loading a Wafer: The wafer is loaded into the system using of the tool. #12;If there are any issues with the tool post a comment in CORAL and contact Donal 2-2983. #12;

  11. NUMBER: 1626 TITLE: Information Technology Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost of more than $100,000 but less than $1 million. E. University Advisory Council on Technology (UACT technology project estimated to cost $1 million or more or deemed to be mission-critical. VI. Designated1626 - 1 NUMBER: 1626 TITLE: Information Technology Management APPROVED: September 9, 2005 I

  12. Project Name Project Number Tagging Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Name Project Number Primary Tagging Type Secondary Tagging Type Fish Species Tagging/ Secondary Legal Driver (BiOp, MOA, Accord, etc.) Tagging Purpose Funded Entity Tagging Location Retrieval CWT Recovery Project 2010-036-00 CWT PIT Chinook, coho retrieval, analysis, address PSMFC sampling

  13. Reference number ISO 8601:2004(E)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    Reference number ISO 8601:2004(E) © ISO 2004 INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 8601 Third edition 2004'heure #12;ISO 8601:2004(E) PDF disclaimer This PDF file may contain embedded typefaces. In accordance. The ISO Central Secretariat accepts no liability in this area. Adobe is a trademark of Adobe Systems

  14. Paper Number: 023084 An ASAE Meeting Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applications. In these terms, quality comprehends all factors influencing the system like accuracy, speedPaper Number: 023084 An ASAE Meeting Presentation Spatio-Temporal Quality of Precision Farming and Land Management, Chair of Geodesy, Arcisstrasse 21, D ­ 80290 Munich Written for presentation

  15. Call Numbers Explained 1 8/23/2012 Call Numbers Explained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    . The second method is the Library of Congress Classification system, which is used to identify university. In the library, books are organized by call number. 3. A call number classifies a book by its subject and tells in the library. 6. The King Library is unusual because it is both a public library and a university library

  16. Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate Soft drink, water and beer bottles; mouthwash bottles; peanut butter containers; salad dressing and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach

  17. Finite-particle-number approach to physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting from a discrete, self-generating and self-organizing, recursive model and self-consistent interpretive rules we construct: the scale constants of physics (3,10,137,1.7x10/sup 38/); 3+1 Minkowski space with a discrete metric and the algebraic bound ..delta.. is an element of ..delta.. tau is greater than or equal to 1; the Einstein-deBroglie relation; algebraic double slit interference; a single-time momentum-space scattering theory connected to laboratory experience; an approximation to wave functions; local phase severance and hence both distant correlations and separability; baryon number, lepton number, charge and helicity; m/sub p//m/sub e/; a cosmology not in disagreement with current observations.

  18. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  19. Small Ramsey Numbers Stanislaw P. Radziszowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radziszowski, Stanislaw P.

    , March 25 ElJC revision #3 1997, July 11 ElJC revision #4 1998, July 9 ElJC revision #5 1999, July 5 El of Technology Rochester, NY 14623, spr@cs.rit.edu http://www.cs.rit.edu/~spr Submitted: June 11, 1994; Revision Subject Number 05C55 Revisions 1993, February preliminary version, RIT-TR-93-009 [Ra2] 1994, July 3 first

  20. Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a large number of questions from the audience. The biofuels topic is so critical to Texas agriculture that it is likely that I will be discussing it from time to time during the next several issues. In many states, the biofuels boat is rapidly... gaining speed. Some states are providing monetary incentives for businesses to establish production plants. Some states see tremendous value in biofuels research, and are providing broad-based funding to foster research focusing on increasing ethanol...

  1. Texas Rice, Volume 1, Number 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas October 2001 Volume I Number 8 Texas Rice Combine Harvester Efficiency: Material Other Than Grain Or Money On The Ground? continued on page 6 From... such observations it is easy to conclude that rice combines are extremely efficient. But this might be misleading, given that the choppers and spreaders do a good job of cutting plant material, including grains, into small pieces. How much rice does a combine leave...

  2. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2004 Volume IV Number 6 Texas Rice Bacterial and Fungal Endophytes in Rice Endophytes are plant-associ- ated organisms that often form... plant/endophyte associations, may infer resistance to insects such as aphids and armyworms. The following is a layman’s review of research conducted by scientists worldwide on endophytic continued on page 4 associations that pertain to rice pro- duction...

