National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for trillion btu 1999

  1. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  2. ,"Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  3. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  4. DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Information Resources » Energy Analysis » DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) About the Energy Data Use this diagram to explore (zoom, pan, select) and compare energy flows across U.S. manufacturing and key subsectors. Line widths indicate the volume of energy flow in trillions of British thermal units (TBtu). The 15 manufacturing subsectors together consume 95% of all

  5. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in this table do not include enclosed malls and strip malls. In the 1999 CBECS, total fuel oil consumption in malls was not statistically significant. (*)Value rounds to zero...

  6. Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107 313 Textile Mills 32 0 65 (s) (s) 2 66 12 -0 178 314 Textile Product Mills 3 0 46 (s) 1 Q 20 (s) -0 72 315 Apparel 0 0 7 (s) (s)

  7. Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year Square Footage Category Principal Building Activity Census Region 1 All Buildings 1,001 to 10,000 10,001 to 100,000 Over 100,000 Education Food Sales Food Service Health Care Lodging Mercantile and Service Office All Other Northeast Midwest South West Major Sources 2 1979 1,255 2,202 1,508 511 [3] 336 469 278 894 861 1,616 1,217 1,826 1,395 526 4,965 1983 1,242 1,935 1,646 480 [3]

  8. Btu)","per Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per...

  9. Table 1.13 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 (Trillion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 (Trillion Btu) Resource and Fiscal Years Agriculture Defense Energy GSA 1 HHS 2 Interior Justice NASA 3 Postal Service Trans- portation Veterans Affairs Other 4 Total Coal 2003 (s) 15.4 2.0 0.0 (s) (s) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 17.7 2010 (s) 15.5 4.5 .0 0.0 0.0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 20.1 2011 P 0.0 14.3 4.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 18.6 Natural Gas 5 2003 1.4 76.6 7.0 7.6 3.7 1.3 8.6 2.9 10.4 .7 15.6 4.2

  10. Trillion Particles,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned from a Hero IO Run on Hopper Surendra Byna , Andrew Uselton , Prabhat , David Knaak , and Yun...

  11. Contemplating 10 Trillion Digits of ?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for calculating digits of stands at about 10 trillion. Alexander J. Yee and Shigeru Kondo used a custom made desktop computer and a program called Y- Cruncher. The calculation...

  12. Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons Berkeley researchers design strategies for extracting interesting data from massive scientific datasets June 26, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 VPIC1.jpg After querying a dataset of approximately 114,875,956,837 particles for those with Energy values less than 1.5, FastQuery identifies 57,740,614 particles, which are mapped on this plot. Image by Oliver Rubel, Berkeley Lab. Modern research tools like

  13. Annual Energy Review 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    67 Diagram 3. Natural Gas Flow, 1999 (Trillion Cubic Feet) a b Includes deliveries to municipalities and public authorities for institutional heating and other purposes. Includes...

  14. First BTU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that is consumed by the United States.3 References First BTU First BTU Green Energy About First BTU Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFirstBT...

  15. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed A team of astrophysicists and computer scientists has created high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. January 8, 2015 Simulation of the cosmic web of the dark matter mass distribution. This region represents about 1/10,000 of the total simulation volume. Simulation of the cosmic web of the dark matter mass distribution. This region represents about 1/10,000 of the total

  16. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  17. Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper Berkeley Lab Researchers Bridge Gap to Exascale May...

  18. Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper Trillion Particle Simulation on Hopper Honored with Best Paper Berkeley Lab Researchers Bridge Gap to Exascale May 31, 2013 Contact: Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, (510) 495-2402 VPIC1.jpg Image by Oliver Rubel, Berkeley Lab. An unprecedented trillion-particle simulation, which utilized more than 120,000 processors and generated approximately 350 terabytes of data, pushed the performance capability of the National Energy Research Scientific

  19. DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY FLOWS TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    this diagram to explore (zoom, pan, select) and compare energy flows across U.S. manufacturing and key subsectors. Line widths indicate the volume of energy flow in trillions of...

  20. BTU International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1862 Product: US-based manufacturer of thermal processing equipment, semiconductor packaging, and surface mount assembly. References: BTU International Inc1 This article is a...

  1. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide...

  2. Annual Energy Review 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2000-07-01

    A generation ago the Ford Foundation convened a group of experts to explore and assess the Nations energy future, and published their conclusions in A Time To Choose: Americas Energy Future (Cambridge, MA: Ballinger, 1974). The Energy Policy Project developed scenarios of U.S. potential energy use in 1985 and 2000. Now, with 1985 well behind us and 2000 nearly on the record books, it may be of interest to take a look back to see what actually happened and consider what it means for our future. The study group sketched three primary scenarios with differing assumptions about the growth of energy use. The Historical Growth scenario assumed that U.S. energy consumption would continue to expand by 3.4 percent per year, the average rate from 1950 to 1970. This scenario assumed no intentional efforts to change the pattern of consumption, only efforts to encourage development of our energy supply. The Technical Fix scenario anticipated a conscious national effort to use energy more efficiently through engineering know-how." The Zero Energy Growth scenario, while not clamping down on the economy or calling for austerity, incorporated the Technical Fix efficiencies plus additional efficiencies. This third path anticipated that economic growth would depend less on energy-intensive industries and more on those that require less energy, i.e., the service sector. In 2000, total energy consumption was projected to be 187 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in the Historical Growth case, 124 quadrillion Btu in the Technical Fix case, and 100 quadrillion Btu in the Zero Energy Growth case. The Annual Energy Review 1999 reports a preliminary total consumption for 1999 of 97 quadrillion Btu (see Table 1.1), and the Energy Information Administrations Short-Term Energy Outlook (April 2000) forecasts total energy consumption of 98 quadrillion Btu in 2000. What energy consumption path did the United States actually travel to get from 1974, when the scenarios were drawn, to the end of the century? What happened to the relationship between growth and energy consumption? How did the fuel mix change over this period? What are the effects of energy usage on our environment? What level of consumption will the United Statesand the worldrecord in the Annual Energy Review 2025? We present this edition of the Annual Energy Review to help investigate these important questions and to stimulate and inform our thinking about what the future holds.

  3. Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lessons Learned from a Hero IO Run on Hopper Trillion Particles, 120,000 cores, and 350 TBs: Lessons Learned from a Hero IO Run on Hopper May 23, 2013 byna Suren Byna Berkeley...

  4. Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "GeothermalCapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR...

  5. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "GeothermalAnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR...

  6. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12:00:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per ...

  7. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    monitoring. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will

  8. NUG 1999

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nov. 15, 1999 NUG 1998 NUG 1997 NUG 1996 NUG 1995 NUG 1994 NUGEX Elections Charter User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords &...

  9. EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this draft environmental impact statement that evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky. DOE cancelled this project after publication of the draft.

  10. Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994...

  11. 1999 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 1999 Thu, 10/14/1999 - 2:00pm Duality Apparently Confirmed In Jefferson Laboratory Experiments July 1999 Tue, 07/20/1999 - 2:00pm Tunable Laser Reaches Record Power Level

  12. 1999 - 02 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 1999 Tue, 02/16/1999 - 1:00am A Closer Look at Cancer (Daily Press

  13. 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) > Detailed Tables 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Building Characteristics | Consumption & Expenditures Data from the 1999...

  14. 1999 - 07 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 1999 Tue, 07/20/1999 - 2:00pm Tunable Laser Reaches Record Power Level

  15. 1999 - 10 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 1999 Thu, 10/14/1999 - 2:00pm Duality Apparently Confirmed In Jefferson Laboratory Experiments

  16. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value

  17. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and

  18. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers | Department of Energy A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers Comment that a requirement to reduce the BTU input rate of existing decorative

  19. 1999 - 12 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1999 Wed, 12/01/1999 - 1:00am HAPPEX Probes 'sea' of Nucleon Strangeness (CERN Courier) Wed, 12/01/1999 - 1:00am Novel X-rays Detected at Jefferson (CERN Courier

  20. 1999 - 01 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 1999 Wed, 01/13/1999 - 1:00am Energy Czar Comes Calling ( The Virginian-Pilot ) Wed, 01/13/1999 - 1:00am Kids Slow Down to Learn about Speed (Daily Press) Wed, 01/13/1999 - 1:00am Official to Support Scientific Research (Daily Press) Sat, 01/02/1999 - 1:00am Physicist Says Goodbye to Homeland (Daily Press) Fri, 01/01/1999 - 1:00am A Few Good Beams (Release) Fri, 01/01/1999 - 1:00am Advances in Contrast Agent Delivery, Mammography (Release) Fri, 01/01/1999 - 1:00am Let There Be (Electron)

  1. C3DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) NEW...

  2. Released: Dec 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per Square Foot (thousand Btu)","per Worker (million Btu)" "All Buildings* ...",4645...

  3. 1999 - 09 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 1999 Sat, 09/11/1999 - 12:00am Laser Researcher to Speak at Museum (Daily Press) Thu, 09/09/1999 - 12:00am Success at Jefferson Lab Spurs Need for More Space (Burrelle's) Wed, 09/01/1999 - 12:00am BIG FEL Grows in Power (Laser Focus World

  4. 1999 - 07 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 1999 Thu, 07/22/1999 - 3:00pm Henry Whitehead - From Transistors to Lasers Thu, 07/22/1999 - 12:00am Henry Whitehead - From Transistors to Lasers (William & Mary News) Tue, 07/20/1999 - 12:00am Tunable Laser Reaches Record Power Level Sun, 07/18/1999 - 12:00am Experts at Newport News Lab Develop Powerful New Laser (Richmond-Times Dispatch) Sat, 07/17/1999 - 12:00am Newport News Lab Zaps Record for Laser Power (Virginian Pilot) Sat, 07/17/1999 - 12:00am Jefferson Laser Team Meets Goal

  5. 1999 - 04 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 1999 Sat, 04/24/1999 - 12:00am Powered Up (Weekly Science) Fri, 04/23/1999 - 12:00am Interactive: Physics professor's high-energy show turns kids on (Daily Press) Tue, 04/20/1999 - 12:00am Taste-Testing a Recipe for the Cosmos Thu, 04/01/1999 - 1:00am ODU Technology Fair Relates High-Tech to Regional Business (The Virginia-Pilot)

  6. 1999 - 08 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1999 Thu, 08/26/1999 - 12:00am New I-64 Sign Points to Times Past (Daily Press) Wed, 08/25/1999 - 12:00am Powerful Tunable Laser Exceeds Design Goals (DOE Pulse) Sun, 08/08/1999 - 12:00am U. Va. Gets $2.5 Million for Study at Jefferson Lab (Daily Press) Sat, 08/07/1999 - 12:00am Another Research Building Considered Near Jefferson Lab (Daily Press

  7. 1999 - 07 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 1999 Tue, 07/20/1999 - 3:50pm Tunable Laser Reaches Record Power Level Sun, 07/18/1999 - 3:48pm Experts at Newport News Lab Develop Powerful New Laser Sat, 07/17/1999 - 3:46pm Jefferson Laser Team Meets Goal Sat, 07/17/1999 - 3:42pm Newport News Lab Zaps Record for Laser Power

  8. 1999 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 1999 Tue, 07/20/1999 - 3:50pm Tunable Laser Reaches Record Power Level Sun, 07/18/1999 - 3:48pm Experts at Newport News Lab Develop Powerful New Laser Sat, 07/17/1999 - 3:46pm Jefferson Laser Team Meets Goal Sat, 07/17/1999 - 3:42pm Newport News Lab Zaps Record for Laser Power

  9. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  10. 1999 - 11 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 1999 Tue, 11/16/1999 - 1:00am At the Frontier / Lab's Electron Beam Also Aimed at Industrial Uses (Washington Bureau) Tue, 11/16/1999 - 1:00am At the Frontier / The Quirks Of Quarks (Washington Bureau

  11. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  12. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

  13. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177...

  14. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2004 through 2014 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks Period Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu) Average Cost (Dollars per MMBtu) Receipts (Trillion Btu)

  15. 1995 CECS C&E Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Major Fuel, 1995 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Primary Electricity (trillion Btu) RSE Row Factor Number of...

  16. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836

  17. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1993 1.906 1994 2.012 2.140 2.120 2.150 2.081 2.189 2.186 2.168 2.079 1.991 1.843 1.672 1995 1.519 1.541 1.672 1.752 1.810 1.763 1.727 1.826 1.886 1.827 1.770 1.844 1996 1.877 1.985 2.040 2.245 2.275 2.561 2.503 2.293 2.296 2.436 2.317 2.419 1997 2.227 1.999 1.987 2.084 2.249 2.194 2.274 2.689 2.997 2.873 2.532 2.204 1998 2.124 2.324 2.333 2.533 2.289 2.291 2.428 2.419 2.537 2.453 2.294 1.940 1999 1.880 1.850 1.886 2.214 2.331 2.429 2.539

  18. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption SurveyCommercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy...

  19. Annual Energy Review 1999

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residual Fuel Oil Petroleum Products Supplied 19.39 (Consumption) Diagram 2. Petroleum Flow, 1999 (Million Barrels per Day) Includes lease condensate. Natural gas plant liquids....

  20. Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

    1983-07-01

    Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory- Completing the Human Genome Project and Triggering Nearly $1 Trillion in U.S. Economic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Jeffrey S.

    2015-07-28

    The success of the Human Genome project is already nearing $1 Trillion dollars of U.S. economic activity. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was a co-leader in one of the biggest biological research effort in history, sequencing the Human Genome Project. This ambitious research effort set out to sequence the approximately 3 billion nucleotides in the human genome, an effort many thought was nearly impossible. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was discovered in 1869, and by 1943 came the discovery that DNA was a molecule that encodes the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of living organisms and many viruses. To make full use of the information, scientists needed to first sequence the billions of nucleotides to begin linking them to genetic traits and illnesses, and eventually more effective treatments. New medical discoveries and improved agriculture productivity were some of the expected benefits. While the potential benefits were vast, the timeline (over a decade) and cost ($3.8 Billion) exceeded what the private sector would normally attempt, especially when this would only be the first phase toward the path to new discoveries and market opportunities. The Department of Energy believed its best research laboratories could meet this Grand Challenge and soon convinced the National Institute of Health to formally propose the Human Genome project to the federal government. The U.S. government accepted the risk and challenge to potentially create new healthcare and food discoveries that could benefit the world and the U.S. Industry.

  2. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,056 1,055 1,057 1,043 983 983 983 983 983 983 983 983 2014 947 946 947 947 947 947 951 978 990 968 974 962 2015 968 954 947 959 990 1,005 1,011 965 989 996 996 997 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  3. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977

  4. 1999 - 10 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 1999 Sun, 10241999 - 11:00pm A Needle Biopsy Alternative Riverside to Test Small Camera that Points Out Growths in Breast (Daily Press) Fri, 10221999 - 11:00pm Science...

  5. 1999 - 06 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 1999 Sun, 06271999 - 12:00am Gizmos, Gadgets & Devices - Oh, My (Daily Press) Fri, 06251999 - 12:00am Exhibit: High-Energy Lab Tours for Kids (Daily Press) Tue, 06221999...

  6. Annual Energy Review 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    89 Diagram 4. Coal Flow, 1999 (Million Short Tons) Notes : Data are preliminary. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Sources: Tables 7.1, 7.2, and...

  7. Geothermal Today - 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-05-01

    U.S. Department of Energy 1999 Geothermal Energy Program Highlights The Hot Facts Getting into Hot Water Turning Waste water into Clean Energy Producing Even Cleaner Power Drilling Faster and Cheaper Program in Review 1999: The Year in Review JanuaryCal Energy announced sale of Coso geothermal power plants at China Lake, California, to Caithness Energy, for $277 million. U.S. Export-Import Bank completed a $50 million refinancing of the Leyte Geothermal Optimization Project in the Philippines. F

  8. NCSL1999.PDF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EMPIRICAL CORRELATIONS FOR THERMAL FLOWMETERS COVERING A WIDE RANGE OF THERMAL-PHYSICAL PROPERTIES J. E. Hardy J. O. Hylton T. E. McKnight Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Paper prepared for the National Conference of Standards Labs (NCSL) 1999 Workshop and Symposium Charlotte, NC July 19-22, 1999 "The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S.Government under contract no. DE- AC05-96OR22464. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free

  9. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,014 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,014 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,017 1,016 1,017 1,017 2014 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 1,027 1,026 1,026 1,025 2015 1,025 1,026 1,025 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,026 1,027 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  10. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,049 1,046 1,048 1,041 1,049 1,058 1,054 1,065 1,064 1,067 1,057 2014 1,052 1,048 1,048 1,051 1,045 1,049 1,063 1,065 1,062 1,063 1,063 1,064 2015 1,061 1,061 1,062 1,051 1,055 1,055 1,044 1,044 1,043 1,051 1,051 1,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,032 1,030 1,033 1,040 1,051 1,056 1,057 1,058 1,037 1,032 1,033 2014 1,030 1,036 1,038 1,041 1,051 1,050 1,048 1,048 1,050 1,055 1,042 1,051 2015 1,046 1,044 1,051 1,059 1,059 1,070 1,073 1,069 1,076 1,069 1,060 1,051 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,016 1,017 1,017 1,018 1,018 2014 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,019 1,019 1,019 1,022 1,023 1,024 1,023 1,024 1,025 2015 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,024 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,024 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,018 1,025 1,011 1,022 1,028 1,024 1,032 1,028 1,030 1,030 1,026 1,024 2014 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,022 1,023 1,021 1,020 1,018 1,017 2015 1,017 1,026 1,029 1,026 1,049 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,026 1,028 1,027 1,026 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  14. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043 1,047 1,044 1,046 1,044 1,045 2015 1,045 1,047 1,047 1,051 1,054 1,060 1,059 1,059 1,058 1,058 1,057 1,056 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Cubic Foot) Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,029 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,025 1,028 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016

