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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Tri State Electric Membership Corporation Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformation

2

Tri-State Electric Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,Corp

3

Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,CorpJump to:

4

Tri-State Electric Member Corp (North Carolina) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) JumpCorp (North Carolina) Jump

5

Testing tri-state and pass transistor circuit structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tri-state structures are used to implement multiplexers and buses because these structures are faster than AND/OR logic structures. But testing of tri-state structures has some issues associated with it. A stuck open control line of a tri-state gate...

Parikh, Shaishav Shailesh

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Florida) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-County

7

Tri-County Electric Coop Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-County Electric

8

Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc (Oklahoma) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-CountyOklahoma)

9

Tri-County Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:Tri-CountyOklahoma)Inc

10

Tri-County Electric Cooperative- Energy Efficient Water Heater Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tri-County Electric Cooperative offers a $75 rebate on the purchase of energy-efficient electric water heaters. The rebate is valid for new or replacement units which have an Energy Factor Rating...

11

Eclipse mapping of RW Tri in the low luminosity state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyzed the eclipse light curve of the nova-like star RW Tri in its low luminosity state. During approximately 150 days, RW Tri was about one magnitude fainter than in its usual state. Our eclipse map shows that the brightness temperature in the disc ranges from 19000 K near the white dwarf to 8700 at the disc edge. For the inner parts of accretion disc, the radial temperature distribution is flatter than that predicted from the steady state models, and for the outer parts, it is close to the R^(-3/4) law. Fitting of the temperature distribution with one for the steady state disc model gives a mean accretion rate of (3.85+-0.19) 10^{-9} M year^(-1). The hotspot in the disc is placed at a distance of 0.17a from the white dwarf, where a is the orbital separation.

A. V. Halevin; A. A. Henden

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

12

TRI-M]AL ELECTRIC FIELD I'MASIJRN$NTS FOR DETERMII.IINGDEEP OCEANWATERMOTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRI-M]AL ELECTRIC FIELD I'MASIJRN$NTS FOR DETERMII.IINGDEEP OCEANWATERMOTIONS: TECHNIQUESAND A PREL OF THE by G e o r g e H . S u t t o n #12;I \\ t ABSTRACT Deep ocean electric field neasureEents provide information on oceanic water uotions and on the electrical conductivity sEructure of the earthrs crust

Luther, Douglas S.

13

TRI State Motor Transit to Resume Shipping Waste to WIPP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign Object DamageSystemsU.S.EnergyTri-State Motor Transit

14

Tri-County Electric Coop (Michigan) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to:

15

Washington State Electric Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

California at Davis, University of

16

Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tri-County High School Exhibition Call for Entries Wayne State University James Pearson Duffy for its Tri-County High School Exhibition. The exhibition dates are March 2 ­ March 23, 2012 counties. ABOUT THE GALLERY The Art Department Gallery hosts annual undergraduate exhibitions, provides

Berdichevsky, Victor

17

Tri State Generation and Transmission Association Inc | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton, NJ)Trexa

18

Tri-City Herald OpEd: Electric Vehicles are a smart choice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Why are so many of us at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a national thought leader in power industry issues located right here in the Tri-Cities, so bullish on the future of EVs? And why do we think it's so important that this country, especially THIS part of the country, be leaders in the adoption of EVs? Is it that we all just happen to like driving polluting golf carts? The answer is that, like most everyone else, most of us here at PNNL drive to work every day, and like most people, we care about the cost of gasoline and the impact that burning imported oil has on the environment and on our foreign policy. The reality is that electric vehicles are simply more efficient, pollute much less, use locally-generated energy, and cost MUCH less to drive.

Christensen, Peter C.; Haas, Anne M.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

19

Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light

20

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(megawatts) 32,547 9 Electric utilities 23,615 7 Independent power producers & combined heat and power 8,933 11 Net generation (megawatthours) 152,878,688 6 Electric utilities...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

16,355 24 Electric Utilities 13,131 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,225 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,005,678 24 Electric Utilities...

22

Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Bosnia-Herzegovina: Trying to Build a Federal State on Paradoxes Jens Woelk Introduction The basis for federalism in Bosnia-Herzegovina1 is rather peculiar due to the unique complexity. This was to be accomplished by physical reconstruction as well as by preserving Bosnia and Herzegovina as one country

Wintner, Shuly

23

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012Louisiana Electricity

24

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity ProfileMichigan Electricity Profile

25

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity ProfileMichigan Electricity

26

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity ProfileMichiganMissouri Electricity

27

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire Electricity Profile 2012

28

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire Electricity Profile

29

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire Electricity ProfileMexico

30

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire Electricity

31

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire ElectricityCarolina

32

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire ElectricityCarolinaDakota

33

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshireOklahoma Electricity

34

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshireOklahoma ElectricityOregon

35

State Renewable Electricity Profiles  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of current and recent historical data for the renewable electric power industry. The data focuses on net summer capacity and net generation for each type of renewable generator, as well as fossil-fired and nuclear power plant types, for the period 2006 through 2010.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity

37

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizesAnalysisPipelinestheArizona Electricity

38

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary

39

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012

40

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012Florida

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1.

42

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1.Hawaii

43

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1.HawaiiIdaho

44

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 Table

45

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 TableIndiana

46

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 TableIndianaIowa

47

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012 TableIndianaIowaKansas

48

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012

49

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012Louisiana

50

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile 2012LouisianaMaryland

51

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity Profile

52

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity ProfileMichigan

53

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity ProfileMichiganMissouri

54

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware Electricity ProfileMichiganMissouriNebraska

55

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshire

56

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshireOklahoma

57

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshireOklahomaRhode Island

58

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshireOklahomaRhode

59

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware ElectricityHampshireOklahomaRhodeDakota

60

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1.

62

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1.Utah

63

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012 Table

64

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012 TableVirginia

65

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012

66

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012West Virginia

67

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012West

68

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelawareTexas Electricity Profile 2012WestWyoming

69

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328 2,683Diesel pricesArkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table

70

State electricity profiles, March 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the role electricity plays in the Nation`s economic and social well-being, interested parties have been following the electric power industry`s transition by keeping abreast of the restructuring and deregulation events that are taking place almost daily. Much of the attention centers around the States and how they are restructuring the business of electricity supply within their respective jurisdictions. This report is designed to profile each State and the District of Columbia regarding not only their current restructuring activities, but also their electricity generation and concomitant statistics from 1986 through 1996. Included are data on a number of subject areas including generating capability, generation, revenues, fuel use, capacity factor for nuclear plants, retail sales, and pollutant emissions. Although the Energy Information Administration (EIA) publishes this type of information, there is a lack of a uniform overview for each individual State. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. In addition to basic statistics in tables and graphs, a textual section is provided for each State, discussing some of the points relative to electricity production that are noteworthy in, or unique to, that particular State. Also, each State is ranked according to the place it holds, as compared to the rest of the states, in various relevant areas, such as its average price of electricity per kilowatthour, its population, and its emissions of certain atmospheric pollutants. The final chapter covers the Nation as a whole. 451 figs., 520 tabs.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

TRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION ASSOCIATION, INC. HEADQUARTERS: P.O  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClient updateTRI-STATE GENERATION AND TRANSMISSION

72

Status of State Electric Industry Restructuring Activity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents an overview of the status of electric industry restructuring in each state. Restructuring means that a monopoly system of electric utilities has been replaced with competing sellers.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume I. Eastern United States: TRY data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Renewable Electricity Futures for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper highlights the key results from the Renewable Electricity (RE) Futures Study. It is a detailed consideration of renewable electricity in the United States. The paper focuses on technical issues related to the operability of the U. S. electricity grid and provides initial answers to important questions about the integration of high penetrations of renewable electricity technologies from a national perspective. The results indicate that the future U. S. electricity system that is largely powered by renewable sources is possible and the further work is warranted to investigate this clean generation pathway. The central conclusion of the analysis is that renewable electricity generation from technologies that are commercially available today, in combination with a more flexible electric system, is more than adequate to supply 80% of the total U. S. electricity generation in 2050 while meeting electricity demand on an hourly basis in every region of the United States.

Mai, Trieu; Hand, Maureen; Baldwin, Sam F.; Wiser , Ryan; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, Paul; Arent, Doug; Porro, Gian; Sandor, Debra; Hostick, Donna J.; Milligan, Michael; DeMeo, Ed; Bazilian, Morgan

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

Schmalensee, Richard

77

Try This  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Activities Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Try This Exercise your science muscles Look around you;...

78

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Electricity markets in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

Bailey, E.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Tri-Party Agreement U.S. Department of Energy Washington State Department of Ecology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen andTrent Tuckerof 17 Tri-Party

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electric trade in the United States 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1994, the wholesale trade market totaled 1.9 trillion kilowatthours, about 66% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1994 (ELECTRA), is the fifth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1994.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy Storage Activities in the United States Electricity Grid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Activities in the United States Electricity Grid Electricity Advisory Committee Energy Storage Technologies Subcommittee Members Ralph Masiello, Subcommittee Chair Senior...

83

Assistance to States on Electric Industry Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to educate state policymakers through a coordinated approach involving state legislatures, regulators, energy officials, and governors staffs. NCSLs activities in this project focus on educating state legislators. Major components of this proposal include technical assistance to state legislatures, briefing papers, coordination with the National Council on Electricity Policy, information assistance, coordination and outreach, meetings, and a set of transmission-related activities.

Glen Andersen

2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

84

Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Center Recovery Act Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity Policies Recovery Act: State Assistance for Recovery Act Related Electricity...

85

Electric trade in the United States, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wholesale trade in electricity plays an important role for the US electric utility industry. Wholesale, or bulk power, transactions allow electric utilities to reduce power costs, increase power supply options, and improve reliability. In 1996, the wholesale trade market totaled 2.3 trillion kilowatthours, over 73% of total sales to ultimate consumers. This publication, Electric Trade in the United States 1996 (ELECTRA), is the sixth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1996. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. 1 fig., 43 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,CorpJump to:T

87

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Department Head #12;New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering Agenda · Welcome.ece.nmsu.edu/~pdeleon/TA/ECE_TA_orientation.pdf #12;New Mexico State University Klipsch School of Electrical Engineering Course Assignments Hussein Al

Johnson, Eric E.

89

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In...

90

United States of America Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, appointed by the Secretary of Energy; and (5) an employee of the Rural Utilities Service, appointedi United States of America Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force and the Federal Energy and Retail Markets for Electric Energy Docket No. AD05

Tesfatsion, Leigh

91

Renewable Electricity Futures: Exploration of Up to 80% Renewable Electricity Penetration in the United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M.; DeMeo, E.; Hostick, D.; Mai, T.; Schlosser, C. A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Electricity privatization : should South Korea privatize its state-owned electric utility?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state-owned electric utility, Korea Electricity Power Cooperation (KEPCO), privatization has been a key word in South Korea since 1997, when the government received $55 billion from the International Monetary Fund in ...

Lim, Sungmin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Regional Per Capita Solar Electric Footprint for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we quantify the state-by-state per-capita 'solar electric footprint' for the United States. We use state-level data on population, electricity consumption, economic activity and solar insolation, along with solar photovoltaic (PV) array packing density data to develop a range of estimates of the solar electric footprint. We find that the solar electric footprint, defined as the land area required to supply all end-use electricity from solar photovoltaics, is about 181 m2 per person in the United States. Two key factors that influence the magnitude of the state-level solar electric footprint include how industrial energy is allocated (based on location of use vs. where goods are consumed) and the assumed distribution of PV configurations (flat rooftop vs. fixed tilt vs. tracking). The solar electric footprint is about 0.6% of the total land area of the United States with state-level estimates ranging from less than 0.1% for Wyoming to about 9% for New Jersey. We also compare the solar electric footprint to a number of other land uses. For example, we find that the solar electric footprint is equal to less than 2% of the land dedicated to cropland and grazing in the United States.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Edison Electric Institute State Generation and Transmission Siting DirectoryPermittingRegulatory...

95

Energy Department Names Two Colorado-based Electric Cooperatives...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

project innovation, and benefits to customers. Since 1998, Tri-State has integrated wind energy into the electricity it supplies to its 44 member distribution cooperatives,...

96

Electric trade in the United States 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication, Electric Trade in the US 1992 (ELECTRA), is the fourth in a series of reports on wholesale power transactions prepared by the Electric Data Systems Branch, Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA). The electric trade data are published biennially. The first report presented 1986 data, and this report provides information on the electric power industry during 1992. The electric trade data collected and presented in this report furnish important information on the wholesale structure found within the US electric power industry. The patterns of interutility trade in the report support analyses of wholesale power transactions and provide input for a broader understanding of bulk power market issues that define the emerging national electric energy policies. The report includes information on the quantity of power purchased, sold, exchanged, and wheeled; the geographical locations of transactions and ownership classes involved; and the revenues and costs. Information on the physical transmission system are being included for the first time in this publication. Transmission data covering investor-owned electric utilities were shifted from the Financial Statistics of Selected Investor-Owned Electric Utilities to the ELECTRA publication. Some of the prominent features of this year`s report include information and data not published before on transmission lines for publicly owned utilities and transmission lines added during 1992 by investor-owned electric utilities.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

State Electric Efficiency Regulatory Frameworks (July 2012 IEE Report)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report summarizes ongoing and recent policy developments that support utility investments in energy efficiency, including program cost recovery, fixed cost recovery, and performance incentives for electric utilities on a state-by-state basis.

98

Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen EnergyStation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department, the Fountain Valley energy station is the world's first tri-generation hydrogen energy and electrical power station to provide transportation fuel to the public...