  3. About the logic of the prime number distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harry K. Hahn

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two basic number sequences which play a major role in the prime number distribution. The first Number Sequence SQ1 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+5 and the second Number Sequence SQ2 contains all prime numbers of the form 6n+1. All existing prime numbers seem to be contained in these two number sequences, except of the prime numbers 2 and 3. Riemanns Zeta Function also seems to indicate, that there is a logical connection between the mentioned number sequences and the distribution of prime numbers. This connection is indicated by lines in the diagram of the Zeta Function, which are formed by the points s where the Zeta Function is real. Another key role in the distribution of the prime numbers plays the number 5 and its periodic occurrence in the two number sequences SQ1 and SQ2. All non-prime numbers in SQ1 and SQ2 are caused by recurrences of these two number sequences with increasing wave-lengths in themselves, in a similar fashion as Overtones (harmonics) or Undertones derive from a fundamental frequency. On the contrary prime numbers represent spots in these two basic Number Sequences SQ1 and SQ2 where there is no interference caused by these recurring number sequences. The distribution of the non-prime numbers and prime numbers can be described in a graphical way with a -Wave Model- (or Interference Model) -- see Table 2.

  4. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  5. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  6. Texas Rice, Volume V, Number 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . If it remains unused for extended periods of time, like 3 years, the land be- comes useless for rice farming. Moreover, industry representatives are dwindling. Farm machines, the John Deere stores, they are disap- pearing. Each year, older farmers quit or retire...Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas May 2005 Volume V Number 3 Texas Rice The following is an excerpt of a speech delivered to the U.S. House of Representatives, April 28, 2005...

  7. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have from 1-8 markers multiplexed. Last year they produced 1.3 million data points using 3 machines, about 25,000 data points a week – or about 8,333 data points per machine per week. RiceTec continued... continued on next page seed from parent lines...Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2004 Volume IV Number 7 Texas Rice Hybrid Rice: Another Tool in Varietal Improvement The breeding method in which crosses are made between...

  8. Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    population of hemp sesbania. What was learned? Castillo said zero grade is critical to establishing an even and early flood. Also, the seeding rate in organic systems should be higher to ensure a thick stand, which would in turn help with weed... 41 acres, due to hemp sesbania, and the portion that was harvested had high numbers of the weed seeds in the final product. This, and a significant amount of brokens, drastically reduced the price received for the crop, resulting in a net loss...

  9. Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluor FederalEnergyContractor: Contract Number:

  10. Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number of3

  11. Number of Natural Gas Industrial Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3 4 5 Number

  12. Compare Activities by Number of Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602and Tables and99EnergyNumber

  13. Compare Activities by Number of Employees

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain,606,602and TablesNumber of Employees

  14. Property:PhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter iconNumOfPlants JumpPhoneNumber Jump to:

  15. New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New MexicoFeet) WorkingFeet)

  16. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER 1 | MARCH 201533,1,

  17. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 | NUMBER 1 | MARCH 201533,1,1

  18. Climate Zone Number 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCityFund Jump to: navigation, searchNumber

  19. Oregon Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) DecadeYear JanYear Jan Feb

  20. Pennsylvania Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand CubicFuelDecade Year-0

  1. Collective Property of Numbers and Its Mathematical Refutation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guang-Liang Li; Victor O. K. Li

    2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A number has the "collective" property if the number is the greatest lower bound of a bounded, strictly decreasing sequence on the real line. We prove that numbers with the collective property constitute an empty set.

  2. ON STIRLING NUMBERS FOR COMPLEX ARGUMENTS AND HANKEL CONTOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodinger, Helmut

    ON STIRLING NUMBERS FOR COMPLEX ARGUMENTS AND HANKEL CONTOURS provide a natural generalization of Stirling numbers for unrestricted complex values. Introduction Richmond and Merlini have introduced in [5] an extension of Stirling's subset numbers xy

  3. The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

    1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

  4. Natural occupation numbers: When do they vanish?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giesbertz, K J H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-vanishing of the natural orbital occupation numbers of the one-particle density matrix of many-body systems has important consequences for the existence of a density matrix-potential mapping for nonlocal potentials in reduced density matrix functional theory and for the validity of the extended Koopmans' Theorem. On the basis of Weyl's theorem we give a connection between the differentiability properties of the ground state wave function and the rate at which the natural occupations approach zero when ordered as a descending series. We show, in particular, that the presence of a Coulomb cusp in the wave function leads, in general, to a power law decay of the natural occupations, whereas infinitely differentiable wave-functions typically have natural occupations that decay exponentially. We analyze for a number of explicit examples of two-particle systems that in case the wave function is non-analytic at its spatial diagonal (for instance, due to the presence of a Coulomb cusp) the natural orbital occu...

  5. Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and International Climate Policy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Navigating the Numbers: Greenhouse Gas Data and...

  6. T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection Attacks T-705: Linux Kernel Weakness in Sequence Number Generation Facilitates Packet Injection...

  7. atomic number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  8. atomic mass number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  9. atomic number electron: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  10. atomic number range: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Physics Websites Summary: Atom-atom correlations and relative number squeezing in...

  11. Windows technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, J.J.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

  12. INDUST: An Industrial Data Base

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilfert, G. L.; Moore, N. L.