  16. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,028 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  17. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,013 1,015 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,016 1,017 1,017 1,016 1,018 1,019 2014 1,017 1,016 1,018 1,021 1,028 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,031 1,034 1,037 1,038 2015 1,030 1,031 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,022 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  18. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,025 1,027 1,025 1,028 1,025 2015 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,044 1,039 1,040 1,042 1,039 1,037 1,035 1,031 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,028 1,030 1,031 1,028 1,028 1,033 2014 1,029 1,024 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,037 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,022 1,017 1,019 2015 1,023 1,018 1,015 1,016 1,023 1,021 1,024 1,015 1,020 1,024 1,021 1,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005 1,019 1,046 1,039 2015 1,047 1,037 1,030 1,023 1,000 1,010 1,034 1,028 1,024 1,033 1,035 1,041 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  1. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,015 1,015 1,014 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,017 1,019 1,018 2014 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021 1,021 1,023 1,024 2015 1,027 1,030 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,027 1,027 1,027 1,028 1,028 1,030 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,012 1,013 1,015 1,019 1,020 1,019 1,021 1,020 1,018 1,015 1,014 2014 1,016 1,017 1,019 1,019 1,023 1,023 1,025 1,030 1,028 1,027 1,025 1,029 2015 1,028 1,029 1,031 1,039 1,037 1,043 1,043 1,044 1,041 1,039 1,034 1,033 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,020 1,021 1,020 1,021 1,026 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,029 1,027 2014 1,031 1,027 1,033 1,034 1,038 1,042 1,042 1,051 1,046 1,040 1,038 1,040 2015 1,041 1,034 1,033 1,037 1,044 1,047 1,043 1,041 1,039 1,041 1,045 1,041 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  4. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,015 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,020 1,020 2014 1,019 1,014 1,019 1,026 1,030 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,035 1,033 1,035 1,034 2015 1,036 1,033 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,030 1,030 1,029 1,031 1,028 1,029 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  5. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,014 1,014 1,013 1,014 1,013 1,017 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,013 1,014 2014 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,011 1,016 1,016 1,018 1,017 1,018 1,017 1,017 2015 1,017 1,020 1,025 1,026 1,024 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,025 1,024 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,044 1,040 1,032 1,034 1,034 1,044 1,048 1,043 1,047 1,041 1,032 1,031 2014 1,034 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,032 1,030 1,038 1,036 1,040 1,031 1,026 1,030 2015 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,021 1,019 1,030 1,031 1,033 1,032 1,032 1,034 1,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,039 1,023 1,016 1,025 1,027 2015 1,033 1,035 1,030 1,025 1,022 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,019 1,026 1,025 1,027 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,041 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,037 1,042 1,060 1,056 1,062 1,059 1,061 1,059 2014 1,053 1,048 1,045 1,049 1,047 1,052 1,051 1,051 1,049 1,052 1,057 1,057 2015 1,059 1,061 1,058 1,051 1,058 1,057 1,055 1,049 1,050 1,053 1,049 1,050 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,033 1,032 1,033 1,035 1,032 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,033 1,030 2014 1,035 1,032 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,028 2015 1,035 1,035 1,030 1,029 1,027 1,027 1,029 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,029 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  10. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,021 1,021 1,022 1,026 1,020 1,022 1,024 1,021 1,019 1,019 1,017 1,019 2014 1,019 1,021 1,021 1,017 1,020 1,019 1,015 1,028 1,022 1,023 1,026 1,029 2015 1,027 1,026 1,030 1,035 1,028 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,034 1,041 1,040 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Enabling Clean Consumption of Low Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Enabling Clean Combustion of Low-Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines By enabling ultralow-emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels, this unique, fuel- fexible catalytic combustor for gas turbines can reduce natural gas consumption in industry. Introduction Gas turbines are commonly used in industry for onsite power and heating needs because of their high

  12. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" "

  13. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-02-12

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  14. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  15. Part-Per-Trillion Level SF6 Detection Using a Quartz Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy-Based Sensor with Single-Mode Fiber-Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spagnolo, V.; Patimisco, P.; Borri, Simone; Scamarcio, G.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Kriesel, J.M.

    2012-10-23

    A sensitive spectroscopic sensor based on a hollow-core fiber-coupled quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting at 10.54 µm and quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) technique is reported. The design and realization of mid-infrared fiber and coupler optics has ensured single-mode QCL beam delivery to the QEPAS sensor . The collimation optics was designed to produce a laser beam of significantly reduced beam size and waist so as to prevent illumination of the quartz tuning fork and micro-resonator tubes. SF6 was selected as the target gas. A minimum detection sensitivity of 50 parts per trillion in 1 s was achieved with a QCL power of 18 mW, corresponding to a normalized noise-equivalent absorption of 2.7x10-10 W•cm-1/Hz1/2.

  16. 1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy...

  17. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  18. Monthly Energy Review - October 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    October 26, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1), and...

  19. Monthly Energy Review - September 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    September 27, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  20. Monthly Energy Review - December 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    December 22, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  1. Monthly Energy Review - November 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    November 23, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website in a variety of formats: * ASCII text, Lotus (wk1),...

  2. NUG Meeting Nov. 15, 1999

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Portland, OR Agenda ERSUG Meeting: Monday November 15, 1999 Doubletree Hotel - Lloyd Center, Portland The next NERSC User Group (ERSUG) meeting will be held in...

  3. Office Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Type of Office Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per Million Btu All Office Buildings 1,089 1,475 90.5 16.32...

  4. Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kartsounes, George T.; Sather, Norman F.

    1979-01-01

    An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

  5. Table 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fossil Fuel Production Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) Year Coal 1 Natural Gas 2 Crude Oil 3 Fossil Fuel Composite 4 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Percent Change 7 1949 0.21 1.45 0.05 0.37 0.44 3.02 0.26 1.81 – – 1950 .21 1.41 .06 .43 .43 2.95 [R] .26 1.74 -3.6 1951 .21 1.35 .06 .40 .44 2.78 .26 1.65 -5.4 1952 .21 1.31 [R] .07 .45 .44 2.73 .26 1.63 -1.0 1953 .21 1.29 .08 .50 .46 2.86 .27 1.69 3.3 1954 .19 1.18 .09 .55 .48 2.94 .28 1.70 .7 1955

  6. 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 – 25, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

  7. Powered by 500 Trillion Calculations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne's supercomputer is using its superpowers to map the movement of red blood cells -- which will hopefully lead to better diagnoses and treatments for patients with blood flow complications.

  8. Sifting Through a Trillion Electrons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    57,740,614 particles, which are mapped on this plot. Image by Oliver Rubel, Berkeley Lab. Modern research tools like supercomputers, particle colliders, and telescopes are...

  9. Monthly Energy Review - May 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    May 25, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website. Go to http:www.eia.doe.gov and click on "Energy...

  10. Monthly Energy Review April 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    April 27, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website. Go to http:www.eia.doe.gov and click on "Energy...

  11. Monthly Energy Review - February 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    February 26, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website. Go to http:www.eia.doe.gov and click on "Energy...

  12. Monthly Energy Review - August 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    August 25, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website. Go to http:www.eia.doe.gov and click on "Over- view."...

  13. Monthly Energy Review - July 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    July 26, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website. Go to http:www.eia.doe.gov and click on "Over- view."...

  14. Monthly Energy Review - January 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    January 26, 1999 Electronic Access The Monthly Energy Review is available on the Energy Information Administration's website. Go to http:www.eia.doe.gov and click on "Energy...

  15. Calendar Year 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Calendar Year 1999 December 22, 1999 Inspection Report: IG-0455 Inspection of the Sale of a Paragon Supercomputer by Sandia National Laboratories December 16, 1999 Inspection Report: INS-O-00-02 Inspection of Alleged Improprieties Regarding Issuance of a Contract December 15, 1999 Audit Report: IG-0454 Waste Incineration at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory December 10, 1999 Audit Report: WR-B-00-02 Property and Facilities at Grand Junction December 1, 1999 Inspection

  16. 1999 EV America Technical Specifications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 EV AMERICA TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS Effective October 1, 1999 Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications 1999 EV AMERICA TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS 2 MINIMUM VEHICLE REQUIREMENTS For a vehicle to be considered qualified as an EV America-USDOE "Production" level vehicle, it must meet the minimum criteria defined by "shall" terminology utilized in the Specification. [For clarity, the use of the word "Shall" defines minimum requirements, whereas the use of the

  17. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  18. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  19. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    . Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare...

  20. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  1. Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE 1999 Annual Report, October 1998-September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 Laboratory for Laser Energetics LLE 1999 Annual Report, October 1998-September 1999 Note: This report was submitted electronically even though ''PAPER'' is indicated.

  2. ARM - 1999 ARM Science Team Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 ARM Science Team Meeting 1999 Meeting 1999 Meeting Home Proceedings Sorted by Author Proceedings Sorted by Title Meeting Archives ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings Past Science Team Meetings 1999 ARM Science Team Meeting March 22 - 26 | San Antonio, Texas | St. Anthony Hotel & The Municipal Auditorium St. Anthony Hotel provided rooms along with the Municipal Auditorium for the 1999 ARM Science Team Meeting. The ninthth ARM Science Team Meeting was held in San Antonio, Texas. The Science

  3. Technical Standards Newsletter - October 1999 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1999 Technical Standards Newsletter - October 1999 October 1999 The Standards Forum and Standards Actions, October 1999 The appropriate Technical Standards Managers (TSMs) will provide selected reviewers with copies for comment. PDF icon The Standards Forum and Standards Actions - October 1999 More Documents & Publications Technical Standards Newsletter - October 1999 Technical Standards Newsletter - November 1999 Technical Standards Newsletter - April 2000

  4. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  5. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand

  6. Health Care Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Tables Sum of Major Fuel Consumption by Size and Type of Health Care Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per...

  7. June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1, 1999: National Ignition Facility June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility June 11, 1999 Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target chamber at DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. R A N K I N G S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table C10. Energy Consumption Estimates by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2013 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector a Transportation Sector Total Consumption a State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,685.9 Texas 1,609.9 Texas 6,574.8 Texas 3,073.5 Texas 12,944.1 2 California 1,480.0 California 1,483.8 Louisiana 2,562.0 California 2,907.8 California 7,684.1 3 Florida 1,168.3 New York 1,134.2 California

  9. Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

    2000-09-28

    This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

  10. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Census Region

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Top Return to: "1999 CBECS-Commercial Buildings Characteristics" Specific questions...

  11. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Year Constructed

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Top Return to: "1999 CBECS-Commercial Buildings Characteristics" Specific questions...

  12. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Size

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Top Return to: "1999 CBECS-Commercial Buildings Characteristics" Specific questions...

  13. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Disaggregated Principal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (202) 586-8800. Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Top Return to: "1999 CBECS-Commercial Buildings Characteristics" Specific questions...

  14. Natural Gas: A Preliminary Summary 1999

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This special report provides preliminary natural gas data for 1999 which were reported on monthly surveys of the industry through December.

  15. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Conservation Features...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Conservation Features and Practices Topics: Energy Sources and End Uses End-Use Equipment Conservation Features and Practices Conservation Features and Practices The 1999 CBECS...

  16. Table 3.3 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 9,10,14 Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 8 Total 9,10 Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel 4 LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total 1970 0.38 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1971 .42 .63 1.22 .77 1.46 2.90 .58 1.45 1.78 .18 1.31 1.15 .38 5.30 1.76 1972 .45 .68 1.22

  17. Industrial co-generation through use of a medium BTU gas from biomass produced in a high throughput reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Ball, D.A.; Paisley, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A high-throughput gasification system has been developed for the steam gasification of woody biomass to produce a fuel gas with a heating value of 475 to 500 Btu/SCF without using oxygen. Recent developments have focused on the use of bark and sawdust as feedstocks in addition to wood chips and the testing of a new reactor concept, the so-called controlled turbulent zone (CTZ) reactor to increase gas production per unit of wood fed. Operating data from the original gasification system and the CTZ system are used to examine the preliminary economics of biomass gasification/gas turbine cogeneration systems. In addition, a ''generic'' pressurized oxygen-blown gasification system is evaluated. The economics of these gasification systems are compared with a conventional wood boiler/steam turbine cogeneration system.

  18. COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

    1994-10-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - 1999 Northeast Corridor Ozone & Particulate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 1999 Northeast Corridor Ozone & Particulate Study 1999.07.23 - 1999.08.11 Lead...

  20. Calendar Year 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 25, 1999 Audit Report: ER-FS-99-01 Results of Audit Procedures Performed at Chicago Operations Office During the Audit of the Department's Consolidated Fiscal Year 1998...

  1. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Year Constructed Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Constructed Comparison Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Year Constructed, 1999 Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Year Constructed, 1999. If having trouble...

  2. TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9 TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1999 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (July 14-15, 1999) Meeting Summaries Items Available for Download TEC Meeting Notes More Documents & Publications TEC...

  3. Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

    1995-08-01

    Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

  4. Philadelphia gas works medium-Btu coal gasification project: capital and operating cost estimate, financial/legal analysis, project implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This volume of the final report is a compilation of the estimated capital and operating costs for the project. Using the definitive design as a basis, capital and operating costs were developed by obtaining quotations for equipment delivered to the site. Tables 1.1 and 1.2 provide a summary of the capital and operating costs estimated for the PGW Coal Gasification Project. In the course of its Phase I Feasibility Study of a medium-Btu coal-gas facility, Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) identified the financing mechanism as having great impact on gas cost. Consequently, PGW formed a Financial/Legal Task Force composed of legal, financial, and project analysis specialists to study various ownership/management options. In seeking an acceptable ownership, management, and financing arrangement, certain ownership forms were initially identified and classified. Several public ownership, private ownership, and third party ownership options for the coal-gas plant are presented. The ownership and financing forms classified as base alternatives involved tax-exempt and taxable financing arrangements and are discussed in Section 3. Project implementation would be initiated by effectively planning the methodology by which commercial operation will be realized. Areas covered in this report are sale of gas to customers, arrangements for feedstock supply and by-product disposal, a schedule of major events leading to commercialization, and a plan for managing the implementation.

  5. Low/medium Btu coal gasification assessment of central plant for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing, distributing, selling, and using fuel gas for industrial applications in Philadelphia. The primary driving force for the assessment is the fact that oil users are encountering rapidly escalating fuel costs, and are uncertain about the future availability of low sulfur fuel oil. The situation is also complicated by legislation aimed at reducing oil consumption and by difficulties in assuring a long term supply of natural gas. Early in the gasifier selection study it was decided that the level of risk associated with the gasification process sould be minimal. It was therefore determined that the process should be selected from those commercially proven. The following processes were considered: Lurgi, KT, Winkler, and Wellman-Galusha. From past experience and a knowledge of the characteristics of each gasifier, a list of advantages and disadvantages of each process was formulated. It was concluded that a medium Btu KT gas can be manufactured and distributed at a lower average price than the conservatively projected average price of No. 6 oil, provided that the plant is operated as a base load producer of gas. The methodology used is described, assumptions are detailed and recommendations are made. (LTN)

  6. Table 2.4 Household Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household 1 Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted) Census Region 2 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 United States Total (does not include wood) 10.56 9.74 9.32 9.29 8.58 9.04 9.13 9.22 10.01 10.25 9.86 10.55 10.18 Natural Gas 5.58 5.31 4.97 5.27 4.74 4.98 4.83 4.86 5.27 5.28 4.84 4.79 4.69 Electricity 3 2.47 2.42 2.48 2.42 2.35 2.48 2.76 3.03 3.28 3.54 3.89 4.35 4.39 Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene 2.19

  7. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  8. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  9. Physics division annual report 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example of the ground-breaking research with Garnmasphere was the first study of the limits of stability with angular momentum in the shell stabilized nobelium isotopes. It was found that these heaviest nuclei could be formed at surprisingly high angular momentum, providing important new insight into the production mechanisms for super-heavy elements. Another focus continues to be experiments with short-lived beams for critical nuclear astrophysics applications. Measurements revealed that {sup 44}Ti is more readily destroyed in supernovae than was expected. Major progress was made in collecting and storing unstable ions in the Canadian Penning Trap. The technique of stopping and rapidly extracting ions from a helium gas cell led directly to the new paradigm in the production of rare isotope beams that became RIA. ATLAS provided a record 6046 hours of beam use for experiments in FY99. The facility pressed hard to support the heavy demands of the GammaSphere Research program but maintained an operational reliability of 93%. Of the 29 different isotopes provided as beams in FY99, radioactive beams of {sup 44}Ti and {sup 17}F comprised 6% of the beam time. The theoretical efforts in the Division made dramatic new strides in such topics as quantum Monte Carlo calculations of light nuclei to understand microscopic many-body forces in nuclei; QCD calculations based on the Dyson-Schwinger approach which were extended to baryon systems and finite temperatures and densities; the structure of heavy nuclei; and proton decay modes of nuclei far from stability. The medium-energy program continues to focus on new techniques to understand how the quark-gluon structure of matter impacts the structure of nuclei. The HERMES experiment began making measurements of the fraction of the spin of the nucleon carried by the glue. Drell-Yan experiments study the flavor composition of the sea of the proton. Experiments at Jefferson lab search for clues of QCD dynamics at the hadronic level. A major advance in trace isotope analysis was realized with pioneering work on Atom Trap Trace Analysis, exploitin

  10. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    public data release. A paper describes the research and data release. Significance of the research The Dark Sky Simulations are an ongoing series of cosmological simulations...

  11. Team B: The trillion dollar experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, A.H.; Prados, J.

    1993-04-01

    Team B was an experiment in competetive threat assessments approved by the director of the CIA at that time, George Bush. Teams of experts were to make independent assessments of highly classified data used by the intelligence community to assess Soviet strategic forces in the yearly National Intelligence Estimates. In this article, two experts report on how a group of Cold War outside experts were invited to second-guess the policies of the CIA. The question explored here is whether or not these outside experts of the 1970s contributed to the military buildup of the 1980s.

  12. 1999 MPP and HPSS Allocation Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1999 MPP Awards 1999 MPP and HPSS Allocation Awards The following table lists MPP and HPSS allocation awards for NERSC for FY99, including Grand Challenge projects. The list is in alphabetical order by the last name of the principal investigator. First Name Last Name Office Program Req # Repo Title FY99 PE Hours FY99 SRUs YORAM ALHASSID HNP NP 67046 mp69 Monte Carlo Methods for Nuclear Structure 33,800 100 CYNTHIA ATHERTON BER ESD/ CHAMMP 65142 mp163 "The use of MPP to investigate the roles

  13. Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1998 - March 31, 1999 Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 1998 - March 31, 1999 April 30, 1999 1999 Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. The report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending March 31, 1999. The Inspector General Act, as amended, requires you to forward the report to the appropriate congressional

  14. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, M.

    2000-08-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  15. Tank Stabilization September 30, 1999 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    United States Court Easter District of Washington Consent Decree (as amended on September 19, 2000.) State Washington Agreement Type Consent Decree Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Renegotiate a schedule to pump liquid radioactive hazardous waste from single-shell tanks to double-shell tanks Parties DOE; State of Washington, Department of Ecology Date 09/30/1999; Amended 09/19/2000 SCOPE * Address DOE's obligations to the State of Washington, Department of Ecology concerning missed and

  16. Preliminary Notice of Violation and Compliance Order, EA-1999...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preliminary Notice of Violation and Compliance Order, EA-1999-04 May 26, 1999 Issued to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., relating to events at the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project, K-Basins...

  17. Management & Administration Forms (0000-1999) | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management & Administration Forms (0000-1999) Management & Administration Forms (0000-1999) DOE F 206.1 (pdf) Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) DOE F 206.4 (fillable pdf) Information ...

  18. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 9 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1999 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at DOE facilities during the calendar year 1999. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 103 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 1999 have been grouped into 29 geographic sites across

  20. Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for emerging competitive distributed generation markets. FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information More Documents & Publications Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities...