99

Smart Meter Deployment Optimization for Efficient Electrical Appliance State Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Meter Deployment Optimization for Efficient Electrical Appliance State Monitoring Xiaohong approaches generally require large-scale smart sensor/meter networks, and thus suffer from the high to optimize the smart meter deployments to track the on/off states of the massive electrical appliances

Wang, Yongcai

100

Community Readiness Project Helps State Get Ready for Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Oregon is planning for the large-scale deployment of hybrid and all-electric vehicles to reach the state's goal of 30,000 plug-in vehicles by 2015.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of MidAmerican Energy Company. Light-emitting diode and induction types of solid state lighting (SSL) qualify under this program....

102

Johns, R. H., D. W. Burgess, C. A. Doswell III, M. S. Gilmore, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: The 1925 Tri-State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 133.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mi) east-northeast of the apparent end of the Tri- State tornado damage path in Pike County, IN: The 1925 Tri- State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 1­33. 1 The 1925 Tri-State Tornado Damage Path and Associated Storm System ROBERT H. JOHNS

Doswell III, Charles A.

103

Electric Grid State Estimators for Distribution Systems with Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46556 Emails: {jhuang6,vgupta2,huang}@nd.edu Abstract--In the development of smart grid, state] into the distribution systems of the power grid. Such integration complicates the operation of distribution systemsElectric Grid State Estimators for Distribution Systems with Microgrids Jing Huang, Vijay Gupta

Gupta, Vijay

104

Electric Industry Restructuring in Five States: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric industry in the United States is undergoing fundamental changes; it is transitioning from regulated monopolies to competitive markets offering customer choice. In this process, the states have been in the forefront of considering the changes in the industry structure and regulation. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) spearheaded a project on electric restructuring in the United States. This is the final report prepared under the project. The purpose of the report is to describe and compare the overall restructuring processes that took place in five states through June 30, 1996. The five states are California, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, and Wisconsin. These are the first major states to consider restructuring or retail wheeling.

Fang, J. M.

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), United States and Territories, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

107

Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

108

Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP): Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Escalante Tri-State - Prewitt, New Mexico (Data)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory collaborates with the solar industry to establish high quality solar and meteorological measurements. This Solar Resource and Meteorological Assessment Project (SOLRMAP) provides high quality measurements to support deployment of power projects in the United States. The no-funds-exchanged collaboration brings NREL solar resource assessment expertise together with industry needs for measurements. The end result is high quality data sets to support the financing, design, and monitoring of large scale solar power projects for industry in addition to research-quality data for NREL model development. NREL provides consultation for instrumentation and station deployment, along with instrument calibrations, data acquisition, quality assessment, data distribution, and summary reports. Industry participants provide equipment, infrastructure, and station maintenance.

Wilcox, S.; Andreas, A.

2012-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electrical detection of 31P spin quantum states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, a variety of solid-state qubits has been realized, including quantum dots, superconducting tunnel junctions and point defects. Due to its potential compatibility with existing microelectronics, the proposal by Kane based on phosphorus donors in Si has also been pursued intensively. A key issue of this concept is the readout of the P quantum state. While electrical measurements of magnetic resonance have been performed on single spins, the statistical nature of these experiments based on random telegraph noise measurements has impeded the readout of single spin states. In this letter, we demonstrate the measurement of the spin state of P donor electrons in silicon and the observation of Rabi flops by purely electric means, accomplished by coherent manipulation of spin-dependent charge carrier recombination between the P donor and paramagnetic localized states at the Si/SiO2 interface via pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance. The electron spin information is shown to be coupled through the hyperfine interaction with the P nucleus, which demonstrates the feasibility of a recombination-based readout of nuclear spins.

A. R. Stegner; C. Boehme; H. Huebl; M. Stutzmann; K. Lips; M. S. Brandt

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, and advanced batteries and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation of electric vehicles. These efforts have included on-board data acquisition of electric vehicle operations and baseline performance testing. The baseline performance tests focus on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 14 electric vehicles will also be baseline performance tested. The baseline performance testing has documented annual improvements in performance. This and additional information is made available to the public via the internet homepage (http://ev.inel.gov). The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its new qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Application of Phoenix, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company, at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Francfort, J.E. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

ANL/ESD/10-9 Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANL/ESD/10-9 Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States: 2009 Status and Issues Energy Laboratory, or UChicago Argonne, LLC. #12;ANL/ESD/10-9 Highway Vehicle Electric Drive in the United States .............................................................................................................. 1 2 STATE OF ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY .......................................... 4 2

Kemner, Ken

114

THE ADOPTION OF STATE ELECTRICITY REGULATION: THE ROLE OF INTEREST GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ADOPTION OF STATE ELECTRICITY REGULATION: THE ROLE OF INTEREST GROUPS? Christopher R. Knittelw This paper examines the adoption of state electricity regulation around the beginning of the 20th century. I residential electricity penetration rates. These results suggest that state regulation responded to regulatory

Rothman, Daniel

115

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

El Paso Electric Company, et al., 100 FERC 61,188 (2002). UNITED STATES OF AMERICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 El Paso Electric Company, et al., 100 FERC ¶ 61,188 (2002). 2 Id. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; William L. Massey, and Nora Mead Brownell. El Paso Electric Company, Enron Power Docket No. EL02 between El Paso Electric Company (El Paso Electric), the California Attorney General (Attorney General

Laughlin, Robert B.

117

Performance Characteristics of the First, State-of-the-art Electric Vehicle Implemented in Chile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance Characteristics of the First, State-of-the-art Electric Vehicle Implemented in Chile@ing.puc.cl *University of Concepcin Abstract The first, state-of-the-art electric vehicle implemented in Chile to transform a conventional ICE truck to an electric vehicle. The vehicle used for this transformation

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Catlica de Chile)

118

*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center in 2001 to simultaneously generate electricity, hydrogen, and heat. It was developed into the first prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. The first and fuel cell electric vehicles), there are still emissions associated with the upstream processes

Mease, Kenneth D.

119

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Cirkva, Vladimir; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

Cirkva, Vladimir

120

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--Methane Rearrangement #12;Církva, Vladimír; Zuraw, Michael J.; Zimmerman, Howard E.* Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 #12;INTRODUCTION The tri--methane of a cyclopentene 5a, but only in crystalline medium. However, in the solution photochemistry of tri--methane system

Cirkva, Vladimir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY in the United States is facing a disquieting shortage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, wholesale and retail electricity marketing, reactive power management, and other ancillary support systemsT HE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY in the United States is facing a disquieting shortage of trained lower than those of vir- tually all other electrical engineers. Student enroll- ments have steadily

122

ECE 331 Electromechanical Energy Conversion Catalog Description: Energy conversion principles for electric motors. Steady-state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction to drives and power electronics in control of electric machines, including switch-mode PWM (ABET Outcomes A, C, E, j, k) Learning Resources: Electric Machines and Drives: A First Course, Ned for electric motors. Steady-state characteristics and analysis of induction, synchronous and direct current

123

State-of-Health Aware Optimal Control of Plug-in Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), which utilize electric motors for propulsion, differ from fossil fuel powered vehiclesState-of-Health Aware Optimal Control of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Yanzhi Wang, Siyu Yue, USA {yanzhiwa, siyuyue, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are key new energy

Pedram, Massoud

124

Highway vehicle electric drive in the United States : 2009 status and issues.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of electric drive technology in the United States as of early 2010 is documented. Rapidly evolving electric drive technologies discussed include hybrid electric vehicles, multiple types of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles. Recent trends for hybrids are quantified. Various plug-in vehicles entering the market in the near term are examined. The technical and economic requirements for electric drive to more broadly succeed in a wider range of highway vehicle applications are described, and implications for the most promising new markets are provided. Federal and selected state government policy measures promoting and preparing for electric drive are discussed. Taking these into account, judgment on areas where increased Clean Cities funds might be most productively focused over the next five years are provided. In closing, the request by Clean Cities for opinion on the broad range of research needs providing near-term support to electric drive is fulfilled.

Santini, D. J.; Energy Systems

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electric vehicle fleet operations in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is actively supporting the development and commercialization of advanced electric vehicles, batteries, and propulsion systems. As part of this effort, the DOE Field Operations Program is performing commercial validation testing of electric vehicles and supporting the development of an electric vehicle infrastructure. These efforts include the evaluation of electric vehicles in baseline performance, accelerated reliability, and fleet operations testing. The baseline performance testing focuses on parameters such as range, acceleration, and battery charging. This testing, performed in conjunction with EV America, has included the baseline performance testing of 16 electric vehicle models from 1994 through 1997. During 1997, the Chevrolet S10 and Ford Ranger electric vehicles were tested. During 1998, several additional electric vehicles from original equipment manufacturers will also be baseline performance tested. This and additional information is made available to the public via the Program`s web page (http://ev.inel.gov/sop). In conjunction with industry and other groups, the Program also supports the Infrastructure Working Council in its development of electric vehicle communications, charging, health and safety, and power quality standards. The Field Operations Program continues to support the development of electric vehicles and infrastructure in conjunction with its qualified vehicle test partners: Electric Transportation Applications, and Southern California Edison. The Field Operations Program is managed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

Francfort, J.E. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; O`Hara, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Commonwealth Edison JOSEPH KELLIHER NextEra Energy, Inc. PARTICIPANTS (CONT'D): SUSAN KELLY American Public Power Association BARRY LAWSON National Rural Electric Cooperative...

127

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reform in the U.S. Electricity Sector. Journal of EconomicCrises in the Electricity Sector: The Case of Maharashtra.of the MH state electricity sector that create unique

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Tri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on an earlier draft. #12;Introduction The Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (TriTri-Met's Experience With Automatic Passenger Counter and Automatic Vehicle Location Systems James State University Portland, OR 97207 This report is benefited from interviews of Tri-Met staff involved

Bertini, Robert L.

129

IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Systems & controls Power systems security Real-time control of power & power electronic systems Aliprantis processing Cooperative controls & synchronization of multi-agent systems, including formation flying UAVs & energy systems Systems & controls Electric machines & power systems Power electronics & controls

Lin, Zhiqun

130

Optimal State Electric Supply in Texas -- Overview and Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1988, the results of the PUCT Bulk Power Transmission Study indicated a range of potential cost savings which could result from greater coordination of power transfers among the utilities in Texas which comprise the Electric Reliability Council...

Moore, B.

131

The Future of Electric Vehicles and Arizona State University...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State University | Photo Credit Arizona State University Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? EV batteries will...

132

Tri-Cities Index of Innovation and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2001 and 2004, the Economic Development Office of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory published companion reports to the Washington Technology Center Index studies that provided additional information on the Tri-Cities (Kennewick-Richland-Pasco) area of the state, its technology businesses, and important advantages that the Tri-Cities have as places to live and do business. These reports also compared the Tri-Cities area to other technology-based metropolitan areas in the Pacific Northwest and nation along critical dimensions known to be important to technology firms. This report updates the material in these earlier reports, and highlights a growing Tri-Cities metropolitan area.

Fowler, Richard A.; Scott, Michael J.; Butner, Ryan S.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

133

Influence of hydrogen on the electronic states of olivine: Implications for electrical conductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of hydrogen on the electronic states of olivine: Implications for electrical conductivity; accepted 29 February 2012; published 28 March 2012. [1] The influence of hydrogen on the electronic states of electrons. We find that the dissolution of hydrogen modifies the electronic states when hydrogen

134

The State of the Art of Electric, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as wind and solar energy and from nuclear energy. Fuel cell vehicles (FCV) use hydrogen as fuel to produceINVITED P A P E R The State of the Art of Electric, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles, and constraints on energy resources, the electric, hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles have attracted more and more

Leung, Ka-Cheong

135

Electricity transmission investment in the United States : an investigation of adequacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a prevailing sentiment that the United States is underinvested in its electric transmission infrastructure. The standard claim is that poor regulation has caused insufficient levels of capital to be devoted to the ...

Kwok, Peter Jordan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

PV Fact Sheets Argument B1Some people state that "The external costs of PV electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PV Fact Sheets Argument B1Some people state that "The external costs of PV electricity is much and the low one to thin-film cadmium telluride PV systems. Fossil fuel power plants PV displaces. 5.8 External

138

State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (Update) (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fact #790: July 29, 2013 States Beginning to Tax Electric Vehicles...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the pump from the sale of motor fuels. Because electric vehicles (EVs) do not refuel at pumps that collect state and Federal highway taxes, they do not contribute to the upkeep of...

140

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States : a general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) could significantly contribute to reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from personal vehicle transportation in the United States over the next century, depending on the ...

Karplus, Valerie Jean

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volumetric price, TOU time of use tariff: volumetric priceService, Time of Use Rates parent tariff Jan 03 Customertime of use United States Environmental Protection Agency xv The Effects of Electricity Tariff

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center August 2009 Mechanical and Electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section 16400 ­ Electric Service Section 16430 ­ Panelboards Section 16440 ­ Dry Type Transformers Section 16445 ­ Liquid Filled Transformers Section 16500 ­ Lighting #12;Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical

Yener, Aylin

143

Generation and control of resonance states in crossed magnetic and electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-dimensional electron system interacting with an impurity and placed in crossed magnetic and electric fields is under investigation. Since it is assumed that an impurity center interacts as an attractive $\\delta$-like potential a renormalization procedure for the retarded Green's function has to be carried out. For the vanishing electric field we obtain a close analytical expression for the Green's function and we find one bound state localized between Landau levels. It is also shown by numerical investigations that switching on the electric field new long-living resonance states localized in the vicinity of Landau levels can be generated.