    .5% of the natural gas consump tion, 98.1% of the fuel oil consumption, 99.2% of the coal/coke consumption, and 99.7% of a class of fuels called "other" fuels. Within these 13 indus try groups, INDUST addresses a wide variety of energy-intense industries... the manufac turing sector, Table 1 shows the latest EIA pro visional estimate of energy consumption (in trillion Btu) for 1985. The EIA reports fuel consumption according to five categories: electricity, fuel oil, natural gas, coal and coke, and other...

  13. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

  14. Copy number: Efficient algorithms for single- and multi-track copy number segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsen, Gro; Liestűl, Knut; Loo, Peter Van; Moen Vollan, Hans Kristian; Eide, Marianne B; Rueda, Oscar M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Russell, Roslin; Baumbusch, Lars O; Caldas, Carlos; Bűrresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Lingjærde, Ole Christian

    2012-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    C, Shah SP, Chin SF et al. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups. Nature 2012. doi:10.1038/nature10983. Mathiesen RR, Fjelldal R, Liestűl K et al. High resolution analysis of copy number... C, Shah SP, Chin SF et al. The genomic and transcriptomic architecture of 2,000 breast tumours reveals novel subgroups. Nature 2012. doi:10.1038/nature10983. Mathiesen RR, Fjelldal R, Liestűl K et al. High resolution analysis of copy number...

  15. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of

  16. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number ofIndustrial

  17. AERODYNAMICS AND DESIGN FOR ULTRA-LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AERODYNAMICS AND DESIGN FOR ULTRA-LOW REYNOLDS NUMBER FLIGHT A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED at Reynolds numbers below 10,000, here termed ultra-low Reynolds numbers. The effects of airfoil geometry at ultra-low Reynolds numbers. To further explore this design space, the flow solver has been coupled

  18. Stirling numbers of forests and cycles David Galvin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvin, David

    Stirling numbers of forests and cycles David Galvin Do Trong Thanh June 15, 2012 Abstract For a graph G and a positive integer k, the graphical Stirling number S(G, k) is the number of partitions. If G is the empty graph on n vertices then S(G, k) reduces to S(n, k), the familiar Stirling number

  19. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the first kind for non­integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy­ pergeometric function

  20. A Short Note on Unsigned Stirling Numbers Dennis Walsh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Dennis P.

    A Short Note on Unsigned Stirling Numbers Dennis Walsh Middle Tennessee State University The unsigned Stirling numbers | , the absolute values of Stirling numbers of the=Ð8� 5�l first kind, are well Stirling number Thel=Ð8� 5�l� following theorem formalizes this result. Theorem. For let denote an unsigned

  1. On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamchik, Victor

    On Stirling numbers and Euler sums Victor Adamchik Wolfram Research Inc., 100 Trade Center Dr of Stirling numbers of the rst kind for non-integer values of their arguments. We discuss the analytic representations of Stirling numbers through harmonic numbers, the generalized hy- pergeometric function

  2. Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

  3. An analysis of Sovereign Wealth Funds and international real estate investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Pulkit

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWFs) have become an important source of international real estate investments. A number of reports predict the swelling of SWF combined assets from its current figure of $3-4 trillion ...

  4. Small numbers in supersymmetric theories of nature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graesser, Michael L.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Model of particle interactions is a successful theory for describing the interactions of quarks, leptons and gauge bosons at microscopic distance scales. Despite these successes, the theory contains many unsatisfactory features. The origin of particle masses is a central mystery that has eluded experimental elucidation. In the Standard Model the known particles obtain their mass from the condensate of the so-called Higgs particle. Quantum corrections to the Higgs mass require an unnatural fine tuning in the Higgs mass of one part in 10{sup {minus}32} to obtain the correct mass scale of electroweak physics. In addition, the origin of the vast hierarchy between the mass scales of the electroweak and quantum gravity physics is not explained in the current theory. Supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model are not plagued by this fine tuning issue and may therefore be relevant in Nature. In the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model there is also a natural explanation for electroweak symmetry breaking. Supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories also correctly predict a parameter of the Standard Model. This provides non-trivial indirect evidence for these theories. The most general supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model however, is excluded by many physical processes, such as rare flavor changing processes, and the non-observation of the instability of the proton. These processes provide important information about the possible structure such a theory. In particular, certain parameters in this theory must be rather small. A physics explanation for why this is the case would be desirable. It is striking that the gauge couplings of the Standard Model unify if there is supersymmetry close to the weak scale. This suggests that at high energies Nature is described by a supersymmetric Grand Unified Theory. But the mass scale of unification must be introduced into the theory since it does not coincide with the probable mass scale of strong quantum gravity. The subject of this dissertation is both the phenomenology and model-building opportunities that may lie behind the small numbers that appear in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model.

  5. Classical Radiation of a Finite Number of Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Stodolsky

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain conditions the number of photons radiated classically by a charged particle following a prescribed trajectory can be finite. An interesting formula for this number is presented and discussed.