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

  2. Construction Safety Advisory Committee, Meeting Minutes- April 27, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Description of CSAC agenda activities during CSAC meeting in Berkeley, CA. The meeting was held on April 27, 1999.

  3. Technical Standards Newsletter - June 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 Technical Standards Newsletter - June 1999 The Technical Standards Newsletter - June 1999 Inside this issue: A Note From the Manager ............. 2 Frequently Asked Questions .......... 2 TSM Spotlights .............................. 3 Topical Committees ....................... 4 Standards Actions .......................... 5 News Briefs ................................... 9 Upcoming Meetings ....................... 11 PDF icon The Standards Forum and Standards Actions, June 1999 More

  4. Meeting Materials: March 30-31, 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    March 30-31, 1999 Meeting Materials: March 30-31, 1999 NEAC Meeting Crystal City Marriott Arlington, Virginia PDF icon Meeting Minutes More Documents & Publications Meeting Materials: April 30 - May 1, 2001 Meeting Materials: July 29-30, 1999 Meeting Materials: Sept. 30 - Oct. 1, 2002

  5. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E3A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing...

  6. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for...

  7. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Note: 1. The Btu conversion factors used...

  8. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)...

  9. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) RSE Row Factor Number of Buildings...

  10. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Mercantile and Office Buildings, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

  11. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels in Older Buildings by Year Constructed, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

  12. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total...

  13. C15DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) NEW ENGLAND ... 45...

  14. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    d Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1d. Nonfuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and...

  15. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4: Wood and Biomass Waste Consumption Estimates, 2013 State Wood Wood and Biomass Waste a Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total b Thousand Cords Trillion Btu...

  16. 1989 CBECS EUI

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 3.2. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1992 Building Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) RSE Row Factor Number of...

  17. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing...

  18. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Electricity by End Use, 1989 Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Office Space Ventil- Water Refrig- Equip- Total Heating Cooling ation Heating Lighting Cooking...

  19. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table B4. Consumption of Electricity by End Use, 1989 Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Office Space Ventil- Water Refrig- Equip- Total Heating Cooling ation Heating Lighting...

  20. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings*",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace...

  1. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  2. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  3. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  4. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  5. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 10.4 Biodiesel Overview, 2001-2011 Year Feedstock 1 Losses and Co-products 2 Production Trade Stocks, End of Year Stock Change 4 Balancing Item 5 Consumption Imports Exports Net Imports 3 Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Thousand Barrels Million Gallons Trillion Btu Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Thousand Barrels Million Gallons Trillion Btu 2001 1 (s) 204 9 1 78 39 39 NA NA NA 243 10 1 2002 1 (s) 250 10 1 191 56 135 NA NA

  6. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  8. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Third Quarter 1999 (July through September 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    2000-09-05

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program during the third quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  10. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program second quarter 1999 (April through June 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-16

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  11. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program First Quarter 1999 (January through March 1999)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, J.B.

    1999-12-08

    This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by Savannah River Site during first quarter 1999. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

  12. Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 1.06 1.54 6.51 2.10 0.75 0.90 [R] 6.09 1.97 0.45 0.38 0.98 1.59 2.99 0.84 2.31 2.31 1971 1.12 1.59 6.80 2.24 .80 1.02 6.44 2.15 .50 .41 1.05

  13. Commercial low-Btu coal-gasification plant. Feasibility study: General Refractories Company, Florence, Kentucky. Volume I. Project summary. [Wellman-Galusha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-11-01

    In response to a 1980 Department of Energy solicitation, the General Refractories Company submitted a Proposal for a feasibility study of a low Btu gasification facility for its Florence, KY plant. The proposed facility would substitute low Btu gas from a fixed bed gasifier for natural gas now used in the manufacture of insulation board. The Proposal from General Refractories was prompted by a concern over the rising costs of natural gas, and the anticipation of a severe increase in fuel costs resulting from deregulation. The proposed feasibility study is defined. The intent is to provide General Refractories with the basis upon which to determine the feasibility of incorporating such a facility in Florence. To perform the work, a Grant for which was awarded by the DOE, General Refractories selected Dravo Engineers and Contractors based upon their qualifications in the field of coal conversion, and the fact that Dravo has acquired the rights to the Wellman-Galusha technology. The LBG prices for the five-gasifier case are encouraging. Given the various natural gas forecasts available, there seems to be a reasonable possibility that the five-gasifier LBG prices will break even with natural gas prices somewhere between 1984 and 1989. General Refractories recognizes that there are many uncertainties in developing these natural gas forecasts, and if the present natural gas decontrol plan is not fully implemented some financial risks occur in undertaking the proposed gasification facility. Because of this, General Refractories has decided to wait for more substantiating evidence that natural gas prices will rise as is now being predicted.

  14. 1999 annual progress report -- Energy conservation team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chalk, S.

    1999-10-19

    This report highlights progress achieved during FY 1999 under the Light-duty Fuels Utilization R and D Program. The program is comprised of two elements: the Advanced Petroleum-Based APB Fuels Program which focused on developing and testing advanced fuels for use with compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines and fuel cells and the Alternative Fuels Program which focused on Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels. The report contains 17 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects. Fuel efficient vehicles with very low emissions are essential to meet the challenges of climate change, energy security, and improved air quality. The authors anticipate cooperative efforts with the auto and energy industries to develop new and innovative technologies that will be used to make advanced transportation vehicles that are fuel efficient, clean, and safe.

  15. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  16. Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment, November 1999

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment, November 1999 Industrial Applications for Micropower: A Market Assessment, November 1999 Micropower (defined here as electricity generation equipment less than 1 MW) such as microturbines, fuel cells, and reciprocating engines offers promise to renew growth in the U.S. industrial sector. Based on the analysis conducted for this 1999 study, these technologies can cost-effectively provide thermal and electric

  17. Review of CHP Technologies, October 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHP Technologies, October 1999 Review of CHP Technologies, October 1999 Combined heat and power (CHP) technologies produce electricity or mechanical power and recover waste heat for process use. This 1999 report describes the leading CHP technologies, their efficiency, size, cost to install, and maintain. PDF icon chp_review.pdf More Documents & Publications The Market and Technical Potential for Combined Heat and Power in the Industrial Sector, January 2000 The Market and Technical

  18. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Principal...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Principal Building Activities > Detailed Tables-Principal Building Activities Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables-Principal Building Activities Table B1....

  19. 1999 CBECS Summary Table for All Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tables 1999 Commercial Buildings Consumption Survey SUMMARY TABLES FOR ALL PRINCIPAL BUILDING ACTIVITIES Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square...

  20. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Building Shell and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    & Practices > Building Shell & Lighting Conservation Features Building Shell and Lighting Conservation Features The 1999 CBECS collected information on two types of building shell...

  1. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Building Activity Comparison

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building Activity Comparison Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity, 1999 Percentage of Floorspace and Buildings by Principal Building Activity,...

  2. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Year...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Constructed > Detailed Tables-Year Constructed Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables-Year Constructed Table B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings...

  3. TRIBAL ISSUES TOPIC GROUP MEETING SUMMARY JULY 13, 1999 Crowne

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    JULY 13, 1999 Crowne Plaza Center City Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Kevin Blackwell (U.S. Department of TransportationFederal Rail Administration) (DOTFRA) presented an overview of...

  4. Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Erten & Rial, 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Erten & Rial, 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At Geysers Area (Erten &...

  5. Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microseismic travel time data Lees, J.M.; Wu, H. (1 August 1999) P wave anisotropy, stress, and crack distribution at Coso geothermal field, California Additional References...

  6. Slim Holes At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration...

  7. Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal...

  8. Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team ... 10.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cells For Transportation - 2001 Annual Progress ...

  9. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Sandia Corporation- EA-1999-03

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Sandia Corporation, related to Radioactive Material Control and Radiological Work Permits at Sandia National Laboratories, (EA-1999-03)

  10. Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  11. Injectivity Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  12. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 011999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999red...

  13. "Table B26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used ...

  14. Table C12. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Electricity Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per kWh",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  15. Oil Overcharge Refund Cases 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil Overcharge Refund Cases 1999 During the period 1973 through 1981, the Federal government imposed price and allocation controls of crude oil and refined petroleum products, such ...

  16. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1999)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso...

  17. Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1999 and 1999 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-03-13

    A maximum of thirty eight-wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water Permit DWP-087A and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program. Iron (Total Recoverable), Chloroethene (Vinyl Chloride) and 1,1-Dichloroethane were the most widespread constituents exceeding the Final Primary Drinking Water Standards during 1999. Trichloroethylene, 1,1-Dichloroethylene, 1,2-Dichloroethane, 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Aluminum (Total Recoverable), Benzene, cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene, Dichlorodifluoromethane, Dichloromethane (Methylene Chloride), Gross Alpha, Mercury (Total Recoverable), Nonvolatile Beta, Tetrachloroethylene, Total Organic Halogens, Trichlorofluoromethane, Tritium also exceeded standards in one or more wells. The groundwater flow direction in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill is to the southeast (universal transverse Mercator coordinates). The flow rate in this unit was approximately 144.175 ft/year during first quarter 1999 and 145.27 ft/year during fourth quarter 1999.

  18. Analytical Chemistry Laboratory progress report for FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D. W.; Boparai, A. S.; Bowers, D. L.; Graczyk, D. G.

    2000-06-15

    This report summarizes the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 (October 1998 through September 1999). This annual progress report, which is the sixteenth in this series for the ACL, describes effort on continuing projects, work on new projects, and contributions of the ACL staff to various programs at ANL.

  19. Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversion Team | Department of Energy 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team Developing Advanced PEM Fuel Cell Technologies for Transportation PDF icon 10.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cells For Transportation - 2001 Annual Progress Report

  20. Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Contact Information | Department of Energy FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Public Benefits and Distributed Generation Outreach Project The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) will hold collaborative workshops with key stakeholders to build consensus on effective policy options for emerging competitive distributed generation markets. PDF icon

  1. Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-09-01

    This Annual Report summarizes and highlights waste generation, waste reduction, pollution prevention accomplishments, and cost avoidance for 44 U.S. Department of Energy reporting sites for Calendar Year 1999. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1999 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments.

  2. Wind River Watershed Restoration: 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, Patrick J.

    2001-09-01

    This document represents work conducted as part of the Wind River Watershed Restoration Project during its first year of funding through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project is a comprehensive effort involving public and private entities seeking to restore water quality and fishery resources in the basin through cooperative actions. Project elements include coordination, watershed assessment, restoration, monitoring, and education. Entities involved with implementing project components are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), USDA Forest Service (USFS), U.S. Geological Survey--Columbia River Research Lab (USGS-CRRL), and WA Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Following categories given in the FY1999 Statement of Work, the broad categories, the related objectives, and the entities associated with each objective (lead entity in boldface) were as follows: Coordination--Objective 1: Coordinate the Wind River watershed Action Committee (AC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) to develop a prioritized list of watershed enhancement projects. Monitoring--Objective 2: Monitor natural production of juvenile, smolt, and adult steelhead in the Wind River subbasin. Objective 3: Evaluate physical habitat conditions in the Wind River subbasin. Assessment--Objective 4: Assess watershed health using an ecosystem-based diagnostic model that will provide the technical basis to prioritize out-year restoration projects. Restoration--Objective 5: Reduce road related sediment sources by reducing road densities to less than 2 miles per square mile. Objective 6: Rehabilitate riparian corridors, flood plains, and channel morphology to reduce maximum water temperatures to less than 61 F, to increase bank stability to greater than 90%, to reduce bankfull width to depth ratios to less than 30, and to provide natural levels of pools and cover for fish. Objective 7: Maintain and evaluate passage for adult and juvenile steelhead at artificial barriers. Education--Objective 8: Promote watershed stewardship among students, the community, private landowners, and local governments. Progress towards six of eight of these objectives is described within nine separate reports included in a four-volume document.

  3. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003 Energy Source and Year Building Characteristics Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures Number of Buildings Total Square Feet Square Feet per Building Total Per Building Per Square Foot Per Employee Total Per Building Per Square Foot Per Million Btu Thousands Millions Thousands Trillion Btu Million Btu Thousand Btu Million Btu Million Dollars 1 Thousand Dollars 1 Dollars 1 Dollars 1 Major

  4. Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure Indicators, Selected Years, 1979-2003 Energy Source and Year Building Characteristics Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures Number of Buildings Total Square Feet Square Feet per Building Total Per Building Per Square Foot Per Employee Total Per Building Per Square Foot Per Million Btu Thousands Millions Thousands Trillion Btu Million Btu Thousand Btu Million Btu Million Dollars 1 Thousand Dollars 1 Dollars 1 Dollars 1 Major Sources 2

  5. FY 1999 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Budget Budget Home About Budget by Program GAO Audit Reports External Links Contact Information Budget U.S. Department of Energy SC-41/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3541 F: (301) 903-9524 More Information » FY 1999 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Fiscal Year 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 FY 1999 Budget Request to

  6. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Fossil fuel sales of production from federal lands, FY 2003-14 Fiscal Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 2 Natural Gas Coal Fossil Fuels Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Billion Cubic Feet 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Short Tons 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total 2003 679 3,939 33.0% 93 347 14.7% 6,798 6,981 35.7% 436 8,960 40.6%

  7. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Table 2. Fossil fuel sales of production from Indian lands, FY 2003-14 Fiscal Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 2 Natural Gas Coal Fossil Fuels Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Billion Cubic Feet 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Short Tons 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total 2003 10 59 0.5% 2 6 0.3% 283 291 1.5% 30 616 2.8% 972 1.7% 2004 10 58

  8. 01-04-1999 - PCB Container Event in the PCB Storage Facility | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory 4-1999 - PCB Container Event in the PCB Storage Facility Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/1999 File (public): PDF icon 01-04-1999_yellow

  9. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Census...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Region > Detailed Tables-Census Region Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables-Census Region Table B3. Census Region, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...

  10. 1999 Commercial Building Characteristics--Detailed Tables--Size...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Complete Set of 1999 CBECS Detailed Tables Detailed Tables- of Buildings Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings b6.pdf (PDF file), b6.xls (Excel spreadsheet file), b6.txt...

  11. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Devil's Kitchen fumarole area and from Coso production wells. References Lutz, S.J.; Moore, J.N.; Adams, M.C.; Norman, D.I. (1 January 1999) TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO...

  12. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  13. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Trends in Commercial...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and floorspace from 1995 to 1999 continued the general trends noted since 1979 (Figures 1 and 2). The size of the commercial buildings has grown steadily over the twenty...

  14. NERSC Users Group Meeting April 26 - 28, 1999 Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Briefing on the NERSC III System April 27, 1999 | Author(s): Adrian Wong | Presentation not available. A technical description of the newly announced NERSC III system: what it...

  15. Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 Estimated Consumer Marginal Energy Prices for the Commercial and Residental Sectors for use in the Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for four of the High-Priority Appliance Rulemakings PDF icon marg_eprice_0799.pdf More Documents & Publications Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Standby Rates for Customer-Sited Resources - Issues, Considerations, and the Elements of Model Tariffs, 2009 Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is

  16. Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Price Report - July 1999 Marginal Energy Price Report - July 1999 Estimated Consumer Marginal Energy Prices for the Commercial and Residental Sectors for use in the Life-Cycle Cost Analyses for four of the High-Priority Appliance Rulemakings PDF icon marg_eprice_0799.pdf More Documents & Publications Standby Rates for Customer-Sited Resources - Issues, Considerations, and the Elements of Model Tariffs, 2009 Marginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update Solar Real-Time Pricing: Is Real-Time

  17. DOE/EIS-0197: Supplement to Record of Decision (March 1999) ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    197: Supplement to Record of Decision (March 1999) DOEEIS-0197: Supplement to Record of Decision (March 1999) Delivery of the Canadian Entitlement Final Environmental Impact...

  18. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC- EA-1999-06

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC, related to the Procurement of Waste Containers at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, August 18, 1999 (EA-1999-06

  19. Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Salt Wells Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999)...

  20. 1999 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1999-12-01

    The Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study (White Book) is published annually by BPA and establishes the planning basis for supplying electricity to customers. It serves a dual purpose. First, the White Book presents projections of regional and Federal system load and resource capabilities, along with relevant definitions and explanations. Second, the White Book serves as a benchmark for annual BPA determinations made pursuant to its regional power sales contracts. Specifically, BPA uses the information in the White Book for determining the notice required when customers request to increase or decrease the amount of power purchased from BPA. The White Book will not be used in calculations for the 2002 regional power sales contract subscription process. The White Book compiles information obtained from several formalized resource planning reports and data submittals, including those from the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) and the Pacific Northwest Utilities Conference Committee (PNUCC). The White Book is not an operational planning guide, nor is it used for determining BPA revenues. Operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) is based on a set of criteria different from that used for resource planning decisions. Operational planning is dependent upon real-time or near-term knowledge of system conditions, including expectations of river flows and runoff, market opportunities, availability of reservoir storage, energy exchanges, and other factors affecting the dynamics of operating a power system. In this loads and resources study, resource availability is compared with a medium forecast of electricity consumption. The forecasted future electricity demands--firm loads--are subtracted from the projected capability of existing and ''contracted for'' resources to determine whether BPA and the region will be surplus or deficit. If Federal system resources are greater than loads in any particular year or month, there is a surplus of energy and/or capacity, which BPA may use or market to increase revenues. Conversely, if Federal system firm loads exceed available resources, there is a deficit of energy and/or capacity and BPA would add conservation or contract purchases as needed to meet its firm loads. The load forecast is derived by using econometric models and analysis to predict the loads that will be placed on electric utilities in the region. This study incorporates information on contract obligations and contract resources, combined with the resource capabilities obtained from public utility and investor-owned utility (IOU) customers through their annual data submittals to the PNUCC, from BPA's Firm Resource Exhibit (FRE Exhibit I) submittals, and through analysis of the Federal hydroelectric power system. The loads and resources analysis in this study simulates the operation of the power system under the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA) produced by the Pacific Northwest Coordinating Group. The PNCA defines the planning and operation of the regional hydrosystem. The 1999 White Book is presented in two documents: (1) this summary of Federal system and Pacific Northwest region loads and resources; and (2) a technical appendix (available electronically only) detailing the loads and resources for each major Pacific Northwest generating utility. This analysis updates the December 1998 Pacific Northwest Loads and Resources Study. This analysis projects the yearly average energy consumption and resource availability for Operating Years (OY) 2000-01 through 2009-10. The study shows the Federal system's and the region's monthly estimated maximum electricity demand, monthly energy demand, monthly energy generation, and monthly maximum generating capability--capacity--for OY 2000-01, 2004-05, and 2009-10. The Federal system and regional monthly capacity surplus/deficit projections are summarized for 10 operating years. This document analyzes the Pacific Northwest's projected loads and available generating resources in two parts: (1) the loads and resources of the Federal system, for which BPA is the marketing agency; and (2) the larger Pacific Northwest regional power system, which includes loads and resources in addition to the Federal system.