Katarzyna Krajewska; Jerzy Z. Kaminski

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

144

Notes for Presentations on Electricity for 3rd Grade The kits provided by the state for electricity do not, at all, explain anything about the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

does wall­plug electricity come from? Use coil moving in magnet and hand­cranked generators (pass' styrofoam popcorn, styrofoam footstool; hand­cranked electric generators; mas­ sive coil­in­magnet generatorNotes for Presentations on Electricity for 3rd Grade Ray Frey The kits provided by the state

Frey, Raymond E.

145

Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States 1013776 #12;#12;ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com www.epri.com Major Long Haul Truck Idling Generators Haul Truck Idling Generators in Key States. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA: 2008. 1013776. #12;#12;v PRODUCT

146

Electric field control of spin-resolved edge states in graphene quantum nanorings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric-field effect on the electronic and magnetic properties of triangular and hexagonal graphene quantum rings with zigzag edge termination is investigated by means of the single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian and the mean-field Hubbard model. It is shown how the electron and spin states in the nanoring structures can be manipulated by applying an electric field. We find different spin-depolarization behaviors with variation of electric field strength due to the dependence of spin densities on the shapes and edges of this kind of nanorings. In the case of triangular quantum rings, the magnetization on the inner and outer edges can be selectively tuned and the spin states depolarize gradually as the field strength is increased, while in the case of hexagonal nanorings, the transverse electric field reduces the magnetic moments on both inner and outer edges symmetrically and rapidly.

Farghadan, R., E-mail: rfarghadan@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saffarzadeh, A. [Department of Physics, Payame Noor University, P.O. Box 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

147

A study of the requirements for the electrical engineering laboratories at Lamar State College of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entering into a new four year technical school whioh has only the engineering build1ng available. An eleotrical engineering currioulum must be decided upon and the equipment selected to oorrelate the laboratory oourses with the theory. Wherever.... courses is as / follows& Electric and Magnetio Circuits, (3-3) Credit 4 D1rect ourrent electric and magnetic cirouits under steady state and transient ocnditions. 8. Direot Current Machinery, (3-3) Credit 4 A study of the theory and application...

Holtkamp, William Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Tri State Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light &TresGlobal

149

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

150

The regulatory divide: Federal and state jurisdiction in a restructured electricity industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In any restructuring, close attention should be paid to how transactions are characterized. The approach adopted in California tends to minimize jurisdictional complications and preserve state jurisdiction over local distribution, while a retail wheeling approach may raise preemption and Commerce Clause concerns. In the United States, the wholesale electricity market and the interstate transmission of electricity have been subject to exclusive federal jurisdiction, while the retail sale and local distribution of electricity have been subject to the jurisdiction of the separate states. Until recently, the jurisdictional dividing line has been relatively clear. Indeed, Congress intended to establish a {open_quotes}bright line{close_quotes} between state and federal jurisdiction. This bright line, however, is becoming blurred by proposals to allow retail customers direct access to competitive generation markets. Regulation of transactions relating to the transmission and sale of electricity at wholesale is within the exclusive jurisdiction of the federal government. Thus, historically, {open_quotes}transmission{close_quotes} has coincided precisely with wholesale transactions, while {open_quotes}local distribution{close_quotes} has coincided precisely with retail transactions. Since 1978, Congress and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have promulgated statutes and regulations to enhance the competitiveness of the wholesale generation market. As a consequence, there are many more non-utility entities competing as sellers of wholesale electricity. Now the push is on at the state level to introduce retail competition in the generation supply side of the electricity market. Introduction of retail competition has the potential to upset, if not extinguish, the traditional bright line between federal and state jurisdiction.

Jubien, S.M.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geographic Variation in Potential of Rooftop Residential Photovoltaic Electric Power Production in the United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This paper describes a geographic evaluation of Zero Energy Home (ZEH) potential, specifically an assessment of residential roof-top solar electric photovoltaic (PV) performance around the United States and how energy produced would match up with very-efficient and super-efficient home designs. We performed annual simulations for 236 TMY2 data locations throughout the United States on two highly-efficient one-story 3-bedroom homes with a generic grid-tied solar electric 2kW PV system. These annual simulations show how potential annual solar electric power generation (kWh) and potential energy savings from PV power vary geographically around the U.S. giving the user in a specific region an indication of their expected PV system performance.

153

Electric Field Modulation of the Membrane Potential in Solid-State Ion Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

channel. KEYWORDS: Nanochannel, membrane potential, electrofluidic gating, ion transport, salinityElectric Field Modulation of the Membrane Potential in Solid-State Ion Channels Weihua Guan a rapid flow of ions across the cell membrane. Normal physiological functions, such as generating action

Reed, Mark

154

The Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and both are regulated under the U.S. Clean Air Act. While emissions from fossil fuel combustion suggests that air quality co-benefits associated with CO2 emission reductions could be significantThe Effects of Climate and Electricity Emissions on Air Quality in the United States by Steven D

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

155

False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the measurements of meters at physically protected locations such as substations, such attacks can introduce13 False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids YAO LIU and PENG also defeat malicious measurements injected by attackers. In this article, we expose an unknown

Reiter, Michael

156

False Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the measurements of meters at physically protected locations such as substations, such attacks can introduceFalse Data Injection Attacks against State Estimation in Electric Power Grids Yao Liu and Peng Ning also defeat malicious measurements injected by attackers. In this paper, we expose an unknown

Ning, Peng

157

Using Transient Electrical Measurements for Real-Time Monitoring of Battery State-of-Charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system. I. INTRODUCTION Future energy-storage systems are likely to use lithium- ion batteries because regulate efficiency and power availability in battery-based systems, it is important to have a robust realUsing Transient Electrical Measurements for Real-Time Monitoring of Battery State

Nasipuri, Asis

158

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY...

159

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States and Japan: A general equilibrium analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prospects for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles in the United States and Japan: A general-in hybrid electric vehicles Environmental policy Emissions a b s t r a c t The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) may offer a potential near term, low-carbon alternative to today's gasoline- and diesel-powered

160

Clean Energy State Program Guide: Mainstreaming Solar Electricity Strategies for States to Build Local Markets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A PV mapping tool visually represents a specific site and calculates PV system size and projected electricity production. This report identifies the commercially available solar mapping tools and thoroughly summarizes the source data type and resolution, the visualization software program being used, user inputs, calculation methodology and algorithms, map outputs, and development costs for each map.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

United States-Mexico electricity transfers: Of alien electrons and the migration of undocumented environmental burdens  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article intends to set forth the necessity for reform in the United States policy and procedures regarding approval of power transfers between the United States and Mexico. In order to do this, the article will review the history of electrical power transfers between the United States and Mexico (Part II), analyze recent regulatory changes in the United States and Mexico which may result in increased power exports to Mexico (Part III), evaluate the extent to which the present permit and authorization system in the United States considers the increased environmental burden of such power transfers (Part IV), and, where appropriate, propose some procedural and policy reforms that could take into account the environmental burdens generated by the production of power destined for transfer across the United States-Mexico border (Part V).

Gandara, A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several states are pursuing policies to foster renewable energy as part of efforts to restructure state electric power markets. The primary policies that states are pursuing for renewables are system benefits charges (SBCs) and renewable portfolio standards (RPSs). However, the eligibility of biomass under state RPS and SBC policies is in question in some states. Eligibility restrictions may make it difficult for biomass power companies to access these policies. Moreover, legislative language governing the eligibility of biomass power is sometimes vague and difficult to interpret. This paper provides an overview of state RPS and SBC policies and focuses on the eligibility of biomass power. For this paper, the authors define biomass power as using wood and agricultural residues and landfill methane, but not waste-to-energy, to produce energy.

Porter, K.; Wiser, R.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

None

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several states have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the states and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected states include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empricial Analysis of Indian States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R Abstract The Economic Effects of Electricity Deregulation: An Empirical Analysis of Indian States EPRG Working Paper 1001 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 1005 Anupama Sen... and Tooraj Jamasb As developing countries seek to improve their economic prospects, electricity reform has been widely viewed as a central part of this effort. While the focus of most research to date has been at economy or utility level; there has...

Sen, A; Jamasb, Tooraj

166

Implications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO and life cycle GHG emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the choice of coal over natural gas. External incentives such as low natural gas prices compared to coalImplications of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO 2 , NO X of changing natural gas prices in the United States electricity sector for SO2, NOX and life cycle GHG

Jaramillo, Paulina

167

Proceedings: Electric dehumidification: State-of-the-art humidity control for supermarkets seminar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 9--10 1990, EPRI sponsored a conference in New Orleans, Louisiana on Electric Dehumidification: State of the Art Humidity Control for Supermarkets. The conference was attended by 124 electric utility, manufacturer, supermarket industry and consultant representatives. Attendees heard 17 speakers address efficient electric technologies for controlling relative humidity, and the importance of humidity control in the supermarket environment. Speakers addressed efficient electric technologies as well as gas desiccant systems. The management of energy use in supermarkets is a complex task. Energy costs are a major part of the supermarket operating budget, and the supermarket business is one where small differences in operating costs can make the difference between profit and loss. Energy use is dominated by refrigeration and HVAC, and the control of energy costs is dependent on the successful management of the interaction between these two systems. Humidity control in supermarkets is critical because of the presence of refrigerated display cases. Excess humidity causes display case fixture sweating and refrigeration coil and product frosting, requires frequent defrosting, and increased energy use for antisweat heaters and refrigeration. The conventional approach to dehumidification in an all-electric system is overcooling to condense moisture and reheat to bring the air to a comfortable temperature. This approach, while effective in less demanding environments, results in high electric energy costs for the humidity control necessary in supermarkets. Speakers in the introductory session of the conference explained the importance of electric energy for the supermarket; discussed modern refrigeration systems; and set the stage for more detailed discussion of specific dehumidification systems.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources: Accommodating Distributed Resources in Wholesale Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed resources can provide cost-effective reliability and energy services - in many cases, obviating the need for more expensive investments in wires and central station electricity generating facilities. Given the unique features of distributed resources, the challenge facing policymakers today is how to restructure wholesale markets for electricity and related services so as to reveal the full value that distributed resources can provide to the electric power system (utility grid). This report looks at the functions that distributed resources can perform and examines the barriers to them. It then identifies a series of policy and operational approaches to promoting DR in wholesale markets. This report is one in the State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources series developed under contract to NREL (see Annual Technical Status Report of the Regulatory Assistance Project: September 2000-September 2001, NREL/SR-560-32733). Other titles in this series are: (1) Distributed Resource Distribution Credit Pilot Programs - Revealing the Value to Consumers and Vendors, NREL/SR-560-32499; (2) Distributed Resources and Electric System Reliability, NREL/SR-560-32498; (3) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation, NREL/SR-560-32500; (4) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation Appendices, NREL/SR-560-32501

Weston, F.; Harrington, C.; Moskovitz, D.; Shirley, W.; Cowart, R.; Sedano, R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169
170

Economic Assessment of Electric-Drive Vehicle Operation in California and the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLE OPERATION INECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLE OPERATION INconsumers to switch to electric-drive vehicles, including a

Lidicker, Jeffrey R.; Lipman, Timothy E.; Shaheen, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

All-electric detection of the polarization state of terahertz laser radiation S. D. Ganichev,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All-electric detection of the polarization state of terahertz laser radiation S. D. Ganichev,1,a W online 6 June 2008 Two types of room-temperature detectors of terahertz laser radiation have been developed which allow, in an all-electric manner, the determination of the plane of polarization of linearly

Ganichev, Sergey

172

Spin counting in electrically detected magnetic resonance via low-field defect state mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work herein describes a method that allows one to measure paramagnetic defect densities in semiconductor and insulator based devices with electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR). The method is based upon the mixing of defect states which results from the dipolar coupling of paramagnetic sites at low magnetic fields. We demonstrate the measurement method with spin dependent tunneling in thin film dielectrics; however, the method should be equally applicable to paramagnetic defect density measurements in semiconductors via the more commonly utilized EDMR technique called spin dependent recombination.

Cochrane, Corey J.; Lenahan, Patrick M. [The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Tri-County Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to: navigation,Tri-County

174

Dynamic Interactions in the Western United States Electricity Spot Markets Christine A. Jerko  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be the dominant market in the long run in both seasons. Key words: electricity prices, directed graphs, vector of the electricity industry and its impact on electricity prices is a subject of considerable interest, especially given the recent electricity price spikes occurring in California and elsewhere. Weron (2000) notes

175

Estimated Value of Service Reliability for Electric Utility Customers in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration, Duke Energy, Mid America Power, Pacific Gas and Electric Company, Puget Sound Energy, Salt River

176

Full electrical control of Charge and Spin conductance through Interferometry of Edge States in Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate electron interferometry of edge states in Topological Insulators. We show that, when inter-boundary coupling is induced at two quantum point contacts of a four terminal setup, both Fabry-P\\'erot-like and Aharonov-Bohm-like loop processes arise. These underlying interference effects lead to a full electrically controllable system, where the magnitude of charge and spin linear conductances can be tuned by gate voltages, without applying magnetic fields. In particular we find that, under appropriate conditions, inter-boundary coupling can lead to negative values of the conductance. Furthermore, the setup also allows to selectively generate pure charge or pure spin currents, by choosing the voltage bias configuration.

Fabrizio Dolcini

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

177

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING at PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Electrical Engineering deals with the study and application of electricity, electronics and electromagnetism. It covers a range of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Maseeh College Student Services Offices: 503.725.4631; advisor@cecs.pdx.edu) Page 1 #12;TransfertoPSU:MaseehCollegeofEngineering&ComputerScience to trans- mit energy and also to process information. Students must apply to the Electrical Engineering (EE/216 or 223/216 General Physics (Calculus) with labs Required PSU 100-- level ENGINEERING courses: ECE 101

Bertini, Robert L.