  6. Crunching Solar Numbers: The Big Apple Uses Big Data | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crunching Solar Numbers: The Big Apple Uses Big Data Crunching Solar Numbers: The Big Apple Uses Big Data The City University of New York (CUNY) and its partners developed an...

  7. The Effect of Temperature, Cations, and Number of Acyl Chains...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Temperature, Cations, and Number of Acyl Chains on the Lamellar to Non-Lamellar Transition in Lipid-A Membranes: A The Effect of Temperature, Cations, and Number of Acyl...

  8. DOMB'S NUMBERS AND RAMANUJAN-SATO TYPE SERIES FOR 1/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOMB'S NUMBERS AND RAMANUJAN-SATO TYPE SERIES FOR 1/ HENG HUAT CHAN, SONG HENG CHAN, AND ZHIGUO LIU Number R146000027112. 1 #12;2 HENG HUAT CHAN, SONG HENG CHAN, AND ZHIGUO LIU the Chudnovskys admitted

  9. DOMB'S NUMBERS AND RAMANUJANSATO TYPE SERIES FOR 1/#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOMB'S NUMBERS AND RAMANUJAN­SATO TYPE SERIES FOR 1/# HENG HUAT CHAN, SONG HENG CHAN, AND ZHIGUO of Singapore Academic Research Fund, Project Number R146000027112. 1 #12; 2 HENG HUAT CHAN, SONG HENG CHAN

  10. DDT Volume 10, Number 19 October 2005 ReviewsDRUGDISCOVERYTODAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham, Karen

    DDT · Volume 10, Number 19 · October 2005 Reviews·DRUGDISCOVERYTODAY 1323www rights reserved. PII:S1359-6446(05)03618-4 REVIEWS #12;REVIEWS DDT · Volume 10, Number 19 · October 2005

  11. 'ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    'ETALE WILD KERNELS OF EXCEPTIONAL NUMBER FIELDS KEVIN HUTCHINSON Abstract.We clarify the relationship between higher 'etale wild kernels * *of a number- cyclotomic tower of the field. We also determine the relationship betwee* *n the 'etale wild kernel

  12. Automotive Repair by Number Theory Bart Snapp and Chris Snapp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snapp, Bart

    Automotive Repair by Number Theory Bart Snapp and Chris Snapp While repairing the ignition switch on a 1981 Fiat Spider, we discovered the following connection between number theory and automotive repair

  13. Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Stirling numbers of graphs, and the normal ordering problem Galvin earned his PhD in mathematics correlations in discrete random structures. The Stirling number of the second kind ${n \\brace k}$ counts

  14. Efficient Algorithms for Computing Betti Numbers of Semi-algebraic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saugata Basu

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Computing Covering by Contractible sets. Quadratic Case. Mayer-Vietoris Exact Sequence. Saugata Basu. Efficient Algorithms for Computing Betti Numbers ...

  15. Performance of an industrial type combustor burning simulated fuels of medium BTU content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goehring, Howard Lee

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studied fuels were those produced by coal gasification (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Other widely studied fuels include petroleum distillates, alcohol type fuel, fuel made from tar sands, fuel made from oil shale (1), petro- chemical process plants "off-gases" (2...). Harmful emissions can be reduced by using steam injection (8, 2, 9). Also the amount of equipment needed to produce and refine fuels, such as coal gas, is large; whereas, in the case of steam, the amount of' equipment needed is relatively small. Also...

  16. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  17. An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebeker, C. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis....

  18. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  19. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

  20. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  1. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 3. Market analysis. Task 8. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to identify and characterize the market potential for the plant by-products - BTX (mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene), phenol, ammonia, sulfur, and sodium sulfate - and to assign value to them. Although traditionally a growth industry, the chemicals market has been generally weakened by the recession, and is experiencing back to back years of declining production. This is due to bad health of specific end uses, such as fertilizer from ammonia. In the long run, this trend is expected to moderate. It is felt that the proposed peat plant has a favorable position in the markets of each of its by-products. This is due to the synergism with nearby industries which are major consumers of these by-products. In the case of sulfur and ammonia, the Red River agricultural area is a large potential market. For sodium sulfate, phenols and perhaps BTX, the nearby paper and timber products industries are large potential markets. The values for these by-products used in the financial analysis were intentionally conservative. This is because of the uncertainty in the quantity and quality. More tests are needed in an integrated facility in order to determine these factors and the variability of each. This is particularly true of the by-product oils which could vary significantly with operating conditions and may even require alternate processing schemes. 18 references, 9 figures, 14 tables.

  2. High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 11. Technical support. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support). This report presents the work conducted under Task II (Technical Support) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process, which was selected for the study. Task achievements are presented for: gasifier design and performance; technical support; and task management. 12 figures, 22 tables.