  1. BTU LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Small start-up with breakthrough technology seeking funding to prove commercial feasibility Coordinates: 45.425788, -122.765754 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy B. Evans, Ph.D. Amy Adams Luft Don Martin; Randall C. Morris, Ph.D.; Timothy D. Reynolds, Ph.D.; Ronald W. Warren; Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division

    2000-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE)Carlsbad Area Office and the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) are dedicated to maintaining high quality management of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) environmental resources. DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting, require that the environment at and near DOE facilities be monitored to ensure the safety and health of the public and the environment. This Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 1999 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental data from calendar year 1999 that characterize environmental management performance and demonstrate compliance with federal and state regulations. This report was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, DOE Order 231.1, the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH- 0173T), and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Protection Implementation Plan (DOE/WIPP 96-2199). The above orders and guidance documents require that DOE facilities submit an Annual Site Environmental Report to DOE Headquarters, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety, and Health. The purpose of this report is to provide a comprehensive description of operational environmental monitoring activities, to provide an abstract of environmental activities conducted to characterize site environmental management performance to confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and to highlight significant programs and efforts of environmental merit at WIPP during calendar year 1999. WIPP received its first shipment of waste on March 26, 1999. In 1999, no evidence was found of any adverse effects from WIPP on the surrounding environment. Radionuclide concentrations in the environment surrounding WIPP were not statistically higher in 1999 than in 1998.

  3. Table B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B8. Year Constructed, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Year Constructed" ,,"1919 or Before","1920 to 1945","1946 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999" "All Buildings ................",4657,419,499,763,665,774,846,690 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000

  4. Preliminary Notice of Violation EA-1999-04

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    6,1999 Mr. Ronald D. Hanson [ ] Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. P.O. Box 1000 MS/H5-20 Richland, Washington 83415 EA-1999-04 Subject: Preliminary Notice of Violation and Proposed Imposition of Civil Penalty $330,000 and Compliance Order (NTS-RL-PHMC-KBASINS-1997-0001,-0002,-0004, and -0005), (NTS-RL-PHMC-KBASINS-1998-0001), (RL-PHMC-SNF-1997-0001, - 0002, -0011,-0014, and -0021) Dear Mr. Hanson: This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of the circumstances surrounding a

  5. 1999 Well Installation Report, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3052-097 1999 Well Installation Report, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office under Contract No. DE-AC08-97NV13052. Revision No.: 0 February 2000 This page intentionally left blank ITLV/13052--097 1999 WELL INSTALLATION REPORT, PROJECT SHOAL AREA, CHURCHILL COUNTY, NEVADA Revision No.: 0 February 2000 IT CORPORATION 2621 Losee Road Building B-1, Suite 3050-01 North Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 Prepared for U.S. Department of

  6. Air Emission Inventory for the INEEL -- 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, Steven K

    2000-05-01

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  7. 1998-1999 Progress Report Table of Contents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8-1999 INTRODUCTION J.B. Natowitz, Director SECTIONS NUCLEAR STRUCTURE, FUNDAMENTAL INTERACTIONS AND ASTROPHYSICS HEAVY ION REACTIONS NUCLEAR THEORY ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE SUPERCONDUCTING CYCLOTRON AND INSTRUMENTATION PUBLICATIONS Abstracts of Papers Published Abstracts of Papers Submitted APPENDIX Talks Presented Posters Presented Research Personnel and Engineering Staff Organizational Chart Graduate Degree Students Institute Colloquia and Seminars

  8. FY 1999 annual work plan for infrastructure program WBS 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donley, C.D.

    1998-08-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 DynCorp Annual Work Plan (AWP) relates DOE-RL work breakdown structure (WBS) to Cost Accounts and to Organizational Structure. Each Cost Account includes a workscope narrative and justification performance and service standards, goals, and deliverables. Basis of estimates are included within each Cost Account to demonstrate the relationship of budget to defined workscope. The FY 1999 AWP reflects the planning assumptions and initiatives that are included in the PHMC Strategic Plan for Infrastructure Optimization which was established in FY 1998. Development of the FY 1999 AWP was in accordance with a sequential series of events and efforts described in the Infrastructure Annual Work Planning and Budget Cycle which was developed and established in conjunction with the Strategic Plan. The Strategic Plan covers a rolling five year span of time and is updated at the start of each fiscal year as the beginning of the annual work planning and budget cycle for the following fiscal year. Accordingly the planning for the FY 1999 AWP began in January 1998. Also included in the annual work planning and budget cycle, and the basis for the budget in this AWP, is the development of a requirements-based budget.

  9. Results of Detailed Hydrologic Characterization Tests - Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2001-01-19

    This report provides the results of detailed hydrologic characterization tests conducted within newly constructed Hanford Site wells during FY 1999. Detailed characterization tests performed during FY 1999 included: groundwater flow characterization, barometric response evaluation, slug tests, single-well tracer tests, constant-rate pumping tests, and in-well vertical flow tests. Hydraulic property estimates obtained from the detailed hydrologic tests include: transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity, specific yield, effective porosity, in-well lateral flow velocity, aquifer flow velocity, vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity (within the well-screen section) and in-well vertical flow velocity. In addition, local groundwater flow characteristics (i.e., hydraulic gradient and flow direction) were determined for four sites where detailed well testing was performed.

  10. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 16,510 1,410 16,357

  11. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    45 Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu

  12. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 *

  13. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 *

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Facilities Newsletter - September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holdridge, D. J., ed

    1999-09-27

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program September 1999 Facilities Newsletter discusses the several Intensive Observation Periods (IOPs) that the ARM SGP CART site will host in the near future. Two projects of note are the International Pyrgeometer Intercomparison and the Fall Single Column Model (SCM)/Nocturnal Boundary Layer (NBL) IOP. Both projects will bring many US and international scientists to the SGP CART site to participate in atmospheric research.

  15. Groundwater Annual Status Report for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. L. Nylander; K. A. Bitner; K. Henning; A. S. Johnson; E. H. Keating; P. Longmire; B. D. Newman; B. Robinson; D. B. Rogers; W. J. Stone; D. Vaniman

    2000-03-01

    Groundwater protection activities and hydrogeologic characterization studies are conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory annually. A summary of fiscal year 1999 results and findings shows increased understanding of the hydrogeologic environment beneath the Pajarito Plateau and significant refinement to elements of the LANL. Hydrogeologic Conceptual Model pertaining to areas and sources of recharge to the regional aquifer. Modeling, drilling, monitoring, and data collection activities are proposed for fiscal year 2000.

  16. 01-07-1999 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fruit Flies | The Ames Laboratory 9 - Contamination Spread Outside of Radiation Control Areas by Fruit Flies Document Number: NA Effective Date: 01/1999 File (public): PDF icon 01-07-1999_red

  17. Notice of Open Meeting, Federal Register, 64 FR 44912, August 18, 1999 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Open Meeting, Federal Register, 64 FR 44912, August 18, 1999 Notice of Open Meeting, Federal Register, 64 FR 44912, August 18, 1999 Document displays the notice of open meeting for Measurement and Verification Guidelines for Federal Energy Projects, which was published in the Federal Register on August 18, 1999. PDF icon 64_fr_44912.pdf More Documents & Publications Notice of Availability, Federal Register, 64 FR 3492, January 22, 1999 EIS-0183: DOE Notice of

  18. Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the April 19, 1999, Special

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agent Fatality at the Southeast Courier Section, Oak Ridge, Tennessee | Department of Energy 19, 1999, Special Agent Fatality at the Southeast Courier Section, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type A Accident Investigation Board Report on the April 19, 1999, Special Agent Fatality at the Southeast Courier Section, Oak Ridge, Tennessee June 1, 1999 On April 19, 1999, a fatality occurred at the Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Southeast Courier Section (SCS). A Special Agent had finished his 1-mile

  19. Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1999 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 9 Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1 - September 30, 1999 September 30, 1999 1999 Inspector General Semiannual Report to Congress I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. The report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending September 30, 1999. The Inspector General Act, as amended, requires you to forward the report to the appropriate congressional oversight committees within 30

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Mason & Hanger Corporation - EA-1999-05 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Mason & Hanger Corporation - EA-1999-05 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Mason & Hanger Corporation - EA-1999-05 July 30, 1999 Issued to Mason & Hanger Corporation, related to a Chemical Fire at the Pantex Plant, (EA-1999-05 On July 30, 1999, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation to Mason & Hanger Corporation for violations of 10 C.F.R. 830 associated with a December 29, 1998, chemical fire that occurred during

  1. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

  2. Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323,191 95,675 461,905 92,556 973,327 546,354 30,217 576,571 39,041 1,588,939 1990 362,524 127,183 538,063 140,695 1,168,465 650,572 36,433 687,005 40,149 1,895,619 1991 351,834 112,144 546,755 148,216 1,158,949 623,442 36,649

  3. Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 13,517 3,896 9,920 102 27,435 145 10,305 10,450 – 37,885 1990 14,670 5,406 15,515 118 35,709 387 10,193 10,580 – 46,289 1991 15,967 3,684 20,809 118 40,578 169 8,980 9,149 1 49,728 1992

  4. West Valley Demonstration Project site environmental report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    2000-06-01

    This report represents a single, comprehensive source of off-site and on-site environmental monitoring data collected during 1999 by environmental monitoring personnel for the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), West Valley, New York. The environmental monitoring program and results are discussed in the body of this report. The monitoring data are presented in the appendices. The data collected provide an historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels from natural and manmade sources in the survey area and document the quality of the groundwater on and around the WVDP and the quality of the air and water discharged by the WVDP.

  5. TRIBAL ISSUES TOPIC GROUP MEETING SUMMARY JULY 13, 1999 Crowne

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    JULY 13, 1999 Crowne Plaza Center City Hotel, Philadelphia, PA Kevin Blackwell (U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Rail Administration) (DOT/FRA) presented an overview of the topic group's discussion. The status of the DOT/FRA's response to DOE's inquiry about the tribal right to inspect rail shipments is still an open issue. At the time of the July meeting, the response was in the final stages of review in the Secretary of Transportation's Legal Division. The response will be forwarded

  6. ORNL/TM-1999/264 Environmental Sciences Division

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TM-1999/264 Environmental Sciences Division Bamboo: an overlooked biomass resource? J. M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6407 U.S.A. D. C. Dayton and B. Hames National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, MS 3311 Golden, CO 80401 U.S.A. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4963 Date Published: January 2000 Prepared for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Transportation Technologies EB 52 03 00

  7. Table B10. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings ................",4657,2376,807,683,487,174,90,39 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  8. Fiscal year 1999 Battelle performance evaluation and fee agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, T.L.

    1998-10-22

    Fiscal Year 1999 represents the third fill year utilizing a results-oriented, performance-based evaluation for the Contractor's operations and management of the DOE Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (here after referred to as the Laboratory). However, this is the first year that the Contractor's fee is totally performance-based utilizing the same Critical Outcomes. This document describes the critical outcomes, objectives, performance indicators, expected levels of performance, and the basis for the evaluation of the Contractor's performance for the period October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999, as required by Clauses entitled ''Use of Objective Standards of Performance, Self Assessment and Performance Evaluation'' and ''Performance Measures Review'' of the Contract DE-ACO6-76RL01830. Furthermore, it documents the distribution of the total available performance-based fee and the methodology set for determining the amount of fee earned by the Contractor as stipulated within the causes entitled ''Estimated Cost and Annual Fee,'' ''Total Available Fee'' and ''Allowable Costs and Fee.'' In partnership with the Contractor and other key customers, the Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters (HQ) and Richland Operations Office (RL) has defined four critical outcomes that serve as the core for the Contractor's performance-based evaluation and fee determination. The Contractor also utilizes these outcomes as a basis for overall management of the Laboratory.

  9. 1999 INEEL National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants - Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Tkachyk

    2000-06-01

    Under Section 61.94 of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emission of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities,'' each Department of Energy (DOE) facility must submit an annual report documenting compliance. This report addresses the Section 61.94 reporting requirements for operations at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for calendar year (CY) 1999. The Idaho Operations Office of the DOE is the primary contract concerning compliance with the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) at the INEEL. For CY 1999, airborne radionuclide emissions from the INEEL operations were calculated to result in a maximum individual dose to a member of the public of 7.92E-03 mrem (7.92E-08 Sievert). This effective dose equivalent (EDE) is well below the 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, regulatory standard of 10 mrem per year (1.0E-04 Sievert per year).

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  11. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1a. Table 1a. Consumption of Site...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1a. Consumption of Energy (Site Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey...

  12. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector...

  13. Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy)For Selected...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    c Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1c. Off-Site Produced Energy (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002 and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and...

  14. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2a. First Use for All Purposes (Primary...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS...

  15. EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS...

  16. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

  17. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of District Heat by End Use, 1989 District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) Space Water a Total Heating Heating Other RSE Building Row Characteristics Factor 1.0 NF NF NF RSE...

  18. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Consumption of Fuel Oil by End Use, 1989 Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Space Water a Total Heating Heating Other RSE Building Row Characteristics Factor 1.0 NF NF NF RSE...

  19. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption (trillion Btu)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water Heat- ing","Light- ing","Cook- ing","Refrig- eration","Office Equip- ment","Com-...

  20. 1992 CBECS C & E

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Natural Gas by End Use, 1989 Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Space Water a Total Heating Heating Cooking Other RSE Building Row Characteristics Factor 1.0 NF...

  1. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Years 1975-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year Coal Natural Gas 1 Petroleum Electricity Purchased Steam and Other 6 Total Aviation Gasoline Fuel Oil 2 Jet Fuel LPG 3 and Other 4 Motor...

  2. R A N K I N G S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6 Table C11. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, Ranked by State, 2013 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,597.4 Texas 4,137.4 Texas 6,259.5 Texas 1,292.5 2 Indiana 1,198.6 California 2,483.5 California 3,370.7 California 892.3 3 Pennsylvania 1,126.1 Louisiana 1,501.1 Louisiana 1,714.7 Florida 757.2 4 Ohio 1,104.5 New York 1,321.6 Florida 1,592.7 Ohio 512.8 5 Illinois 1,026.9

  3. Industrial Technical Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10 years. As of August 2013, Partners have saved about 190 trillion Btu and 1 billion. vi Partners are implementing cost-effective, energy efficiency im- provements that save...

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    8: Solar Energy Consumption Estimates, 2013 State Electric Power Residential a Commercial b Industrial b Electric Power Total Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu Alabama 0 0.1 0.0 ...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  6. How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Does Each State Produce? How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it produces Source: EIA State Energy Data Systems

  7. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase I awards, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-12-01

    This booklet presents technical abstracts of Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999 under the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. SBIR research explores innovative concepts in important technological and scientific areas that can lead to valuable new technology and products. The work described in the abstracts is novel, high-risk research, but the benefits will also be potentially high if the objectives are met. Brief comments on the potential applications, as described by the awardee, are given after each abstract. Individuals and organizations, including venture capital and larger industrial firms, with an interest in the research described in any of the abstracts are encouraged to contact the appropriate small business directly.

  8. Federal Geothermal Research Program Update Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors have conducted research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy since 1971. To develop the technology needed to harness the Nation's vast geothermal resources, DOE's Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies oversees a network of national laboratories, industrial contractors, universities, and their subcontractors. The following mission and goal statements guide the overall activities of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies. This Federal Geothermal Program Research Update reviews the specific objectives, status, and accomplishments of DOE's Geothermal Program for Federal Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The information contained in this Research Update illustrates how the mission and goals of the Office of Geothermal and Wind Technologies are reflected in each R&D activity. The Geothermal Program, from its guiding principles to the most detailed research activities, is focused on expanding the use of geothermal energy.

  9. Naval Reactors Facility environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1999 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  10. Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings ","Building Size" ,,"1,001 to 5,000 Square Feet","5,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 25,000 Square Feet","25,001 to 50,000 Square Feet","50,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","100,001 to 200,000 Square Feet","200,001 to 500,000 Square Feet","Over 500,000 Square Feet" "All Buildings

  11. Advanced Fusion Power Plant Studies. Annual Report for 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; Greenfield, C.M.; Kinsey, J.E.; et al.

    2000-01-01

    Significant progress in physics understanding of the reversed shear advanced tokamak regime has been made since the last ARIES-RS study was completed in 1996. The 1999 study aimed at updating the physics design of ARIES-RS, which has been renamed ARIES-AT, using the improved understanding achieved in the last few years. The new study focused on: Improvement of beta-limit stability calculations to include important non-ideal effects such as resistive wall modes and neo-classical tearing modes; Use of physics based transport model for internal transport barrier (ITB) formation and sustainment; Comparison of current drive and rotational flow drive using fast wave, electron cyclotron wave and neutral particle beam; Improvement in heat and particle control; Integrated modeling of the optimized scenario with self-consistent current and transport profiles to study the robustness of the bootstrap alignment, ITB sustainment, and stable path to high beta and high bootstrap fraction operation.

  12. Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

  13. OCRWM annual report to Congress FY 1999 [USDOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-05-01

    During Fiscal Year 1999, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) continued to make significant progress in its characterization of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, candidate geologic repository site. Although OCRWM's appropriation for Fiscal Year 1999 was lower than requested, the Program accomplished all three success measures in the Secretary's Fiscal Year 1999 Performance Agreement with the President and completed important work in many other areas. This Annual Report reviews this work and looks toward future activities.

  14. Notice of Availability, Federal Register, 64 FR 3492, January 22, 1999 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 64 FR 3492, January 22, 1999 Notice of Availability, Federal Register, 64 FR 3492, January 22, 1999 Document displays a notice of availability pertaining to the Availability of Product Energy Efficiency Recommendations, which was published in the Federal Register on January 22, 1999. PDF icon 64_fr_3492.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0302: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Notice of Open Meeting, Federal Register, 64

  15. Core Holes At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling...

  16. Slim Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling...

  17. Core Holes At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling...

  18. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Argonne National Laboratory-East- EA-1999-10

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to the University of Chicago related to the Failure to Control Radioactive Material and Personnel Contamination Events at Argonne National Laboratory-East, (EA-1999-10)

  19. Preliminary Notice of Violation, West Valley Nuclear Services- EA-1999-09

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to West Valley Nuclear Services, related to a High-Level Radioactive Waste Contamination Event at the West Valley Demonstration Project,(EA-1999-09)

  20. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Los Alamos National Laboratory- EA-1999-08

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to the University of California related to Deficiencies in Work Controls at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility, (EA-1999-08)

  1. Preliminary Notice of Violation, International Technology Corporation- EA-1999-01

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to International Technology Corporation, related to Radiological Work Control Deficiencies at the Salmon Site in Mississippi, (EA-1999-01)

  2. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Brookhaven Science Associates- EA-1999-02

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Brookhaven Science Associates related to Radiological Protection and Work Control Deficiencies at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, (EA-1999-0)

  3. Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  4. Injectivity Test At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  5. Hanford Diversification and the Tri-Cities Economy FY 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOTT, M.J.