178

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Electric power supply and demand for the contiguous United States, 1980-1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A limited review is presented of the outlook for the electric power supply and demand during the period 1980 to 1989. Only the adequacy and reliability aspects of bulk electric power supply in the contiguous US are considered. The economic, financial and environmental aspects of electric power system planning and the distribution of electricity (below the transmission level) are topics of prime importance, but they are outside the scope of this report.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Southeast Regional Assessment Study: an assessment of the opportunities of solar electric power generation in the Southeastern United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to identify and assess opportunities for demonstration and large scale deployment of solar electric facilities in the southeast region and to define the technical, economic, and institutional factors that can contribute to an accelerated use of solar energy for electric power generation. Graphs and tables are presented indicating the solar resource potential, siting opportunities, energy generation and use, and socioeconomic factors of the region by state. Solar electric technologies considered include both central station and dispersed solar electric generating facilities. Central stations studied include solar thermal electric, wind, photovoltaic, ocean thermal gradient, and biomass; dispersed facilities include solar thermal total energy systems, wind, and photovoltaic. The value of solar electric facilities is determined in terms of the value of conventional facilities and the use of conventional fuels which the solar facilities can replace. Suitable cost and risk sharing mechanisms to accelerate the commercialization of solar electric technologies in the Southeast are identified. The major regulatory and legal factors which could impact on the commercialization of solar facilities are reviewed. The most important factors which affect market penetration are reviewed, ways to accelerate the implementation of these technologies are identified, and market entry paths are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

None

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The state of energy storage in electric utility systems and its effect on renewable energy resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the state of the art of electric energy storage technologies and discusses how adding intermittent renewable energy technologies (IRETs) to a utility network affects the benefits from storage dispatch. Load leveling was the mode of storage dispatch examined in the study. However, the report recommended that other modes be examined in the future for kilowatt and kilowatt-hour optimization of storage. The motivation to install storage with IRET generation can arise from two considerations: reliability and enhancement of the value of energy. Because adding storage increases cost, reliability-related storage is attractive only if the accruing benefits exceed the cost of storage installation. The study revealed that the operation of storage should not be guided by the output of the IRET but rather by system marginal costs. Consequently, in planning studies to quantify benefits, storage should not be considered as an entity belonging to the system and not as a component of IRETS. The study also indicted that because the infusion of IRET energy tends to reduce system marginal cost, the benefits from load leveling (value of energy) would be reduced. However, if a system has storage, particularly if the storage is underutilized, its dispatch can be reoriented to enhance the benefits of IRET integration.

Rau, N.S.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electric tuning of the surface and quantum well states in Bi2Se3 films: a first-principles study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on first-principles calculations in the framework of van der Waals density functional theory, we find that giant, Rashba-like spin splittings can be induced in both the surface states and quantum well states of thin Bi2Se3 films by application of an external electric field. The charge is redistributed so that the Dirac cones of the upper and lower surfaces become nondegenerate and completely gapless. Interestingly, a momentum-dependent spin texture is developed on the two surfaces of the films. Some of the quantum well states, which reside in the middle of the Bi2Se3 film under zero field, are driven to the surface by the electric field. The Rashba splitting energy has a highly non-linear dependence on the momentum and the electric field due to the large contribution of the high-order Rashba terms, which suggests complex spin dynamics in the thin films of Bi2Se3 under an electric field.

Yang, Hong [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Peng, Xiangyang [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Liu, Wenliang [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Wei, Xiaolin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Hao, Guolin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; He, Chaoyu [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Li, Jin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Zhong, Jianxin [Xiangtan University, Xiangtan Hunan, China

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Magnetic and electric dipole moments of the H {sup 3}{Delta}{sub 1} state in ThO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The metastable H {sup 3}{Delta}{sub 1} state in the thorium monoxide (ThO) molecule is highly sensitive to the presence of a CP-violating permanent electric dipole moment of the electron (eEDM) [E. R. Meyer and J. L. Bohn, Phys. Rev. A 78, 010502 (2008)]. The magnetic dipole moment {mu}{sub H} and the molecule-fixed electric dipole moment D{sub H} of this state are measured in preparation for a search for the eEDM. The small magnetic moment {mu}{sub H}=8.5(5)x10{sup -3} {mu}{sub B} displays the predicted cancellation of spin and orbital contributions in a {sup 3}{Delta}{sub 1} paramagnetic molecular state, providing a significant advantage for the suppression of magnetic field noise and related systematic effects in the eEDM search. In addition, the induced electric dipole moment is shown to be fully saturated in very modest electric fields (<10 V/cm). This feature is favorable for the suppression of many other potential systematic errors in the ThO eEDM search experiment.

Vutha, A. C.; Kirilov, E.; DeMille, D. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Spaun, B.; Gurevich, Y. V.; Hutzler, N. R.; Doyle, J. M.; Gabrielse, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rd International Electric Vehicle Symposium and Exposition (Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Applications, Sandiaand Impacts of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Options EPRI, Palo

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources under various tariffs no inv. inv. standby no inv.The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributedthe greatest. Standby tariffs tend to encourage installing

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

Nix, R.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis of drought impacts on electricity production in the Western and Texas interconnections of the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electricity generation relies heavily on water resources and their availability. To examine the interdependence of energy and water in the electricity context, the impacts of a severe drought to assess the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the western and Texas interconnections has been examined. The historical drought patterns in the western United States were analyzed, and the risk posed by drought to electricity generation within the region was evaluated. The results of this effort will be used to develop scenarios for medium- and long-term transmission modeling and planning efforts by the Western Electricity Coordination Council (WECC) and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT). The study was performed in response to a request developed by the Western Governors Association in conjunction with the transmission modeling teams at the participating interconnections. It is part of a U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored, national laboratory-led research effort to develop tools related to the interdependency of energy and water as part of a larger interconnection-wide transmission planning project funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This study accomplished three main objectives. It provided a thorough literature review of recent studies of drought and the potential implications for electricity generation. It analyzed historical drought patterns in the western United States and used the results to develop three design drought scenarios. Finally, it quantified the risk to electricity generation for each of eight basins for each of the three drought scenarios and considered the implications for transmission planning. Literature on drought impacts on electricity generation describes a number of examples where hydroelectric generation capacity has been limited because of drought but only a few examples of impact on thermoelectric generation. In all documented cases, shortfalls of generation were met by purchasing power from the market, albeit at higher prices. However, sufficient excess generation and transmission must be available for this strategy to work. Although power purchase was the most commonly discussed drought mitigation strategy, a total of 12 response strategies were identified in the literature, falling into four main categories: electricity supply, electricity demand response, alternative water supplies, and water demand response. Three hydrological drought scenarios were developed based on a literature review and historical data analysis. The literature review helped to identify key drought parameters and data on drought frequency and severity. Historical hydrological drought data were analyzed for the western United States to identify potential drought correlations and estimate drought parameters. The first scenario was a West-wide drought occurring in 1977; it represented a severe drought in five of the eight basins in the study area. A second drought scenario was artificially defined by selecting the conditions from the 10th-percentile drought year for each individual basin; this drought was defined in this way to allow more consistent analysis of risk to electricity generation in each basin. The final scenario was based upon the current low-flow hydro modeling scenario defined by WECC, which uses conditions from the year 2001. These scenarios were then used to quantify the risk to electricity generation in each basin. The risk calculations represent a first-order estimate of the maximum amount of electricity generation that might be lost from both hydroelectric and thermoelectric sources under a worst-case scenario. Even with the conservative methodology used, the majority of basins showed a limited amount of risk under most scenarios. The level of risk in these basins is likely to be amenable to mitigation by known strategies, combined with existing reserve generation and transmission capacity. However, the risks to the Pacific Northwest and Texas Basins require further study. The Pacific Northwest is vulnerable because of its heavy reliance on hydroelectri

Harto, C. B.; Yan, Y. E.; Demissie, Y. K.; Elcock, D.; Tidwell, V. C.; Hallett, K.; Macknick, J.; Wigmosta, M. S.; Tesfa, T. K. (Environmental Science Division); (Sandia National Laboratory); (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2012-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

Prospects for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for internal combustion engine (ICE)-only vehicles. Engineering cost estimates for the PHEV, as well Engineering ABSTRACT The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) could significantly contribute to reductions, depending on the cost-competitiveness of the vehicle, the relative cost of refined fuels and electricity

191

Tri-Party Agreement databases, access mechanism and procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the information required for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to access databases related to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order [also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA)] (Ecology et al. 1992). It identifies the procedure required to obtain access to the Hanford computer networks and the TPA related databases. It addresses security requirements, access methods, database availability dates, database access procedures, and the minimum computer hardware and software configurations required to operate within the Hanford networks.

Brulotte, P.J.; Christensen, K.C.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

National policy dialogue on state and federal regulation of the electricity industry - staff report on a Keystone policy dialogue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over two years, The Keystone Center facilitated a dialogue on State and Federal Regulation of the Electricity Industry. The intent of this report is to assist policy-makers faced with decisions about changes to traditional utility regulation and planning and provide an overview of a diverse group`s deliberations on regulatory jurisdictional conflicts. This report is not a consensus document, rather it is a staff written summary of two years of discussion on the issues. The participants in the Keystone Dialogue believed that all affected interests could benefit from, if nothing else, a summary of their discussions of state/federal issues. The electric utility industry is one of the last remaining, heavily regulated industries in the United States. Rate and corporate regulation is split between state and federal governments and there is distinct regulatory authority at each level. For example, retail rate regulation occurs at the state level, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is responsible for wholesale rate regulation under the Federal Power Act, and the Securities and Exchange Commission oversees registered utility holding companies as defined under the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. This jurisdictional split between state and federal regulation has evolved over many years through legislation and litigation on such matters. The creation of this allocation of regulatory responsibility was initiated in 1935 with the passage of the Public Utility Holding Company Act and the Federal Power Act when the economic and technological changes that are now occurring in the industry simply could not have been envisioned.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cost of Power Interruptions to Electricity Consumers in the UnitedStates (U.S.)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The massive electric power blackout in the northeastern U.S.and Canada on August 14-15, 2003 catalyzed discussions about modernizingthe U.S. electricity grid. Industry sources suggested that investments of$50 to $100 billion would be needed. This work seeks to better understandan important piece of information that has been missing from thesediscussions: What do power interruptions and fluctuations in powerquality (power-quality events) cost electricity consumers? We developed abottom-up approach for assessing the cost to U.S. electricity consumersof power interruptions and power-quality events (referred to collectivelyas "reliability events"). The approach can be used to help assess thepotential benefits of investments in improving the reliability of thegrid. We developed a new estimate based on publicly availableinformation, and assessed how uncertainties in these data affect thisestimate using sensitivity analysis.

Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina; Eto, Joseph H.

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

A State Regulatory Perspective; New Building, Old Motors, and Marginal Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity consumption in Texas is expected to grow at 3.2 percent annually for the next ten years. Utility demand management activities, if effective, may reduce that expected rate of growth. Residential cooling, commercial lighting and cooling...

Treadway, N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POWER AND STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES UNDER ELECTRICPROVISIONS IN STATE RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES Of the 17that have adopted renewable energy policy measures as part

Porter, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Potential for Avoided Emissions from Photovoltaic Electricity in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

integration, The PR&C Renewable Power Service, 2003 Powers N. Do state renewable portfolio standards promote in-?state renewable generation? Energ

Zhai, Pei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Techniques for analyzing the impacts of certain electric-utility ratemaking and regulatory-policy concepts. Regulatory laws and policies. [State by state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a legal study prepared to provide a review of the substantive and procedural laws of each regulatory jurisdiction that may affect implementation of the PURPA standards, and to summarize the current state of consideration and implementation of policies and rate designs similar or identical to the PURPA standards by state regulatory agencies and nonregulated utilities. This report is divided into three sections. The first section, the Introduction, summarizes the standards promulgated by PURPA and the results of the legal study. The second section, State Regulatory Law and Procedure, summarizes for each state or other ratemaking jurisdiction: (1) general constitutional and statutory provisions affecting utility rates and conditions of service; (2) specific laws or decisions affecting policy or rate design issues covered by PURPA standards; and (3) statutes and decisions governing administrative procedures, including judicial review. A chart showing actions taken on the policy and rate design issues addressed by PURPA is also included for each jurisdiction, and citations to relevant authorities are presented for each standard. State statutes or decisions that specifically define a state standard similar or identical to a PURPA standard, or that refer to one of the three PURPA objectives, are noted. The third section, Nonregulated Electric Utilities, summarizes information available on nonregulated utilities, i.e., publicly or cooperatively owned utilities which are specifically exempted from state regulation by state law.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Reaction of bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)ceriumbenzyl, Cp'2CeCH2Ph with Methylhalides: a Metathesis Reaction that does not proceed by a Metathesis Transition State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental reaction between [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeCH2Ph and CH3X, X = F, Cl, Br, and I, yields the metathetical exchange products, [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeX and CH3CH2Ph. The reaction is complicated by the equilibrium between the benzyl derivative and the metallacycle [[1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2] [(Me3C)2C5H2C(CH3)2CH2]Ce, plus toluene since the metallacycle reacts with CH3X. Labelling studies show that the methyl group of the methylhalide is transferred intact to the benzyl group. The mechanism, as revealed by DFT calculations on (C5H5)2CeCH2Ph and CH3F, does not proceed by way of a four-center mechanism, (sigma-bond metathesis) but a lower barrier process involves a haptotropic shift of the Cp2Ce fragment so that at the transition state the para-carbon of the benzene ring is attached to the Cp2Ce fragment while the CH2 fragment of the benzyl group attacks CH3F that is activated by coordination to the metal ion. As a result the mechanism is classified as an associative interchange process.