  3. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part A. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasbility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part A of Volume 3 contains the introduction and plant area conditions which include the following: (1) description of existing conditions-geology; (2) hydrology; (3) terrestrial and aquatic ecology; (4) meteorology; (5) land use existing conditions; (6) archaeology; (7) aesthetics-existing conditions; (8) acoustics; (9) existing socioeconomic conditions; and (10) resource assessment. 25 figures, 55 tables.

  4. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

  5. Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators...

  6. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R A S K A2009

  7. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R A SNevadaCubic

  8. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R

  9. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN ECoalbed

  10. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels) LiquidsCoalbed MethaneFoot)

  11. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013 Next1.878 2.358 -NA

  12. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013A4. CensusFeet)Cubic

  13. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3+Foot) Year

  14. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0ProvedExpected

  15. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9Yearper

  16. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year Jan

  17. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors forA2. For9,250 14,609403,972

  18. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24, 2014EconomicsEnergy

  19. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24,Feet) Year

  20. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePriceExpectedOtherOffshoreAnnual",2014

  1. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+

  2. ,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and NaturalWellhead PriceNet WithdrawalsVolumeHenry

  3. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases

  4. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear JanSales (Billion

  5. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U BCubic Feet)Appendix E2

  6. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U (Million31 22

  7. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate

  8. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpectedSeparation, ProvedCubic

  9. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpectedSeparation,

  10. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0c.+Foot) Decade

  11. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0c.+Foot)

  12. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level ImportsYear Jan

  13. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level ImportsYear JanCubic

  14. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanyS

  15. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanySFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar

  16. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use

  17. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  18. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009SamplingSee See

  19. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009SamplingSee

  20. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0 Year-1

  1. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0 Year-1Foot) Year

  2. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.IV. NorthernFoot)

  3. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.IV.

  4. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand Cubic Feet) YearFoot)

  5. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand Cubic Feet)

  6. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015 IndependentFoot) Decade

  7. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015 IndependentFoot)

  8. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year Jan

  9. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year JanFoot) Year Jan Feb

  10. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYear

  11. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYearFoot) Year Jan Feb

  12. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0Foot) Decade

  13. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0Foot)

  14. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002 (next8,,9,7,3,

  15. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002 (next8,,9,7,3,Foot) Year

  16. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002DecadeYear JanN E B R

  17. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  18. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic Foot)perper Thousand

  19. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, WetReservesCubic

  20. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProductionFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  1. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May1.878 2.358 -Cubic

  2. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanFeet)Cubic

  3. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb(BillionDecadeFoot) Decade

  4. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear Jan FebProvedFoot) Decade

  5. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear JanYearCubicDecade Year-0

  6. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYearYear Jan8,859ProvedDecade

  7. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity For RenewableJanuary403,972Cubic

  8. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1 Table 5.1. PAD DistrictCubic

  9. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun1 1,030 1,026 1,028 1,029

  10. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb MarFields34 1,035 1,036 1,036 1,036 1,037

  11. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1 andCubicEstimatedSales

  12. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1Decade6,393 6,810 6,5154019

  13. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane,ThousandExtensions (BillionSales

  14. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0Feet) DecadetoYear Jan

  15. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0Feet) Decreases

  16. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090 7,16354,828 424,763CubicCubic Foot)

  17. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 NProved ReservesDecadeFoot)

  18. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 NProved

  19. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0 Year-1

  20. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0 Year-1Foot) Year

  1. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  2. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  3. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year JanDecadeExpectedFoot)

  4. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year

  5. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarkets EnergyConsumption5 15EnvironmentalErin

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr(Percent)Babb, MT Havre,Lease

  7. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0Sales (Billion CubicConsumption

  8. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRAA Liquid Layer Solution for theDecorative Vented

  9. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricSales (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry

  10. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricSales (BillionActivities byFuel OilDecadeEIACubic

  11. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricSales (Million CubicThousandTobago063 1,064

  12. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty Vehicles, 1975-2004Foot) Decade Year-0

  13. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty(Million Cubic Feet)Cubic117.8 105.96 1,025

  14. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty(MillionGlossaryOf Mexico NaturalCubic974 962

  15. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Thousand Cubic6

  16. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1DecadeYear Jan FebYear Jan

  17. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,775 898,864 835,335 777,231.

  18. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,7752009 2010 2011DecadeSame0 0 04

  19. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1Feet)YearDecadeCubic

  20. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1Feet)YearDecadeCubicCubic

  1. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet)Expected

  2. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet)ExpectedFoot) Year

  3. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2 Missouri22

  4. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2 Missouri22Cubic

  5. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale ProductionExpectedCubic

  6. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale

  7. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale%73Thousand CubicFoot)

  8. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale%73Thousand

  9. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil

  10. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  11. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantityReporting Entities,Cubic

  12. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future Production (Billion

  13. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReserves (Billion

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReservesCubicDecade2009 2010

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReservesCubicDecade2009 2010Year Jan

  16. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197(Billion Cubic(MillionFoot)

  17. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197(BillionYear Jan

  18. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet) Gas, WetCubic Foot)

  19. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet)ProvedFeet)

  20. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear Jan Feb MarperYork State

  1. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear Jan

  2. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear JanFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar

  3. MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - Householdshort version)6/09/2015Values shownLower

  4. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(DollarsCubicThousand68.76,760.2520099 20109

  5. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecade Year-0Feet)Thousand7ThousandYear78

  6. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0TotalH BV CYear Jan Feb Mar AprCubic

  7. Enabling Clean Consumption of Low Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | Department ofEmily KnouseEnSys Energy Report on

  8. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"for Selected6.