    2000-06-05

    The missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) are to safely manage the Hanford Site, to manage and clean up its legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy new science and technology in the environmental and energy fields. Collectively, DOE/RL and its contractors are the most important single entity in the Tri-Cities local economy (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland, Washington, and the surrounding area). Although the relevant economic region affected by DOE/RL and its contractors actually embraces a geographic area reaching from Yakima in the west to Walla Walla in the east and from Moses Lake in the north to Pendleton, Oregon, in the south, over 90% of economic impacts likely occur in Benton and Franklin Counties. These two counties are defined as the ''local'' Tri-Cities economy for purposes of this study. In the federal fiscal year (FY) 1999 (October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999), the total impact of DOE'S local $1.59 billion budget was felt through payrolls of $542 million and local purchases of goods and services of $226 million. The total local spending of $768 million was up slightly from the FY 1998 total of $765 million. Taking into account the multiplier effects of this spending, the DOE/RL budget sustained an estimated 32% of all local employment (28,250 out of 88,100 jobs) and about 35% of local earned income (almost $1.08 billion out of $3.08 billion). The decrease in these percentages from last year's report reflects an update of the model's economic structure based on the 1997 economic census year, a correction of a programming error in the model found during the update, and a broader definition of earnings that includes proprietor income, not just wages (see the Appendix for revisions to the previous forecasts). DOE budget increases in FY 2000 are expected to result in no change to the number of local DOE contractor jobs and about a $29 million increase in direct local spending.

  6. 1,"Salt River Proj Ag I & P Dist",16572,1999,"Coronado","Silver...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 15,"Anchorage City of",599,1999,"Sub 15","APA Sub Tap",115,"Single Pole",0,0,"397 MCM ACSR",1 16,"Anchorage City of",599,1999,"APA Sub Tap","APA Sub",115,"Single Pole",0,0,"397 ...

  7. University of Washington Lab Report to SNEAP, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-23

    OAK-B135 University of Washington Lab Report to SNEAP, 1999. The NPL tandem Van de Graaff accelerator chains ran 1869 hours between 9/1/98 and 8/31/99. The DEIS ran 356 hours and the SpIS ran 667. There were 28 experiment-days in which the LINAC and tandem were used together and seven days when the tandem was used, with one of the external ion sources, as a tandem. Four of these were with light ions and three with heavy ions. There were 68 days of Tandem Terminal Ion Source (TIS) development or repair, and 46 days of TIS installation or removal or changing TIS ion species. The TIS/tandem was used a total of 70 days to deliver p, d, {sup 3}He, or {sup 4}He beams for use by an experimenter. There were 47 experiment-days during which the injector deck was used to generate C{sub 60} or LiF{sub 3} clusters, which were then investigated without further acceleration. They had 25 tank openings over the year. There were three scheduled openings for the installation or removal of the TIS, and seven to change the TIS ion species. There were 10 openings for {sup 4}He ion source and column resistor gradient development. There were four openings for various repairs other than ion source, and one to replace the LE grid, which was found undamaged after all.

  8. Proceedings of the 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    2000-06-05

    The 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It was held August 3 to 5 in Chicago, Illinois. The goal of this conference was to provide a forum for reviewing fuel cell research and development (R&D) programs, assist in strategic R&D planning, promote awareness of sponsor activities, and enhance interactions between manufacturers, researchers, and stakeholders. This conference was attended by over 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, gas and electric utilities, DOE, and other Government agencies. The conference agenda included a keynote session, five presentation sessions, a poster presentation reception, and three breakout sessions. The presentation session topics were DOD Fuel Cell Applications, Low-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, Low-Temperature Component Research, High-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, and High-Temperature Component Research; the breakout session topics were Future R&D Directions for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells, Future R&D Directions for High-Temperature Fuel Cells, and a plenary summary session. All sessions were well attended.

  9. 1999 vadose zone monitoring plan and guidance for subsequent years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, D.G.; Reidel, S.P.; Last, G.V.

    1998-08-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site has the most diverse and largest amounts of radioactive waste in the US. The majority of the liquid waste was disposed to the soil column where much of it remains today. This document provides the rationale and general framework for vadose zone monitoring at cribs, ditches, trenches and other disposal facilities to detect new sources of contamination and track the movement of existing contamination in the vadose zone for the protection of groundwater. The document provides guidance for subsequent site-specific vadose zone monitoring plans and includes a brief description of past vadose monitoring activities (Chapter 3); the results of the Data Quality Objective process used for this plan (Chapter 4); a prioritization of liquid waste disposal sites for vadose monitoring (Chapter 5 and Appendix B); a general Monitoring and Analysis Plan (Chapter 6); a general Quality Assurance Project Plan (Appendix A), and a description of vadose monitoring activities planned for FY 1999 (Appendix C).

  10. Annual energy outlook 1999, with projections to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 1999 (AEO99) presents midterm forecasts of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2020 prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The projections are based on results from EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The report begins with an Overview summarizing the AEO99 reference case. The next section, Legislation and Regulations, describes the assumptions made with regard to laws that affect energy markets and discusses evolving legislative and regulatory issues. Issues in Focus discusses current energy issues--the economic decline in East Asia, growth in demand for natural gas, vehicle emissions standards, competitive electricity pricing, renewable portfolio standards, and carbon emissions. It is followed by the analysis of energy market trends. The analysis in AEO99 focuses primarily on a reference case and four other cases that assume higher and lower economic growth and higher and lower world oil prices than in the reference case. Forecast tables for these cases are provided in Appendixes A through C. Appendixes D and E present a summary of the reference case forecasts in units of oil equivalence and household energy expenditures. The AEO99 projections are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1998. Pending legislation and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the forecasts. Historical data used for the AEOI99 projections were the most current available as of July 31, 1998, when most 1997 data but only partial 1998 data were available.

  11. Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 1999-June 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse TRU Solutions

    2002-10-01

    This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations during operations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 1999, to June 30, 2000. It is divided into ten chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1 provides background information on the WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which includes fracture mapping, borehole logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9 provides an assessment of the hydrologic conditions near the Exhaust Shaft. Chapter 10 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements.

  12. Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 1998-June 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse

    2002-08-29

    This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations during operations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 1998, to June 30, 1999. It is divided into nine chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1.0 provides background information on the WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2.0 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3.0 and 4.0 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8.0 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which includes fracture mapping, borehole logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9.0 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements.

  13. Final report on Weeks Island Monitoring Phase : 1999 through 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Munson, Darrell Eugene

    2005-05-01

    This Final Report on the Monitoring Phase of the former Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve crude oil storage facility details the results of five years of monitoring of various surface accessible quantities at the decommissioned facility. The Weeks Island mine was authorized by the State of Louisiana as a Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage facility from 1979 until decommissioning of the facility in 1999. Discovery of a sinkhole over the facility in 1992 with freshwater inflow to the facility threatened the integrity of the oil storage and led to the decision to remove the oil, fill the chambers with brine, and decommission the facility. Thereafter, a monitoring phase, by agreement between the Department of Energy and the State, addressed facility stability and environmental concerns. Monitoring of the surface ground water and the brine of the underground chambers from the East Fill Hole produced no evidence of hydrocarbon contamination, which suggests that any unrecovered oil remaining in the underground chambers has been contained. Ever diminishing progression of the initial major sinkhole, and a subsequent minor sinkhole, with time was verification of the response of sinkholes to filling of the facility with brine. Brine filling of the facility ostensively eliminates any further growth or new formation from freshwater inflow. Continued monitoring of sinkhole response, together with continued surface surveillance for environmental problems, confirmed the intended results of brine pressurization. Surface subsidence measurements over the mine continued throughout the monitoring phase. And finally, the outward flow of brine was monitored as a measure of the creep closure of the mine chambers. Results of each of these monitoring activities are presented, with their correlation toward assuring the stability and environmental security of the decommissioned facility. The results suggest that the decommissioning was successful and no contamination of the surface environment by crude oil has been found.

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  15. Arrow Lakes Reservoir Fertilization Experiment, Technical Report 1999-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, E.

    2007-02-01

    The Arrow Lakes food web has been influenced by several anthropogenic stressors during the past 45 years. These include the introduction of mysid shrimp (Mysis relicta) in 1968 and 1974 and the construction of large hydroelectric impoundments in 1969, 1973 and 1983. The construction of the impoundments affected the fish stocks in Upper and Lower Arrow lakes in several ways. The construction of Hugh Keenleyside Dam (1969) resulted in flooding that eliminated an estimated 30% of the available kokanee spawning habitat in Lower Arrow tributaries and at least 20% of spawning habitat in Upper Arrow tributaries. The Mica Dam (1973) contributed to water level fluctuations and blocked upstream migration of all fish species including kokanee. The Revelstoke Dam (1983) flooded 150 km of the mainstem Columbia River and 80 km of tributary streams which were used by kokanee, bull trout, rainbow trout and other species. The construction of upstream dams also resulted in nutrient retention which ultimately reduced reservoir productivity. In Arrow Lakes Reservoir (ALR), nutrients settled out in the Revelstoke and Mica reservoirs, resulting in decreased productivity, a process known as oligotrophication. Kokanee are typically the first species to respond to oligotrophication resulting from aging impoundments. To address the ultra-oligotrophic status of ALR, a bottom-up approach was taken with the addition of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus in the form of liquid fertilizer from 1999 to 2004). Two of the main objectives of the experiment were to replace lost nutrients as a result of upstream impoundments and restore productivity in Upper Arrow and to restore kokanee and other sport fish abundance in the reservoir. The bottom-up approach to restoring kokanee in ALR has been successful by replacing nutrients lost as a result of upstream impoundments and has successfully restored the productivity of Upper Arrow. Primary production rates increased, the phytoplankton community responded with a shift in species and zooplankton biomass was more favorable for kokanee. With more productive lower trophic levels, the kokanee population increased in abundance and biomass, resulting in improved conditions for bull trout, one of ALR's piscivorous species.

  16. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  17. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  18. Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and

  19. Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99

  20. Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4

  1. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  2. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  3. Table 7.6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,108 75,652 2 4

  4. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed

  5. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107

  6. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3

  7. table2.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1

  8. table4.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column

  9. table5.1_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total

  10. table5.5_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE

  11. table7.6_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column

  12. Reflection Survey At Oceanic-Marine Systems (Singh, Et Al., 1999...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References S. C. Singh, J. S. Collier, A. J. Harding, G. M. Kent, J. A. Orcutt (1999) Seismic Evidence For A...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company- EA-1999-07

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, related to Procurement, Quality Assurance, Emergency Communications, and other issues at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental laboratory, (EA-1999-07)

  14. Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell--GJO-99-96-TAR, June 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy GJO-99-96-TAR Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of Long-Term Performance and Risk June 1999 DOE Grand Junction Office June 1999 Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell Page iii Contents Page Executive Summary

  15. Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 1999, to March 31, 2000 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 9, to March 31, 2000 Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 1999, to March 31, 2000 April 26, 2000 Semiannual Report to Congress October 1, 1999, to March 31, 2000 I am pleased to submit the Office of Inspector General's (OIG) Semiannual Report to Congress. The report summarizes significant OIG activities and accomplishments during the 6-month period ending March 31, 2000. The Inspector General Act, as amended, requires you to forward the report to the appropriate

  16. Umatilla Hatchery Monitoring and Evaluation, 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stonecypher, R. Wess; Groberg, Jr., Warren J.; Farman, Brett M.

    2001-07-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program authorized construction of Umatilla Fish Hatchery (UFH) in 1986. Measure 703 of the program amended the original authorization for the hatchery and specified evaluation of the Michigan (MI) raceways using oxygen supplementation to reach production goals of 290,000 lb of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (O. mykiss). The hatchery was completed in fall 1991. Partial justification for the hatchery was to evaluate new production and supplementation techniques. MI raceways at UFH increase smolt production with a limited water supply. Test results for MI raceways will have systematic application in the Columbia River basin. The UFH is the foundation for rehabilitating chinook salmon and enhancing steelhead in the Umatilla River (CTUIR and ODFW 1990) and is expected to contribute significantly to the Northwest Power Planning Council's goal of doubling salmon production in the Columbia Basin. Hatchery production goals and a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan were presented in the Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan (CTUIR and ODFW 1990). The Comprehensive Plan for Monitoring and Evaluation of Umatilla Hatchery (Carmichael 1990) was approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council as a critical adaptive management guide for fisheries rehabilitation in the Umatilla River. Monitoring and evaluation will be used to increase knowledge about uncertainties inherent in the fisheries rehabilitation and will complement the developing systematic monitoring and evaluation program. The monitoring and evaluation goals are: (1) Provide information and recommendations for the culture and release of hatchery fish, harvest regulations, and natural escapement to accomplish long-term natural and hatchery production goals in the Umatilla River basin that are consistent with provisions of the Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. (2) Assess the success of achieving the management objectives in the Umatilla River basin that are presented in the Master Plan and the Comprehensive Rehabilitation Plan. A substantial proportion of the production at UFH is reared in MI raceways. This system has not been thoroughly evaluated to determine the effects on Smolt-to-adult survival (SAS). In addition, the rearing strategies proposed for spring chinook salmon require an unusually extensive period of incubation in chilled well water. Extensive background and justification for UFH monitoring and evaluation is presented in Carmichael (1990). In this report, we present findings for the UFH Monitoring and Evaluation Project from 1 November 1998 to 31 October 1999. We designed our program to evaluate fish cultural practices, conduct rearing and survival studies, assess sport fisheries, and provide information for planning and coordination. Additional studies have been designed for fall chinook salmon to evaluate straying and the effects of tagging. We monitored the culture and performance of more than 3.2 million chinook salmon and steelhead produced at UFH in 1997-98 (Appendix Tables A1-8). Individual stock profiles, release, performance, and return data of previously released groups are presented in the following sections.

  17. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  18. Tank 241-AP-103 08/1999 Compatibility Grab Samples and Analytical Results for the Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BELL, K.E.

    1999-12-09

    This document is the format IV, final report for the tank 241-AP-103 (AP-103) grab samples taken in August 1999 to address waste compatibility concerns. Chemical, radiochemical, and physical analyses on the tank AP-103 samples were performed as directed in ''Compatibility Grub Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999'' (Sasaki 1999a). Any deviations from the instructions provided in the tank sampling and analysis plan (TSAP) were discussed in this narrative. No notification limits were exceeded.

  19. Kalispel Resident Fish Project: Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluff, Stanley

    2000-12-01

    In October of 1997, The construction of the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was complete. No spawning activity was recorded for the spring of 1998. On June 14, 1999 the first spawn at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was successful. A total of seven nests were fertilized that produced approximately 144,000 fry. The second spawn occurred on July 13, 1999 and a total of six nests were fertilized producing approximately 98,0000 fry. The total amount of largemouth bass fry produced at the Kalispel Tribal Hatchery was 242,000.

  20. Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management and Conservation Programs, Fiscal Year 1999

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1999 January 11, 2001 U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program Washington, DC 20585 i TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 I. OVERVIEW OF FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT ACTIVITIES . . 7 A. Overview of Federal Energy Management Policy and Legislative Mandates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  1. Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - Calendar Year 1999 Emission Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zohner, S.K.

    2000-05-30

    This report presents the 1999 calendar year update of the Air Emission Inventory for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The INEEL Air Emission Inventory documents sources and emissions of nonradionuclide pollutants from operations at the INEEL. The report describes the emission inventory process and all of the sources at the INEEL, and provides nonradionuclide emissions estimates for stationary sources.

  2. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet

  3. table1.1_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources RSE NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 *

  4. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for the Hanford Site Calendar Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROKKAN, D.J.

    2000-06-01

    This report documents radionuclide air emissions from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in 1999 and the resulting effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) member of the public. The report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Title 40, Protection of the Environment, Part 61. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities'', and with the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) Chapter 246-247. Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The federal regulations in Subpart H of 40 CFR 61 require the measurement and reporting of radionuclides emitted from US. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and the resulting offsite dose from those emissions. A standard of 10 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent (EDE) is imposed on them. The EDE to the MEI due to routine emissions in 1999 from Hanford Site point sources was 0.029 mrem (2.9 E-04 mSv), which is less than 0.3 percent of the federal standard. WAC 246-247 requires the reporting of radionuclide emissions from all Hanford Site sources, during routine as well as nonroutine operations. The state has adopted the 40 CFR 61 standard of 10 mrem/yr EDE into their regulations. The state further requires that the EDE to the MEI be calculated not only from point source emissions but also from diffuse and fugitive sources of emissions. The EDE from diffuse and fugitive emissions at the Hanford Site in 1999 was 0.039 mrem (3.9 E-04 mSv) EDE. The total dose from point sources and from diffuse and fugitive sources of radionuclide emissions during all operating conditions in 1999 was 0.068 mrem (6.8 E-04 mSv) EDE, which is less than 0.7 percent of the state standard.

  5. Savannah River Site Consent Order 99-41-HW, September 28, 1999 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    41-HW State South Carolina Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Establish guidelines for developing a closure plan for the Beta-Gamma Incinerator Tank and an approval plan for all previously unidentified sources of hazardous or mixed wastes at the facility Parties DOE; Westinghouse Savannah River Company; State of South Carolina (Department of Health and Environmental Control) Date 9/28/1999 SCOPE * Establish a course of action due to DOE and WSRC's violation of the

  6. Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Director's Final Findings and Orders, March 18, 1999 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Integrated Units) State Ohio Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) Ohio EPA Scope Summary Integrating the PORTS on-site closure work required by various sources in order to avoid duplication of effort, and efficiently perform sitewide ground water monitoring and surveillance and maintenance activities Parties DOE; Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC; State of Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Date 3/18/1999 SCOPE * Integrate the on-site closure work required for specific units to

  7. Solid state research. Quarterly technical report 1 February--30 April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, D.C.

    1999-09-01

    This report covers in detail the research work of the Solid State Division at Lincoln Laboratory for the period 1 February--30 April 1999. The topics covered are Quantum Electronics, Electro-optical Materials and Devices, Submicrometer Technology, Biosensor and Molecular Technologies, Microelectronics, Analog Device Technology, and Advanced Silicon Technology. Funding is provided by several DoD organizations--including the Air Force, Army, BMDO, DARPA, Navy, NSA, and OSD--and also by the DOE, NASA, and NIST.