Werkema, Evan; Andersen, Richard; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

Recent trends in the production and use of electricity in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production and consumption of electricity in the US grew rapidly from 1950 to 1973, about 7.5%/yr, and then decreased in rate of growth considerably, averaging about 2.2%/yr since 1973. Electricity's growth rate in this period was much greater than that of energy as a whole - about double. Worldwide, the rate of growth was even faster than that of the US - nearly 8%/yr. As a consequence, the US proportion of world electricity generation dropped from 40% in 1959 to 27% in 1982, based on the latest UN data. US electricity production by type of generation is principally by conventional steam turbines, and the major fuel for the generation of steam is coal. Coal use has been increasing steadily at the expense of more costly oil and gas. Fossil fuels as a group contribute more than 70% of the energy input to power plants and are likely to be the prime contributors for some time to come because of the limited growth potential of hydroelectricity and nuclear. Coal is favored by its relatively low price and large domestic reserves, but is constrained by special problems. Residential and commercial sales promoted vigorously by the electric utility industry, have grown more rapidly than industrial sales. 15 figures, 2 tables.

Parent, J.D.

1985-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the electric motor to maximize efficiency. 3 Pure EVsbattery and electric motor to increase the efficiency of thebattery and electric motor to increase the efficiency of the

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. (2001). The California Electricity Crisis: Lessons forMagic or Mayhem? The Electricity Journal Vol 17, No 7,a Deregulated California Electricity Industry. Journal of

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University No. 5501 Rev.: 0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-licensed gas- or electric-powered utility-type vehicles) that are operated on the main campus in Blacksburg, VAElectric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle Page 1 of 5 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University __________________________________________________________________________________ Subject: Electric/Gas Utility-type Vehicle

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

204

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a PHEV has both an electric motor and a heat engineusuallythe vehicle only by an electric motor using electricity fromand forth with the electric motor to maximize efficiency.

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003). ! 6 th Electric Power Survey. New Delhi: Centralin its 16 th Electric Power Survey of India, estimates that

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

battery Utility electricity consumption Electricity providedis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - Tri-State Case Study.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.eps MoreWSRC-STI-2007-00250 Rev. 05 Oak09 U . S . D e p a Department

208

Characterization of Tri-lab Tantalum Plate.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed characterization Tri-lab Tantalum (Ta) plate jointly purchased from HCStark Inc. by Sandia, Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Data in this report was compiled from series of material and properties characterization experiments carried out at Sandia (SNL) and Los Alamos (LANL) Laboratories through a leveraged effort funded by the C2 campaign. Results include microstructure characterization detailing the crystallographic texture of the material and an increase in grain size near the end of the rolled plate. Mechanical properties evaluations include, compression cylinder, sub-scale tension specimen, micohardness and instrumented indentation testing. The plate was found to have vastly superior uniformity when compare with previously characterized wrought Ta material. Small but measurable variations in microstructure and properties were noted at the end, and at the top and bottom edges of the plate.

Buchheit, Thomas E.; Cerreta, Ellen K.; Deibler, Lisa Anne; Chen, Shu-Rong; Michael, Joseph R.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Tri-party agreement databases, access mechanism and procedures. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the information required for the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to access databases related to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). It identifies the procedure required to obtain access to the Hanford Site computer networks and the Tri-Party Agreement related databases. It addresses security requirements, access methods, database availability dates, database access procedures, and the minimum computer hardware and software configurations required to operate within the Hanford Site networks. This document supersedes any previous agreements including the Administrative Agreement to Provide Computer Access to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Administrative Agreement to Provide Computer Access to Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), agreements that were signed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) in June 1990, Access approval to EPA and Ecology is extended by RL to include all Tri-Party Agreement relevant databases named in this document via the documented access method and date. Access to databases and systems not listed in this document will be granted as determined necessary and negotiated among Ecology, EPA, and RL through the Tri-Party Agreement Project Managers. The Tri-Party Agreement Project Managers are the primary points of contact for all activities to be carried out under the Tri-Party Agreement. Action Plan. Access to the Tri-Party Agreement related databases and systems does not provide or imply any ownership on behalf of Ecology or EPA whether public or private of either the database or the system. Access to identified systems and databases does not include access to network/system administrative control information, network maps, etc.

Brulotte, P.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Fact #790: July 29, 2013 States Beginning to Tax Electric Vehicles for Road  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112:ofElectric Vehicle Purchases |Use |

212

Fact #795: September 2, 2013 Electric Vehicle Charging Stations by State |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112:ofElectric Vehicle PurchasesFuel

213

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible...

214

Surface State Transport and Ambipolar Electric Field Effect in Bi2Se3 Nanodevices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic transport experiments involving the topologically protected states found at the surface of Bi[subscript 2]Se[subscript 3] and other topological insulators require fine control over carrier density, which is ...

Steinberg, Hadar

215

A portfolio approach to energy governance : state management of China's coal and electric power supply industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study addresses the extent to which China's central state devolved ownership and investment levels in its energy sector to other actors during the modern reform period (1978- 2008). The project focused on China's coal ...

Cunningham, Edward A., IV (Edward Albert)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Batteries for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs): Goals and the State of Technology circa 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemistries. In summary, electric-drive interest groups,the present and future of electric-drive vehicles, including24 -vii- 1.0 Introduction Electric-drive continues to pique

Axsen, Jonn; Burke, Andy; Kurani, Kenneth S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Tracking the Reliability of the U.S. Electric Power System: An Assessment of Publicly Available Information Reported to State Public Utility Commissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large blackouts, such as the August 14-15, 2003 blackout in the northeasternUnited States and Canada, focus attention on the importance of reliable electric service. As public and private efforts are undertaken to improve reliability and prevent power interruptions, it is appropriate to assess their effectiveness. Measures of reliability, such as the frequency and duration of power interruptions, have been reported by electric utilities to state public utility commissions for many years. This study examines current state and utility practices for collecting and reporting electricity reliability information and discusses challenges that arise in assessing reliability because of differences among these practices. The study is based primarily on reliability information for 2006 reported by 123 utilities to 37 state public utility commissions.

LaCommare, Kristina H.; Eto, Joseph H.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis indicates that wholesale competition could be oneCSEM WP 152 Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity CompetitionFeasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tri Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformation WaynesvilleTracy,LtdTrenton

220

Electricity | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Sources Electricity Electricity January 22, 2015 State of the Union Remarks on Energy in Four Charts We dive into the data behind President Obama's State of the Union statements...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Tracking States of Massive Electrical Appliances by Lightweight Metering and Sequence Decoding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to track the on/off states of N appliances by deploying only m smart meters on the power load tree, where m demonstrate some interesting structures of the problem. Keywords Energy auditing, Smart meter, Deployment smart meter networks, and thus suffer from the high deploy- ment, maintenance and data collection costs

Wang, Yongcai

222

BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District Speaker Series: Advancing Research Parks networking. Shady Grove Life Sciences Park (Montgomery County, MD) Research Triangle Park Live

223

Three-Color Passive-Matrix Pixels Using Dye-Diffusion-Patterned Tri-Layer Polymer-Based LED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-Color Passive-Matrix Pixels Using Dye-Diffusion-Patterned Tri-Layer Polymer-Based LED Ke Long of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 ABSTRACT Dry dye-printing and solvent-enhanced dye diffusion were used to locally dope a previously spin-coated poly(9-vinylcarbazole

224

Assessing student reasoning in upper-division electricity and magnetism at Oregon State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standardized assessment tests that allow researchers to compare the performance of students under various curricula are highly desirable. There are several research-based conceptual tests that serve as instruments to assess and identify students' difficulties in lower-division courses. At the upper-division level, however, assessing students' difficulties is a more challenging task. Although several research groups are currently working on such tests, their reliability and validity are still under investigation. We analyze the results of the Colorado Upper-Division Electrostatics diagnostic from Oregon State University and compare it with data from University of Colorado. In particular, we show potential shortcomings in the Oregon State University curriculum regarding separation of variables and boundary conditions, as well as uncover weaknesses of the rubric to the free response version of the diagnostic. We also demonstrate that the diagnostic can be used to obtain information about student learning during ...

Zwolak, Justyna P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TriWo AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,CorpJump

226

An original method to evaluate the transport parameters and reconstruct the electric field in solid-state photodetectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for reconstructing the spatial profile of the electric field along the thickness of a generic bulk solid-state photodetector is proposed. Furthermore, the mobility and lifetime of both electrons and holes can be evaluated contextually. The method is based on a procedure of minimization built up from current transient profiles induced by laser pulses in a planar detector at different applied voltages. The procedure was tested in CdTe planar detectors for X- and Gamma rays. The devices were measured in a single-carrier transport configuration by impinging laser light on the sample cathode. This method could be suitable for many other devices provided that they are made of materials with sufficiently high resistivity, i.e., with a sufficiently low density of intrinsic carriers.

Santi, A.; Piacentini, G. [DiFeST, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Zanichelli, M.; Pavesi, M., E-mail: maura.pavesi@unipr.it [DiFeST, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); IMEM-CNR, Institute of Materials for Electronics and Magnetism, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, 43124 Parma (Italy); Cola, A.; Farella, I. [IMM-CNR, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, Via Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Tri-Party Agreement Template and Sample Tri-Party Agreement | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe EnergyDepartment7 thFuel27, 2008,Inc.Energy Tri-Party

228

Solid-state ultracapacitors for electric vehicles and consumer electronics. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced ultracapacitors are described that are based upon conducting polymer technology. Both Type I and Type II capacitors were constructed in single cell and stacked arrays that had superior electrochemical properties. More specifically nanophase clay electrode supports were fabricated and the conducting polymers solvent deposited upon them. Both liquid phase and solid polymer electrolytes were evaluated as well. Both single cell and multiple cell capacitors were prepared that exceeded the 15Wh/kg, 1500W/kg goals set by the United States Department of Energy. In addition, it was shown that different conducting polymer electrode configurations could be constructed that showed promise.

Dr. Brian G. Dixon

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New Energyof Energy8, UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF

230

Clean Energy and the Electric System: Assessing the Many Benefits of State and Local Clean Energy Initiatives Multiple Benefits of Clean Energy Initiatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing energy demand and/ or increasing renewable energy generation from state and local clean energy initiativessuch as goals, standards, codes, funds and programscan generate many benefits including: Security, diversity, and overall reliability improvements for the electric system. Improved environmental quality, human health, and quality of life. Positive economic gains through energy costs saved, avoided medical costs, higher disposable incomes, increased labor productivity, and more jobs. This brochure is part of a series and focuses on electric system benefits. Whats Inside: Why assess electric system benefits? How can state and local governments estimate potential electric system benefits? Quantitative examples of how clean energy initiatives result in direct energy benefits. How to find more information. What are clean energy initiatives? Clean energy initiatives are policies and programs that state and local governments are using to save energy, improve air quality, reduce carbon emissions, support electric system reliability and security, and improve economic development. Examples include: Energy efficiency policies that reduce demand for energy, such as: Building codes for energy efficiency in both commercial and residential buildings; energy efficiency portfolio standards; public benefit funds for energy efficiency; and appliance efficiency standards. Energy supply policies that increase the use of renewables and clean sources, such as: Clean distributed generation and net metering interconnection standards; output-based environmental regulations; public benefit funds for clean energy supply; combined heat and power; and renewable portfolio standards. Clean energy initiatives reduce demand for fossil-fuel powered electricity and increase electricity generated with clean, renewable energy, contributing to a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system. Specifically, energy efficiency and/or renewable energy are resources that can: Avoid costs typically associated with conventional generation, including: Fuel, variable operation, and maintenance costs; emissions allowances; costs of emission Greenhouse gas (GHG) related policies that measure or limit emissions, such as: GHG registries, mandatory GHG reporting; CO offset requirements;

unknown authors

231

PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PECIAL REPORS T Tri-County Health Department in Colorado Does More Than Just Review and benefits of land use choices and improve the quality of land use decision making. Background Tri-County counties of the metropolitan Denver area, has offered development review services to its jurisdictions

232

(TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elevator (TWST = Tri-Cities West Building) West Building 1st Floor Stage to parking lot Nursing TV Parking Lot and Cougar Garden Admissions Elevator Elevator Commons To the East Building Mac Lab Vet Center Professional Programs Student Affairs Nursing Lab Media Services Lobby West Building 2nd Floor (TWST = Tri

Collins, Gary S.

233

TFC-0004- In the Matter of Tri-Valley CARES  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tri-Valley CARES filed an Appeal from a determination that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued on June 2, 2010. In that determination, NNSA denied in part a request for information that Tri-Valley CARES had submitted on September 8, 2008, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552.

234

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Tri--methane Rearrangement: Mechanistic and Exploratory Organic Photochemistry1 Howard E zimmerman@bert.chem.wisc.edu Received May 31, 2000 ABSTRACT The di--methane rearrangement is firmly established as a mode of synthesizing three-membered-ring compounds. We now report the tri-- methane

Cirkva, Vladimir

235

Prospects for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in the United States and Japan: A General Equilibrium Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) may offer a potential near term, low carbon alternative to today's gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles. A representative vehicle technology that runs on electricity in addition ...

Reilly, John M.