  9. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in Delaware (Million3,751,360 3,740,7578 2009 20100

  10. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotal ConsumptionThousand CubicfromDryFoot)

  11. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotalResidential ConsumersDecadeYear28 1,030Cubic

  12. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand Cubic Feet) Priceper Thousand Cubic44

  13. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand Cubic Feet)AdjustmentsSales (Billion

  14. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand CubicFeet)perFeet) New2 1,033 1,034

  15. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine8 2.415 -CubicYear8

  16. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) Estimated

  17. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugFeet)Foot) Decade

  18. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9ThousandFeet)41 1,041

  19. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunFoot)

  20. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan

  1. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS willProvedExpected FutureCubic

  2. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS willProvedExpected FutureCubicCubic

  3. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage Volume16, 2012PeterFoot)

  4. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage Volume16,

  5. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1 EnergyAssessment

  6. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1 EnergyAssessmentFoot) Year

  7. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)Thousand Cubic7. Net5:EnergyCubic Foot) Decade

  8. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)Thousand Cubic7.

  9. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation, Proved ReservesSeparation,Cubic Feet)Decade

  10. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet) U.S.Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)2009

  11. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,7752009Base

  12. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,7752009Base6Thousand417 1,019 1,023

  13. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0 Year-1480 530Feet)37 1,038Cubic

  14. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecadePublication and Tables Publication

  15. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecadePublication10.99 12.28EA9.Foot) Decade

  16. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)ThousandFeet) Year JanCubic

  17. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Millionper ThousandCubicFeet)6 1,029

  18. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (MillionperYear Jan FebSamenuclear5)8)May 2003

  19. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 6,895 6,559 6,303 5,952Sales (Billion

  20. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 6,895Vehicle FuelFeet)(DollarsFoot)

  1. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 (Million CubicFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  2. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+Nonassociated NaturalPrice

  3. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+Nonassociated

  4. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan FebFeet)Reserves inDecade Year-0

  5. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousand Cubic Feet) YearDay)Foot)

  6. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousand CubicFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  7. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousandYear Jan FebCubic Foot) Decade

  8. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousandYearDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Cubic

  9. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)YearWellhead Price (DollarsYork State SHOPP

  10. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-533 1,036 1,043 1,041

  11. Adaptive low Mach number simulations of nuclear flame microphysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    Adaptive low Mach number simulations of nuclear flame microphysics J. B. Bell, M. S. Day, C. A of nuclear flames in Type Ia su- pernovae. This model is based on a low Mach number formulation nuclear burning. The formulation presented here generalizes low Mach number models used in combustion

  12. Inventory List Item Number Brief Description Price Preferred Vendor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventory List UT Austin Item Number Brief Description Price Preferred Vendor L0146 Adapter, Glass w/Screw Top, Amber, 4 dram $0.56 VWRSC 4/21/14 Page - 1 #12;Inventory List UT Austin Item Number;Inventory List UT Austin Item Number Brief Description Price Preferred Vendor S0027 CD, Recordable $0

  13. Quantum Response at Finite Fields and Breakdown of Chern Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @physics.technion.ac.il #12; Quantum Response at Finite Fields and Breakdown of Chern Numbers 2 On closer inspection oneQuantum Response at Finite Fields and Breakdown of Chern Numbers J E Avron and Z Kons y Department singularity at zero field. We also study the breakdown of Chern numbers associated with the response

  14. Radio Number for Trees Daphne Der-Fen Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Daphne Der-Fen

    Radio Number for Trees Daphne Der-Fen Liu Department of Mathematics California State University be a connected graph with diameter diam(G). The radio number for G, denoted by rn(G), is the smallest integer k bound for the radio number of trees, and characterize the trees achiev- ing this bound. Moreover, we

  15. MU student numberVISITING STUDENT APPLICATION UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    (area code) Telephone number (area code) Cellphone number (area code) Fax number (if available) Student officials, and the completed application is to be sent to the Director of Admissions, University of Missouri, 230 Jesse Hall, Columbia, MO 65211-1300. Because this certification is in lieu of an official