  8. Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)",,,,,"All Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manufact-uring",,"Space

  9. Nevada Test 1999 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 radioactive waste management sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yvonne Townsend

    2000-05-01

    Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These monitoring data include radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, and biota data. Although some of these media (radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are reported in detail in other Bechtel Nevada reports (Annual Site Environmental Report [ASER], the National Emissions Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants [NESHAP] report, and the Annual Groundwater Monitoring Report), they are also summarized in this report to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and environmental compliance. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate that exposure at and around the RWMSs is not above background levels. Air monitoring data indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels, whereas radon concentrations are not above background levels. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the alluvial aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS has not been affected by the facility. Meteorology data indicate that 1999 was a dry year: rainfall totaled 3.9 inches at the Area 3 RWMS (61 percent of average) and 3.8 inches at the Area 5 RWMS (75 percent of average). Vadose zone monitoring data indicate that 1999 rainfall infiltrated less than one foot before being returned to the atmosphere by evaporation. Soil-gas tritium data indicate very slow migration, and tritium concentrations in biota were insignificant. All 1999 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing as expected at isolating buried waste.

  10. 1999-2002 Public Housing Partnership: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    This document details the results of an agreement between DOE and the Department of Housing between 1999 and 2002.

  11. Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Dolislager, Fredrick G

    2007-05-01

    This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development are also protective. When EPA finalizes and documents a position on the matter of indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments, site-specific risk assessments should make use of modified models and criteria. Screening values such as those presented in this report may be used to assess soil or other porous media to determine whether chemical warfare agent contamination is present as part of initial site investigations (whether due to intentional or accidental releases) and to determine whether weather/decontamination has adequately mitigated the presence of agent residual to below levels of concern. However, despite the availability of scientifically supported health-based criteria, there are significant resources needs that should be considered during sample planning. In particular, few analytical laboratories are likely to be able to meet these screening levels. Analyses will take time and usually have limited confidence at these concentrations. Therefore, and particularly for the more volatile agents, soil/destructive samples of porous media should be limited and instead enhanced with headspace monitoring and presence-absence wipe sampling.

  12. Results of Toxicity Studies Conducted on Outfall X-08 and Its Contributing Waste Streams, November 1999 - June 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, W.L.

    2000-06-28

    This interim report summarizes the results of toxicity tests, Toxicity Identification Evaluations, and chemical analyses that have been conducted on SRS's NPDES Outfall X-08 and its contributing waste streams between November 1999 and June 2000.

  13. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 7.3c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.3a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 417 953 28 15 10,740

  14. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19 Table 7.4c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.4a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total

  15. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2013 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Imports Exports Imports Exports Thousand Short Tons Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Trillion Btu Alabama - 0 2,834 24,400 27,235 - 0.0 76.4 488.6 565.1 - - - - Alaska - 585 1 400 986 - 8.9 (s) 5.9 14.8 - - - - Arizona - 0 181 23,298 23,479 - 0.0 4.3 450.5 454.9 - - - - Arkansas - 0 215

  16. Hanford Site Environment Safety and Health (ES and H) FY 1999 and FY 2000 Execution Commitment Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REEP, I.E.

    1999-12-01

    All sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Complex prepare this report annually for the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the previous and current year's Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) execution commitments and the S&H resources that support these activities. The fiscal year (FY) 1999 and 2000 information (Sieracki 1999) and data contained in the ''Hanford Site Environment, Safety and Health Fiscal Year 2001 Budget-Risk Management Summary'' (RL 1999) were the basis for preparing this report. Fiscal year 2000 finding of Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) activities is based on the President's budget of $1,065.1 million and $28.0 million, plus $2.7 million carryover finding, respectively, as of October 31, 1999. Any funding changes as a result of the Congressional appropriation process will be reflected in the Fiscal Year 2002 ES&H Budget-Risk Management Summary to be issued in May 2000. This report provides the end-of-year status of FY 1999 ES&H execution commitments, including actual S&H expenditures, and describes planned FY 2000 ES&H execution commitments and the S&H resources needed to support those activities. This requirement is included in the ES&H ''Guidance for FY200l Budget Formulations and Execution'' (DOE 1999).

  17. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) Fiscal Year 1999 annual technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-10-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1999 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  18. Label Building Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natural Gas Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our

  19. Table B24. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Cooling","Cooling Energy Sources (more than one may apply)",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Cooling","Cooling Energy Sources (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District

  20. Table B37. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Water Heating Equipment, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Type of Water Heating Equipment",,,"All Buildings","All Buildings with Water Heating","Type of Water Heating Equipment" ,,,"Central-ized System","Distri-buted System","Combination

  1. SETEC/Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies Program: 1999 Annual and Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

    2000-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of work conducted by the Semiconductor Manufacturing Technologies Program at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) during 1999. This work was performed by one working group: the Semiconductor Equipment Technology Center (SETEC). The group's projects included Numerical/Experimental Characterization of the Growth of Single-Crystal Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}); The Use of High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) Imaging for Certifying Critical-Dimension Reference Materials Fabricated with Silicon Micromachining; Assembly Test Chip for Flip Chip on Board; Plasma Mechanism Validation: Modeling and Experimentation; and Model-Based Reduction of Contamination in Gate-Quality Nitride Reactor. During 1999, all projects focused on meeting customer needs in a timely manner and ensuring that projects were aligned with the goals of the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors sponsored by the Semiconductor Industry Association and with Sandia's defense mission. This report also provides a short history of the Sandia/SEMATECH relationship and a brief on all projects completed during the seven years of the program.

  2. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN1999em

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-06-01

    Because of their intrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmological probes. We describe the spectral-fitting expanding atmosphere method (SEAM) for obtaining distances to Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) and present a distance to SN 1999em for which a Cepheid distance exists. Our models give results consistent with the Cepheid distance, even though we have not attempted to tune the underlying hydrodynamical model but have simply chosen the best fits. This is in contradistinction to the expanding photosphere method (EPM), which yields a distance to SN 1999em that is 50 percent smaller than the Cepheid distance. We emphasize the differences between the SEAM and the EPM. We show that the dilution factors used in the EPM analysis were systematically too small at later epochs. We also show that the EPM blackbody assumption is suspect. Since SNe IIP are visible to redshifts as high as z {approx}< 6, with the James Webb Space Telescope, the SEAM may be a valuable probe of the early universe.

  3. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1999 Completion Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley J.

    2000-01-01

    The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in WRIA 35. According to WDFW's Priority WRIA's by At-Risk Stock Significance Map, it is the highest priority in southeastern WA. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred seventy-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1999. Twenty of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1999 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; thirty-eight were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as vegetative plantings (17,000 trees and shrubs) and noxious weed control. Two sediment basin constructions, 67 acres of grass seeding, and seven hundred forty-five acres of minimum till were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-09-01

    OAK A271 Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Rocketdyne. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 1999 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of the Rocketdyne Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). In the past, these operations included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials under the former Atomics International Division. Other activities included the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities for testing of liquid metal fast breeder components at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility within Area IV. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and subsequently, all radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the previously used nuclear facilities and associated site areas. Large-scale D&D activities of the sodium test facilities began in 1996. This Annual Site Environmental Report provides information showing that there are no indications of any potential impact on public health and safety due to the operations conducted at the SSFL. All measures and calculations of off-site conditions demonstrate compliance with applicable regulations, which provide for protection of human health and the environment.

  5. 1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1994-03-01

    This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

  6. SOAR Data: Data from Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR)1999 through 2001

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Click on the DATA menu button and then click on a specific ship to find instructions on accessing data from that particular cruise. Instructions will lead you to an FTP site from which data can be downloaded. SOAR data for 1999 through 2001 is reported. SOAR is a global network of research and volunteer ships that carry global change instrumentation. The primary emphasis for SOAR is solar and IR radiation but some ships cary ceilometers, meteorological instruments, and related equipment. All data are collected in a central data collection computer and the flexible data collection software can be adapted to any other user instrumentation. Currently SOAR is installed pas permanent instrumentation on four ships operating in the western Pacific, eastern tropical Pacific, West Indies, and an oceanographic ship that operates around the world. In addition, six other system are used on cruises of opportunity. [Taken from SOAR homepage at http://www.gim.bnl.gov/soar/index.html

  7. LLE Quarterly Report (July-September 1999)[Library for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2000-01-07

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period July-September 1999, features a theoretical analysis of a process that generates mass perturbations of an imploding target driven by modulated laser illumination. The process, referred to as laser imprint, impacts the integrity of the shell during direct-drive implosions, potentially quenching target performance. In this article V. N. Goncharov, J. A. Delettrez, S. Skupsky, and R. P. J. Town present a model of the generation of mass perturbations and analyze the mass perturbation growth due to nonuniform ablation pressure. Stabilizing mechanisms of thermal conduction smoothing and mass ablation are shown to suppress the acceleration perturbation, and mass ablation is also shown to impact velocity perturbations. The model predicts that a direct-drive cryogenic NIF target will remain intact during the implosion when l-Thz SSD beam smoothing is used.

  8. The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project : Progress Report, 1999-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contor, Craig R.; Sexton, Amy D.

    2003-06-02

    The Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME) was funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as directed by section 4(h) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P. L. 96-501). This project is in accordance with and pursuant to measures 4.2A, 4.3C.1, 7.1A.2, 7.1C.3, 7.1C.4 and 7.1D.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Work was conducted by the Fisheries Program of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) under the Walla Walla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation Project (WWNPME). Chapter One provides an overview of the entire report and how the objectives of each statement of work from 1999, 2000, 2001, and 2002 contract years are organized and reported. Chapter One also provides background information relevant to the aquatic resources of the Walla Walla River Basin. Objectives are outlined below for the statements of work for the 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 contract years. The same objectives were sometimes given different numbers in different years. Because this document is a synthesis of four years of reporting, we gave objectives letter designations and listed the objective number associated with the statement of work for each year. Some objectives were in all four work statements, while other objectives were in only one or two work statements. Each objective is discussed in a chapter. The chapter that reports activities and findings of each objective are listed with the objective below. Because data is often interrelated, aspects of some findings may be reported or discussed in more than one chapter. Specifics related to tasks, approaches, methods, results and discussion are addressed in the individual chapters.

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption Glossary › FAQS › Overview Industrial Commercial Industrial Transportation Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data 2006 Analysis & Reports Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based

  10. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Residential - U.S. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration (EIA) Early-release estimates from the 2010 MECS show that energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased between 2006 and 2010 MECS 2006-2010 - Release date: March 28, 2012 Energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector fell from 21,098 trillion Btu (tBtu) in 2006 to 19,062 tBtu in 2010, a decline of almost 10 percent, based on preliminary estimates released from the 2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This decline continues the

  11. Energy consumption and expenditure projections by population group on the basis of the annual energy outlook 1999 forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poyer, D.A.; Balsley, J.H.

    2000-01-07

    This report presents an analysis of the relative impact of the base-case scenario used in Annual Energy Outlook 1999 on different population groups. Projections of energy consumption and expenditures, as well as energy expenditure as a share of income, from 1996 to 2020 are given. The projected consumption of electricty, natural gas, distillate fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas during this period is also reported for each population group. In addition, this report compares the findings of the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 report with the 1998 report. Changes in certain indicators and information affect energy use forecasts, and these effects are analyzed and discussed.

  12. Energy and water development appropriations bill, 1999. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, June 16, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    Mr. McDade, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted this report. The Committee on Appropriations submits the following report in explanation of the accompanying bill making appropriations for energy and water development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1999, and for other purposes.

  13. Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

  14. Global Insight Energy Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Overview -4,000 -2,000 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 1990-2000 2000-2008 2008-2030 Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Pow er Losses Energy Demand by Sector (Trillion Btu) ...

  15. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  16. Semi-annual technical report, September 30, 1999 - March 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumacher, Dorin

    2000-04-01

    The Consortium for Plant Biotechnology Research, Inc. (CPBR) continues to operate according to objectives outlined in the proposal funded through the cooperative agreement. The italicized objectives below are addressed in this report, which covers the period September 30,1999 through March 31, 2000. (1) Update the research agenda using information obtained from member companies. (2) Identify and implement research projects that are deemed by industrial, scientific, and sponsoring agency evaluation to address significantly the problems and future of U.S. energy resources and that are relevant to the Department of Energy's mission. Specifically: (1) Announce research grants competition through a Request for Preproposals. (2) Conduct a dual-stage review process: Stage one--industrial and DOE review of preproposals; and Stage two--peer review, scientific consultants' review, DOE review of full proposals and Project Recommendation Committee evaluation and recommendation for funding. (3) Board of Directors approval of recommended awards. (4) Conduct ongoing project management. (5) Obtain semiannual, annual and final reports for evaluation of research goals and technology transfer. (6) Present reports to DOE.

  17. Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERRON,KERRY G.; JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C.; HUGHES,SCOTT D.

    2000-06-01

    This is the fourth report in an ongoing series of studies examining how US perspectives about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era. In Volume 1 the authors present findings from a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public conducted from 13 September to 14 October 1999. Results are compared to findings from previous surveys in this series conducted in 1993, 1995, and 1997, and trends are analyzed. Key areas of investigation reported in Volume 1 include evolving perceptions of nuclear weapons risks and benefits, preferences for related policy and spending issues, and views about three emerging issue areas: deterrent utility of precision guided munitions; response options to attacks in which mass casualty weapons are used; and expectations about national missile defenses. In this volume they relate respondent beliefs about nuclear security to perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits and to policy preferences. They develop causal models to partially explain key preferences, and they employ cluster analysis to group respondents into four policy relevant clusters characterized by similar views and preferences about nuclear security within each cluster. Systematic links are found among respondent demographic characteristics, perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits, policy beliefs, and security policy and spending preferences. In Volume 2 they provide analysis of in-depth interviews with fifty members of the US security policy community.

  18. Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

  19. Association of low-level blood lead and blood pressure in NHANES 1999-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Abadin, Henry G.; Edward Murray, H.

    2011-11-15

    This study investigated whether low blood-lead levels ({<=}10 {mu}g/dL) were associated with blood pressure (BP) outcomes. The authors analyzed data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2006 and participants aged 20 years or older. Outcome variables were systolic and diastolic BP measurements, pulse pressure, and hypertension status. Multivariable linear and logistic regressions stratified by race/ethnicity and gender were performed. Blood lead levels (BLL) were significantly correlated with higher systolic BP among black men and women, but not white or Mexican-American participants. BLLs were significantly associated with higher diastolic BPs among white men and women and black men, whereas, a negative association was observed in Mexican-American men that had, also, a wider pulse pressure. Black men in the 90th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{>=}3.50 {mu}g/dL) compared to black men in the 10th percentile of blood lead distribution (BLL{<=}0.7 {mu}g/dL) had a significant increase of risk of having hypertension (adjusted POR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.08-6.72). In addition, blood cadmium was significantly associated with hypertension and systolic and diastolic blood. This study found that, despite the continuous decline in blood lead in the U.S. population, lead exposure disparities among race and gender still exist.

  20. Proceedings of the 1999 Oil and Gas Conference: Technology Options for Producer Survival

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    2000-04-12

    The 1999 Oil & Gas Conference was cosponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) on June 28 to 30 in Dallas, Texas. The Oil & Gas Conference theme, Technology Options for Producer Survival, reflects the need for development and implementation of new technologies to ensure an affordable, reliable energy future. The conference was attended by nearly 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, DOE, and other Government agencies. Three preconference workshops (Downhole Separation Technologies: Is it Applicable for Your Operations, Exploring and developing Naturally Fractured Low-Permeability Gas Reservoirs from the Rocky Mountains to the Austin Chalk, and Software Program Applications) were held. The conference agenda included an opening plenary session, three platform sessions (Sessions 2 and 3 were split into 2 concurrent topics), and a poster presentation reception. The platform session topics were Converting Your Resources Into Reserves (Sessions 1 and 2A), Clarifying Your Subsurface Vision (Session 2B), and High Performance, Cost Effective Drilling, Completion, Stimulation Technologies (Session 3B). In total, there were 5 opening speakers, 30 presenters, and 16 poster presentations.

  1. Blood lead level association with lower body weight in NHANES 19992006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scinicariello, Franco; Buser, Melanie C.; Mevissen, Meike; Portier, Christopher J.

    2013-12-15

    Background: Lead exposure is associated with low birth-weight. The objective of this study is to determine whether lead exposure is associated with lower body weight in children, adolescents and adults. Methods: We analyzed data from NHANES 19992006 for participants aged ? 3 using multiple logistic and multivariate linear regression. Using age- and sex-standardized BMI Z-scores, overweight and obese children (ages 319) were classified by BMI ? 85th and ? 95th percentiles, respectively. The adult population (age ? 20) was classified as overweight and obese with BMI measures of 2529.9 and ? 30, respectively. Blood lead level (BLL) was categorized by weighted quartiles. Results: Multivariate linear regressions revealed a lower BMI Z-score in children and adolescents when the highest lead quartile was compared to the lowest lead quartile (? (SE) = ? 0.33 (0.07), p < 0.001), and a decreased BMI in adults (? (SE) = ? 2.58 (0.25), p < 0.001). Multiple logistic analyses in children and adolescents found a negative association between BLL and the percentage of obese and overweight with BLL in the highest quartile compared to the lowest quartile (OR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.300.59; and OR = 0.67, 95% CI: 0.520.88, respectively). Adults in the highest lead quartile were less likely to be obese (OR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.350.50) compared to those in the lowest lead quartile. Further analyses with blood lead as restricted cubic splines, confirmed the dose-relationship between blood lead and body weight outcomes. Conclusions: BLLs are associated with lower body mass index and obesity in children, adolescents and adults. - Highlights: NHANES analysis of BLL and body weight outcomes Increased BLL associated with decreased body weight in children and adolescent Increased BLL associated with decreased body weight in adults.

  2. MODIFYING A 60 YEAR OLD STACK SAMPLING SYSTEM TO MEET ANSI N13.1-1999 EQUIVALENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2006-06-14

    The 291-T-1 stack was constructed in 1944 to support ongoing missions associated with the Hanford Project. Recent changes in the plant mission required a revision to the existing license of the stack that was operating as a minor emission unit. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Health (WDOH) deemed this revision to be a significant modification, thereby requiring the stack to operate to the ANSI N13.1-1999 sampling and monitoring requirements. Because the stack is similar to other stacks on the Hanford site, allowance was made by EPA to demonstrate equivalency to the ANSI standard via calculations in lieu of actual testing. Calculations were allowed for determining the deposition, nozzle transmission and aspiration ratios, but measurements were required for the stack flow coefficient of variation (COV). The equivalency determination was to be based on the requirements of Table 6 of the ANSI N13.1-1999 Standard.

  3. United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Susan M.; Filipy, Ronald E.

    2000-07-01

    The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

  4. Independent Oversight Review of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Medicine Programs from June 1998 to December 1999

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Oversight performed a two-phased review of eight Departmental contractor occupational medicine programs. The first phase of the review was completed in September 1998 and the second phase in December 1999. To conduct the review, Oversight teamed with the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), a non-profit accreditation organization for health-care facilities. The Office of Oversight's interim report on the three sites

  5. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12...