236

Feasibility of Wholesale Electricity Competition in a Developing Country: Insights from Simulating a Market in Maharashtra State, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I assume that private firms in the MH electricity market actand private firms will play important roles in the electricityand private firms operate in the sector at the same time) on wholesale electricity

Phadke, Amol

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels.

NONE

1995-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

238

Advanced Electrical Characterization of Semiconductor Nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOSFETs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electrical Propertiesof surface states on electrical characteristics of inn andCho, and H. -Y. Cha, Electrical properties of ingan grown

Khanal, Devesh Raj

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Power Electonics & Electric Machinery | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric Machinery SHARE Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Power Electronics and Electric Machinery research has dramatically advanced the technology of state-of-the-art...

240

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Driving on the Interior of Campus An increased number of vehicles and small electric/gas carts on campus, both State and private, have created an increased risk to pedestrians and has damaged walkways Director or the designee. · Private and vendor vehicles are restricted at all times. Vehicles requiring

de Lijser, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The calculation of electron chemical potential and ion charge state and their influence on plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electron chemical potential and ion charge state (average ion charge and ion distribution) are important parameters in calculating plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire. In this paper, the calculating method of electron chemical potential and ion charge state is discussed at first. For the calculation of electron chemical potential, the ideal free electron gas model and Thomas-Fermi model are compared and analyzed in terms of the coupling constant of plasma. The Thomas-Fermi ionization model, which is used to calculate ion charge state, is compared with the method based on Saha equation. Furthermore, the influence of electron degenerated energy levels and ion excited states in Saha equation on the ion charge state is also analyzed. Then the influence of different calculating methods of electron chemical potential and ion charge state on plasma conductivity is discussed by applying them in the Lee-More conductivity model.

Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Li, Yao; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shanxi 710049 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shanxi 710049 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Examination of the Regional Supply and Demand Balance for Renewable Electricity in the United States through 2015: Projecting from 2009 through 2015 (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the balance between the demand and supply of new renewable electricity in the United States on a regional basis through 2015. It expands on a 2007 NREL study that assessed the supply and demand balance on a national basis. As with the earlier study, this analysis relies on estimates of renewable energy supplies compared to demand for renewable energy generation needed to meet existing state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies in 28 states, as well as demand by consumers who voluntarily purchase renewable energy. However, it does not address demand by utilities that may procure cost-effective renewables through an integrated resource planning process or otherwise.

Bird, L.; Hurlbut, D.; Donohoo, P.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

charging kW Utility electricity consumption Electricityis expressed in electricity consumption of the electricis expressed in electricity consumption of the electric

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Mai, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

Hand, M. M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Virginia Electric Utility Regulation Act constitutes the main legislation in Virginia that pertains to the regulation of the state's electric utilities. The Act directs the State Corporation...

249

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizesAnalysisPipelinesthe

250

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizesAnalysisPipelinestheArizona

251

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizesAnalysisPipelinestheArizonaColorado

252

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering

253

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scatteringDelaware

254

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328 2,683Diesel prices

255

Try-A Global Database of Plant Traits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant traits the morphological, anatomical, physiological, biochemical and phenological characteristics of plants and their organs determine how primary producers respond to environmental factors, affect other trophic levels, influence ecosystem processes and services and provide a link from species richness to ecosystem functional diversity. Trait data thus represent the raw material for a wide range of research from evolutionary biology, community and functional ecology to biogeography. Here we present the global database initiative named TRY, which has united a wide range of the plant trait research community worldwide and gained an unprecedented buy-in of trait data: so far 93 trait databases have been contributed. The data repository currently contains almost three million trait entries for 69 000 out of the world s 300 000 plant species, with a focus on 52 groups of traits characterizing the vegetative and regeneration stages of the plant life cycle, including growth, dispersal, establishment and persistence. A first data analysis shows that most plant traits are approximately log-normally distributed, with widely differing ranges of variation across traits. Most trait variation is between species (interspecific), but significant intraspecific variation is also documented, up to 40% of the overall variation. Plant functional types (PFTs), as commonly used in vegetation models, capture a substantial fraction of the observed variation but for several traits most variation occurs within PFTs, up to 75% of the overall variation. In the context of vegetation models these traits would better be represented by state variables rather than fixed parameter values. The improved availability of plant trait data in the unified global database is expected to support a paradigm shift from species to trait-based ecology, offer new opportunities for synthetic plant trait research and enable a more realistic and empirically grounded representation of terrestrial vegetation in Earth system models.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Preventing Electrical Shock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

closer to un- guarded energized overhead lines than the following distances: 1) For voltages to ground 50 kV or less?10 feet; 2) For voltages to ground more than 50 kV ?10 feet plus 4 inches for every 10 kV over 50 kV. ? Make sure all electric motors... attempt to unplug the cord, move an energized line with any object, or grab the person to free him. Once the person is free, administer CPR immedi- ately, if necessary, to try to resuscitate the individual. In case of an electrical fi re, turn off...

Smith, David

2004-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

Bound states for a Coulomb-type potential induced by the interaction between a moving electric quadrupole moment and a magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the arising of bound states solutions of the Schrdinger equation due to the presence of a Coulomb-type potential induced by the interaction between a moving electric quadrupole moment and a magnetic field. Furthermore, we study the influence of the Coulomb-type potential on the harmonic oscillator by showing a quantum effect characterized by the dependence of the angular frequency on the quantum numbers of the system, whose meaning is that not all values of the angular frequency are allowed. -- Highlights: Interaction between a moving electric quadrupole moment and a magnetic field. Arising of bound states solutions due to the presence of a Coulomb-type potential. Influence of the Coulomb-type potential on the harmonic oscillator. Dependence of the angular frequency on the quantum numbers of the system.

Bakke, K., E-mail: kbakke@fisica.ufpb.br

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

Modeling the steady-state ISV (in situ vitrification) process: A 3-D finite element analysis of coupled thermal-electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steady-state modeling considerations for simulating the in situ vitrification (ISV) process are documented based upon the finite element numerical approach. Recommendations regarding boundary condition specifications and mesh discretization are presented. The effects of several parameters on the ISV process response are calculated and the results discussed. The parameters investigated include: (1) electrode depth, (2) ambient temperature, (3) supplied current, (4) electrical conductivity, (5) electrode separation, and (6) soil/waste characterization. 13 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Langerman, M.A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers Print Wednesday, 30 May 2012 00:00 In principle, tri-block copolymers...

260

Tri-Cities research may help biofuels take flight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald. Excerpt: If you stop and think about it, some pretty interesting stuff has roots in the Tri-Cities, but reaches far beyond. Many Tri-Citians have gone on to be professional athletes, entertainers, scientists and engineers, doctors, lawyers, and humanitarians to name just a few. And a lot of groundbreaking discoveries - many born of strategic collaborations resulting from purposeful economic development efforts - have emerged from work at our local national laboratory. Just recently, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory entered into a $2M collaboration with Seattle biofuel producer Imperium Renewables and other partners to develop a new method to make renewable jet fuels. Successful development of the catalytic process, which converts biomass-based alcohols into renewable drop-in jet fuels, could lead to additional renewable jet fuel production facilities being built and operated in the Pacific Northwest.

Madison, Alison L.

2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING SEMINAR "Considerations for Curriculum Planning and Computer Engineering Colorado State University Monday, Feb. 20, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Location: LSC 210 Abstract

262

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wholesale Markets: October 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

263

Electricity Monthly Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wholesale Markets: September 2014 The United States has many regional wholesale electricity markets. Below we look at monthly and annual ranges of on-peak, daily wholesale...

264

RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND SVANTE JANSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND STRINGS SVANTE JANSON To my colleague and friend Allan Gut on the occasion of his retirement Abstract. We give a survey of a number of simple applications of renewal theory been realized that renewal theory is a useful tool in the study of random strings and related

Janson, Svante

265

Feasible Caf Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Feasible CAFE Standard Increases Using Emerging Diesel and Hybrid-Electric Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING EMERGING DIESEL AND HYBRID-ELECTRIC TECHNOLOGIES FORusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies forusing Emerging Diesel and Hybrid- Electric Technologies for

Burke, Andy; Abeles, Ethan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ES 2. CA nursing home electricity pattern: July weekday lowJanuary and July weekday electricity and total heat (space +CA school weekday total electricity (inclusive of cooling)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster 2007 SOW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program (formerly know as Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative, ASCI) has led the world in capability computing for the last ten years. Capability computing is defined as a world-class platform (in the Top10 of the Top500.org list) with scientific simulations running at scale on the platform. Example systems are ASCI Red, Blue-Pacific, Blue-Mountain, White, Q, RedStorm, and Purple. ASC applications have scaled to multiple thousands of CPUs and accomplished a long list of mission milestones on these ASC capability platforms. However, the computing demands of the ASC and Stockpile Stewardship programs also include a vast number of smaller scale runs for day-to-day simulations. Indeed, every 'hero' capability run requires many hundreds to thousands of much smaller runs in preparation and post processing activities. In addition, there are many aspects of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) that can be directly accomplished with these so-called 'capacity' calculations. The need for capacity is now so great within the program that it is increasingly difficult to allocate the computer resources required by the larger capability runs. To rectify the current 'capacity' computing resource shortfall, the ASC program has allocated a large portion of the overall ASC platforms budget to 'capacity' systems. In addition, within the next five to ten years the Life Extension Programs (LEPs) for major nuclear weapons systems must be accomplished. These LEPs and other SSP programmatic elements will further drive the need for capacity calculations and hence 'capacity' systems as well as future ASC capability calculations on 'capability' systems. To respond to this new workload analysis, the ASC program will be making a large sustained strategic investment in these capacity systems over the next ten years, starting with the United States Government Fiscal Year 2007 (GFY07). However, given the growing need for 'capability' systems as well, the budget demands are extreme and new, more cost effective ways of fielding these systems must be developed. This Tri-Laboratory Linux Capacity Cluster (TLCC) procurement represents the ASC first investment vehicle in these capacity systems. It also represents a new strategy for quickly building, fielding and integrating many Linux clusters of various sizes into classified and unclassified production service through a concept of Scalable Units (SU). The programmatic objective is to dramatically reduce the overall Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of these 'capacity' systems relative to the best practices in Linux Cluster deployments today. This objective only makes sense in the context of these systems quickly becoming very robust and useful production clusters under the crushing load that will be inflicted on them by the ASC and SSP scientific simulation capacity workload.

Seager, M

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ultracapacitor/Battery Hybrid Energy Storage Systems for Electric Vehicles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis deals with the design of Hybrid Energy Storage System (HESS) for Light Electric Vehicles (LEV) and EVs. More specifically, a tri-mode high-efficiency non-isolated (more)

Moshirvaziri, Mazhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails. An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, Alaska, and Hawaii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As has been noted in many reports and publications, acquiring new or expanded rights-of-way for transmission is a challenging process, because numerous land use and land ownership constraints must be overcome to develop pathways suitable for energy transmission infrastructure. In the eastern U.S., more than twenty federally protected national trails (some of which are thousands of miles long, and cross many states) pose a potential obstacle to the development of new or expanded electricity transmission capacity. However, the scope of this potential problem is not well-documented, and there is no baseline information available that could allow all stakeholders to study routing scenarios that could mitigate impacts on national trails. This report, Electricity Transmission, Pipelines, and National Trails: An Analysis of Current and Potential Intersections on Federal Lands in the Eastern United States, was prepared by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne). Argonne was tasked by DOE to analyze the footprint of the current network of National Historic and Scenic Trails and the electricity transmission system in the 37 eastern contiguous states, Alaska, and Hawaii; assess the extent to which national trails are affected by electrical transmission; and investigate the extent to which national trails and other sensitive land use types may be affected in the near future by planned transmission lines. Pipelines are secondary to transmission lines for analysis, but are also within the analysis scope in connection with the overall directives of Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and because of the potential for electrical transmission lines being collocated with pipelines. Based on Platts electrical transmission line data, a total of 101 existing intersections with national trails on federal land were found, and 20 proposed intersections. Transmission lines and pipelines are proposed in Alaska; however there are no locations that intersect national trails. Source data did not indicate any planned transmission lines or pipelines in Hawaii. A map atlas provides more detailed mapping of the topics investigated in this study, and the accompanying GIS database provides the baseline information for further investigating locations of interest. In many cases the locations of proposed transmission lines are not accurately mapped (or a specific route may not yet be determined), and accordingly the specific crossing locations are speculative. However since both national trails and electrical transmission lines are long linear systems, the characteristics of the crossings reported in this study are expected to be similar to both observed characteristics of the existing infrastructure provided in this report, and of the new infrastructure if these proposed projects are built. More focused study of these siting challenges is expected to mitigate some of potential impacts by choosing routes that minimize or eliminate them. The current study primarily addresses a set of screening-level characterizations that provide insights into how the National Trail System may influence the siting of energy transport facilities in the states identified under Section 368(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. As such, it initializes gathering and beginning analysis of the primary environmental and energy data, and maps the contextual relationships between an important national environmental asset and how this asset intersects with energy planning activities. Thus the current study sets the stage for more in-depth analyses and data development activities that begin to solve key transmission siting constraints. Our recommendations for future work incorporate two major areas: (1) database development and analytics and (2) modeling and scenario analysis for energy planning. These recommendations provide a path forward to address key issues originally developed under the Energy Policy Act of 2005 that are now being carried forward under the Presidents Climate Action Plan.