  16. COMBINATORIAL INTERPRETATIONS OF THE JACOBI-STIRLING NUMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    COMBINATORIAL INTERPRETATIONS OF THE JACOBI-STIRLING NUMBERS YOANN GELINEAU AND JIANG ZENG Abstract. The Jacobi-Stirling numbers of the first and second kinds were in- troduced in 2006 in the spectral theory and are polynomial refinements of the Legendre-Stirling numbers. Andrews and Littlejohn have recently given a com

  17. On some arithmetic properties of polynomial expressions involving Stirling numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klazar, Martin

    On some arithmetic properties of polynomial expressions involving Stirling numbers of the second by the grant SEP-CONACYT 37259-E. 1 #12;Abstract Let S(n, k) be the classical Stirling numbers of the second. We give similar but more particular results on the more general Stirling-like numbers T(n, k). 2 #12

  18. Stirling numbers for complex arguments Bruce Richmond \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlini, Donatella

    Stirling numbers for complex arguments Bruce Richmond \\Lambda Department of Combinatorics.Merlini@dsi2.ing.unifi.it Abstract We define the Stirling numbers for complex values and obtain extensions of the Stirling numbers of the first and second kind ( h n k i and n n k o in a standard notation) to complex

  19. Boolean Theory laws proof Number Theory Character Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hehner, Eric C.R.

    Review Boolean Theory laws proof Number Theory Character Theory Bunches Sets Strings Lists for loop 1/109 #12;Review Boolean Theory laws proof Number Theory Character Theory Bunches Sets Strings with exit for loop 2/109 #12;Review Boolean Theory laws proof Number Theory Character Theory Bunches Sets

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep (Number

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug (Number

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug (Number

  3. Grant Title: BEHAVIORAL AND INTEGRATIVE TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (R01, R03, Funding Opportunity Number: PA-13-077. CFDA Number(s): 93.279, 93.273.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Opportunity Number: PA-13-077. CFDA Number(s): 93.279, 93.273. Agency/Department: Department of Health

  4. Export support of renewable energy industries. Task number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on task coordination and effectiveness.

  5. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  6. Look-ahead Driver Feedback and Powertrain Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Rajeev

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial medium and heavy vehicles, though only a small portion of total vehicle population, play a significant role in energy consumption. In 2012, these vehicles accounted for about 5775.5 trillion btu of energy consumption and 408.8 million tons of CO2 emissions annually, which is a quarter of the total energy burden of highway transportation in the United States [1]. This number is expected to surpass passenger car fuel use within the next few decades. In the meantime, most commercial vehicle fleets are running at a very low profit margin. It is a wellknown fact that fuel economy can vary significantly between drivers, even when they operate the same vehicle on the same route. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Natural Resource Canada (NRCan), there is up to 35% fuel economy difference between drivers within the same commercial fleet [2] [3], [4]. Similar results were obtained from a Field Operation Test conducted by Eaton Corporation [5]. During this test as much as 30% fuel economy difference was observed among pick-up-and-delivery drivers and 11% difference was observed among line-haul drivers. The driver variability can be attributed to the fact that different drivers react differently to driving conditions such as road grade, traffic, speed limits, etc. For instance, analysis of over 600k miles of naturalistic heavy duty truck driving data [5] indicates that an experienced driver anticipates a downhill and eases up on the throttle to save fuel while an inexperienced driver lacks this judgment.

  7. Classification of nonlocal two-qubit gates using Schmidt number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S Balakrishnan; Leona J Felicia; R Sankaranarayanan

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known from Schmidt decomposition that Schmidt number of nonlocal two-qubit quantum gates is 2 or 4. We identify conditions on geometrical points of a gate to have Schmidt number 2. A simple analysis reveals that Schmidt number 2 corresponds to controlled unitary gates with CNOT being the only perfect entangler. Further, it is shown that Schmidt strength and entangling power are maximum only for CNOT in the controlled unitary family.

  8. Classification of nonlocal two-qubit gates using Schmidt number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, S; Sankaranarayanan, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known from Schmidt decomposition that Schmidt number of nonlocal two-qubit quantum gates is 2 or 4. We identify conditions on geometrical points of a gate to have Schmidt number 2. A simple analysis reveals that Schmidt number 2 corresponds to controlled unitary gates with CNOT being the only perfect entangler. Further, it is shown that Schmidt strength and entangling power are maximum only for CNOT in the controlled unitary family.

  9. Stirling number Identities and High energy String Scatterings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jen-Chi Lee; Yi Yang; Sheng-Lan Ko

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We use Stirling number identities developed recently in number theory to show that ratios among high energy string scattering amplitudes in the fixed angle regime can be extracted from the Kummer function of the second kind. This result not only brings an interesting bridge between string theory and combinatoric number theory but also sheds light on the understanding of algebraic structure of high energy stringy symmetry.

  10. action unit number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    products are used in or around buildings including homes or schools. In conducting this review of MDI compounds, EPA considered a number of potential actions, including...