  6. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.001 1.720 2.433 2.463 2.231 2.376 2000's 4.304 4.105 3.441 5.497 6.417 9.186 7.399 7.359 9.014 4.428 2010's 4.471 4.090 2.926 3.775 4.236 2.684

  7. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1994-Jan 01/14 2.113 01/21 2.159 01/28 2.233 1994-Feb 02/04 2.303 02/11 2.230 02/18 2.223 02/25 2.197 1994-Mar 03/04 2.144 03/11 2.150 03/18 2.148 03/25 2.095 1994-Apr 04/01 2.076 04/08 2.101 04/15 2.137 04/22 2.171 04/29 2.133 1994-May 05/06 2.056 05/13 2.017 05/20 1.987 05/27 1.938 1994-Jun 06/03 2.023 06/10 2.122 06/17 2.173 06/24 2.118 1994-Jul 07/01 2.182 07/08 2.119

  8. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.039 1.739 2.350 2.418 2.290 2.406 2000's 4.217 4.069 3.499 5.466 6.522 9.307 7.852 7.601 9.141 4.669 2010's 4.564 4.160 3.020 3.822 4.227 2.739

  9. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1994-Jan 01/21 2.055 01/28 2.133 1994-Feb 02/04 2.189 02/11 2.159 02/18 2.174 02/25 2.163 1994-Mar 03/04 2.127 03/11 2.136 03/18 2.141 03/25 2.103 1994-Apr 04/01 2.085 04/08 2.105 04/15 2.131 04/22 2.175 04/29 2.149 1994-May 05/06 2.076 05/13 2.045 05/20 2.034 05/27 1.994 1994-Jun 06/03 2.078 06/10 2.149 06/17 2.172 06/24 2.142 1994-Jul 07/01 2.187 07/08 2.143 07/15 2.079

  10. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.906 2.054 1.746 2.270 2.363 2.332 2.418 2000's 4.045 4.103 3.539 5.401 6.534 9.185 8.238 7.811 9.254 4.882 2010's 4.658 4.227 3.109 3.854 4.218 2.792

  11. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187

  12. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 03 NATURAL GAS; COMBUSTION; EFFICIENCY; FEEDBACK; ...

  13. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.934 1.692 2.502 2.475 2.156 2.319 2000's 4.311 4.053 3.366 5.493 6.178 9.014 6.976 7.114 8.899 4.159 2010's 4.382 4.026 2.827 3.731 4.262 2.627

  14. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1994-Jan 01/14 2.231 01/21 2.297 01/28 2.404 1994-Feb 02/04 2.506 02/11 2.369 02/18 2.330 02/25 2.267 1994-Mar 03/04 2.178 03/11 2.146 03/18 2.108 03/25 2.058 1994-Apr 04/01 2.065 04/08 2.092 04/15 2.127 04/22 2.126 04/29 2.097 1994-May 05/06 2.025 05/13 1.959 05/20 1.933 05/27 1.855 1994-Jun 06/03 1.938 06/10 2.052 06/17 2.128 06/24 2.065 1994-Jul 07/01 2.183 07/08 2.087

  15. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18

  16. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25

  17. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to

  18. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021...

  19. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050

  20. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Daily","3212016" ,"Release Date:","3232016" ,"Next Release Date:","3302016" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  1. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","22016" ,"Release Date:","3232016" ,"Next Release Date:","3302016" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  2. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to ...

  3. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 0110 3.79 0117 4.19 0124 2.98 0131 2.91 ...

  4. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.49 2.09 2.27 2000's 4.31 3.96 3.38 5.47 5.89 8.69 6.73 6.97 8.86 3.94 2010's 4.37 4.00 2.75 ...

  5. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 ...

  6. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494...

  7. Evaluation of Juvenile Fall Chinook Salmon Stranding on the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, John

    2002-01-24

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has been contracted through the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) to perform an evaluation of juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) stranding on the Hanford Reach. The evaluation, in the third year of a multi-year study, has been developed to assess the impacts of water fluctuations from Priest Rapids Dam on rearing juvenile fall chinook salmon, other fishes, and benthic macroinvertebrates of the Hanford Reach. This document provides the results of the 1999 field season.

  8. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 1998-1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, David L.

    2000-12-01

    The authors report on their progress from April 1998 through March 1999 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report D), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report E), and the University of Idaho (UI; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 1998 through March 1999 are given.

  9. Summary of Information Presented at an NRC-Sponsored Low-Power Shutdown Public Workshop, April 27, 1999, Rockville, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Whitehead, Donnie W.; Lois, Erasmia

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes a public workshop that was held on April 27, 1999, in Rockville, Maryland. The workshop was conducted as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts to further develop its understanding of the risks associated with low power and shutdown operations at US nuclear power plants. A sufficient understanding of such risks is required to support decision-making for risk-informed regulation, in particular Regulatory Guide 1.174, and the development of a consensus standard. During the workshop the NRC staff discussed and requested feedback from the public (including representatives of the nuclear industry, state governments, consultants, private industry, and the media) on the risk associated with low-power and shutdown operations.

  10. A Study to Determine the Biological Feasibility of a New Fish-Tagging System : Annual Report 1998-1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.; Peterson, Bradley W.; Nunnallee, Edmund P.; Jonasson, Bruce F.

    2000-09-01

    This report covers our work during 1998 and 1999 (FY99) on a project to expand and improve technology for passive-integrated-transponder tags (PIT tags) throughout the Columbia River Basin. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted the work. Timely and accurate information derived from PIT-tag technology is increasingly critical to resource stakeholders in assessing the effectiveness of efforts to enhance survival of juvenile and adult salmonids. Continued development of PIT-tag technology will enable researchers and fisheries managers to address issues expressed in the NMFS biological opinions for operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and the proposed Snake River Recovery Plan. The FY99 work was divided into individual projects that are covered separately in this report.

  11. Comparison of the Energy Efficiency Prescribed by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 and ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Liu, Bing; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

    2006-12-01

    This document presents the qualitative comparison of DOEs formal determination of energy savings of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. The term qualitative is used in the sense of identifying whether or not changes have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on energy efficiency of the standard, with no attempt made to quantify that impact. A companion document will present the quantitative comparison of DOEs determination. The quantitative comparison will be based on whole building simulation of selected building prototypes in selected climates. This document presents a comparison of the energy efficiency requirements in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-1999 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-1999) and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-2004). The comparison was done through a thorough review of all addenda to Standard 90.1-1999 that were included in the published ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2001 (herein referred to as Standard 90.1-2001) and also all addenda to Standard 90.1-2001 that were included in the published Standard 90.1-2004. A summary table showing the impact of each addendum is provided. Each addendum to both Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001 was evaluated as to its impact on the energy efficiency requirements of the standard (greater efficiency, lesser efficiency) and as to significance. The final section of this document summarizes the impacts of the various addenda and proposes which addenda should be included in the companion quantitative portion of DOEs determination. Addenda are referred to with the nomenclature addendum 90.1-xxz, where xx is either 99 for 1999 or 01 for 2001, and z is the ASHRAE letter designation for the addendum. Addenda names are shown in bold face in text. DOE has chosen not to prepare a separate evaluation of Standard 90.1-2001 as that standard does not appear to improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. What this means for the determination of energy savings for Standard 90.1-2004 is that the baseline standard for comparison is Standard 90.1-1999 and all addenda to both Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001 must be considered to determine the overall change in efficiency between Standard 90.1-1999 and Standard 90.1-2004.

  12. Word Pro - S2.lwp

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation, 2006 By Selected End Use¹ By Energy Source 48 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 1 Excludes inputs of unallocated energy sources (5,820 trillion Btu). 2 Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning. Excludes steam and hot water. 3 Excludes coal coke and breeze. 4 Liquefied petroleum gases. 5 Natural gas liquids. (s)=Less than 0.05 quadrillion Btu. Source: Table 2.3. 3.3 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.2

  13. Fuel Tables.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1: Kerosene Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2014 State Consumption Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Total Residential Commercial Industrial Total Residential and Commercial Industrial Total Residential Commercial Industrial Total Thousand Barrels Trillion Btu Dollars per Million Btu Million Dollars Alabama 4 3 4 11 (s) (s) (s) 0.1 25.33 20.88 23.77 0.6 0.4 0.4 1.4 Alaska 6 3 (s) 9 (s) (s) (s) 0.1 31.05 25.59 30.88 1.0 0.5 (s) 1.6 Arizona (s) (s) (s) (s) (s)

  14. R A N K I N G S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption Estimates, Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption Estimates per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2013 Rank Total Energy Consumption Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2009) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2009) Dollar 1 Texas 12,944.1 California 2,055.2 Louisiana 18.1 2 California 7,684.1 Texas 1,395.4 Wyoming 15.0 3 Florida 4,077.9 New York 1,248.4

  15. Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million

  16. Tank Vapor Sampling and Analysis Data Package for Tank 241-Z-361 Sampled 09/22/1999 and 09/271999 During Sludge Core Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VISWANATH, R.S.

    1999-12-29

    This data package presents sampling data and analytical results from the September 22 and 27, 1999, headspace vapor sampling of Hanford Site Tank 241-2-361 during sludge core removal. The Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation (LMHC) sampling team collected the samples and Waste Management Laboratory (WML) analyzed the samples in accordance with the requirements specified in the 241-2361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan, (SAP), HNF-4371, Rev. 1, (Babcock and Wilcox Hanford Corporation, 1999). Six SUMMA{trademark} canister samples were collected on each day (1 ambient field blank and 5 tank vapor samples collected when each core segment was removed). The samples were radiologically released on September 28 and October 4, 1999, and received at the laboratory on September 29 and October 6, 1999. Target analytes were not detected at concentrations greater than their notification limits as specified in the SAP. Analytical results for the target analytes and tentatively identified compounds (TICs) are presented in Section 2.2.2 starting on page 2B-7. Three compounds identified for analysis in the SAP were analyzed as TICs. The discussion of this modification is presented in Section 2.2.1.2.

  17. Post-Release Attributes and Survival of Hatchery and Natural Fall Chinook Salmon in the Snake River : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Rondorf, Dennis W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes results of research activities conducted in 1999 and years previous. In an effort to provide this information to a wider audience, the individual chapters in this report have been submitted as manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. These chapters communicate significant findings that will aid in the management and recovery of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Abundance and timing of seaward migration of Snake River fall chinook salmon was indexed using passage data collected at Lower Granite Dam for five years. We used genetic analyses to determine the lineage of fish recaptured at Lower Granite Dam that had been previously PIT tagged. We then used discriminant analysis to determine run membership of PIT-tagged smolts that were not recaptured to enable us to calculate annual run composition and to compared early life history attributes of wild subyearling fall and spring chinook salmon. Because spring chinook salmon made up from 15.1 to 44.4% of the tagged subyearling smolts that were detected passing Lower Granite Dam, subyearling passage data at Lower Granite Dam can only be used to index fall chinook salmon smolt abundance and passage timing if genetic samples are taken to identify run membership of smolts. Otherwise, fall chinook salmon smolt abundance would be overestimated and timing of fall chinook salmon smolt passage would appear to be earlier and more protracted than is the case.

  18. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, Kauai Test Facility, HI, 1999-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark Laverne

    2007-11-01

    In 1999, 2002, and 2007, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), HI, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at KTF. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends that indicated that further investigation might be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  19. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a project whose goal is to commercialize a production process for propylene and acrylic acid from propane using a catalytic auto-thermal oxydehydrogenation process operating at short contact times. Auto-thermal oxidation for conversion of propane to propylene and acrylic acid promises energy savings of 20 trillion Btu per year by 2020. In addition to reducing energy consumption, this technology can reduce manufacturing costs by up to 25 percent, and reduce a variety of greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. Development of Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real-Time, Gas Quality Sensor Technology Introduction Landfll gas (LFG), composed largely of methane and carbon dioxide, is used in over 645 operational projects in 48 states. These projects convert a large source of greenhouse gases into a fuel that currently provides approximately 51 trillion Btu of electricity and supplies 108 billion cubic feet of LFG annually to direct use applications and natural gas pipelines. However, there is still a signifcant resource base for new projects, with over

  1. Word Pro - S3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 3.8a Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption: Residential and Commercial Sectors (Trillion Btu) Residential Sector Commercial Sector a Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Motor Gasoline b Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total 1950 Total ........................ 829 347 146 1,322 262 47 39 100 NA 424 872 1955 Total

  2. Word Pro - S3

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 Table 3.8c Heat Content of Petroleum Consumption: Transportation and Electric Power Sectors (Trillion Btu) Transportation Sector Electric Power Sector a Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil b Jet Fuel c Liquefied Petroleum Gases Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Distillate Fuel Oil e Petro- leum Coke Residual Fuel Oil f Total 1950 Total ........................ 199 480 c ( ) 3 141 4,664 1,201

  3. Level: National Data;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,433 Natural Gas 5,911 Net Electricity 2,851 Purchases 2,894 Transfers In 20 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 4 Sales and Transfers Offsite 67 Coke and Breeze 272

  4. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food ................................................................................. 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products ..................................... 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107

  5. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End Use, 2003 (Trillion Btu) End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other 1 Total All Buildings .................................... 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 3,559 Principal Building Activity Education ...................................... 15 74 83 11 113 2 16 4 32 21 371 Food Sales ................................... 6 12 7 Q 46 2 119 2 2 10 208

  6. " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",," ",,,,,,," "," "," " ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One

  7. " Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A49. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs" ,,,,,"(1992 through 1994)" ,," " ,,,,,,"Federal, State, or" ,,"No Energy",,"Electric Utility",,"Local

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  10. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  11. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural

  12. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural

  13. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural

  14. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," ","

  15. New Jersey Industrial Energy Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jersey Industrial Energy Program New Jersey Industrial Energy Program Map highlighting New Jersey New Jersey is home to energy-intensive industrial manufacturing sectors such as chemicals, computers and electronics, and transportation equipment manufacturing. In 2007, industrial manufacturing in the state contributed to approximately 10% of New Jersey's gross domestic product and 20% of the state's energy usage, consuming 452.1 trillion British thermal units (Btu). As part of an initiative to

  16. Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," ","

  17. Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  18. Table A31. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)",,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," ","

  19. Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," ","

  20. Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent

  1. Table N1.3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .3. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," " " "," ","RSE" ,"Total","Row" "Energy Source","First

  2. Originally Released: August 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 2009" "Revised: October 2009" "Next MECS will be conducted in 2010" "Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,"Waste" ,,,,"Blast",,,,"Pulping Liquor",,"Oils/Tars"

  3. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG

  4. Released: August 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","

  5. Released: March 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG

  6. Released: March 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," "

  7. Released: May 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products" ,,,"Biomass" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","

  8. Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  9. Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural

  10. Table A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A41. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy Management Program, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,," Census Region",,,,"RSE" "SIC","Industry Groups",," -------------------------------------------",,,,"Row" "Code(a)","and

  11. Table A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A50. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Census Region, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of" " Energy-Management Program, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Census Region",,,"RSE" "SIC",,,,,,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and

  12. Table A52. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Employment Size" " Categories and Presence of General Technologies and Cogeneration Technologies, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Employment Size(a)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" ,,,,,,,"1000 and","Row" "General/Cogeneration Technologies","Total","Under

  13. Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources;" " Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," " " "," ","RSE" ,"Total","Row" "Energy Source","First

  14. Table 1.5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .5 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National Data; Row: Energy Sources and Shipments, including Further Classification of 'Other' Energy Sources; Column: First Use per Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Trillion Btu. Total Energy Source First Use Total United States Coal 1,328 Natural Gas 5,725 Net Electricity 2,437 Purchases 2,510 Transfers In 33 Onsite Generation from Noncombustible Renewable Energy 7 Sales and Transfers Offsite 113 Coke and Breeze 374

  15. How Much Energy Does Your State Produce? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Does Your State Produce? How Much Energy Does Your State Produce? November 10, 2014 - 2:52pm Addthis Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it produces Source: EIA State Energy Data Systems Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs More Energy Maps Interested in learning more about national energy trends? Learn how much you spend on energy and how much energy you consume. Here

  16. Commercial Buildings Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Integration Images courtesy CREE, True Manufacturing, A.O. Smith, Bernstein Associates, Cambridge Engineering, Alliance Laundry Systems, NREL 2 Strategic Fit within Building Technologies Office 3 4 In the U.S., packaged units: * condition 40 billion square feet of the commercial building floor space * consume 2,100 trillion Btu of primary energy annually Many RTUs are past their typical life span, functioning at much lower efficiency levels than new units, and are ready to be replaced.

  17. Wisconsin Save Energy Now Program | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Map of Midwest U.S. with Wisconsin highlighted Among Wisconsin's economic sectors, the industrial sector represents the highest level of energy consumption. In 2007, this sector consumed approximately 623.5 trillion British thermal units (Btu). Wisconsin's industrial sector includes energy-intensive industries, such as food processing, chemical manufacturing, plastics, and forest products. The Wisconsin Office of Energy Independence, along with its project partners, expanded the Wisconsin Save

  18. Annual Energy Review 1999

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    for 0.13 e T & D losses 0.16 c Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 5.33 Geothermal and Other 0.06 d Sales to Electric Utilities 0.85 g h Conversion Losses 21.89 a...

  19. WIPP News Releases - 1999

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... RH waste is handled with remote-controlled machinery to protect the workers from potential ... We've seen mixed signals from stakeholders and technical experts alike on how to best get ...

  20. 1999 User Survey Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    helpful. At times they went beyond the scope of my request which resulted in making my job easier." "Provides reliable machines, which are well-maintained and have scheduling...

  1. Annual Energy Review 1999

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    motor gasoline, which is accounted for in both fossil fuels and renewables and removed once from this total to avoid doublecounting. Notes: Data are preliminary. Totals may not...

  2. 1999 CBECS Sample Design

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    contractor for survey verification purposes only. Geographic identifiers and NOAA Weather Division identifiers are not included on micro-data files delivered to EIA....

  3. 1999 - 03 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search

  4. 1999 - 05 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search

  5. Amro_1999.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. Powell_1999.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  7. NCSL1999.PDF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of gases and vapors over a wide range of process conditions without the need for density corrections based on pressure and temperature. They are widely used in industrial...

  8. International energy outlook 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

  9. APS 1999 Conferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of interest to the APS researcher community. Workshop on Scientific Applications of the LCLS. (Jan. 12-14) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSLC) Stanford, CA Workshop on...

  10. BPA 1999 Annual Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    payment was 628 million, of which 421 million was interest on the government's investment in the Federal Columbia River Power System. And it was a good year on other fronts...

  11. 1999 APS Abstracts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Neutrals using High Resolution Spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod Inst. for Plasma Research, U. of Maryland Maqueda, R.J. - Outer divertor heating in Alcator C-Mod LANL...