Kuiper, James A; Krummel, John R; Hlava, Kevin J; Moore, H Robert; Orr, Andrew B; Schlueter, Scott O; Sullivan, Robert G; Zvolanek, Emily A

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

Electric sales and revenue 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Minimizing State-of-Health Degradation in Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage Systems with Arbitrary Source and Load Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elements and hide their weaknesses for achieving a combination of superior performance metrics. The cycle. The cycle life is directly related to the state-of-health (SoH), which is defined as the ratio of full of battery in the previous literature can only be applied to charging/discharging cycles with the same state

Pedram, Massoud

273

Electric sales and revenue 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

International Electricity Regulation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Regulation International Electricity Regulation U.S. trade in electric energy with Canada and Mexico is rising, bringing economic and reliability benefits to the United States and...

275

Tri-Party Agreement Agencies Annual Hanford Public Involvement Survey  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2TopoPortal Hydrogen andTrent Tuckerof 17 Tri-Party

276

Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a Workforce for Advanced Vehicle Development Energy Department Awards Will Promote Electric Vehicles in 24 States and Train a...

277

Mean-field analysis of ground state and low-lying electric dipole strength in $^{22}$C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of neutron-rich $^{22}$C are studied using the mean-field approach with Skyrme energy density functionals. Its weak binding and large total reaction cross section, which are suggested by recent experiments, are simulated by modifying the central part of Skyrme potential. Calculating $E1$ strength distribution by using the random-phase approximation, we investigate developments of low-lying electric dipole ($E1$) strength and a contribution of core excitations of $^{20}$C. As the neutron Fermi level approaches the zero energy threshold ($\\varepsilon_F >\\sim -1$ MeV), we find that the low-lying $E1$ strength exceeds the energy-weighted cluster sum rule, which indicates an importance of the core excitations with the $1d_{5/2}$ orbit.

Tsunenori Inakura; W. Horiuchi; Y. Suzuki; T. Nakatsukasa

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

A high dynamic range data acquisition system for a solid-state electron Electric Dipole Moment experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have built a high precision (24-bit) data acquisition (DAQ) system with eight simultaneously sampling input channels for the measurement of the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron. The DAQ system consists of two main components, a master board and eight individual analog-to-digital converter (ADC) boards. This custom DAQ system provides galvanic isolation, with fiber optic communication, between the master board and each ADC board to reduce the possibility of ground loop pickups. In addition, each ADC board is enclosed in its own heavy-duty radio frequency shielding enclosure and powered by DC batteries, to attain the ultimate low levels of channel cross-talk. In this paper, we describe the implementation of the DAQ system and scrutinize its performance.

Young Jin Kim; Brandon Kunkler; Chen-Yu Liu; Gerard Visser

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

279

Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 23 / Wednesday, February 4, 2004 / Notices 5331 electric load in the states of Ohio,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy On-Board Fuel Processing Go/No-Go Decision AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of on-board fuel Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to review the current state of fuel processing activities against

280

State and Local Clean Energy Policy Primer: Getting from Here to Clean Electricity with Policy (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet proposes a framework for how states and localities can build policy portfolios by first setting the stage for clean energy in the market with low cost policies, and then growing the market with successive policies until the need for financial incentives can be reduced and eventually eliminated.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Unimolecular Electrical Rectification in Hexadecylquinolinium Tricyanoquinodimethanide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unimolecular Electrical Rectification in Hexadecylquinolinium Tricyanoquinodimethanide Robert M Abstract: Macroscopic and nanoscopic current-voltage measurements reveal asymmetries in the DC electrical to an excited-state conformer which is probably neutral. Unimolecular electrical rectification by monolayers

Metzger, Robert M.

282

High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas Success story about using waste water...

283

An Analysis of Client Satisfaction and Company Efficiency at Tri Lake Consultants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meetings. County of Riverside In the past, Tri Lake providedTri Lake currently has contracts with the Cities of Perris, San Jacinto, Canyon Lake, Menifee, and the CountyCounty Sheriff Department. The low level of interaction and impact between Tri

Sunde, Christopher Nathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

Hand, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

Hand, M.; Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Electric sales and revenue 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electrical and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies such as solar power and solid state (LED) lighting; Design sensors that measure glucose, generating and transmitting power, and designing smart sensors for robots. Circuits Communications Optics Power Sensors Signal & Image Processing #12;Electrical Engineering Develop environmentally friendly

Weber, Rodney

291

AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

10 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Electric Vehicles International Neighborhood Electric Vehicle Testing Results The...

292

Electricity Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS) Visualization in the future because they have virtually no resistance to electric current, offering the possibility of new electric power equipment with more energy efficiency and higher capacity than today's systems

293

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the exception of hydroelectric and nuclear facilities, must obtain a certificate of registration from the Department of Public...

294

Electric $ales and revenue 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication provides information on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers in the United States.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Perforation patterned electrical interconnects  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

Frey, Jonathan

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

296

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

DeMeo, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Delaware, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Colorado, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kentucky, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Michigan, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off-site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nevada, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility; the first nine digit alphanumeric number a facility holds under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Mssissippi, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99- 499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and annual maintenance costs for distributed generation (utility electricity and natural gas purchases plus amortized capital and annual maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Creating the wholesale market for electricity in Japan : what should Japan learn from major markets in the United States and Europe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The movement of deregulation in Japan's electric power industry started in 1995 with the revision of the Electric Utility Industry Law. During these past over five years, levels of various discussions have been made in ...

Hori, Takahide

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electric power monthly, March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

NONE

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hanford Diversification and the Tri-Cities Economy FY 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) are to safely manage the Hanford Site, to manage and clean up its legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy new science and technology in the environmental and energy fields. Collectively, DOE/RL and its contractors are the most important single entity in the Tri-Cities local economy (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland, Washington, and the surrounding area). Although the relevant economic region affected by DOE/RL and its contractors actually embraces a geographic area reaching from Yakima in the west to Walla Walla in the east and from Moses Lake in the north to Pendleton, Oregon, in the south, over 90% of economic impacts likely occur in Benton and Franklin Counties. These two counties are defined as the ''local'' Tri-Cities economy for purposes of this study. In the federal fiscal year (FY) 1999 (October 1, 1998 through September 30, 1999), the total impact of DOE'S local $1.59 billion budget was felt through payrolls of $542 million and local purchases of goods and services of $226 million. The total local spending of $768 million was up slightly from the FY 1998 total of $765 million. Taking into account the multiplier effects of this spending, the DOE/RL budget sustained an estimated 32% of all local employment (28,250 out of 88,100 jobs) and about 35% of local earned income (almost $1.08 billion out of $3.08 billion). The decrease in these percentages from last year's report reflects an update of the model's economic structure based on the 1997 economic census year, a correction of a programming error in the model found during the update, and a broader definition of earnings that includes proprietor income, not just wages (see the Appendix for revisions to the previous forecasts). DOE budget increases in FY 2000 are expected to result in no change to the number of local DOE contractor jobs and about a $29 million increase in direct local spending.

SCOTT, M.J.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time of use United States Postal Service v Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Yukawa and Tri-scalar Processes in Electroweak Baryogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the contributions to the quantum transport equations for electroweak baryogenesis due to decays and inverse decays induced by tri-scalar and Yukawa interactions. In the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), these contributions give rise to couplings between Higgs and fermion supermultiplet densities, thereby communicating the effects of CP-violation in the Higgs sector to the baryon sector. We show that the decay and inverse decay-induced contributions that arise at zeroth order in the strong coupling, \\alpha_s, can be substantially larger than the O(\\alpha_s) terms that are generated by scattering processes and that are usually assumed to dominate. We revisit the often-used approximation of fast Yukawa-induced processes and show that for realistic parameter choices it is not justified. We solve the resulting quantum transport equations numerically with special attention on the impact of Yukawa rates and study the dependence of the baryon-to-entropy ratio Y_B on MSSM parameters.

Cirigliano, V; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Tulin, S; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Lee, Christopher; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Tulin, Sean

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Electricity Case: Statistical Analysis of Electric Power Outages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the United States Department of Homeland Security. #12;0 Electricity Case, Report 3 Electricity Case was supported by the United States Department of Homeland Security through the Center for Risk and Economic, with an estimated increase of a bit more than 10,000 customers per incident per year. Similar analyses of MW lost

Wang, Hai

345

Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump to: navigation, search

346

Tri-County Rural Elec Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) Jump

347

TriEagle Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, IncTipmontInformationKentucky) JumpCorp (North Carolina)

348

VOLUME 78, NUMBER 5 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 3 FEBRUARY 1997 Steady-State Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas by Rotating Electric Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. This process is analogous to an in- duction motor, since the applied electric field both creates and couples-State Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas by Rotating Electric Fields X.-P. Huang,* F. Anderegg, E. M. Hollmann, C. F "rotating wall" electric fields to spin up a non-neutral plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap, resulting

California at San Diego, University of

349

Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kansas State University, with funding support from federal, state, public, and private companies, is participating in the Department of Energy's Electric Vehicle Site Operator Program. Through participation is this program, Kansas State is demonstrating, testing, and evaluating electric or hybrid vehicle technology. This participation will provide organizations the opportunity to examine the latest EHV prototypes under actual operating conditions. KSU proposes to purchase one (1) electric or hybrid van and four (4) electric cars during the first two years of this five year program. KSU has purchased one G-Van built by Conceptor Industries, Toronto, Canada and has initiated a procurement order to purchase two (2) Soleq 1992 Ford EVcort stationwagons.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water heating systems in the Tri-cities and surrounding area 2382 Solar Heating equipment installation, Environmental Services, Calibration Services, Facilities Leasing, Industrial Development 2211 Electric power generation in irrigation canals 2211 Electric power generation, transmission and distribution Columbia Basin

352

Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

353

Crystalline Electric Field as a Probe for Long-Range Antiferromagnetic Order and Superconducting State of CeFeAsO1-xFx  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use inelastic neutron scattering to study the crystalline electric field (CEF) excitations of Ce{sup 3+} in CeFeAsO{sub 1-x}F{sub x} (x=0, 0.16). For nonsuperconducting CeFeAsO, the Ce CEF levels have three magnetic doublets in the paramagnetic state, but these doublets split into six singlets when the Fe ions order antiferromagnetically. For superconducting CeFeAsO{sub 0.84}F{sub 0.16} (T{sub c} = 41 K), where the static antiferromagnetic order is suppressed, the Ce CEF levels have three magnetic doublets at {h_bar}{sub {omega}} = 0, 18.7, 58.4 meV at all temperatures. Careful measurements of the intrinsic linewidth {Lambda} and the peak position of the 18.7 meV mode reveal a clear anomaly at T{sub c}, consistent with a strong enhancement of local magnetic susceptibility {chi}{double_prime}({h_bar}{sub {omega}}) below T{sub c}. These results suggest that CEF excitations in the rare-earth oxypnictides can be used as a probe of spin dynamics in the nearby FeAs planes.

Chi, Songxue [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Adroja, D. T. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; GUIDI, T. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Bewley, Robert I. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Li, Shiliang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Zhao, Jun [ORNL; Lynn, J. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Brown, C. M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Chen, G. F, [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics; Luo, J. L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Wang, N. L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Dai, Pengcheng [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Electric power annual 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric utility statistics at national, regional and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. ``The US Electric Power Industry at a Glance`` section presents a profile of the electric power industry ownership and performance, and a review of key statistics for the year. Subsequent sections present data on generating capability, including proposed capability additions; net generation; fossil-fuel statistics; retail sales; revenue; financial statistics; environmental statistics; electric power transactions; demand-side management; and nonutility power producers. In addition, the appendices provide supplemental data on major disturbances and unusual occurrences in US electricity power systems. Each section contains related text and tables and refers the reader to the appropriate publication that contains more detailed data on the subject matter. Monetary values in this publication are expressed in nominal terms.

Not Available

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

355

Resonant Soft X-Ray Scattering of Tri-Block Copolymers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomolecular materials to structured electrolytes for lithum-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Drawings of 12 possible morphologies Varying morphologies of linear tri-block...

356

Atomistic Study of the Migration of Di- and Tri-Interstitials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

silicon is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations with a Stillinger-Weber potential. At first the structures and energetics of the di- and the tri-interstitial...

357

Tri-County solid waste-to-fuel production project feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis and preliminary findings of refuse-derived fuel and recovered components markets are presented. Other topics covered are: municipal solid waste composition, quantity and constraints; technical assessment and capital cost assessment; economic feasibility of burning process residue to generate steam; review of commercially available equipment for the densification of refuse-derived fuel; final pre-feasibility analysis for the Tri-County Municipal Solid Waste to Fuel Production Project; preliminary economic and sensitivity analysis for the Tri-County Project; risks assessment for the Tri-County Project; and environmental, health, safety, and socioeconomic assessment for the Tri-County Project. (MHR)

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Central Electric Coop. Oregon Trail Electric Coop. Douglas Electric  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Central Electric Coop. Oregon Trail Electric Coop. Douglas Electric Coop. Blachly- Lane Co. Coop Umatilla Electric Coop. Hermiston Milton- Freewater Idaho Co Light & Power Coop....

359

Tri-County Elec Member Corp (Tennessee) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,LtdInformation DixieTraverse Electric Coop,Trenton,

360

Electric power monthly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in peak shaving by the battery and PV. Therefore, to satisfylow storage & 60% PV incentive Battery discharging BatteryElectricity input to battery Considering lower PV prices and

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimal could be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughlylead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, withcell electric storage heat storage flow battery abs. chiller

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Electric Power detailed State data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781 2,328 2,683Diesel pricesArkansas56,4/15/2015 - Arizona,

364

Electric power annual 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and state levels: generating capability and additions, net generation, fossil-fuel statistics, retail sales and revenue, finanical statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, demand side management, nonutility power producers. Purpose is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets.