  11. FEI Program Session: Date: CHRIS Code: Session Number:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    OPM Federal Executive Institute - DOE CHRIS Codes: (Program Tuition Cost - 19,875.00) *Program Calendar for Fiscal Year 2015 FEI Program Session: Date: CHRIS Code: Session Number:...

  12. Universal Characteristics of Fractal Fluctuations in Prime Number Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The frequency of occurrence of prime numbers at unit number spacing intervals exhibits selfsimilar fractal fluctuations concomitant with inverse power law form for power spectrum generic to dynamical systems in nature such as fluid flows, stock market fluctuations, population dynamics, etc. The physics of long-range correlations exhibited by fractals is not yet identified. A recently developed general systems theory visualises the eddy continuum underlying fractals to result from the growth of large eddies as the integrated mean of enclosed small scale eddies, thereby generating a hierarchy of eddy circulations, or an inter-connected network with associated long-range correlations. The model predictions are as follows: (i) The probability distribution and power spectrum of fractals follow the same inverse power law which is a function of the golden mean. The predicted inverse power law distribution is very close to the statistical normal distribution for fluctuations within two standard deviations from the mean of the distribution. (ii) Fractals signify quantumlike chaos since variance spectrum represents probability density distribution, a characteristic of quantum systems such as electron or photon. (ii) Fractal fluctuations of frequency distribution of prime numbers signify spontaneous organisation of underlying continuum number field into the ordered pattern of the quasiperiodic Penrose tiling pattern. The model predictions are in agreement with the probability distributions and power spectra for different sets of frequency of occurrence of prime numbers at unit number interval for successive 1000 numbers. Prime numbers in the first 10 million numbers were used for the study.

  13. Magic of Numbers in Networks of Wireless Image Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimi, Mohammed; Ahmadian, Shaun; Zats, David; Laufer, Rafael; Estrin, D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is the emphasis on low-power battery-operated devices [3].Oncases, a large number of low- power battery-operated sensors

  14. Request for Proposals Number RHT-5-52358

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Managed and Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Request for Proposals Number RHT-5-52358 "Renewable Fuel Impacts on Fuel...

  15. ICTP in Numbers 2009 Sinceitsinception,ICTPhasreceivedmorethan116,000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    India, China, Brazil, Argentina and Egypt. Least developed countries (LDCs) with the highest number Energy, Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics (HECAP); Condensed Matter and Statistical Physics (CMSP

  16. On the Number of Connected Components of the Relative Closure ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-20-53T23:59:59.000Z

    usual definitions related to Pfaffian functions, then we cover the essential material .... Counting the number of critical points of a generic projection, we obtain the.

  17. atomic number density: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and relative number squeezing in dissociation of spatially inhomogeneous molecular condensates Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: We study atom-atom correlations and relative...

  18. Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

    2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri – Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project are due to: i) a reduced number of process shutdowns to change hardware or lining material, ii) reduced need to produce new hardware or lining material, iii) improved product quality leads to reduced need to remake product or manufacturing of new product, iv) reduction in contamination of melt from degradation of refractory and metallic components, v) elimination of worn hardware will increase efficiency of process, vi) reduced refractory lining deterioration or formation of a less insulating phase, would result in decreased heat loss through the walls. Projected 2015 benefits for the U.S. aluminum industry, assuming 21% market penetration of improved refractory materials, are energy savings of approximately 0.2 trillion BTU/year, cost savings of $2.3 billion/year and carbon reductions of approximately 1.4 billion tons/year. The carbon reduction benefit of the project for the hot-dip galvanize and aluminum industries combined is projected to be approximately 2.2 billion tons/year in 2015. Pathways from research to commercialization were based on structure of the project’s industrial partnerships. These partnerships included suppliers, industrial associations, and end users. All parties were involved in conducting the project including planning and critiquing the trials. Supplier companies such as Pyrotech Metaullics, Stoody, and Duraloy have commercialized products and processes developed on the project.

  19. The Revenge of the Market on the Rentiers: Why neo-liberal Reports of the end of history turned out to be premature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palma, J G

    government transfers (such as social security, unemployment benefits, welfare payments, etc.), and before individual income taxes and employees' payroll taxes (but after employers’ payroll taxes and corporate income taxes). 24 In turn, including capital... ; the value of private and government debt securities from US$9 to US$80 trillion; and bank assets from US$11 to US$96 trillion (on the latter number, see notes below Figure 1; all figures in US$ at 2007 value). 3 FIGURE 1 ? (a...

  20. State Registration Number Michigan Department Of Environmental Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quality Division RENEWABLE OPERATING PERMIT STAFF REPORT Greater Detroit Resource Recovery Facility SRN: M4148 located at 5700 Russell Street, Detroit, Michigan, 48211-2545 RO Pennit Number 199600325 Permit Number: Staff Report Date: RO Penmit Issuance Date: RO Permit Expiration Date: 199600325 October 14, 2003