  12. 1999 - 03 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March

  13. 1999 - 06 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June

  14. 1999 News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sunlight Helps Laboratory Get Ready for Y2K - (122799) NREL Hosts Free Workshops on Solar and Wind Energy - (121599) Seminar Explores Benefits of Using Solar Power for ...

  15. 1999 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Needle Biopsy Alternative Riverside to Test Small Camera that Points Out Growths in Breast (Daily Press) Fri, 10221999 - 11:00pm Science Finds God (Daily Press) Sun, 1017...

  16. BN 1999.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  17. Type B Accident Investigation of the Serious Personal Injury while Doble Testing at the Western Area Power Administration Hayden Substation, May 19, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 19, 1999, at 10:31 a.m., four Western Area Power Administration (Western) employees were performing Doble testing on a circuit breaker at Hayden Substation in Routt County, Colorado. Three electricians were injured when the high-voltage lead (HVL) of the Doble test set encroached on the minimum approach distance to an energized part outside clearance boundaries, drawing arcing faults.

  18. Millimeter-Wavelength Forward-Model Comparisons Based on Ground-Based Radiometric Data Taken During the 1999 NSA/AO Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Millimeter-Wavelength Forward-Model Comparisons Based on Ground-Based Radiometric Data Taken During the 1999 NSA/AAO Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater and M. A. Klein Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Racette National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland D. Cimini University of L'Aquila

  19. Measurement of Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Exp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boundary-Layer Temperature Profiles by a Scanning 5-MM Radiometer During the 1999 Winter NSA/AAO Radiometer Experiment and WVIOP 2000 V. Y. Leuski and E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction A scanning 5-mm-wavelength radiometer was deployed during two Intensive Operational Periods (IOPs) at the Atmospheric Radiation

  20. Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-September 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.

    2001-04-16

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-September 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within ten major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Physical Properties Research, Biochemical Engineering, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structures and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of the Cell Operations involved the testing of two continuously stirred tank reactors in series to evaluate the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium and transuranics from supernatant. Within the area of Process Chemistry, various topics related to solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge were addressed. Saltcake dissolution efforts continued, including the development of a predictive algorithm. New initiatives for the section included modeling activities centered on detection of hydrogen in {sup 233}U storage wells and wax formation in petroleum mixtures, as well as support for the Spallation Neutron Source (investigation of transmutation products formed during operation). Other activities involved in situ grouting and evaluation of options for use (i.e., as castable shapes) of depleted uranium. In a continuation of activities of the preceding quarter, MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its conversion to a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. Investigation of options for final disposition of the {sup 233}U inventory represents a new initiative within this area. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for use in areas such as selective sorption, chemical sensing, and catalysis, as well as spectroscopic investigation into the fundamental interaction between ionic solvents and solutes in both low- and high-temperature ionic liquids.

  1. Trends in the Quality of Treatment for Patients With Intact Cervical Cancer in the United States, 1999 Through 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Giordano, Sharon H.; Meyer, Larissa A.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: High-quality treatment for intact cervical cancer requires external radiation therapy, brachytherapy, and chemotherapy, carefully sequenced and completed without delays. We sought to determine how frequently current treatment meets quality benchmarks and whether new technologies have influenced patterns of care. Methods and Materials: By searching diagnosis and procedure claims in MarketScan, an employment-based health care claims database, we identified 1508 patients with nonmetastatic, intact cervical cancer treated from 1999 to 2011, who were <65 years of age and received >10 fractions of radiation. Treatments received were identified using procedure codes and compared with 3 quality benchmarks: receipt of brachytherapy, receipt of chemotherapy, and radiation treatment duration not exceeding 63 days. The Cochran-Armitage test was used to evaluate temporal trends. Results: Seventy-eight percent of patients (n=1182) received brachytherapy, with brachytherapy receipt stable over time (Cochran-Armitage P{sub trend}=.15). Among patients who received brachytherapy, 66% had high–dose rate and 34% had low–dose rate treatment, although use of high–dose rate brachytherapy steadily increased to 75% by 2011 (P{sub trend}<.001). Eighteen percent of patients (n=278) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and IMRT receipt increased to 37% by 2011 (P{sub trend}<.001). Only 2.5% of patients (n=38) received IMRT in the setting of brachytherapy omission. Overall, 79% of patients (n=1185) received chemotherapy, and chemotherapy receipt increased to 84% by 2011 (P{sub trend}<.001). Median radiation treatment duration was 56 days (interquartile range, 47-65 days); however, duration exceeded 63 days in 36% of patients (n=543). Although 98% of patients received at least 1 benchmark treatment, only 44% received treatment that met all 3 benchmarks. With more stringent indicators (brachytherapy, ≥4 chemotherapy cycles, and duration not exceeding 56 days), only 25% of patients received treatment that met all benchmarks. Conclusion: In this cohort, most cervical cancer patients received treatment that did not comply with all 3 benchmarks for quality treatment. In contrast to increasing receipt of newer radiation technologies, there was little improvement in receipt of essential treatment benchmarks.

  2. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for use in areas such as selective sorption, chemical sensing, and catalysis, as well as spectroscopic investigation into the fundamental interaction between ionic solvents and solutes in both low- and high-temperature ionic liquids. In the area of Separations and Materials Synthesis, fundamental studies explored the use of electromagnetic fields to enhance transport processes in multiphase separations; investigated nucleation and particle growth for the synthesis, characterization, application, and processing of ultrafine particles; and examined the use of electric fields to modify phase equilibria in multiphase separations processes. Other efforts involved enhanced oxidation of organic pollutants in aqueous solutions by applying electric fields to form microbubbles and the use of electric fields to improve distillation efficiency. Research was also directed toward the use of ozonation to treat water-soluble organics, the application of electrical and acoustic methods to remediate aerosol problems, and the development of improved means of decontamination using aqueous surfactant cleaners. Fluid Structure and Properties included molecular-based studies of systems with supercritical solvents, a multi-institutional initiative to develop a molecular understanding of reverse miscelles in supercritical carbon dioxide through experimentation and molecular simulation calculations, and molecular-based prediction of the structure and properties of long-chain molecules undergoing shear flow.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 1999 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2000-03-31

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global-change data and information analysis center of the Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has--since its inception in 1982--enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Acting Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC's FY 1999 budget was 2.2M dollars. CDIAC represents the DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System. Bobbi Parra, and Wanda Ferrell on an interim basis, is DOE's Program Manager with responsibility for CDIAC. CDIAC comprises three groups, Global Change Data, Computer Systems, and Information Services, with seventeen full-time and part-time staff. The Global Change Data group is responsible for identifying and obtaining databases important to global-change research, analyzing data, compiling needed databases, providing data management support to specific programs (e.g., NARSTO), and preparing documentation to ensure the long-term utility of CDIAC's data holdings. The Computer Systems group provides computer system support for all CDIAC and WDC activities, including designing and maintaining CDIAC's computing system network; ensuring compliance with ORNL/DOE computing security regulations; ensuring long-term preservation of CDIAC data holdings through systematic backups; evaluating, developing, and implementing software; ensuring standards compliance; generating user statistics; providing Web design, development, and oversight; and providing systems analysis and programming assistance for scientific data projects. The Information Services group responds to data and information requests; maintains records of all request activities; assists in Web development and maintenance; and produces CDIAC's newsletter, CDIAC Communications, catalog, glossary, and educational materials. The following section provides further details on CDIAC's organization.

  4. Workshop on the origin of the heavy elements: Astrophysical models and experimental challenges, Santa Fe, New Mexico, September 3-4, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Haight; John L. Ullmann; Daniel D. Strottman; Paul E. Koehler; Franz Kaeppeler

    2000-01-01

    This Workshop was held on September 3--4, 1999, following the 10th International Symposium on Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Presentations were made by 14 speakers, 6 from the US and 8 from other countries on topics relevant to s-, r- and rp-process nucleosynthesis. Laboratory experiments, both present and planned, and astrophysical observations were represented as were astrophysical models. Approximately 50 scientists participated in this Workshop. These Proceedings consist of copies of vu-graphs presented at the Workshop. For further information, the interested readers are referred to the authors.

  5. Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-08-27

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

  6. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell, Uravan, Colorado, DOE/AL/62350-250, Revision 1, July 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DISPOSAL CELL URAUAN, COLORADO July 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Dhrision U MTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico DOElAU62350-250 REV. 1 Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank LONG-TERM GURMIWNCE P U N FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DrsPosAL CEU. WYAAI. COhORAOD TABLE OF DONENTe TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSEANDSCOPE

  7. Project Plan: Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility, Piqua, Ohio, April 1998 (minor revisions November 1999).

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility Piqua, Ohio April 1998 (minor revisions November 1999) Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction Office Prepared by MACTEC Environmental Restoration Services, LLC Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number LTS-111-0027-00-000 Document Number S0007600 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-06 This page

  8. Summary of Vadose -- Zone Conceptual Models for Flow and Contaminant Transport and 1999 - 2003 Progress on Resolving Deficiencies in Understanding the Vadose Zone at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. Starr; Dana L. Dettmers; Brennon R. Orr; Thomas R. Wood

    2003-12-01

    The thick vadose zone that underlies the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory has been recognized both as an avenue through which contaminants disposed at or near the ground surface can migrate to groundwater in the underlying Eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, and as a barrier to the movement of contaminants into the aquifer. Flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at the INEEL is complicated by the highly heterogeneous nature of the geologic framework and by the variations in the behavior of different contaminants in the subsurface. The state of knowledge concerning flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone at and near the INEEL IN 1999 was summarized in Deficiencies in Vadose Zone Understanding at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (Wood et al., 2000). These authors identified deficiencies in knowledge of flow and contaminant transport processes in the vadose zone, and provided recommendations for additional work that should be conducted to address these deficiencies. In the period since (Wood et al., 2000) was prepared, research has been published that, to some degree, address these deficiencies. This document provides a bibliography of reports, journal articles, and conference proceedings published 1999 through mid-2003 that are relevant to the vadose zone at or near the INEEL and provides a brief description of each work. Publications that address specific deficiencies or recommendations are identified, and pertinent information from selected publications is presented.

  9. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  10. Assessment of Waste Treatment Plant Lab C3V (LB-S1) Stack Sampling Probe Location for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Geeting, John GH

    2013-02-01

    This report documents a series of tests used to assess the proposed air sampling location in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Lab C3V (LB-S1) exhaust stack with respect to the applicable criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that an air sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack in accordance with the criteria of American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that represents the effluent stream.

  11. Assessment of the Proposed INTEC CPP 666 Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2010-02-16

    This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the proposed new location for air sampling probes in the CPP-666 heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct would meet the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations( ) require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the American National Standards Institute/Health Physical Society (ANSI/HPS) N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream.

  12. Special lecture in memory of Glenn Theodore Seaborg (19 April 1912 - 25 February 1999) Glenn T. Seaborg's multi-faceted career

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2001-11-01

    Glenn Theodore Seaborg (1912-1999) was a world-renowned nuclear chemist, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry in 1951, co-discoverer of plutonium and nine other transuranium elements, Chairman of the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1961-71, scientific advisor to ten US presidents, active in national and international professional societies, an advocate for nuclear power as well as for a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty, a prolific writer, an avid hiker, environmentalist, and sports enthusiast. He was known and esteemed not only by chemists and other scientists throughout the world, but also by lay people, politicians, statesmen, and students of all ages. This memorial includes a brief glimpse of Glenn Seaborg's early life and education, describes some of his major contributions to nuclear science over his long and fruitful career, and highlights his profound influence on nuclear science, both in the US and in the international community.

  13. Special Lecture in Memory of Glenn Theodore Seaborg (19 April 1912 - 25 February 1999) Glenn T. Seaborg's Multi-faceted Career

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2001-11-01

    Glenn Theodore Seaborg (1912-1999) was a world-renowned nuclear chemist, a Nobel Laureate in chemistry in 1951, co-discoverer of plutonium and nine other transuranium elements, Chairman of the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1961-71, scientific advisor to ten US presidents, active in national and international professional societies, an advocate for nuclear power as well as for a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty, a prolific writer, an avid hiker, environmentalist, and sports enthusiast. He was known and esteemed not only by chemists and other scientists throughout the world, but also by lay people, politicians, statesmen, and students of all ages. This memorial includes a brief glimpse of Glenn Seaborg's early life and education, describes some of his major contributions to nuclear science over his long and fruitful career, and highlights his profound influence on nuclear science, both in the US and in the international community.

  14. 1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

  15. 1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1990-12-31

    This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington`s industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state`s total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state`s energy needs.

  16. S.2058: This act may be cited as the Department of Energy National Security Act for Fiscal Year 1999, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, May 11, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    This bill is to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1999 for defense activities of the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Topics addressed in the bill include DOE national security programs including recurring general provisions and program authorizations, restrictions,and limitations; defense nuclear facilities safety board; national defense stockpile; naval petroleum reserves; and Panama Canal commission.

  17. Evaluate Potential Means of Rebuilding Sturgeon Populations in the Snake River between Lower Granite and Hells Canyon Dams, 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuell, Michael A.; Everett, Scott R.

    2003-03-01

    The specific research goal of this project is to identify means to restore and rebuild the Snake River white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) population to support a sustainable annual subsistence harvest equivalent to 5 kg/ha/yr (CBFWA 1997). Based on data collected, a white sturgeon adaptive management plan will be developed. This 1999 annual report covers the third year of sampling of this multi-year study. In 1999 white sturgeon were captured, marked and population data were collected in the Snake and Salmon rivers. A total of 33,943 hours of setline effort and 2,112 hours of hook-and-line effort was employed in 1999. A total of 289 white sturgeon were captured and tagged in the Snake River and 29 in the Salmon River. Since 1997, 11.1 percent of the tagged white sturgeon have been recaptured. In the Snake River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 27 cm to 261 cm and averaged 110 cm. In the Salmon River, white sturgeon ranged in total length from 98 cm to 244 cm and averaged 183.5 cm. Using the Jolly-Seber model, the abundance of white sturgeon < 60 cm, between Lower Granite Dam and the mouth of the Salmon River, was estimated at 1,823 fish, with a 95% confidence interval of 1,052-4,221. A total of 15 white sturgeon were fitted with radio-tags. The movement of these fish ranged from 6.4 km (4 miles) downstream to 13.7 km (8.5 miles) upstream; however, 83.6 percent of the detected movement was less than 0.8 kilometers (0.5 miles). Both radio-tagged fish and recaptured white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir appear to move more than fish in the free-flowing segment of the Snake River. No seasonal movement pattern was detected, and no movement pattern was detected for different size fish. Differences were detected in the length frequency distributions of white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir and the free-flowing Snake River (Chi-Square test, P < 0.05). The proportion of white sturgeon greater than 92 cm (total length) in the free-flowing Snake River has shown an increase of 29 percent since the 1970's. Analysis of the length-weight relationship indicated that white sturgeon in Lower Granite Reservoir were slightly larger than white sturgeon in the free-flowing Snake River. A von Bertalanffy growth curve was fitted to 49 aged white sturgeon. The results suggests the fish are currently growing faster than fish historicly inhabiting the study area, as well as other Columbia River basin white sturgeon populations. Artificial substrate mats were used to document white sturgeon spawning. Five white sturgeon eggs were recovered in the Snake River.

  18. Supplement Analysis to the 1999 Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Proposed Disposition of Certain Large Containment Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-12

    This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to determine if the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory (SWEIS) (DOE/EIS-0238) (DOE 1999a) adequately addresses the environmental effects of introducing a proposed project for the clean-out and decontamination (DECON) of certain large containment vessels into the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Building located at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 3, or if the SWEIS needs to be supplemented. After undergoing the clean-out and DECON steps, the subject containment vessels would be disposed of at LANL's TA-54 low-level waste (LLW) disposal site or, as appropriate, at a DOE or commercial offsite permitted LLW-regulated landfill; after actinides were recovered from the DECON solution within the CMR Building, they would be moved to LANL's TA-55 Plutonium Facility and undergo subsequent processing at that facility for reuse. Council on Environmental Quality regulations at Title 40, Section 1502.9(c) of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9[c]) require federal agencies to prepare a supplement to an environmental impact statement (EIS) when an agency makes substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns, or there are changed circumstances or new or changed information relevant to concerns and bearing on the proposed action or its impacts. This SA is prepared in accordance with Section 10 CFR 10211.314(c) of the DOE's regulations for National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementation that states: ''When it is unclear whether or not an EIS supplement is required, DOE shall prepare a Supplement Analysis''. This SA specifically compares key impact assessment parameters of the proposed project action with the LANL operations capabilities evaluated in the 1999 SWEIS in support DOE's long-term hydrodynamic testing program at LANL, as well as the waste disposal capabilities evaluated in the SWEIS in support of LANL operations. It also provides an explanation of any differences between the proposed action and activities described in the SWEIS analysis. The SWEIS analyzed the impacts of performing plutonium (Pu) and actinide activities, including hydrodynamic testing support activity, at the Plutonium Facility and at the CMR Building.

  19. The changing character of household waste in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 as a function of home heating methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolealov, Markta; Beneov, Libue; Zvodsk, Anita

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: The character of household waste in the three different types of households were assesed. The quantity, density and composition of household waste were determined. The physicochemical characteristics were determined. The changing character of household waste during past 10 years was described. The potential of energy recovery of household waste in Czech republic was assesed. - Abstract: The authors of this paper report on the changing character of household waste, in the Czech Republic between 1999 and 2009 in households differentiated by their heating methods. The data presented are the result of two projects, financed by the Czech Ministry of Environment, which were undertaken during this time period with the aim of focusing on the waste characterisation and complete analysis of the physicochemical properties of the household waste. In the Czech Republic, the composition of household waste varies significantly between different types of households based on the methods of home heating employed. For the purposes of these studies, the types of homes were divided into three categories urban, mixed and rural. Some of the biggest differences were found in the quantities of certain subsample categories, especially fine residue (matter smaller than 20 mm), between urban households with central heating and rural households that primarily employ solid fuel such coal or wood. The use of these solid fuels increases the fraction of the finer categories because of the higher presence of ash. Heating values of the residual household waste from the three categories varied very significantly, ranging from 6.8 MJ/kg to 14.2 MJ/kg in 1999 and from 6.8 MJ/kg to 10.5 MJ/kg in 2009 depending on the type of household and season. The same factors affect moisture of residual household waste which varied from 23.2% to 33.3%. The chemical parameters also varied significantly, especially in the quantities of Tl, As, Cr, Zn, Fe and Mn, which were higher in rural households. Because knowledge about the properties of household waste, as well as its physicochemical characteristics, is very important not only for future waste management, but also for the prediction of the behaviour and influence of the waste on the environment as the country continues to streamline its legislation to the European Unions solid waste mandates, the results of these studies were employed by the Czech Ministry of Environment to optimise the national waste management strategy.

  20. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,019 1,023 1,029 2010's 1,010 1,010 1,019 1,015 1,033