Not Available

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

Hand, M. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Paradox of Regulatory Development in China: The Case of the Electricity Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zhongguo dianli chanye (Chinas Electricity Industry at themulti_page.pdf. State Electricity Regulatory Commission.The Annual Report on Electricity Regulation (2006). Beijing:

Tsai, Chung-min

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electrical Engineer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This position is located in the Office of Electric Reliability. The Office of Electric Reliability helps protect and improve the reliability and security of the nation's bulk power system through...

368

Driving conditions dependence of magneto-electroluminescence in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

we investigated the magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in tri-(8-hydroxyquinoline)-aluminum based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) through the steady-state and transient method simultaneously. The MELs show the great different behaviors when we turn the driving condition from a constant voltage to a pulse voltage. For devices driven by the constant voltage, the MELs are similar with the literature data; for devices driven by the pulse voltage, the MELs are quite different, they firstly increase to a maximum then decrease as the magnetic field increases continuously. Negative MELs can be seen when both the magnetic field and driving voltage are high enough.

Peng, Qiming; Li, Xianjie; Li, Mingliang; Li, Feng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Daily Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. ActualDaily Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. ActualHourly Electrical Consumption of Simulation Model vs. Actual

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the United States Guide to Federal Regulation of Sales of Imported Electricity in Canada, Mexico and the...

371

Excited State Dynamics of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work we tried to shed light on issue by excited state dynamics in carbon nanotubes by combining the photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy with the (more)

HARUTYUNYAN, HAYK

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Technology transfer and commercialization initiatives at TRI/Austin: Resources and examples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Located at TRI/Austin, and operated under a Department of Defense contract, is the Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center (NTIAC). This is a full service Information Analysis Center sponsored by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), although services of NTIAC are available to other government agencies, government contractors, industry and academia. The principal objective of NTIAC is to help increase the productivity of the nation`s scientists, engineers, and technical managers involved in, or requiring, nondestructive testing by providing broad information analysis services of technical excellence. TRI/Austin is actively pursuing commercialization of several products based on results from outside funded R and D programs. As a small business, TRI/Austin has limited capabilities for large scale fabrication, production, marketing or distribution. Thus, part of a successful commercialization process involves making appropriate collaboration arrangements with other organizations to augment TRI/Austin`s capabilities. Brief descriptions are given here of two recent commercialization efforts at TRI/Austin.

Matzkanin, G.A.; Dingus, M.L. [Texas Research Institute, Austin, Inc., TX (United States). Nondestructive Testing Information Analysis Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Quantum Mechanics of a Simulated Tri-hydrogen Dication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Schroedinger equation is solved exactly within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation for a simulacrum of the $H_3^{++}$-ion. The ion is assumed to form an isosceles triangle and the ground state energy is obtained over its geometrical parameter space. No multi-center molecular integrations are required. We indicate how the approximation to the actual molecule can be improved systematically.

M. L. Glasser

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electric vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Electric power monthly, May 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

376

Electric power monthly, April 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

Mai, T.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Reviewer Institution Ahring, Birgitte Kiaer Washington State University Tri-Cities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Central Washington University Kaplan, Daniel I Savannah River National Laboratory Kayani, Asghar Nawaz National Laboratory Bennett, Brian NMN Medical College of Wisconsin Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw University National Laboratory Goodlett, David R University of Washington Gorman, Brian P Colorado School of Mines

379

California's The state tries afirst-in-the-nationapproach to attackin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. A Ijevy of bikes at the busy Southern l'.icific Depot in Davis, California--a city that's ahead reinforces good planning concepts." Intleed, the low-carbon lievelopment pattern is nearly identical

Handy, Susan L.

380

NNSA Small Business Week Day 3: Tri-State General Contracting Group, Inc. |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclear SecurityNationalApplyMaintaining Approved:National NuclearNational

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Tri-Lateral Noor al Salaam High Concentration Solar Central Receiver Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the efforts conducted primarily under the Noor al Salaam (Light of Peace) program under DOE GRANT NUMBER DE-FC36-02GO12030, together with relevant technical results from a closely related technology development effort, the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Foundation (USISTF) High Concentration Solar Central Receiver program. These efforts involved preliminary design, development, and test of selected prototype power production subsystems and documentation of an initial version of the system definition for a high concentration solar hybrid/gas electrical power plant to be built in Zaafarana, Egypt as a first step in planned commercialization. A major part of the planned work was halted in 2007 with an amendment in October 2007 requiring that we complete the technical effort by December 31, 2007 and provide a final report to DOE within the following 90 days. This document summarizes the work conducted. The USISTF program was a 50/50 cost-shared program supported by the Department of Commerce through the U.S./Israel Science and Technology Commission (USISTC). The USISTC was cooperatively developed by President Clinton and the late Prime Minister Rabin of Israel "to encourage technological collaboration" and "support peace in the Middle East through economic development". The program was conducted as a follow-on effort to Israel's Magnet/CONSOLAR Program, which was an advanced development effort to design, fabricate, and test a solar central receiver and secondary optics for a "beam down" central receiver concept. The status of these hardware development programs is reviewed, since they form the basis for the Noor al Salaam program. Descriptions are provided of the integrated system and the major subsystems, including the heliostat, the high temperature air receiver, the power conversion unit, tower and tower reflector, compound parabolic concentrator, and the master control system. One objective of the USISTF program was to conduct marketing research, identify opportunities for use of this technology, and to the extent possible, secure an agreement leading to a pre-commercialization demonstration or prototype plant. This was accomplished with the agreement to conduct the Noor al Salaam program as a tri-lateral project between Egypt, Israel, and the U.S. The tri-lateral project was led by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH); this included the Egyptian New and Renewable Energy Authority and the Israeli USISTC participants. This project, known was Noor al Salaam, was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) through the Department of Energy (DOE). The Egyptian activity was under the auspices of the Egyptian Ministry of Energy and Electricity, New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) as part of Egypt's plans for renewable energy development. The objective of the Noor al Salaam project was to develop the conditions necessary to obtain funding and construct and operate an approximately 10 to 20 Megawatt hybrid solar/natural gas demonstration power plant in Zaafarana, Egypt that could serve both as a test bed for advanced solar technology evaluations, and as a forerunner to commercial plant designs. This plant, termed Noor Al Salaam, or Light of Peace, reached the initial phase of system definition before being curtailed, in part by changes in USAID objectives, coupled with various delays that were beyond the scope of the program to resolve. The background of the USISTF technology development and pre-commercialization effort is provided in this report, together with documentation of the technology developments conducted under the Noor al Salaam program. It should be noted that only a relatively small part of the Noor al Salaam funding was expended over the approximately five years for which UAH was prime contractor before the program was ordered closed (Reference 1) so that the remaining funds could be returned to USAID.

Blackmon, James B

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable...

383

Electrical Energy Producer's License Tax (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Each person or other organization engaged in the generation, manufacture, or production of electricity and electrical energy in the state of Montana, either through waterpower or by any other means...

384

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CA nursing homes is the constant total NYC heating load. Theand heating demand were performed for the CA nursing home.home meets all of its electricity demand via utility purchases and heating

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Edison (SCE) have time-of-use tariffs with stiff demandthe absence of a time of use tariff for electrical energy.the power of the time-of-use tariff. The xix The Effects of

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electric Vehicles  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

Ozpineci, Burak

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

389

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;I Basic ConceptsI. Basic Concepts Static electricity: charges at rest Electric charge Like charges repel Unlike charges attract Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;Electric ChargeElectric Charge Electron charge: -eElectron charge

Yoo, S. J. Ben

390

PSU TOYOTA ELECTRIC VEHICLE PROGRAM POLICY JULY 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSU TOYOTA ELECTRIC VEHICLE PROGRAM POLICY JULY 2010 Purpose: The University State University Toyota Electric Vehicle Program under which Toyota Motor Sales, U.S.A., Inc. (Toyota Agreement PSU Toyota Electric Vehicle Program Procedures Manual for Individual Users Duration

Bertini, Robert L.

391

Electric Power monthly, November 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and state agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. Purpose is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electric power monthly, August 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

393

Electric power monthly, September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

Not Available

1993-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electric machine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

395

Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison.www.gastechnology.org 2 #12;Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated-Battelle for the Department of Energy Subcontract Number: 4000052360 GTI Project Number: 20441 New York State Energy Research

Pennycook, Steve

396

Electric sales and revenue: 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tri-n-butyl-phosphate/n-Dodecane Mixture: Thermophysical Properties and Molecular Structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP)/n-dodecane mixture in the liquid phase have been carried out using two recently developed TBP force field models (J. Phys. Chem. B 2012, 116, 305) in combination with the all-atom optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS-AA) force field model for n-dodecane. Specifically, the electric dipole moment of TBP, mass density of the mixture, and the excess volume of mixing were computed with TBP mole fraction ranging from 0 to 1. It is found that the aforementioned force field models accurately predict the mass density of the mixture in the entire mole fraction range. Commensurate with experimental measurements, the electric dipole moment of the TBP was found to slightly increase with the mole fraction of TBP in the mixture. Also, in accord with experimental data, the excess volume of mixing is positive in the entire mole fraction range, peaking at TBP mole fraction range 0.3 0.5. Finally, a close examination of the spatial pair correlation functions between TBP molecules, and between TBP and n-dodecane molecules, revealed formation of TBP dimers through self-association at close distance, a phenomenon with ample experimental evidence.

de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Cui, Shengting [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability:A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In past work, Berkeley Lab has developed the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). Given end-use energy details for a facility, a description of its economic environment and a menu of available equipment, DER-CAM finds the optimal investment portfolio and its operating schedule which together minimize the cost of meeting site service, e.g., cooling, heating, requirements. Past studies have considered combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. Methods and software have been developed to solve this problem, finding optimal solutions which take simultaneity into account. This project aims to extend on those prior capabilities in two key dimensions. In this research storage technologies have been added as well as power quality and reliability (PQR) features that provide the ability to value the additional indirect reliability benefit derived from Consortium for Electricity Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Microgrid capability. This project is intended to determine how attractive on-site generation becomes to a medium-sized commercial site if economical storage (both electrical and thermal), CHP opportunities, and PQR benefits are provided in addition to avoiding electricity purchases. On-site electrical storage, generators, and the ability to seamlessly connect and disconnect from utility service would provide the facility with ride-through capability for minor grid disturbances. Three building types in both California and New York are assumed to have a share of their sensitive electrical load separable. Providing enhanced service to this load fraction has an unknown value to the facility, which is estimated analytically. In summary, this project began with 3 major goals: (1) to conduct detailed analysis to find the optimal equipment combination for microgrids at a few promising commercial building hosts in the two favorable markets of California and New York; (2) to extend the analysis capability of DER-CAM to include both heat and electricity storage; and (3) to make an initial effort towards adding consideration of PQR into the capabilities of DER-CAM.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy; Coffey, Brian; Aki, Hirohisa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The sequence and characterization of TRI1, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase involved in T-2 toxin biosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 22 P1 hyg B 900 bp 300 bp TRI1 pIKE9 FIG. 5. The TRI1 complementation vector. The plasmid plKE9, contains a 3. 2 kb genomic fragment of TRI1, which is flanked by the P1:hyg B cassette. 23 Novozyme 234 (InterSpex Products), 1 /o driselase...

Meek, Isaac Burton

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Farmington Electric Utility System- Net Metering  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

Fritz, R.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

Electrical connector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Electric power monthly, August 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Electric power monthly, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Electric power monthly, June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Engineering Electrical &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

407

Engineering Electrical &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

Hickman, Mark

408

Electric power monthly, May 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Electric power monthly, April 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Xiaohan Kang School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xiaohan Kang School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering Arizona State University.D. in Electrical Engineering Jun. 2015 (expected) Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ Advisor: Professor Lei Ying M.S. in Electrical Engineering Dec. 2012 Iowa State University, Ames, IA Advisor: Professor Lei Ying B

Zhang, Junshan

411

Electric power annual 1995. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding U.S. electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S. Department of Energy. In the private sector, the majority of the users of the Electric Power Annual are researchers and analysts and, ultimately, individuals with policy- and decisionmaking responsibilities in electric utility companies. Financial and investment institutions, economic development organizations interested in new power plant construction, special interest groups, lobbyists, electric power associations, and the news media will find data in the Electric Power Annual useful. In the public sector, users include analysts, researchers, statisticians, and other professionals with regulatory, policy, and program responsibilities for Federal, State, and local governments. The Congress and other legislative bodies may also be interested in general trends related to electricity at State and national levels. Much of the data in these reports can be used in analytic studies to evaluate new legislation. Public service commissions and other special government groups share an interest in State-level statistics. These groups can also compare the statistics for their States with those of other jurisdictions.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

United States Environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home United States Environmental Protection Agency United · What you can do to protect your family · Where to go for more information Before renting or buying Family from Lead Hazards If you think your home has lead-based paint: · Don't try to remove lead

Loudon, Catherine

413

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Kansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Nebraska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Montana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Utah, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Texas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Idaho, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Florida, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Hampshire, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oklahoma, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Missouri, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Washington, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maryland, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arizona, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alaska, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Connecticut, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), vVrginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Puerto Rico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Minnesota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Iowa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Carolina, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Oregon, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Georgia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wyoming, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Arkansas, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Louisiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), North Carolina 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Indiana, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), California, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virgin Islands, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Vermont, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Wisconsin, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Maine, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), West Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Illinois, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Jersey, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Rhode Island, 1991 and 1992 (in dbase iii plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tri state electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Virginia, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New Mexico, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), South Dakota, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Tennessee, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Massachusetts, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Ohio, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), American Samoa, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), New York, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Hawaii, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working